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now The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

week of September 18


September 19 is

Pablita’s birthday!!

Birthday admission Thursday and Friday (19/20) - $1.00 New hours - noon to 5:00pm Tuesday - Sunday

“Harvesting Traditions”

A One Woman Show by Kathleen Wall runs through January 4, 2015

213 Cathedral Place, Santa Fe, NM 505-988-8900 info@PVMIWA.org - www.PVMIWA.org


TOM BERG REGINA FOSTER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2014 On view through Tuesday, October 7, 2014

2 1 7 W. W a t e r S t r e e t Santa Fe, NM 87501 phone: 505 . 660 . 4393 www.wadewilsonart.com 1 1 a m - 5 p m Tu e s d a y - S a t u r d a y


SANTA FE

From the time of the ancient Anazasi, the Santa Fe area has been a trading center. The Santa Fe Trail is synonymous with the romance of the old west, and from the time of New Mexico statehood in 1912, Santa Fe has been a multicultural art center and shoppers’ paradise.

Free iPhone and Android app The Best of Santa Fe

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publisher’s note

2014

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We’re lucky. Friends love to visit us here in Santa Fe and enjoy our amazing community and incredibly beautiful setting. This weekend I have friends coming into town and have just 30 hours to show them our city. My preference is to show them experiences, because that’s something Santa Fe does so well. This week’s Friday night gallery openings are excellent, so taking in a number of them is a great way to start our weekend. And with the variety of art being featured, finding pieces my guests can connect with shouldn’t be difficult. As tourists, they’ll want good, authentic Northern New Mexico cuisine, but almost as important is a restaurant environment that says Santa Fe. No problem; we’ve got that! The weekend’s music scene also has a lot going on, including salsa at The Lodge. To me, our wonderful mountains are a key part of the Santa Fe experience, especially this time of year. A trip up the chairlift at the local ski area provides an altitude-friendly experience that will allow those not used to our elevation to enjoy the full splendor of the Sangres without any major discomfort. A late summer afternoon stroll through the Plaza is a must. Right now, Santa Fe’s seasonal light is shimmering, and the sunsets are becoming more spectacular. Lastly, a short walk up to the Cross of the Martyrs provides a meditative and final scenic overview of our city. The best thing about out-of-towners visiting is that it encourages us to see our city through their eyes, rekindling our appreciation of this place we call home. We are indeed very lucky to be here.

Bruce Adams

Publisher

Joe West & Friends brought the summer music series at the Santa Fe Bandstand to an end on August 28. For more images of recent goings-on around town, check out Seen Around on page 18.

Find the best shops, restaurants, galleries, museums, parking locations, turn-by-turn directions, mobile deals, weather, news, and local-events with the free app from the iTunes App Store and from the Android Market. Look for the green sticker in the window of participating stores.

LISA LAW

SantaFeDowntown.org

Santa Fe is a top US art center, with museums, shopping, Year-round outdoor activities, top flight restaurants, spas, and world famous cultural events. It’s not just your grandparents’ Santa Fe, it’s walkable, historic, charming, and exciting.A high desert destination of distinction and fun.

now

SEPT 18 – SEPT 24

DAVID ROBIN

SHOPPING IN


YSABEL LEMAY Gracia

Opening Reception Friday, September 19th from 5–7 pm Gallery Talk Saturday, September 20th at 2pm Show continues through Saturday, October 25th, 2014

VERVE Gallery of Photography 219 East Marcy Street, Santa Fe 505-982-5009   vervegallery.com

September 18, 2014 NOW

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Welcome to Santa Fe! As a creative, cultural hub, Santa Fe offers an abundance of the world’s best art, attractions, and entertainment opportunities. Santa Fean NOW is an excellent source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local or a tourist visiting for the first time or the 100th, NOW ’s complete listings of everything from gallery openings to live music events will help you make the most of the city. We look forward to seeing you around the City Different. Should you need any extra tips, please stop by our information centers at the Santa Fe Railyard or off the Plaza at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center.

now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

amy hegarty samantha schwirck

GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

whitney stewart

michelle odom, sybil watson

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Wishing you a wonderful time, Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

b.y. cooper

ginny stewart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER MARKETING CONSULTANT

david wilkinson

andrea nagler

WRITERS

ashley m. biggers, amy gross, steven horak cristina olds, phil parker emily van cleve

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com Copyright 2014. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Fean NOW Volume 1, Number 19, Week of September 18, 2014. Published by Bella Media, LLC at 215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2014 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

On the cover: Ysabel LeMay, Circa 1930, 36 x 36", C-print mounted to Dibond. For details on LeMay’s show Gracia at VERVE Gallery of Photography, see page 21.

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the

buzz

Reaching for the Stars

KERRI COTTLE

Flamenco dancers Juan Siddi and Mina Fajardo perform at last year’s fundraiser.

Art by local artists will be part of the fundraiser’s silent auction offerings.

Having spent three decades directing and motivating workers to excel in the business world while serving as a leader in the foodservice industry, Roy Martinez recently turned his attention to guiding high school students toward achieving their professional and academic goals. Through his nonprofit organization Rising Stars in the Southwest, Martinez helps teens with dreams develop leadership skills, set goals, and make positive life choices, all of which can lead to them successfully applying for scholarships, landing key internships, and getting the jobs they most want. Instrumental to each student’s success, Martinez says, is that “they must be able to articulate their dream. Maybe they want to go to Stanford, or maybe they want to be an entrepreneur.” In celebration of Rising Star’s third anniversary, the organization is holding a Spanish-themed fundraiser at the Governor’s Mansion on September 20 called Reaching for the Stars. In line with the organization’s emphasis on teens “reaching their full potential and actualizing their dreams,” the event, which is open to the public, will feature tapas prepared by culinary students from the Santa Fe Community College and musical entertainment provided by a local 16-yearold guitarist. Other highlights include performances by acclaimed flamenco dancers Juan Siddi and Mina Fajardo and by flamenco guitarist Joaquin Gallegos. A silent auction will feature works by some of the region’s top artists and items from local retail shops. In an act that emphasizes the importance of Rising Stars’ work, Governor Susana Martinez has proclaimed September 20 to be Hispanic Youth Leadership Day.—Cristina Olds Reaching for the Stars Fundraiser, $50, September 20, 5:30–8:30 pm, New Mexico Governor’s Mansion, risingstarssouthwest.org September 18, 2014 NOW

