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now The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

Fashion Week! celebrate style santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

week of September 11


The Only 3 Generation, Full-time, Female, Painting Dynasty Recorded in History

Margarete Bagshaw “Mandala” 30” X 24” oil on panel

Helen Hardin (1943 - 1984)

Pablita Velarde (1918 - 2006)

201 Galisteo St. Santa Fe, NM 505-988-2024 www.goldendawngallery.com


TOM BERG REGINA FOSTER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2014 On view through Tuesday, October 7, 2014

2 1 7 W. W a t e r S t r e e t Santa Fe, NM 87501 phone: 505 . 660 . 4393 www.wadewilsonart.com 1 1 a m - 5 p m Tu e s d a y - S a t u r d a y


now |

SEP 11 – SEP 17

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

2014

|

TURN UP THE HEAT

Bruce Adams

Publisher

AT THE FREE FUZE.SW MARKETPLACE!

The first annual Santa Fe Yoga Festival, which was held August 28–31, featured 108 classes taught by 40 instructors on the mesa at Bishop’s Lodge. For more images of recent goings on around town, check out Seen Around on page 18.

Sunday, September 14 · 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM · Museum Hill

KAREN SCHULD

This free-to-the-public, day-long family food event is brought to you by FUZE.SW and Delicious New Mexico. Vendors will offer tastes of and sell New Mexico-grown, produced, and prepared foods, from jams to empanadas. Enjoy Native American dance performances, cooking demonstrations, cookbook signings, a green chile roast, tours of the Santa Fe Botanical Garden, food trucks, and more activities that everyone will relish.

DAVID ROBIN

RECENTLY, ON A QUICK TRIP to Sedona, I took a peek at the city’s local events calendar and found only a few interesting things listed. By contrast, SantaFeanCalendar.com is chock-full of interesting events. We may sometimes think of Santa Fe as a sleepy little town, but compared to other small cities, we’re leaps ahead in terms of our cultural offerings and other fun or unusual events. This weekend, one such event is the Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown at the Farmers Market Pavilion in the Railyard. Last year the event sold out, and for very good reasons. Many of us consider ourselves green chile cheeseburger experts, sensitive to every nuance employed by local purveyors. The Smackdown is your chance to dig in and dish it out with your fellow chile addicts. And yes, you can sample all the burgers and vote for your favorite. The coolest part of all this is that something like the Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown is just one of the many things going on here this weekend. Gallery openings, music concerts, cheeseburgers—Sedona, eat your heart out.


the

buzz

AHA Festival of Progressive Arts

BRANDON JOHNSON

The AHA Festival of Progressive Arts presents emerging and alternative arts to Santa Fe audiences. Dedicated to celebrating a range of disciplines and featuring works that both push boundaries and redefine genres, the festival includes musical acts, art installations, gallery-style booths, interactive events, and more. “Participants get exposed to new audiences and make new connections, but we think the real value of the festival is to give people something local to aspire to instead of them [having to] move to New York City or Los Angeles,” says festival director Shannon Murphy. “More than 75 percent of our artists are local,” she adds. With applications coming in from around the world, and with the festival entering its fourth year, “We’ve been really thrilled with the response,” Murphy says. “People consistently say they had no idea that there were so many talented young artists, and in fact young people, in Santa Fe. But we’re not just about young people— we’re trying to unite different generations around art and music that’s non-traditional and progressive.” The festival is being held from 7 pm to 2 am on September 13 at El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe and from 1 pm to 10 pm on September 14 on Santa Fe’s Railyard Plaza.—Cristina Olds

Vadi Grontis and Helen Gruhlkey use found objects for their immersive art and music exhibition Distortion by Design at the 2013 AHA Festival.

Chauncey Gadek, half of the electro-pop duo Lady Gloves, performs at the 2013 AHA Festival.

September 11, 2014 NOW

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now bruce adams

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Supporting Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program

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Our Local TeensProgram Dreams to Careers Program Supporting Our LocalSupporting Teens Dreams to Careers Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program

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A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

Supporting Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program

215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com

Supporting Our Local Teens Dreams to Careers Program

Copyright 2014. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

Invites you to Reaching for the Stars FLAMENCO - TAPAS - SILENT AUCTION Saturday, September 20th • Governor’s Mansion • 5:30pm TICKETS & INFORMATION: Alphagraphics & The Spanish Table TICKETS $50 or purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org FLAMENCO - TAPAS - SILENT AUCTION

PATTI BOSE

Includes Tapas, wine and beverages LEASE KNOW TICKETS WILL NOT BE SOLD AT THE LAST20th DAY FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER FLAMENCO - TAPAS -DOOR. SILENT AUCTION Saturday, September • Governor’s Mansion17TH • 5:30pm FLAMENCO - TAPAS - SILENT AUCTION Saturday, 20th • Governor’s 5:30pm AUCTION -Mansion TAPAS -•SILENT Call 505.216.6049 for• Information ay, September 20thSeptember • Governor’s Mansion 5:30pm TICKETS &FLAMENCO INFORMATION: Alphagraphics & The Spanish Table - TAPAS -& SILENT AUCTION FLAMENCO - TAPAS - SILENT AUCTION Saturday, September • Governor’s Mansion • 5:30pm purchase online:20th www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org FLAMENCO -or TAPAS - SILENT AUCTION TICKETS INFORMATION: & The Spanish Table “Red Archer” by artist John Nieto &NCO INFORMATION: Alphagraphics &Alphagraphics The Spanish Table Saturday, September 20th • Governor’s Mansion • 5:30pm ember 20th • Governor’s Mansion •WILL 5:30pm orPLEASE purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org KNOW TICKETS NOT BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST DAY FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH purchase Saturday, online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org TICKETS & Alphagraphics & The Spanish Table September 20th •INFORMATION: Governor’s Mansion • 5:30pm TICKETS & INFORMATION: Alphagraphics & The Spanish Table or purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org RMATION: Alphagraphics The Spanish Table orATDAY purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org SE KNOW NOT BE & SOLD THE DOOR. LAST DAY SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH WILL NOT TICKETS BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH TICKETS &WILL INFORMATION: Alphagraphics &FOR Thefor Spanish Table Call 505.216.6049 Information PLEASE KNOW TICKETS WILL NOT BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST DAY FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH e online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org KNOW TICKETS WILL NOT BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST DAY FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH or PLEASE purchase online: www.RisingStarsSouthwest.org Call 505.216.6049 for Information Call 505.216.6049 for Information Call 505.216.6049 for Information T BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. LAST DAY FOR SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH SE KNOW TICKETS WILL NOT BE SOLD AT THE Call DOOR. LAST DAY FOR for SALES IS SEPTEMBER 17TH 505.216.6049 Information l 505.216.6049 for Information Call 505.216.6049 for Information

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Santa Fean NOW Volume 1, Number 18, Week of September 11, 2014. Published by Bella Media, LLC at 215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2014 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

On the cover: Items from Mantra Bazaar, which are designed here in Santa Fe: White “Chikankari” hand-embellished tunic, $88; tie-dye chiffon scarf, $58. For more, see page 26.


COURTESY ORLANDO DUGI

the

buzz

A dress from designer Orlando Dugi’s Desert Heat collection

Santa Fe Fashion Week Clothing for women and men of all shapes and sizes is on display at the third annual Santa Fe Fashion Week, which takes place September 18–20 on Canyon Road and at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. “We’ve invited designers to participate who are from the Southwest and West Coast and who are in line with our idea of sustainable fashion,” says the event’s assistant executive producer, Amanda Caserta. “They’re people who make greener choices with their materials. If they use fur, for example, they use fur from animals that are an important source of food for a community rather than animals raised exclusively for their fur.” Although the event’s industry-only kick-off party in Albuquerque on September 17 is closed to the public, everyone is welcome to enjoy the free SFFW Shop n Stroll event on Canyon Road from 5 to 7 pm on Thursday, September 18. Twenty-two of the 30 participating designers—including Robin Ross, the evening-wear designer for the television show Dancing with the Stars; Santa Fe designer Orlando Dugi of DUGI fashions; L.A. designer Aaron Fust, CEO of Syrup Swimwear; and Ezra Estes, head of the fashion design program at Santa Fe Community College and owner of the line Seams Unusual—display and sell casual attire and unique evening outfits at GF Contemporary, Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art, Winterowd Fine Art, and Ronnie Layden Fine Art. An opportunity to see and purchase pieces from all the designers takes place at the free Santa Fe Fashion Market, held from noon to 4 pm on Friday, September 19, and Saturday, September 20, at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. A ticketed runway show at 7 pm on both nights is hosted by Arizona boutique owner and designer Allie Olson and features accessories by local designers. Wedding lingerie and gowns are part of the runway show, which includes performances by the Albuquerque–based contemporary dance company Sparrow Dance Productions.—Emily Van Cleve Santa Fe Fashion Week, September 18, Shop n Stroll on Canyon Road, free, 5–7 pm; September 19–20, Santa Fe Fashion Market, free, 12–4 pm; September 19–20, Runway Show, $25 general admission, $100 VIP tickets with priority seating and hors d’oeuvres, 7 pm, santafefashionweek.com

let’s hope we don’t live here

VOLTAGE PICTURES

Qohen Leth abhors his job. At the Mancorp offices, the programmer (played by Christoph Waltz) pedals away on a stationary bike while crunching entities (data far more complex than mere numbers). His boss doesn’t know his name yet won’t leave him alone. His requests to work from home are denied without explanation. Then he’s given a special assignment: Prove zero equals 100 percent. “Management” at Mancorp is a person, played by Matt Damon, whose suit changes to match the background. Management has a financial stake in zero equaling 100 percent: If zero Mélanie Thierry in The Zero equals 100 percent, then the universe is all for nothing Theorem and faith is time wasted. The Zero Theorem is the crazy new science-fiction acid dream from director Terry Gilliam (Brazil, 12 Monkeys). It has bleak notions about humanity, and that bleakness is expressed not with drab grays but with wild neons and omnipresent noises like stretching rubber, crunches, dings, clicks, and beeps. Watching this movie is like going inside a pinball machine. No wonder Qohen hates being outside: Ads project on every wall that surrounds him, pestering every step. Poor Qohen is sick and possibly dying, but doctors

say he’s fine because Management wants him at work. He’s intensely awkward, speaking about himself in the plural first person. “We fear parties.” “Our diet dictates against food with perceptible flavor.” Christoph Waltz just won two Oscars in three years (for Inglourious Basterds and Django Unchained) so we know he’s a great actor. But still . . . wow is Waltz a great actor. He’s amazing as Qohen, infusing this sad weirdo—who represents everyone who is stepped on by a selfish boss—with soul and humanity. Qohen falls in love with a prostitute he connects with via “memory chips and fiber optics” in a body suit. Things go awry when the two contemplate running away together. Their world is frightening and merciless. Everyone’s under surveillance, and ads are ubiquitous. If zero equals 100 percent, love is worse than doomed. It’s nothing. The Zero Theorem is playing at CCA.—Phil Parker September 11, 2014 NOW

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this week

September 11–September 17

GABRIELLA MARKS

September 13: Santa Fe–based food photographer Gabriella Marks and Santa Fe Photography Workshops host the two-day intensive Cooking with Chef Kim and Food Photography Workshop. For details, see page 9.

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September 11 thursday Introduction to Weaving: Inkle Loom Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A class focused on the inkle loom, which is commonly used for narrow weaving of items like belts, trims, and straps. $69, 6–8 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

National Theatre Live: Medea The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

traditional Northern New Mexican foods. $85, 10 am–1 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Guitarras Con Sabor El Farol 808 Canyon

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Jacob Cummings Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Soul/pop/blues music. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

A screening of National Theatre’s production of Euripides’ Medea. Adapted by Ben Power, directed by Carrie Cracknell, and starring Helen McCrory. $22, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

John Kurzweg Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Green Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

A demonstration class focused on the green chile. $75, 2 pm, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Northern New Mexican Cuisine Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco, Ste 300

Chef Rocky Durham prepares a seasonal lunch of

Ron Newman Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Classical and jazz piano works. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

The Saltanah Dancers Cleopatra Café 3482 Zafarano

Belly-dancing performance. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-474-5644, saltanahstudios.com.

Cascarones Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, Ste B

DNAWORKS and Teatro Paraguas present the world premiere of Irma Mayoraga’s play Cascarones.

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Karaoke with Michele. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Moondogs La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Live music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

September 11: A screening at The Lensic of National Theater Live’s production of Medea, starring Helen McCrory.

RICHARD HUBERT SMITH

JOHN PERSSON

September 16: A screening at The Lensic of National Theatre Live’s production of A Streetcar Named Desire, starring Gillian Anderson (seen here) and Ben Foster.

September 11, 2014 NOW

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topics. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-919-9553, wheelhouseart.com.

Violent Femmes Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy

Landscapes from the Archives David Rothermel Contemporary Fine Art 142 Lincoln, Ste 102

Eighties acoustic punk duo the Violent Femmes tour to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the release of their first album. $42, 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org, heathconcerts.org.

September 12 friday Friday Night Get Together Gallery 901 and Ronnie Layden Fine Art 901 Canyon

Music and refreshments in the courtyard. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-670-6793, ronnielaydenfineart.com.

Meet the Artists Tesuque Flea Market 15 Flea Market Rd

Local artists show and discuss their work. Free, all day, 505-670-2599, pueblooftesuquefleamarket.com.

Restaurant Walk I Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A walking tour of Santa Fe restaurants including Agoyo Lounge and 315 Restaurant and Wine Bar. $115, 2 pm, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Sauces and Salsas of the Great Southwest Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Editor’s Pick

A cooking class focused on sauces and salsas. 6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

The Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Santa Fe chefs battle for the honor of making the best Santa Fe green chile cheeseburger. Sample food and vote for your favorite. $20, 6 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Captured by the Light Greenberg Fine Art 205 Canyon

Solo exhibition of paintings by Wendy Higgins. See profile on page 22. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-955-1500, greenbergfineart.com.

Paintings by David Rothermel. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 575-642-4981, drfa-sf.com.