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THE orchard/PBS

the

buzz

a profound portrait of American poverty Appachey is 13, overweight, swears, and smokes. His mom lies in bed, under the covers, smoking and drinking a soda as she runs through Appachey’s diagnoses: “ADHD, bipolar, OCD, ODD, and they’re looking into Asperger’s.” In the documentary Rich Hill, we watch Appachey be vicious to his little sister, get slapped by his mom, and reveal (early one morning, while puffing on a cigarette and staring at his feet) that he was 6 when his dad left. “Just walked out. Didn’t even say goodbye,” he says. Rich Hill is a look at the lives of three male teenagers in Rich Hill, Missouri (population 1,396). Appachey, Harley, and Andrew aren’t friends; their stories are separate, and the film gives equal time to each. Harley is a knife nut who spits and yells, and whose mother is in prison. Andrew is a football player, and his mother is constantly stoned on sleeping pills. Andrew’s father can’t make enough money to pay their bills, so the family moves frequently. The film is a pure documentary, devoid of context or identifiable style. There are American flags everywhere, so it’s certainly saying something about our nation’s kids. But not out loud. The filmmakers merely follow these children from one day to the next and document their travails. The details they capture—a lamp with no shade, a tired grandmother in a room full of cigarette smoke, a trashed skateboard partly buried in dirty ice—are profound in that they’re simultaneously beautiful and quite a bummer. These kids are poor. Their lives are difficult. Their families are whooped. School can’t hold Appachey, who beats up other children, or Harley, who complains to the principal every day that he can’t breathe and needs to go home. Harley, we learn late in the film, experienced horrific 6

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trauma in the past, an assault terrible enough to devastate his family and leave him angry and deeply affected. In Andrew, though, we see the most hopeful of the three. He’s the boy who professes love for his family. He’s the boy who doesn’t hurt others or swear or fantasize about killing. He’s the boy with a dad. Rich Hill is a powerful, creeping mindblower. It’s showing at CCA.—Phil Parker

THE orchard/PBS

The documentary Rich Hill follows the lives of three male teenagers in a small Missouri town.


this week

September 18–September 24

CHRIS CORRIE

September 24–28: The 24th annual Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta. For details, see page 12.

September 18, 2014 NOW

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COURTESY OF EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS

September 20 & 21: Santa Fe Renaissance Fair

September 18 thursday Introduction to Weaving: Inkle Loom Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A class focused on the inkle loom, which is commonly used for narrow weaving of items like belts, trims, and straps. $69, 6–8 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Santa Fe Fashion Week: Shop n Stroll Various Locations Canyon Road

Twenty-two of the 30 designers participating in Santa Fe Fashon week show their items at galleries like GF Contemporary and Winterowd Fine Art. Free, 5–7 pm, santafefashionweek.com.

Cooking Inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

An SFSC chef guides participants through Georgia O’Keeffe’s recipes featured in the book A Painter’s Kitchen: Recipes from the Kitchen of Georgia O’Keeffe by Margaret Wood. $85, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

PREcognition REcognition 8

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Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

Cleopatra Café 3482 Zafarano

This exhibit, curated by James Rutherford, features 14 large-format still photographs selected from 74 individual shots in Godfrey Reggio’s film Visitors. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-428-1501, sfcc.edu.

Belly-dancing performance. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-474-5644, saltanahstudios.com.

Buffalo Nickel La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Jazz classics played with string instruments. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-988-7008, ziadiner.com.

Country music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Guitarras con Sabor El Farol 808 Canyon

Live Spanish guitar music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Jess Godwin Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Karaoke with Michele. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

The Saltanah Dancers

Trio Bijou Zia Diner 326 S Guadalupe

September 19 friday Friday Night Get Together Gallery 901 and Ronnie Layden Fine Art 901 Canyon

Music and refreshments in the courtyard. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-670-6793, ronnielaydenfineart.com.

Meet the Artists Tesuque Flea Market 15 Flea Market Rd

Local artists show and discuss their work. Free, all day, 505-670-2599, pueblooftesuquefleamarket.com.

Santa Fe Fashion Week: Santa Fe Fashion Market Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy


A runway show as part of Santa Fe Fashion Week. $25 and up, 6 pm, santafefashionweek.com.

Red Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on class focused on the red chile. $75, 9 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

American Landscapes and Portraits Addison Rowe Fine Art 229 E Marcy

The first show in Craig Kosak’s new series, The Solitude of Ravendell. See profile on page 22. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-986-1156, giacobbefritz.com.

Throwing of the Bones Ceremony Santa Fe Community Yoga Center 826 Camino de Monte Rey, Ste B1

Ceremony, led by JoAnne Dodgson, offering guidance with relationships, health, work, life transitions, and more. $30, 6–8 pm, 505-820-9383, santafecommunityyoga.org.

September 19: September Song at Jane Hamilton Fine Art

Group exhibition of paintings. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-1533, addisonrowe.com.

Laura Wait and T Barny Hunter Kirkland Contemporary 200-B Canyon

Sculptures by T Barny and encaustic and mixed-media works by Laura Wait. Free, artist talk by T Barny at 4:30 pm, reception 5–7 pm, 505-984-2111, hunterkirklandcontemporary.com.

Boom Roots Collective The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace Blues music. $5, 10 pm-12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

C. S. Rock Show El Farol 808 Canyon

Linda Petersen New Concept Gallery 610 Canyon

Rock music. $5, 9 pm-12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com

Monotypes and More Pippin Contemporary 200 Canyon

A jazz concert presented by the Santa Fe Music Collective. $20–$25, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6820, santafemusiccollective.org.

Paintings by Linda Petersen. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-795-7570, newconceptgallery.com.

Paintings and monotypes by artists representing a range of artistic experience, all of whom produced work at Santa Fe Timberwick Studios. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com.

Personal Winds Catenary Art Gallery 616 ½ Canyon

Works by mixed-media artist Larisa Ilieva. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-2700, catenaryartgallery.com.

September Song Jane Hamilton Fine Art 200 Canyon, Ste D

Contemporary Southwestern-themed oil paintings by Pat Parkinson. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-465-2655, janehamiltonfineart.com.

Una Noche sin Ornamento Nüart Gallery 670 Canyon

Works by Spanish painter Alberto Galvez. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-3888, nuartgallery.com.

Urban Wilderness: Chaos Transformed and Gracia VERVE Gallery of Photography 219 E Marcy

Two concurrent exhibitions by Irving Greines and Ysabel LeMay, respectively. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-5009, vervegallery.com.

Warpaint Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art 702 Canyon

Dmitri Matheny CD Release Celebration Museum Hill Café 710 Camino Lejo

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Gary Reynolds Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Folk and country music by singer/songwriter Gary Reynolds. Free, 5–7:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

and dancing. $5, 9:30 pm–1:30 am, 505-992-5800, lodgeatsantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Square Dancing Open House Eldorado Community Center 1 Hacienda Loop

Annual open house presented by the Eldorado Depot Dancers. Free, 6:30–9 pm, 505-466-0540.

September 20 saturday Artist Talk VERVE Gallery of Photography 219 E Marcy

A discussion with Irving Greines and Ysabel LeMay to coincide with their solo exhibitions, which open September 19. Free, 2 pm, 505-982-5009, vervegallery.com.

Beginning Tinworking Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

Jess Godwin Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

A class focused on the art of tinwork. $125, 10 am–3:30 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Pull your own monotypes and learn about monotyping. $15 (two monotypes), 11 am–3 pm, 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com.