Moments in Time Joe Wade Fine Art 102 E Water

Solo exhibition featuring paintings by Roger Williams. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-2727, joewadefineart.com.

New Sculptures Art Exchange Gallery 60 E San Francisco

Works by Jim Griffith. Free, reception 4–6 pm, 505-603-4485, aegallery.com.

Still Life and the Southwest Henington Fine Art 802 Canyon

Group exhibition featuring Ruth Paulsen, Martha Kellar, Bobby Lee Rajnik, and Antonio Weiss. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-501-0415, heningtonfineart.com.

Tom Berg and Regina Foster Wade Wilson Art 217 W Water

An exhibition of works by painters Tom Berg and Regina Foster. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-660-4393, wadewilsonart.com.

Transparency: Color and Light David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

A survey of paintings by Salvatore Emblema (1929–2006) that were produced from 1965 through 2005. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 855-983-9555, davidrichardgallery.com.

Chango Junction 530 S Guadalupe

Live music. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-988-7222, junctionsantafe.com.

DSR and Friends The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace Live music. $5, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Erin Currier Blue Rain Gallery 130 Lincoln, Ste C

Happy Hours with Bill Hearne Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Here and Now, Now and Then Wheelhouse Art 418 Montezuma

Instameet Santa Fe Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Mixed-media works by Erin Currier. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-954-9902, blueraingallery.com

An exhibition of mixed-media works by Margaret Denney that addresses consumer culture, mass production, and the illusion of choice generated by these 8

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TOURISM SANTA FE

Editor’s Pick

Directed by Daniel Banks. $5–$15, 7 pm, 866-394-6033, teatroparaguas.org.

Country music. Free, 5–7:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

A whole-campus event with photography opportunities, a meet-and-greet with local and international Instagrammers, a pop-up restaurant by Paper

September 12: The second annual Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown at the Farmers Market Pavillion in the Railyard

Dosa, and a cash bar. Mountain. Desert. Mirror, a photography exhibition, opens concurrently in the Cinematheque Lobby. Free, 6–10 pm, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Jimmy Stadler Band La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Live music. Free, 9–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

JJ & The Hooligans El Farol 808 Canyon

Rock music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Pachanga The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St Francis

Salsa, cumbia, bachata, and merengue music and dancing. $5, 9:30 pm–1:30 am, 505-992-5800, lodgeatsantafe.com.

Robin Holloway Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Jazz music. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe

1501 Paseo de Peralta Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

The Santa Fe Revue Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Americana music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Cabaret and the Spirit of Montmartre Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E DeVargas

A new one-man show by veteran pianist/singer/playwright Charles Tichenor. $20 (discounts for seniors, students, educators, and military), 7 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.


GABY GERSTER/DIOGENES, ZURICH

Cascarones Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, Ste B

DNAWORKS and Teatro Paraguas present the world premiere of Irma Mayoraga’s Cascarones. Directed by Daniel Banks. $5–$15, 7 pm, 866-394-6033, teatroparaguas.org.

Jerry Lopez and Friends The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

A benefit concert for the National Latino Behavioral Health Association, which raises funds for Latino students pursuing a college degree in behavioral health. $25–$40, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

A cooking class focused on panini and sandwiches. 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

September 13: Author Dennis Lehane reads from his new book The Drop and hosts a screening of the film version at the Jean Cocteau Cinema.

A festival with music, visual arts, and pop-up performances. See profile on page 3. Festival is free; certain events require tickets; through September 14; ahafestival.com.

and Pie Town Considered. Free, 2–3:30 pm, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Editor’s Pick

Evolving Intentions in Public Art Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

A one-day symposium featuring presentations of public art projects in the morning followed by a roundtable in the afternoon. $10 suggested donation, 9 am–1 pm or 3–5:30 pm, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Meet the Artists Tesuque Flea Market 15 Flea Market Rd

Local artists show and discuss their work. Free, all day, 505-670-2599, pueblooftesuquefleamarket.com.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Park 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and more by local artists. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-310-1555, santafeartistsmarket.com.

Santa Fe Society of Artists Fine Art Show First National Bank of Santa Fe Parking Lot 107 W San Francisco

A diverse group of works by premier local artists are on view in an outdoor fine art show. Free, all day, 505-926-1497, santafesocietyofartists.com.

Three Films about Photography New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

A meal prepared with locally grown ingredients. $100, 6–8 pm, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

AHA Festival of Progressive Arts Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

A class focused on the art of tinwork. $125, 10 am–3:30 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Harvest Dinners Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo

Panini and Super Sandwiches Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

September 13 saturday

Beginning Tinworking Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

learn new cooking techniques and healthy recipes, develop food photography skills, and eat great food. $585, $60 materials fee, through September 14, 505-988-1975, santafeworkshops.com.

In conjunction with the yearlong series of exhibitions Focus on Photography, the museum screens three films: Re Joyce, Remembering Edward Weston,

Dennis Lehane Reading/The Drop Screening Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Dennis Lehane, author of Mystic River, Gone Baby Gone, and Shutter Island, reads from his new book The Drop and hosts a screening of the film version, which stars Tom Hardy and the late James Gandolfini. $10, 6 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Cooking with Chef Kim and Food Photography Santa Fe Photographic Workshops 50 Mt Carmel

Santa Fe–based food photographer Gabriella Marks and Santa Fe Photography Workshops host a twoday intensive workshop offering the opportunity to

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, 7 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Summer Cooking Class Estrella Del Norte Vineyard 106 N Shining Sun

Santa Fe School of Cooking hosts a Southwesternthemed cooking class on Estrella Del Norte’s garden patio. Instructors demonstrate using a wood-fired oven and grill while wine experts discuss New Mexico’s wine history and production. $120, 10 am–12 pm, 505-455-2826, estrelladelnortevineyard.com.

The Edges Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art 702 ½ Canyon

New work from three gallery artists that will hang around the edges of Renate Aller’s solo exhibition of large-scale photographs. Includes silk tapestries by Rebecca Bluestone, mixed-media paintings by Jay Tracy, and color field paintings by Chris Richter. Free, reception 2–4 pm, 505-992-0711, chiaroscurosantafe.com.

Lost Treasures Cerrillos Hills State Park Visitor Center 37 Main

Bob Julyan digs into stories of New Mexican treasure hunting that continue to this day. Free (donations accepted), 2–4 pm, 505-476-3200, emnrd.state.nm.us.

Twelve Big Questions That Will Change the Way You Think Santa Fe Soul Health & Healing Center 2905 Rodeo Park Dr E

An introductory coaching workshop led by master coach Ron Helman for individuals who are simply stuck and need guidance and the tools to move toward a happy and fulfilling life. Free, 3–5 pm, 505-466-1919, ronhelman.com.

RESCUEFEST Second Street Brewery at Second Street 1814 Second St

A fundraiser with live music, a raffle, and a silent September 11, 2014 NOW

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GABRIELLE SAVOY

auction, to support Atalaya Search and Rescue. The event also includes a beer special, Atalaya Altbier, brewed by brewmaster Rod Tweet. Free, 11 am–7 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

¡Celebración! The Spanish Colonial Art Society’s 10th Annual Gala La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco

Cocktails, a silent auction, a buffet dinner with food from three continents, and a live auction featuring works by Spanish Market artists and items donated by local patrons and businesses. $175, 6–10 pm, 505-982-2226, spanishcolonial.org.

Dana Smith Upper Crust Pizza 329 Old Santa Fe Trl

Live music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-0000, uppercrustpizza.com

D.K. & The Affordables Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Roots music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar with John Serkin Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen 1512 Pacheco Slack key guitar music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com.

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant 113 Washington

Live performance by singer/songwriter and guitarist Jesus Bas. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

Jimmy Stadler Band La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

September 13: Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys at The Lensic

Lucha Libre Exótica El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia

A gender-bending twist on Mexican wrestling traditions. $20–$35, 8 pm, 505-270-2332, thecassandroproject.com.

Lyle Lovett and His Large Band Santa Fe Downs 27475 W Frontage

Singer, composer, and actor Lyle Lovett performs country, swing, jazz, folk, gospel, and blues with his large band. $12–$76, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org, heathconcerts.org.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Jon Hogan & Maria Moss Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Cajun French music. See profile on page 16. $15–$35, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Los Esmitz El Farol 808 Canyon

Stand-up comedy. $5, 8 pm, skylightsantafe.com.

Folk music. Free, 2–5 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Rock music in Spanish. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com. 10

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The Luluz Comedy Night Skylight Santa Fe 139 W San Francisco

Walk to End Alzheimers

Santa Fe Railyard 740 Cerrillos

Two-mile walk presented by the Alzheimers Association of Santa Fe. Free (donations accepted), 8 am registration, 9 am ceremony, 9:30 am walk, 505-473-1297, alz.org.

Big Al Anderson GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St

A performance by Big Al Anderson, who’s best known for his 23-year stint playing guitar in the rock band NRBQ (New Rhythm and Blues Quartet). $20, 7:30–9:30 pm, gigsantafe.com.

Cabaret and the Spirit of Montmartre Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E DeVargas

A new one-man show by veteran pianist/singer/playwright Charles Tichenor. $20 (discounts for seniors, students, educators, and military), 7 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

Cascarones Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, Ste B

DNAWORKS and Teatro Paraguas present the world premiere of Irma Mayoraga’s play Cascarones. Directed by Daniel Banks. $5–$15, 7 pm, 866-394-6033, teatroparaguas.org.

September 14 sunday AHA Festival of Progressive Arts Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

A festival with music, visual arts, and pop-up performances. See profile on page 3. Festival is free; certain events require tickets; through


The Cut + Paste Society hosts part two of a community conversation on creativity with panelists including MiJan Celie, Linda Durham, and Cecile Lipworth. Free for New Mexico residents, $6–$9 for out-of-state residents, 2–3:30 pm, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Adam Marsland Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe COURTESY PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS

Indie pop music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com. September 14; ahafestival.com.

Life Drawing Series Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Draw from a live model while enjoying beer and waffles. $22, 11 am–1 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Meet the Artists Tesuque Flea Market 15 Flea Market Rd

Local artists show and discuss their work. Free, all day, 505-670-2599, pueblooftesuquefleamarket.com.

Santa Fe Society of Artists Fine Art Show First National Bank of Santa Fe Parking Lot 107 W San Francisco

A diverse group of works by premier local artists are on view in an outdoor fine art show. Free, all day, 505-926-1497, santafesocietyofartists.com.

Traditional New Mexican II Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A demonstration class focused on traditional New Mexican cuisine. $80, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Wine and Cider Barrel Tasting

Estrella Del Norte Vineyard 106 N Shining Sun Join wine and hard-cider makers for a barrel tasting and education session. $10–$15, 3 pm, 505-455-2826, estrelladelnortevineyard.com.

Corrales Home Tour Village of Corrales

Corrales Future Fund (CFF) is hosting the first annual Corrales Home Tour, showcasing six beautiful homes in the historic farming village of Corrales. $20, 10 am–4 pm, 505-898-6583, corralesfuturefund.org.

Cascarones Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, Ste B

DNAWORKS and Teatro Paraguas present the world premiere of Irma Mayoraga’s play Cascarones. Directed by Daniel Banks. $5–$15, 5 pm, 866-394-6033, teatroparaguas.org.

Showcase of the Stars The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Guest conductor Kevin Rhodes leads the Santa Fe Symphony’s season opener. See profile on page 14. $22–$76, 4 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

September 15 monday Before Baatan: New Mexico’s 200th Coast Artillery Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Nacha Mendez El Farol 808 Canyon

Rare photos of the New Mexico 200th Coast Artillery pre-Bataan, taken by unnamed photographers, are exhibited in this Palace of the Governor’s photo archive show. Free, all day, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Santa Fe Revue Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Latin world music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com

Americana music. Free, 12–3 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Spruce Street Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Acoustic folk duo. Free, 5–7 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Community Day Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo

Monthly day of free admission for New Mexico residents and students. Sponsored by Hilton Santa Fe Historic Plaza. Free for New Mexico residents and students, 9 am–5 pm, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Editor’s Pick

Revolutions Big New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

September 14: Showcase of the Stars, the opening concert of the Santa Fe Symphony’s 2014–2015 season

JOHN WILLIAMS

September 15: Before Bataan: New Mexico’s 200th Coast Artillery at the Jean Cocteau Cinema

Santa Fe to Buffalo Thunder Half Marathon Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino 30 Buffalo Thunder Trl

USA Track & Field–certified point-to-point course, which drops 1,000 feet in 13 miles. Also 5K run and 1-mile walk options. $20–$65, 8 am, santafethunder.com.

Cabaret and the Spirit of Montmartre Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E DeVargas

A new one-man show by veteran pianist/singer/playwright Charles Tichenor. $20 (discounts for seniors, students, educators, and military), 2 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org. September 11, 2014 NOW

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Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

1607 Paseo de Peralta

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Hillary Smith and Company El Farol 808 Canyon Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 50df5-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol 808 Canyon

Larry Mitchell, Jaime Michaels, & Jose Antonio Ponce Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Live music. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

A concert presented by the New Mexico Music Awards Songwriter’s Initiative. $8–$10, 7–9:30 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

DIANE ROLNICK, JOY SERIES JAM

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

September 17: Monotypes and More at Pippin Contemporary

September 16 tuesday National Theatre Live: A Streetcar Named Desire The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

A screening of the National Theater’s production of Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire starring Gillian Anderson and Ben Foster and directed by Benedict Andrews. $22, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Celebrating World Cheeses with the Cheese Master Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

John Isaac Gutierrez, cheesemonger from the new downtown cheese shop Cheesemongers of Santa Fe, shares his love and knowledge of the many cheeses featured in his shop. 6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Red Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A demonstration class focused on the red chile. $75, 2 pm, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 12

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Nacha Mendez TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson

Latin world music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-989-1166, terracottawinebistro.com.

Nathan Kalish & The Lastcallers Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Country music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

September 17 wednesday Botanical Drawing and Painting Autumn Specimens Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A class focused on botanical drawing and painting autumn specimens. $149, 9:30 am–12:30 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Let’s Take a Look Museum of Indian Arts and Culture 710 Camino Lejo

Curators from the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and the Laboratory of Anthropology are in the MIAC lobby to evaluate your treasures. Free, 12–1 pm, 505-467-1200, indianartsandculture.org.