Live music. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8-11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Night Train La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Blues music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Pachanga The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St Francis

Salsa, cumbia, bachata, and merengue music

How To Pull Your Own Monotype Pippin Contemporary 200 Canyon

Meet the Artists Tesuque Flea Market 15 Flea Market Rd

Local artists show and discuss their work. Free, all day, 505-670-2599, pueblooftesuquefleamarket.com.

Pour Painting Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

Create oil paintings using a technique that involves gravity. $159, 12:30–3:30 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu. September 18, 2014 NOW

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free), 10 am–6 pm, 505-471-2261, golondrinas.org.

New Mexico Film Foundation: Life in New Mexico Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Working from 138 clips submitted by 54 New Mexico residents, eight editors created a series of films exploring and celebrating New Mexico’s local cultures and peoples. $5 suggested donation, 11:30 am, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, 7 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

September 20: Shedding Skin at MoCNA

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Park 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and more by local artists. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-310-1555, santafeartistsmarket.com.

Santa Fe Society of Artists Fine Art Show First National Bank of Santa Fe Parking Lot 107 W San Francisco

A diverse group of works by premier local artists are on view in an outdoor fine art show. Free, all day, 505-926-1497, santafesocietyofartists.com.

Shedding Skin: Reconstructing our Relationship to Art MoCNA’s Allan Houser Art Park 108 Cathedral

An interactive symposium of open questions based upon critical introspection by Native artists, curators, collectors, scholars, and their communities. Free, 9 am–5 pm, 505-983-1666, iaia.edu/museum.

Fall Fashion Show Turquoise Butterfly Courtyard 149 E Alameda

A fashion show to benefit Children’s Miracle Network. $30, 11:30 am–6 pm, 505-982-9277, misssantafefashionshow.com.

Santa Fe Fashion Week: SF Fashion Market Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy A runway show for Santa Fe Fashion Week. $25 and up, 6 pm, santafefashionweek.com.

Santa Fe Renaissance Fair El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos

Medieval combat, live entertainment, vendors, kids’ games, food and drinks, and more. See profile on page 10. $10 (discounts for teens and seniors, kids

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Southwest Tapas Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on class focused on traditional Spanish tapas. $80, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Book Signing Garcia Street Books 376 Garcia

Sallie Bingham reads from and signs her new book, The Blue Box. Free, 2–3 pm, 505-986-0151, garciastreetbooks.com.

The Ring in the Bell’s Steel: Learning to Trust Our Voices Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo

Dharma talk exploring human potential with a clip from the documentary about poet Jimmy Santiago Baca, A Place to Stand. Free, 5:30–6:30 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar with John Serkin Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen 1512 Pacheco

Slack key guitar music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com.

Jewel Box Cabaret Armory for the Arts Theater 1050 Old Pecos Trl

A cabaret performance that supports the Northern New Mexico Street Homeless Animal Project. $25, 8 pm, 505-983-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Jess Godwin Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant 113 Washington

Live performance by singer/songwriter and guitarist Jesus Bas. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Night Train La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Blues music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.

Rising Stars in the Southwest Annual Fundraiser Governor’s Mansion 1 Mansion Dr

Flamenco, tapas, and a silent auction to support Rising Stars in the Southwest, a non-profit that helps teens reach their full potential. See profile on page 5. $50, 5:30 pm, 505-216-6049, risingstarssouthwest.org.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

St. Vincent Hospital Foundation Gala Buffalo Thunder Resort 20 Buffalo Thunder Trl


A hosted cocktail party, live and silent auctions, dinner, dancing, and a performance by The Temptations. $175, 4:30–11 pm, 505-983-3361, stvinfoundation.org.

September 20 & 21: Santa Fe Renaissance Festival

The Gruve El Farol 808 Canyon

Funk and soul music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Editor’s Pick

Music of David Krakauer, Osvaldo Golijov, Kinan Azmeh, Yousif Sheronick, Alan Hovhaness, and Arvo Pärt. $15–$30 (discounts for students and kids), 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Santa Fe Pro Musica Season Opening Concert The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

The opening concert of the chamber orchestra’s 33rd season includes Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 and Piano Concerto No. 3, featuring Melissa Marse. See profile on page 16. $20–$65, 4 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

September 21 sunday Life Drawing Series Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Draw from a live model while enjoying beer and waffles. $22, 11 am–1 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Meet the Artists Tesuque Flea Market 15 Flea Market Rd

Local artists show and discuss their work. Free, all day, 505-670-2599, pueblooftesuquefleamarket.com.

Santa Fe Society of Artists Fine Art Show First National Bank of Santa Fe Parking Lot 107 W San Francisco

Editor’s Pick

A diverse group of works by premier local artists are on view in an outdoor fine art show. Free, all day, 505-926-1497, santafesocietyofartists.com.

Santa Fe Renaissance Fair El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos

Medieval combat, live entertainment, vendors, kids’ games, food and drinks, and more. See profile on page 10. $10 (discounts for teens and seniors, kids free), 10 am–6 pm, 505-471-2261, golondrinas.org.

Sustainable Sunday Film Series: PUMP Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

September 22 monday Green Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

CHARLES MANN

Serenata of Santa Fe: Other Worlds First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant

Piano Concerto No. 3, featuring Melissa Marse. See profile on page 16. $20–$65, 3 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

In their film PUMP, directors Josh and Rebecca Tickell, winners at Sundance for their film FUEL, trace the story of America’s addiction to oil. $5 suggested donation, 12:30 pm, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Contemporary Southwest VI Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on class focused on contemporary Southwestern fare. $82, 11 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Sunday Social Sipper Estrella Del Norte Vineyard 106 N Shining Sun

A “vertical” wine tasting of five vintages of Estrella Del Norte Vineyard’s Pinot Noir. $25, 3–5 pm, 720-289-6592, estrelladelnortevineyard.com.

Turquoise from Prehistory to Present Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo

Lecture series. Free with museum admission, 2–4 pm, 505-467-1200, indianartsandculture.org.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Hank 3 Sol Santa Fe Patio 37 Fire Pl

A concert with “hellbilly” musician Hank 3, to coincide with the release of three new albums. $20, 6 pm, solofsantafe.com.

Nacha Mendez El Farol 808 Canyon

Latin world music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com

Santa Fe Pro Musica Season Opening Concert The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

The opening concert of the chamber orchestra’s 33rd season includes Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 and

Hands-on class focused on the green chile. $75, 2 pm, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Country music. Free, 7:30-11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Hillary Smith and Company El Farol 808 Canyon

Jazzy blues, gospel-inflected R&B, and soul by singer/songwriter Hillary Smith. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Jess Godwin Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

September 23 tuesday Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Tacos Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on class focused on tacos. $98, 2 pm, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Acoustic Open Mic/Song Night Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Open mic night with Ben Wright. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-989-8585, secondstreetbrewery.com.