Cooking with Plant Families Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco, Ste 300

Renowned chef, writer, and cooking teacher Deborah Madison spends an evening at the SFCA sharing recipes and stories from her latest cookbook, Vegetable Literacy. $100, 5:30–8:30 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Rellenos Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A demonstration class focused on rellenos. $98, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

September 17: Cooking with Plant Families at the Santa Fe Culinary Academy

Monotypes and More Pippin Contemporary 200 Canyon

Paintings and monotypes by artists representing a range of artistic experience, all of whom produced work at Santa Fe Timberwick Studios. 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com.

Discussion of David Roberts’s The Pueblo Revolt: The Secret Rebellion that Drove the Spaniards Out of the Southwest Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian 704 Camino Lejo Book club discussion of David Robert’s book, which centers on the 1680 revolt that drove the Spanish (temporarily) from the region. Free, 1:30 pm, 505-471-4970, wheelwright.org.

In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom: Alfredo Corchado with Melissa del Bosque The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

The Lannan Foundation presents a conversation between Alfredo Corchado, Mexico bureau chief for The Dallas Morning News and an expert on immigration, drug violence, and U.S.-Mexico foreign policy, and Melissa del Bosque, a staff reporter with The Texas Observer who, since 1998, has covered issues concerning the U.S.-Mexico border. $5, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Buffalo Nickel La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Jess Godwin Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.


John Kurzweg El Farol 808 Canyon

Group Exhibition Gallery 901 901 Canyon

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Exhibition of works by artists like painters John Barker, Jody Le Cher, Sherry Ikeda, and John Schaeffer and jewelry designer Christine Norton at Canyon Road’s newest fine art gallery. Free, ongoing, 505-780-8390, gallery901.org.

Wine Down Wednesday The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw Golden Dawn Gallery 201 Galisteo

With DJ Obi Zen. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Ongoing

Paintings by acclaimed Native American artists (and family members) Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw. Free, ongoing, 505-988-2024, goldendawngallery.com.

Jodi & Dean Balsamo Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Lands of Enchantment Wiford Gallery, 403 Canyon

Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams: The Hawaii Pictures Georgia O’Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson Ongoing: Star Liana York’s show Wisdom Keepers at Sorrel Sky Gallery

Landscape paintings of scenes from France, Italy, Mexico, the Caribbean, and New Mexico by Inger Jirby. Free, through September 17, 505-982-2403, wifordgallery.com.

315 Johnson

The Tradition of the Martinez Family of San Ildefonso Pueblo Adobe Gallery 221 Canyon

Yazzie Johnson and Gail Bird Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

An exhibit of pottery and paintings by Maria Martinez, her husband, her son, and her grandson. Free, through September 15, 505-629-4051, adobegallery.com.

The Spirit of the Horse Manitou Galleries 123 W Palace

New oil paintings by Ethelinda. Free, through September 19, 505-986-0440, manitougalleries.com.

A Walk in the Clouds Evoke Contemporary 550 S Guadalupe

Works by the late New Mexico painter Louisa McElwain. Free, through September 20, 505-995-9902, evokecontemporary.com.

New Works Sculpture 619, 619 Canyon

Dave Lambard’s newest series of paintings. Free, through September 22, 505-660-6166, sculpture619.com.

Indian Market Show Pablo Milan Gallery 209 Galisteo

Work by fifth-generation New Mexican Pablo Milan, wildlife sculptor Jess Davila, and Cheyenne River Sioux artist Don Brewer Wakpa Free, through September 22, 505-820-1285, pablomilangallery.com.

Smoke on the Mirror Heidi Loewen Porcelain Gallery & School

Smoke-fired and golf-leafed sculptures and platters by Heidi Loewen. Free, through September 22, 505-988-2225, heidiloewen.com.

Native American contemporary jewelry. Free, through September 26, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Indian Summer, 1835–1935 William R. Talbot Fine Art, Antique Maps & Prints 129 W San Francisco (Second Floor)

Group exhibition of paintings and prints, as well as early maps of the Southwest and Indian Territory. Free, through September 30, 505-982-1559, williamtalbot.com.

Logos in the Next Dimension Gallery 901 901 Canyon

Graphic art/sculpture by Wilfried Haest. Free, through October 2, 505-780-8390, gallery901.org.

Wisdom Keepers Sorrel Sky Gallery 125 W Palace

Twenty-five works from the late 1980s through the present by Abiquiú-based bronze artist Star Liana York. Free, through October 5, 505-501-6555, sorrelsky.com.

Messages from the Wounded Healers Center for Contemporary Arts/Spector Ripps Project Space 1050 Old Pecos Trl

An exhibit of Sam Scott’s series of large paintings, The Wounded Healers. Free, through November 2, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

The first exhibition to feature artwork created in Hawaii by American modernists and friends Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams. $6–$12 (kids free), through September 14, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

Local Color: Judy Chicago in New Mexico New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace An exhibition of Judy Chicago’s large-scale projects and smaller-scale personal artworks in honor of the artist’s 75th birthday. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through October 12, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Editor’s Pick

Works by photographer and collage artist Jodi Balsamo and mixed-media artist Dean Balsamo. Free, through September 15, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Harvesting Traditions Pablita Velarde Museum of Indian Women in the Arts 213 Cathedral

A solo exhibition of work by Kathleen Wall. $10 (discounts for seniors, students, and military), $5 New Mexico residents, through January 4, 2015, 505-988-8900, pvmiwa.org.

City Tours

Walking tours of Santa Fe with various companies including Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), and New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com. September 11, 2014 NOW

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RALPH LAUER/THE CLIBURN

Fe Santa Fe Symphony the orchestra’s 31st season features show-stopping works and exciting guest artists by As hle y M . Big ge rs

AS THE SANTA FE SYMPHONY celebrates its 31st season of performances, it’s tuning into a repertoire of burnished audience favorites and those that are soon to be. On September 14, the season opens with a concert (dubbed Showcase of the Stars) featuring two distinguished soloists: Clancy Newman on cello and Mark Kaplan on violin. Regarded as a leading violinist of his generation, Kaplan has played solo engagements with nearly every major American orchestra, including the New York and Los Angeles Philharmonics. In Santa Fe, he’ll ply his artistry on Monti’s Csárdás and team with Newman for Brahms’s Double Concerto for Violin and Cello. Newman, the 2001 first-prize winner of the Walter W. Naumburg International Competition, is set to play Popper’s Hungarian Rhapsody. This concert segues into an autumnal performance, on October 19, featuring Jason Vieaux playing Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez, one of the most famous classical guitar pieces ever written. The concert will also include a performance of Arturo Márquez’s Danzón No. 2, a significant Mexican contemporary classical work rooted in the Cuban dance style of danzón and the folklore of Veracruz, Mexico. “Márquez is very rhythmical and accessible,” says the symphony’s founder and general director, Gregory W. Heltman, of the living Mexican composer. November brings the symphony’s performance of Handel’s Messiah, a musical rite of the Santa Fe holiday season, and on January 18

INSIGHT FOTO

The Santa Fe Symphony kicks off its 31st season at The Lensic on September 14.