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September 24: A preview of the award-winning film Copenhagen at the Jean Cocteau Cinema

The Invincible Czars perform live music set to a screening of the 1928 silent film The Wind. $10–$12, 7:30–9 pm, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta Various locations

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Editor’s Pick

A five-day event, now in its 24th year, celebrating Santa Fe’s culinary scene with cooking demos, wine seminars, winery luncheons, and dinners. Ticket prices vary according to event, through September 28, 505-4388060, santafewineandchile.org.

Intuition Workshop Kruger Building 227 E Palace

Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol 808 Canyon

Spiritual counselor Elissa Heyman offers instruction on accessing intuition as well as psychic readings. $45, 7–9 pm, 505-982-3294, elissaheyman.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Buckwheat Zydeco Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Live music. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Jess Godwin Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Nacha Mendez TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson

Latin world music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-989-1166, terracottawinebistro.com.

September 24 wednesday Copenhagen Preview Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

A preview of the award-winning film Copenhagen, starring Gethin Anthony (“Renly” from Game of Thrones), which is scheduled for a limited theatrical release in October. $10 (discounts for students and kids), 6:10 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

The Wind with The Invincible Czars Center for Contemporary Arts/Spector Ripps Project Space 1050 Old Pecos Trl 12

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Grammy Award–winning American musical legend Stanley “Buckwheat” Dural Jr. performs with his band. $25–$30, 7:30 pm, 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com.

Jess Godwin Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music. Free, 6:30-9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

John Kurzweg El Farol 808 Canyon

Original jams and classic rock covers. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Railyard Reunion La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Blues music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Sister Carol Skylight Santa Fe 139 W San Francisco

Reggae with a social message. $18, 7:30 pm, skylightsantafe.com.

Trash Disco The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

DJ Oona. Free, 8:30–10:30 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Ongoing Landscapes New Concept Gallery 610 Canyon

Expressionist works by Cecilia Kirby Binkley. Free, through September 19, 505-795-7570, newconceptgallery.com.

The Spirit of the Horse Manitou Galleries 123 W Palace

New oil paintings by Ethelinda. Free, through September 19, 505-986-0440, manitougalleries.com.

A Walk in the Clouds EVOKE Contemporary 550 S Guadalupe

Works by the late New Mexico painter Louisa McElwain (1953–2013). Free, through September 20, 505-995-9902, evokecontemporary.com.

David Crane and José Sierra Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia

Ceramics by David Crane and porcelain stoneware by José Sierra. Free, through September 20, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

Hiroshi Yamano and Pedro Surroca LewAllen Galleries 1613 Paseo de Peralta

Meditative interpretations of tree branches by Hiroshi Yamano and Pedro Surroca. Free, through September 21, 505-988-3250, lewallencontemporary.com.

Moments in Time Joe Wade Fine Art 102 E Water

Solo exhibition featuring paintings by Roger Williams. Free, through September 21, 505-988-2727, joewadefineart.com.

Once Upon a Time In America Monroe Gallery of Photography 112 Don Gaspar

Works by Steve Schapiro. Free, through September 21, 505-992-0810, monroegallery.com.

IMPACTS! Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

Zane Bennett Contemporary Art, in collaboration with the Mizuma Art Gallery (Tokyo), presents an exhibition of artworks by artists primarily from Japan. Free, through September 22, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Indian Market Show Pablo Milan Gallery 209 Galisteo

Work by fifth-generation New Mexican Pablo Milan, wildlife sculptor Jess Davila, and artist Don Brewer Wakpa. Free, through September 22, 505-820-1285, pablomilangallery.com.


New Works Sculpture 619 619 Canyon

Dave Lambard’s newest series of paintings. Free, through September 22, 505-660-6166, sculpture619.com.

Smoke on the Mirror Heidi Loewen Porcelain Gallery & School 315 Johnson

Smoke-fired and gold-leafed sculptures and platters by Heidi Loewen. Free, through September 22, 505-988-2225, heidiloewen.com.

Here and Now, Now and Then Wheelhouse Art 418 Montezuma

Mixed-media works by Margaret Denney that address consumer culture, mass production, and the illusion of choice generated by these topics. Free, through September 23, 505-919-9553, wheelhouseart.com.

Women in Cultural Context: A Multi-Media Group Exhibition Tansey Contemporary 652 Canyon

Gallery artists explore women’s responses to cultural roles and expectations. Free, through September 23, 505-995-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.

Landscapes from the Archives David Rothermel Contemporary Fine Art 142 Lincoln, Ste 102 Paintings by David Rothermel. Free, through September 24, 575-642-4981, drfa-sf.com.

Captured by the Light Greenberg Fine Art 205 Canyon

Solo exhibition of paintings by Wendy Higgins. Free, through September 25, 505-955-1500, greenbergfineart.com.

Still Life and the Southwest Henington Fine Art 802 Canyon

Group exhibition featuring Ruth Paulsen, Martha Kellar, Bobby Lee Rajnik, and Antonio Weiss. Free, through September 26, 505-501-0415, heningtonfineart.com.

Yazzie Johnson and Gail Bird Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

Native American contemporary jewelry. Free, through September 26, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Erin Currier Blue Rain Gallery 130 Lincoln, Ste C

Mixed-media works by Erin Currier. Free, through September 27, 505-954-9902, blueraingallery.com

In the Light Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 554 S Guadalupe

Two- and three-dimensional pieces by

Florence Miller Pierce (1918–2007). Free, through September 30, 505-989-8688, charlottejackson.com.

Indian Summer, 1835–1935 William R. Talbot Fine Art, Antique Maps & Prints 129 W San Francisco (Second Floor)

Group exhibition of paintings and prints, as well as early maps of the Southwest and Indian Territory. Free, through September 30, 505-982-1559, williamtalbot.com.

New Sculptures by Jim Griffith Art Exchange Gallery 60 E San Francisco

Sculptures by Jim Griffith. Free, through September 30, 505-603-4485, aegallery.com.

Logos in the Next Dimension Gallery 901 901 Canyon

Graphic art/sculpture by Wilfried Haest. Free, through October 2, 505780-8390, gallery901.org. Ongoing: Logos in the Next Dimension at Gallery 901

The Edges Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art 702 ½ Canyon

New work from three gallery artists that will hang around the edges of Renate Aller’s solo exhibition of large-scale photographs. Includes silk tapestries by Rebecca Bluestone, mixed-media paintings by Jay Tracy, and color field paintings by Chris Richter. Free, through October 4, 505-992-0711, chiaroscurosantafe.com.

Wisdom Keepers Sorrel Sky Gallery 125 W Palace

Twenty-five works from the late 1980s through the present by Abiquiú-based bronze artist Star Liana York. Free, through October 5, 505-501-6555, sorrelsky.com.

Tom Berg and Regina Foster Wade Wilson Art 217 W Water

An exhibition of works by painters Tom Berg and Regina Foster. Free, through October 7, 505-6604393, wadewilsonart.com.

Avian: Selected Works from the Affinity Series photo-eye Bookstore + Project Space 376-A Garcia An exhibition of photographs by Brad Wilson. Free, through October 11, 800-227-6941, photoeye.com.

Before Baatan: New Mexico’s 200th Coast Artillery Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Rare photos of the New Mexico 200th Coast Artillery pre-Bataan, taken by unnamed photographers, are exhibited in this Palace of the Governors’ photo archive show. Free, through October 12, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Ongoing: The Edges at Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art

Ben Wright Art Gone Wild Galleries 130-D Lincoln

Paintings by Ben Wright. Free, through October 15, 505-820-1004, artgonewildgalleries.com.

Historic San Ildefonso Polychrome Pottery Steve Elmore Indian Art 839 Paseo de Peralta

Pottery from San Ildefonso Pueblo, ca. 1875–1925. Free, through October 16, 505-995-9677, elmoreindianart.com.

Transparency: Color and Light David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

A survey of paintings by Salvatore Emblema (1929–2006) that were produced from 1965 through 2005. Free, through October 18, 855-983-9555, davidrichardgallery.com.

Opening Back Street Bistro (Artspace) 513 Camino de Los Marquez

Mixed-media pieces by Patricia Wyatt. Free, through October 25, 505-982-3500, patriciawyatt.com.

Messages from the Wounded Healers Center for Contemporary Arts/ Spector Ripps Project Space 1050 Old Pecos Trl

An exhibit of Sam Scott’s series of large paintings, The Wounded Healers. Free, through November 2, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

New Perspectives Center for Contemporary Arts/ Muñoz Waxman Gallery 1050 Old Pecos Trl

An exhibit of work by sculptor Chuck Ginnever. Free, through November 2, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Poems of Divine Colors Catenary Art Gallery 616 ½ Canyon

Watercolor paintings by Vassia Alaykova. Free, through November 19, 505-982-2700, catenaryartgallery.com.

Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, September 18, 2014 NOW

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$6–$9, through March 2015, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

and Margarete Bagshaw Golden Dawn Gallery 201 Galisteo

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo

Paintings by acclaimed Native American artists (and family members) Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw. Free, ongoing, 505-988-2024, goldendawngallery.com.

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture presents its extensive collection of Southwestern turquoise jewelry and educates on the geology, mining, and history of the stone. $6–$9, through May 2016, 505-467-1200, indianartsandculture.org.

Local Color: Judy Chicago in New Mexico New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

An exhibition of Judy Chicago’s large-scale projects and smaller-scale personal artworks in honor of the artist’s 75th birthday. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through October 12, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

City Tours

Walking tours of Santa Fe with various companies including Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505-983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), and New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

Cameraless New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

A group exhibition of photo-media works. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through December 7, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Works by Courtney M. Leonard (Shinnecock Nation) that question our relationship to cultural landscape and sustainable continuity. Free, through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Saligaaw (it is loud-voiced) Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Alaskan artist Da-ka-xeen Mehner celebrates the lasting and profound relationship between Tlingit language and song. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

The Desert Never Left “The City” Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Mario Martinez’s artwork pays reverence to nature through the influences derived from his deeply rooted Yaqui cultural background and commitment to Western Modernism. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Rattlebone Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Traveling exhibition of paintings and related works by Spokane artist Ric Gendron. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Harvesting Traditions Pablita Velarde Museum of Indian Women in the Arts 213 Cathedral

A solo exhibition of work by Kathleen Wall. $10 (discounts for seniors, students, and military), $5 New Mexico residents, through January 4, 2015, 505-988-8900, pvmiwa.org.

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Ongoing: Poems of Divine Colors at Catenary Art Gallery

Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

A slide and sound installation by Andrea Geyer, in collaboration with SITE Santa Fe as part of SITElines: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through January 11, 2015, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Alcove Shows 1917–1927 New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

Works by 24 artists in the museum’s permanent collection. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through February 23, 2015, 2015, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Delilah Montoya: Syncretism New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

Photographs by Delilah Montoya. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through March 15, 2015, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Kitty Leaken

LEVEL/LAND Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Ongoing: Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning

Painting the Divine: Images of Mary in the New World New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A 1960s’ ecclesiastical wave of urban renewal inspired mission churches throughout the Americas to undergo renovations and, all too often, cast off centuries-old art work. $6–$9, through March 29, 2015, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A collection of nearly 225 photographs and 40 cameras that show how a light-tight box with a tiny hole can help capture amazing photos.

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.


courtesy of el rancho de las golondrinas

Santa Fe Renaissance Fair

the popular event takes over El Rancho de las Golondrinas by Emi ly Va n Cle ve

Twenty-first century trappings are left far behind at the Santa Fe Renaissance Fair, which is being held at El Rancho de las Golondrinas September 20 and 21. Now in its seventh year, the popular event features Spanish styles of combat and cultural activities from the 8th through the 15th centuries, all of which are re-created by local and regional actors, musicians, magicians, and dancers dressed in the eye-catching garb of the times. Visitors can watch jousting tournaments and sword fights; buy shields, cloaks, jewels, and other items from numerous vendors; indulge in ale, mead, and turkey legs; and bend their knees to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. Onstage entertainment includes belly-dancing, flamenco dancing, and performances by Belisama Irish Dance

and the Santa Fe Shakespeare Society, among many other organizations. Clan Tynker, a Santa Fe–based family of five jugglers, musicians, and magicians who perform worldwide and have appeared at the Santa Fe Renaissance Fair for the past six years, will present three sets daily on the event’s main stage. “We’ll start each set with some magic before we turn to fire eating,” says Santiago Tynker, Clan Tynker’s master of ceremonies and accordion player. “Every show has fire eating in the beginning and fire juggling at the end. I’m the only one in the troupe who doesn’t eat fire. I play the accordion while the other four do it.” Muller Davis, an eighth grade English teacher at Capshaw Middle School, plans to do some tried and true magic tricks and be as silly as possible during his second appearance at the event. “What I hope for at the Renaissance Fair is a gaggle of kids ready to laugh their heads off and scream their eyes to tears for the love and joy and hilarity of being alive,” he says. Proceeds from the event go to The Interfaith Community Shelter, which provides services for people who are homeless, and to funding El Rancho de las Golondrinas’ year-round educational programs.