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Pianist Sean Chen performs on March 15, 2015, as part of the Santa Fe Symphony’s Beethoven festival.

the orchestra rings in 2015 with Mahler’s Symphony No. 1. Although it’s played better-known works by the composer, Heltman says the orchestra wanted to continue “exploring the great symphonic output with Mahler.” Of this composition, which is sometimes called “Titan,” Heltman says that “it’s so inspiring and fun to perform. You walk out of there feeling like Superman.” On March 15, Sean Chen—winner of the American Pianists Association’s 2013 Christel DeHaan Classical Fellowship and the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition Crystal Award—makes his first appearance in Santa Fe at the symphony’s Beethoven festival. On May 16 and 17, the orchestra performs its final program, which includes Verdi’s Requiem featuring baritone Lester Lynch, tenor Issachah Savage, soprano Alexendra Loutsion, and Christine Brewer singing mezzo-soprano. With former music director Steven Smith’s position still open, the symphony will audition a different candidate at each of this season’s performances. Kevin Rhodes, who currently conducts the Springfield (Massachusetts)Symphony Orchestra, will guest conduct the season opener. Also set to guest conduct this season are Michael Butterman, music director of the Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra; Sarah Hicks, principal conductor of the Minnesota Orchestra’s Live at Orchestra Hall; James Feddeck, former assistant conductor of The Cleveland Orchestra; Gary Thor Wedow, renowned for conducting opera; Jason Altieri, associate conductor of the Reno Philharmonic and principal guest conductor of the Atlanta Pops Orchestra; and Guillermo Figueroa, music director of the Lynn Philharmonia and former music director of the New Mexico Symphony.

For a complete listing of the Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra & Chorus’ concerts, repertoire, and guest artists, visit santafesymphony.org.


GABRIELLA MARKS

LOIS ELLEN FRANK

FUSE.SW, Santa Fe’s only annual food conference, explores the history of New Mexico’s multicultural influences.

cultural fusion the annual Southwestern food conference FUSE.SW celebrates New Mexico’s rich culinary history

LUTZ STERNSTEIN

by Ashle y M. Big g e r s

THAT FOOD IS LIFE is never truer than it is in New Mexico, where it provides both nutritional and cultural sustenance. Santa Fe’s only annual food conference, FUSE.SW, explores the history of the state’s multicultural influences and touts this flavor melting pot to a global audience. In its inaugural year, the conference was a way for participants to literally taste the heritage honored in New World Cuisine: The Histories of Chocolate, Mate y Más, a Museum of International Folk Art exhibit that closed in December 2013. In 2014, the festival (September 12–14) delves into Native American food traditions with keynote presentations by celebrated local Native American chef Lois Ellen

Frank and Betty Fussell, a contemporary of both Julia Child and James Beard and the author of (most recently) Raising Steaks: The Life and Times of American Beef. The recipe for the conference emerged from successful Southern Foodways Alliance symposia celebrating the cuisine of the American South. However, FUSE.SW’s organizers, which include founder Steve Cantrell (public relations manager for the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs) and leading food authors Cheryl Jamison and Deborah Madison, have made the event’s ingredients uniquely New Mexican. Amid the panel presentations and TED Talk-esque 12-minutelong presentations by chefs, authors, and archeologists, the conference also includes art breaks, during which local poets, like Navajo Poet Laureate Luci Tapahonso, and storytellers will recite stanzas relating to food culture and memory. Attendees may create new food remembrances at the Grandmother’s Lunch on Friday, September 12, during which local Hispanic and Native American grandmothers will serve their traditional recipes, and at a concluding buffalo roast held that evening. Meals, snacks, and tastings are included in the ticket price. Tickets aren’t necessary for the free Sunday MarketPlace, which will feature chef demos, including horno baking, and samples of prepared foods. Food trucks such as Albuquerque’s Irrational Pie will also be on hand.

FUZE.SW 2014, September 12–14, Museum of International Folk Art and Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, fuzesw.museumofnewmexico.org, Museum of New Mexico members $200, nonmembers $250 September 11, 2014 NOW

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Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys

acclaimed Louisiana musicians bring their Cajun sounds to The Lensic by Emi ly Va n Cle ve

CAJUN ACCORDION PLAYER and vocalist Steve Riley calls his band’s September 13 performance at The Lensic “a musical journey from the beginning of Cajun music to now.” “Cajun music has a rich heritage,” he says, referring to the popular musical style’s roots, which trace back to ballads that Frenchspeaking Acadians from Canada brought to Louisiana in the late 18th century. “We tell a lot of stories about its history during our concerts,” he adds. Besides performing traditional Cajun ballads and dance tunes, Riley and his band the Mamou Playboys—composed of Sam Broussard (guitar/vocals), Kevin Wimmer (fiddle/vocals), Kevin Dugas (drums), and Brazos Huval (bass)—play original tunes written by Riley, Broussard, and Wimmer. “The old tunes were written in French, and most of the new stuff is also in French,” Riley notes. The Cajun accordion, an instrument Riley describes as a harmonica with bellows, is at the center of the band’s music. Most of these accordions are simpler in design than the type used in other styles of music and are made by craftsmen in their home shops. Riley often uses five Cajun accordions set up in different keys during his shows. Formed in Mamou, Louisiana, in 1988, Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys have recorded 13 albums and earned Grammy nominations for four of them: Trace of Time (1993), Bon Reve (2004), Live at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival (2009), and Grand Isle (2011). For more information on the “Cajun music has a rich heritage,” says band and its touring schedule, visit mamouplayboys.com. Steve Riley. “We tell a lot of stories

GABRIELLE SAVOY

about its history during our concerts.”

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Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys, $15–$35, September 13, 7 pm, The Lensic Performing Arts Center, ticketssantafe.org


Fire & Hops

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

Joel Coleman, chef and co-owner of the new gastropub Fire & Hops, says the decadent small-plate dish seen here featuring beer-braised Berkshire pork belly on sliced rice cakes with sweet and sour sauce has something for every taste bud. “The tomato-based sauce has a little acidity, a little spice, and a little sweetness,” he says. “Pork belly can be kind of fat, so we wanted something to cut that richness,” he adds. The pork is seared lightly and then braised in a mixture of beer, stock, soy sauce, onion, celery, carrots, peppercorn, and various aromatics for about four hours. The pea sprouts on top are locally sourced from “the sprout lady,” and in some versions of the dish, pickled mustard seeds are used instead. Although he notes that Santa Fe is home, Coleman grew up in Hawaii, where, he says, “every household has a pot of rice cooking, and it’s usually eaten with some kind of pork.” The rice cakes in this dish are similar to mochi, a Japanese rice cake in which rice is pounded into a paste, dried, rehydrated, and then crisped in a pan with a little salt.—Cristina Olds Fire & Hops, 222 N Guadalupe, fireandhopsgastropub.com

eating+ drinking

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Seen Around

LISA LAW

LISA LAW

KAREN SCHULD

Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.

KAREN SCHULD

photographs by Stephen Lang

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COMPANIONS GR OOM I N G DOWNTOWN DOGGIE DAYCARE

239 Johnson Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501

(505) 982–7882 Photo: Frances Ehrenberg-Hyman

KAREN SCHULD

LISA LAW

AND

(505) 954–1049

Covering Santa Fe in a unique way. aBqJournal.com/subscribe September 11, 2014 NOW

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As one of the largest art markets in the country, Santa Fe is always hosting openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was recently out and about at a number of opening-night receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we hung out with.


In its show Monotypes and More (September 17–October 7, reception September 19, 5–7 pm , 200 Canyon, pippincontemporary.com), Pippin Contemporary unveils paintings and monotypes by artists representing a range of artistic experience, all of whom produced work at Santa Fe Timberwick Studios: Diane Rolnick, Aleta Pippin, Michael Coop, and Timberwick owner Ron Pokrasso (who in 1987 created the annual printmaking fundraiser Monothon). On September 20, from 11 am to 3 pm , visitors are invited to pull their own monotype at the gallery.—Eve Tolpa

art

openings | reviews | artists

Ron Pokrasso, Figure Palette Blues, monotype, intaglio, and collage on paper, 16 x 24"

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art

PROFILE

If Peaches Could Sing, oil on linen on board, 12 x 24"

Captured by the Light by Ashle y M. Big g e r s

Wendy Higgins’s annual solo exhibition opens at Greenberg Fine Art

“THE BEAUTY OF A NECTARINE can blow me away,” says painter Wendy Higgins of her intricate appreciation of botanicals—subjects that appear in her illuminated still lifes. Although the Old Masters favored the technique that captures everyday scenes, few likely had Higgins’s blend of artistic and hands-on training. The Eldorado resident earned a bachelor’s of art degree, but, she notes, with few real-world skills, she turned to landscaping and gardening, in which she had a 20-year career. “Both [painting and gardening] are aspects of my nature,” she says. “I’m a very somatic being. I enjoy working physically with the flowers and beauty of growing. When I’m painting, I’m focused on physical beauty, harmony, and texture.” An encounter with the glowing compositions of fellow painter Cary Ellis reignited Higgins’s passion for art. Following a mentorship with Ellis, Higgins parlayed her talents into a full-time art career and has held a one-woman show at a Canyon Road gallery annually since 2001. This year’s exhibition, Captured by the Light, opens at Greenberg Fine Art on Friday, September 12. The 18 pieces in the show display Higgins’s customary tightly realistic style. However, the artist says that she aims “to bring a more painterly style to that tightness, where some [images] begin to breathe more.” Some of the subjects “come to [me] in the quiet of the morning, where I see the whole concept or idea,” she notes. “Some come to me when I bring home a treasure from the farmers market and put it in the light of my 22

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Good Medicine, oil on linen on board, 30 x 24"

studio. . . . Sometimes they tease themselves out of me.” The latter happened with one of the show’s standout compositions: an untitled vertical 30-inch-by-15-inch scene with a black-on-black pueblo pot sitting on a slab of red rock with figs and a juniper branch laced with dusty-blue berries. Still in tune with her natural surroundings, Higgins paints flora at the height of the season, capturing and celebrating its head-turning natural beauty.

Wendy Higgins: Captured by the Light, September 12–25, reception September 12, 5–7 pm Greenberg Fine Art, 205 Canyon, greenbergfineart.com

Celebration, oil on linen on board, 24 x 18"


art

Elizabeth Hahn

PROFILE

the former gallerist holds a mini-retrospective of her paintings at Crazy Fox by Em ily Va n C le ve

WHEN PAINTER ELIZABETH HAHN was a young girl in Louisiana, she started having the same dream every night. It began with the sounds of an orchestra tuning up outside her bedroom door. The sounds took on visual forms—often flowers with musical notes that appeared in a surrounding fog. “The chaotic whirlwind would grow larger, causing me to wake up and leaving a lasting memory and influence in my later work,” says Hahn, who co-owned Santa Fe’s Hahn Ross Gallery for 20 years and now paints full-time. A mini-retrospective of Hahn’s vibrant and intriguing acrylic paintings from as early as 1983 and as recent as six months ago opens on Friday, September 12, at Crazy Fox, a mom and pop shop just off the Plaza. A common thread among the paintings is that they all come from Hahn’s dreams or real-life experiences. Magic Bagel, a 2008 work featured in the show, centers on a woman’s feet and on her pet rabbit. In this case, the rabbit is Hahn’s own beloved pet, Bagel. “I found him in the South Capitol area,” Hahn says. “Neighbors had seen him around but said he didn’t belong to anyone so I took him home. The cartoons on the woman’s shoes are of an imaginary history of Bagel’s life.” Shoes frequently appear in Hahn’s paintings. The reason, the artist says, is because she’s inherently shy and used to spend a lot of time looking down at the ground, thereby noticing shoes and patterns on floors. (Years ago Hahn collected shoes from the 1940s and wore them until they fell apart.) One of the earlier works in Hahn’s show is Balancing Act, which shows a chinchilla standing on a red bowling ball. “I found this ball in a Goodwill store in Sedona,” Hahn says. “It had the name Irma engraved on it. In Balancing Act, my [real-life] pet chinchilla is balancing on Irma, which is where I found him one day when I started chasing him around my basement.” Elizabeth Hahn at Crazy Fox, September 12—ongoing, reception September 12, 5–7 pm, 227 Don Gaspar, elizabethhahnart.com

Balancing Act, acrylic on panel, 24 x12"

Magic Bagel, acrylic on panel, 36 x 60"

September 11, 2014 NOW

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art

ongoing

PREVIEWS

Impacts! Japanese Contemporary Art in Collaboration with Mizuma Art Gallery, Tokyo Zane Bennett Contemporary Art, 435 S Guadalupe, zanebennettgallery.com Through September 22 Discover the work of 17 established and emerging Japanese artists, among them video game image designer Yoshitaka Amano, former street artist Ai Kato, and painter Nanami Ishihara. From August 19 through August 23, Zane Bennett hosts a series of special events: artist talks, film screenings, a painting demonstration, a Japanese tea ceremony, and forums examining the relationship between art and cultural and political issues.—ET Ethelinda, Sierra Blanca-Sioux, oil on canvas, 72 x 52"

Nanami Ishihara, Yama Onna, Japanese pigment and acrylic gouache on cotton mounted on panel, 76 x 154"

The Spirit of the Horse Manitou Galleries, 123 W Palace, manitougalleries.com Through September 19 In her latest show, Hawaiian-born artist Ethelinda showcases her signature confident style in a new series of oil paintings that center on horses. Created with bold, dramatic brushstrokes, Ethelinda’s works capture the unbridled spirit of the animal, the evocative local landscape, and, in her portraits, carefully researched depictions of traditional Native American dress. Hiroshi Yamano and Pedro Surroca LewAllen Galleries, 1613 Paseo de Peralta, lewallencontemporary.com Through September 21 Hiroshi Yamano and Pedro Surroca present meditative interpretations of tree branches. Japanese-born Yamano is of a pioneering generation of glass artists who moved the medium away from vessels and toward sculpture, and his pieces incorporate glass blowing, cutting, and etching as well as copper- and silver-plating. Surroca’s focus on the line, light, and shadow of the branch form result in paintings with a spare elegance.—ET