Santa Fe Renaissance Fair, $10 ($8 for seniors and teens, free for kids under 13), September 20 & 21, 10 am–6 pm, El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 334 Los Pinos Rd, La Cienega, golondrinas.org September 18, 2014 NOW

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Santa Fe Pro Musica

the acclaimed chamber orchestra launches its 33rd season with an all-Beethoven program by Ashle y M. Big g e r s

Da da da dum. Four notes. That’s all it takes for audiences around the world to recognize what’s generally considered the most famous symphony in classical music history: Beethoven’s Fifth. Yet for musicians, familiarity with an iconic work doesn’t always translate into a sense of ease or a certain leeway to become complacent about their performance. In fact, says conductor and music director Thomas O’Connor—who leads Santa Fe Pro Musica in the work on September 20 as part of the opening concert of the chamber orchestra’s 33rd season—it can mean just the opposite. “You have to invest a lot of thought and care in the preparation of the work so that you bring something special to it,” O’Connor says. “If the performance is going to have integrity, you have to make sure it’s alive, full of energy, and accurately represents what’s there.” The season opener will also include Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Minor, which O’Connor

describes as being just as grand as Beethoven’s symphonies. “Beethoven’s music is a reflection of what it is to be human. It takes you to places of joy, sorrow, happiness, and contemplation, and the concertos are equally as rich in that understanding,” O’Connor says. The concerto will feature piano soloist Melissa Marse, a Steinway Artist who’s collaborated with members of the New York Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, and other ensembles. “When you can work with a soloist who has [Marse’s] experience,” O’Connor says, “the orchestra is not merely accompanying them, [but rather] you’re really partnering with the soloist in a great piece of music with a unified approach.” Other works in Santa Fe Pro Musica’s 2014–15 season include Schoenberg’s Transfigured Night and Mahler’s Symphony No. 4 in November; “Autumn” and “Winter” from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons in December; and Schumann’s Violin Concerto in D Minor featuring world-renowned violinist Midori in February and March. For a detailed list of this season’s repertoire and guest artists, visit santafepromusica.com.

Santa Fe Pro Musica Season Opening Concert, September 20, 4 pm, and September 21, 3 pm, The Lensic Performing Arts Center; Artist Dinner September 21, 5:30 pm; 505-988-4640; santafepromusica.com

Peter Norby

Conductor Thomas O’Connor leads the Santa Fe Pro Musica chamber orchestra, which he founded in 1980 with Carol Redman.

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Joseph’s of Santa Fe

douglas merriam

According to chef Joseph Wrede, diners are drawn to his new culinary pub, Joseph’s of Santa Fe, for the “not necessarily predictable contemporary Southwestern cuisine.” Best known for his work at the now closed Joseph’s Table in Taos (which earned him a Best New Chef award from Food & Wine magazine), Wrede will celebrate the one-year anniversary of his latest endeavor next month. His raw vegetable salad pictured here is based on “the idea of serving summer-fresh vegetables in Italy,” and it’s inspired by Wrede’s desire to create global combinations of ingredients. Building on what’s in season and available locally, this raw salad comprises leaves of butter lettuce, thinly sliced rounds of zucchini and squash, and julienned fennel. Traditionally, Wrede says, this type of salad is best with a black truffle oil vinaigrette. “The zucchini, squash, and lettuce have an earthy base flavor that creates a foil for the bold fennel,” he explains. “Fennel is closest to a licorice or anise flavor and has a nice deep nose to it, as does the truffle oil.” The sprinkle of juicy pomegranate seeds adds a bright red color to the plate while also giving the dish “a pleasing mouth texture.”— Cristina Olds Joseph’s of Santa Fe, 428 Agua Fria, josephsofsantafe.com

eating+ drinking

September 18, 2014 NOW

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Seen Around photographs by Stephen Lang

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KAREN SCHULD

KAREN SCHULD

KAREN SCHULD

KAREN SCHULD

KAREN SCHULD

KAREN SCHULD

KAREN SCHULD

KAREN SCHULD

Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.


KAREN SCHULD

September 18, 2014 NOW

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Opening Night

STEPHEN LANG

As one of the largest art markets in the country, Santa Fe is always hosting openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was recently out and about at a number of openingnight receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we hung out with.

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art

openings | reviews | artists

Ysabel LeMay, Cosmic Nursery, C-print, 48 x 63"

Practically the only indicator that Austin-based artist Ysabel LeMay’s work is photographic in nature is the fact that she’s exhibiting at VERVE Gallery of Photography. Her works appear to be detailed paintings of trees, floral arrangements, and birds; in reality, they’re compositions comprising hundreds of photographs arranged in a highly complex, painterly manner. “My art is a tribute to nature. It’s an offering—a moment of contemplation,” says LeMay, whose show, Gracia, will include 11 works. In this series, says the former graphic artist, “I’ve chosen to expose nature’s paradox, which I take pleasure in reinventing.”—Amy Gross Ysabel LeMay, Gracia, through October 25, reception September 19, 5–7 pm, VERVE Gallery of Photography, 219 E Marcy, vervegallery.com September 18, 2014 NOW

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art

PROFILE

“I’ve been absolutely terrified every moment of my life, and I’ve never let it keep me from doing a single thing that I wanted to do.” —Georgia O’Keeffe

Warpaint

Prometheus, oil on canvas, 32 x 48"

Craig Kosak’s latest show—the first in a series called The Solitude of Ravendell— celebrates new directions in his life and his art by Ash le y M . Big ge rs

Moondance, oil on canvas, 48 x 32" 22

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The words of fellow painter Georgia O’Keeffe above have echoed strongly with Craig Kosak during the course of his recent personal and professional evolution, the fruits of which are on view in his new show Warpaint, opening September 19 at Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art. Although Kosak was a city dweller, his trips to national parks in the American West, and the resulting animal portraits over color-blocked backgrounds, established his career. In the past year, he made a permanent home, which he calls Ravendell, on secluded Whidbey Island, off the coast of Seattle, Washington, and embarked on a new chapter in his artistic career. “Warpaint [is a group of] markings that bestow courage, and it was a courageous experiment [for me] to move from the city, to buy a piece of undeveloped forest, and to transform my life in this way,” he says. In Kosak’s island solitude (he often goes days without seeing another human), the artist has found companionship in his dog, Tucker, and in the local wildlife, who are the subjects of his newest works. “With this new series, [Craig’s] leaving behind some of his favorite creatures of the West, like the bison and wolf,” says Palin Wiltshire, gallery director for Giacobbe-Fritz. “We’re meeting Selene, a great horned owl; Grace, a red-tailed hawk; and a new host of ravens along with deer and rabbits. With [Craig’s] new style, we’re also seeing color blocking in the body of his

creatures,” she adds. Kosak is also for the first time crafting his own horsehair, calligraphy-style brushes that layer on paint thickly, expose brushwork, and lend a greater texture to the canvas’s surface. “There was a lot of spontaneity in my older work that I was trying to reclaim in this show,” he says. “I sometimes feel like a mad scientist.” Kosak’s bold moves are paying off already. Wiltshire says that the artist’s fans are thrilled with the new work, and that show sales are already brisk. Craig Kosak: Warpaint, September 19–October 5, reception September 19, 5–7 pm, Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art, 702 Canyon, giacobbefritz.com


focused lens

by Donna Schillinge r

a multimedia exhibition showcases photographer Will Wilson’s timely and forward-looking work

courtesy of the wheelwright museum of the american indian

AIR 6, archival pigment print, 44 x 79"

The manifold talent and passion of Diné (or Navajo) photographer Will Wilson is on full display in an exhibition that runs through April 19, 2015, at Santa Fe’s Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian. Wilson, who was born in San Francisco and raised in Tuba City, Arizona (the largest community in the Navajo Nation), combines digital technology, historic photographic processes, performance, and installation to address the themes that most concern him: environmental activism, the impact of cultural and environmental change on indigenous peoples, and cultural survival and renewal. At the entrance to the Wheelwright is Wilson’s AIR LAB, a large hogan-shaped greenhouse in which vegetables, culinary herbs, and native and drought-tolerant shrubs grow. Part of a vision that centers on indigenous communities growing healthy food and raising healthy children, AIR LAB fuses Wilson’s grownup concerns with childhood memories of his grandparents’ home. “My grandfather’s cornfields, fruit trees, melons, and squash, along with my grandmother Martha’s large herd of sheep, sustained our extended family for generations,” Wilson has said. The exhibition also includes 12 photographic portraits from Wilson’s CIPX (Critical Indigenous Photographic Exchange) project. In response to the general public’s reception of Edward S. Curtis’s famous early-20th-century images of Native Americans, CIPX expands on the photographer’s work, but from a 21st-century perspective. “Curtis did a certain amount of manipulation by removing modern

accoutrements from view and asking subjects to wear heirloom clothing,” says Cheri Falkenstien-Doyle, the Wheelwright’s curator. “Also, the photographic chemistry of Curtis’s day renders some skin tones very dark, which white viewers tended to read as exotic. Will’s portraits represent a more equitable relationship with his subjects. People pose with items of personal significance—everything from vintage typewriters to manga paperbacks—and share rights to the image.” Among the other pieces not to be missed is Wilson’s huge AIR (Auto Immune Response) series, which depicts a post-apocalyptic Navajo man’s journey through a desolate but beautiful landscape symbolic of the exploited Navajo reservation. The futuristic protagonist considers profound questions: What has occurred to transform the landscape? Why has the land become toxic? How will I reconnect with the earth? Wilson’s message is as manifest as the immense images of the exhibition, leaving the viewer debating whether Wilson is an activist with a camera or an artist on a mission—so evenly apparent are the two energies. As Falkenstien-Doyle says: “I’m drawn to the beauty and poignancy of his work, and then I like the message.” Will Wilson at the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, through April 19, 2015, 704 Camino Lejo, wheelwright.org September 18, 2014 NOW

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art

PREVIEWS Ron Pokrasso, Figure Palette Blues, monotype, intaglio, and collage on paper, 16 x 24"

Monotypes and More Pippin Contemporary, 200 Canyon, pippincontemporary.com Through October 7, reception September 19, 5–7 pm Pippin Contemporary unveils paintings and monotypes by artists representing a range of artistic experience, all of whom produced work at Santa Fe Timberwick Studios: Diane Rolnick, Aleta Pippin, Michael Coop, and Timberwick owner Ron Pokrasso (who in 1987 created the annual printmaking fundraiser Monothon). On September 20, from 11 am to 3 pm , visitors are invited to pull their own monotype at the gallery.—Eve Tolpa

ongoing

Florence Miller Pierce: In the Light Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, 554 S Guadalupe charlottejackson.com Through September 30 The subtleties of light are the predominant focus of two- and three-dimensional pieces by Florence Miller Pierce (1918–2007), who worked in diverse mediums (including paint on canvas, ink on rice paper, balsa wood, stone, and resin) and was renowned for her sculptures. Charlotte Jackson’s comprehensive survey showcases work from the 1960s through the early 2000s.—ET

Florence Miller Pierce, Spire #1, resin relief, 96 x 16"

The Spirit of the Horse Manitou Galleries, 123 W Palace, manitougalleries.com Through September 19 In her latest show, Hawaiian-born artist Ethelinda showcases her signature confident style in a new series of oil paintings that center on horses. Created with bold, dramatic brushstrokes, Ethelinda’s works capture the unbridled spirit of the animal, the evocative local landscape, and, in her portraits, carefully researched depictions of traditional Native American dress. 24

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Ethelinda, Sierra Blanca-Sioux, oil on canvas, 72 x 52"


Hiroshi Yamano and Pedro Surroca LewAllen Galleries, 1613 Paseo de Peralta, lewallencontemporary.com Through September 21 Hiroshi Yamano and Pedro Surroca present meditative interpretations of tree branches. Japanese-born Yamano is of a pioneering generation of glass artists who moved the medium away from vessels and toward sculpture, and his pieces incorporate glass blowing, cutting, and etching as well as copper- and silver-plating. Surroca’s focus on the line, light, and shadow of the branch form result in paintings with a spare elegance.—ET Nanami Ishihara, Yama Onna, Japanese pigment and acrylic gouache on cotton mounted on panel, 76 x 154" Hiroshi Yamano, From East to West “Scene of Japan” (FS #159), blown/sculpted glass, silver leaf engraving, and copper plating, 18 x 26 x 18"

Impacts! Japanese Contemporary Art in Collaboration with Mizuma Art Gallery, Tokyo Zane Bennett Contemporary Art, 435 S Guadalupe, zanebennettgallery.com, through September 22 Discover the work of 17 established and emerging Japanese artists, among them video game image designer Yoshitaka Amano, former street artist Ai Kato, and painter Nanami Ishihara. From August 19 through August 23, Zane Bennett hosts a series of special events: artist talks, film screenings, a painting demonstration, a Japanese tea ceremony, and forums examining the relationship between art and cultural and political issues.—ET

Irina Zaytceva, Primavera Vase, porcelain, 7 x 6 x 3"

Women in Cultural Context: A Multi-Media Group Exhibition Tansey Contemporary, 652 Canyon tanseycontemporary.com Through September 23 Gallery artists working in glass, ceramics, fiber, beading, and basketry (as well as painting and mixed media) explore women’s responses to cultural roles and expectations. Painter Patrick McGrath Muñiz’s elaborate tableaux, for example, incorporate iconography ranging from Christian to pop culture and offer sly commentary on history, while glass artist Susan Taylor Glasgow explores conflicting messages about femininity in a medium she terms “seductive but unforgiving.”—ET

Covering Santa Fe in a unique way. aBqJournal.com/subscribe September 18, 2014 NOW

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[on the market] Tom Smylie with Zorro

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diving at astonishing speeds of up to 250 miles per hour. Fairgoers can catch the hawk and falcon demonstration at 3:15 pm on Saturday and Sunday. The Peregrine Fund also has a booth at the fair, where Smylie and his fellow conservationists distribute literature and answer questions about the falcon, which almost became extinct some 40 years ago because of the insecticide DDT. Smylie is a welcome addition to the event, captivating his audiences

Falconers train their birds to chase a lure.

DAN WILLIAMS, NM DEPT. OF GAME & FISH

The year was 1957. A young UNM football player named Tom Smylie was mentally preparing for a halftime drubbing from his coach when he spied a cadet on the sidelines with a falcon on his arm. The cadet and his falcon then put on a spectacular show that completely captivated Smylie. It would prove to be a defining moment in his life. Soon after graduation, Smylie embarked upon a lifelong career in wildlife biology that would include 22 years as assistant regional director of the New Mexico Department of Fish and Wildlife Service. Now retired, and considered one of the most respected authorities on raptors and raptor conservation, Smylie is a consultant with The Peregrine Fund, a nonprofit in Idaho that works to conserve populations of wild birds of prey. But what Smylie loves to do most is fly falcons and hawks. On September 20 and 21, the 77-year-old Edgewood resident returns to the Santa Fe Renaissance Fair at El Rancho de las Golondrinas, where he’s put on raptor shows for the past four years. And it’s no accident that he’s invited to this particular fair. “Falconing was an important part of the culture of the Renaissance,” Smylie notes. “Up until gunpowder and guns arrived [from China in the 17th century], it was a pretty effective form of hunting.” Amid the color and revelry of acrobats and jousters, Smylie and his birds—a male lanner falcon named Zorro and EZ, a male Harris’s hawk—attract a huge crowd on the hillside at Falcon Field. To the delight of spectators, EZ flies from the Renaissance Fair’s king to his queen, and Zorro chases lures (substituting for small birds, its typical prey) high in the air,

in the same way he himself was captivated at that fateful football game many years ago. “Tom’s shows are extremely popular,” says Joseph Maes, curator of historical interpretation at Las Golondrinas. “Before each presentation and at his booth, he explains the importance and history of falconry and how these magnificent creatures are protected for future generations to cherish and enjoy.” —Amy Gross Falcon and Hawk Show with Tom Smylie, September 20 and 21, 3:15 pm, Santa Fe Renaissance Fair at El Rancho de las Golondrinas, golondrinas.org

contemporary condo Although technically considered a condo, this 1,820-square-foot Eastside adobe home with three bedrooms and three bathrooms is freestanding. Built in the 1940s, it was completely renovated by architect David F. Smith in 2004. Located on a private drive off Delgado Street, the home features antique doors that lead into rooms with 11-foot-tall ceilings and skylights. There are two master suites, and a third bedroom can be used as a study. One of the suites looks out over a private and lush courtyard that contains peonies, oriental poppies, coreopsis, vinca, and clematis. The courtyard can be accessed through the home’s colorful, old world–style kitchen. The property’s cherry tree produces up to 100 pounds of cherries annually. List price: $950,000 Contact: Tony Allegretti, Allegretti & Hiltbrand, Barker Realty, 505-992-3575, santaferealestate.com

DAVID SMITH

raptor expert Tom Smylie returns to the Santa Fe Renaissance Fair

Laurie Allegretti

the falcon and the hawk


[on the market]

style

Green Chile Cheeseburger

Smackdown

by Ste ve n Hora k

KEN AHLER

two victors emerge from a group of eight stellar competitors

indoor/outdoor living

Madrid’s Mine Shaft Tavern took home the People’s Choice Award.

For grilled-meat lovers, there was just one place to be last Friday: at the Farmers Market Pavilion for the second annual Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown. As much an occasion to savor some of the best burgers in town as it was a chance to celebrate Santa Fe as the country’s green chile cheeseburger capital, the Smackdown showcased the inspired creations of eight area restaurants. The Tiho Dimitrov Trio provided a bluesy rock soundtrack to an evening of clanging spatulas, wafting smoke, and heady aromas, as chefs and grill cooks prepared wave after wave of elevated takes on the venerable dish for an ever-eager crowd. Picking the best burger was never going to be easy for the judges or attendees, but it proved to be an enviable task that everyone present took on with gusto. In the end, Madrid’s Mine Shaft Tavern and its “Mad Chile” burger (topped with battered and fried Hatch green chiles and aged cheddar cheese) walked away with the People’s Choice Award. The “Alien” burger—a gooey, otherworldly concoction featuring blue corn chile relleno, bacon, pepper Jack cheese, and guacamole—earned Second Street Brewery the title of Reigning Chomp, as selected by local and national food critics. Judging by the enthusiastic response to all of the finalists’ burgers, the Smackdown is fast becoming a beloved fixture on Santa Fe’s culinary scene.

the outside by a patio with a riverrock fireplace. The second level includes a two-car garage that has a one-room guest unit attached to it. The third level features two bedrooms and a bathroom as well as an outdoor patio. Gardens filled with Southwestern plants surround the home, making this property a great choice for relaxed indoor and outdoor living. List price: $989,900 Contact: Ken Ahler, Ken Ahler Real Estate, 505-490-0220, santafeland.com

STEVEN HORAK

This 4.52-acre property with mature pine and aspen trees is located on the north side of Santa Fe, close to the Governor’s Mansion. The 3,500-square-foot main home with hardwood floors and granite countertops has three levels. The master bedroom and one guest bedroom, which are separated by a media room, are on the main level and are fronted on

Pots of green chile simmer on flattop stoves, waiting to garnish perfectly cooked cheeseburgers. September 18, 2014 NOW

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| L A S T LOO K |

GABRIELLA MARKS

Violent Femmes

The iconic 1980s acoustic punk rockers the Violent Femmes are nowhere near gone, daddy, gone. Commemorating the 30th anniversary of the release of their first album, the Femmes have been touring the U.S. and Canada since May, and on September 11 they brought their raw energy before the faithful fans crowding the patio at Sol Santa Fe. Opening with “Blister in the Sun,” the Femmes played their entire eponymous 1983 album, with singer/songwriter/ guitarist Gordon Gano belting every hit exactly the way we first heard it, while bassist Brian Ritchie mastered the familiar instrumentation. Not just for now-grown-up kids of the ’80s, the Femmes’ sound resonated with teens, their older siblings, and their parents in the crossgenerational audience. “I didn’t feel like I was watching a tribute to something from my past,” one attendee shared. “The show felt completely vital and relevant.” —Cristina Olds 28

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concorso ad-now mag-full page 9/11/14 10:30 AM Page 1

1939 and 1940 Indy 500 winning Maserati Wilber Shaw/Boyle Special

Legends of Racing Al Unser, Sr.

Parnelli Jones

Johnny Rutherford

Eddie Cheever

Al Unser, Jr.

A Tribute to Indy Drivers and their Cars Friday, September 26, 1:00– 2:30 p.m. Santa Fe Municipal Airport, Hangar K 121 Aviation Drive, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Indy 500 racers Al Unser, Sr., Al Unser, Jr., Parnelli Jones, Eddie Cheever, and Johnny Rutherford, will recount their career highlights in their own words, along with a display of memorable Indy cars. $20 at the door. Visit www.santafeconcorso.com for information, schedule, and tickets. The Santa Fe Concorso is an all-volunteer 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. A portion of the proceeds from the Concorso go to benefit youth organizations in Santa Fe and Santa Fe County.


621 C anyon R oad 830 C anyon R oad billhester@billhesterfineart.com

BillHesterFineArt.com (505) 660-5966

Sean Wimberly Autumn Carpet acrylic on canvas 40" x 30" Jane Filer Bird, Bee, & Rabbit acrylic on canvas 22" x 22"

Margaretta Caesar Harvest Color Series oil on canvas 30" x 38"

Santa Fean NOW September 18 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW September 18 2014 Digital Edition

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