Florence Miller Pierce, Spire #1, resin relief, 96 x 16"

Florence Miller Pierce: In the Light Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, 554 S Guadalupe, charlottejackson.com Through September 30 The subtleties of light are the predominant focus of twoand three-dimensional pieces by Florence Miller Pierce (1918–2007), who worked in diverse mediums (including paint on canvas, ink on rice paper, balsa wood, stone, and resin) and was renowned for her sculptures. Charlotte Jackson’s comprehensive survey showcases work from the 1960s through the early 2000s.—ET 24

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T H E S O U T H W ES T ’ S P R E M I E R AU TO M OT I V E G AT H E R I N G

Irina Zaytceva, Primavera Vase, porcelain, 7 x 6 x 3"

Women in Cultural Context: A Multi-Media Group Exhibition Tansey Contemporary, 652 Canyon tanseycontemporary.com Through September 23 Gallery artists working in glass, ceramics, fiber, beading, and basketry (as well as painting and mixed media) explore women’s responses to cultural roles and expectations. Painter Patrick McGrath Muñiz’s elaborate tableaux, for example, incorporate iconography ranging from Christian to pop culture and offer sly commentary on history, while glass artist Susan Taylor Glasgow explores conflicting messages about femininity in a medium she terms “seductive but unforgiving.”—ET

VIP reception Mountain Tour Judged Concorso José Sierra, Geometric Vase, porcelain, 8 x 6 x 6"

David Crane and José Sierra Santa Fe Clay, 545 Camino de la Familia, santafeclay.com Through September 20 With a commitment to creating work that is simultaneously practical and aesthetically refined, Virginia Tech ceramics professor David Crane crafts salt-fired stoneware pots (either wheelthrown or slab-built) inf luenced by Asian, European, and Native American traditions. Tucson-based Venezuela native José Sierra incorporates the colors of the Andes into both his porcelain and stoneware pieces.—ET

September 26, 27, 28, 2014 Featuring the cars of the Maserati brothers and Indy cars

A limited number of tickets are still available. Visit our website:

www.santafeconcorso.com Held on the grounds of The Club at Las Campanas, Santa Fe, New Mexico The Santa Fe Concorso is a 501(c)(3) organization. A portion of the proceeds benefits the youth organizations of Santa Fe. September 11, 2014 NOW

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style

[on the market]

Red Tussar Silk Namesake Mantra Tunic, $64

PATTI BOSE

IF YOU ARE WHAT you wear, then an individual who wears Mantra Bazaar tunics and kaftans is well traveled, effortlessly chic, and community-minded with an eye to spiritual awareness. Perhaps these qualities seem overstated for a simple shirt, but they’re true to the vision of the clothing line’s creators, Betsy Ronel and Shibana Singh. Besides, these are hardly simple shirts: They have a high-fashion bohemian ease that’s as wearable in Santa Fe as in New York City or along the Amalfi Coast, but they also touch a deeper thread. Ronel and Singh design the men’s and women’s tops and scarves in Santa Fe, and members of Singh’s family tailor-handcraft each design in India. Every piece or its trim is made of the high-end, fair-trade fabric that was used to make the item that inspired the clothing line—a tunic Singh designed herself with the Sanskrit mantra so hum (“I am that”) inked in the cloth. In addition to the mantra woven into each item, the designers add a secondary saying to each tag, inviting the wearer to meditate on one of 108 centering thoughts. For example, a chartreuse tunic with orange, coral, and royal blue beading might call for the chant om namah shivaya (“I salute my consciousness.”). “We hope this mantra will infuse [our customers’] lives not only while wearing the Mantra shirt but also in giving them whatever is needed throughout their week,” Singh says. This lifestyle bazaar is a natural fit for Ronel and Singh, given Ronel’s background in the fashion industry (she worked in public relations for Giorgio Armani, Barney’s New York, and Emilio Pucci) and Singh’s experience as a yoga instructor and Ayurvedic practitioner. Ronel and Singh launched Mantra Bazaar (which donates 15 percent of its proceeds to the Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families) with a trunk show in November 2013, and the items are now available locally at Flying Fish Studio, Gallery, and Shop; Maya Santa Fe; Spirit of the Earth; and StudioNia Santa Fe. Soon they will also be available at the Museum of International Folk Art on Museum Hill. All of Mantra’s eight styles of items—which feature various color and trim combinations—are available online and currently half off, as the company prepares to showcase new designs. Ronel and Singh anticipate holding a trunk show featuring their new designs in November. For more information, visit mantrabazaar.com.—Ashley M. Biggers

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independent living Self-sufficiency is a reality at this private 95.45-acre property in the Pecos/Rowe area. The active-solar 2,783-square-foot adobe main house has high ceilings, high-end finishes and fixtures, a gourmet kitchen, and a large pantry. Grow your own food in the 585-squarefoot detached studio, which has a hydroponic greenhouse in addition to plenty of office space. The property’s custom chicken coop, dog kennel, large animal shelter, and tack room provide ample farming opportunities. Drive to the property or fly into it on a small plane, which can land on the 1,500foot earth runway. A large airplane hangar offers an abundance of storage space. List price: $795,000 Contact: Deborah Bodelson, Santa Fe Properties, 505-660-4442, santafeproperties.com

JAMES BLACK

Mantra Bazaar


[on the market]

mushroom foraging

style

finding your favorite fungi in the forests of Santa Fe

WITH ALL THE GLORIOUS rainfall of late, native mushrooms of all kinds are popping out of the forest floor. Santa Fe Culinary Academy cofounder and executive chef Rocky Durham is a proponent of sourcing fresh local foods, and as such he’s been foraging for mushrooms for years. Here, he talks about where and how he finds his favorite fungi and what you need to know before taking on the challenge yourself.

MARSHALL ELIAS

What’s your background with mushrooming? I started foraging for mushrooms about 10 years ago. I learned from friends who were chefs here in Santa Fe. On days when we got a great haul, we would knock on the back door of local restaurants and sell them to our chef friends. What are some varieties of mushrooms you can find locally? In the Sangre de Cristos, you can find porcini, hawk’s wing, chanterelle, morels, and edible puffballs, to name just a few.

classic contemporary

Why is the climate here so favorable to such a variety of mushrooms? Our Rocky Mountain backyard is a perfect spot for finding edible mushrooms, and the climate is equally important. Wait for some summer monsoons to get the ground nice and wet several inches down, and then, after a spark of warm or hot weather, get to the mountain before first light. That will help ensure that the mushrooms are free from any insect infestations.

This 3,035-square-foot home is close to El Gancho Fitness, Swim, and Racquet Club and is just a short drive from downtown Santa Fe. The light-filled living room has a soaring ceiling and two-story windows that offer views of the mountains in the distance. The kitchen, which features cherry cabinetry, granite countertops, and new appliances, recently underwent upgrades and renovations. The master bedroom and bath have bamboo and slate floors, contemporary tile, and new fixtures. Set up for relaxed outdoor living, the property has several patios and decks with views of many mature trees and perennial plants and two recirculating ponds with vegetation around them. Water gently trickles from one pond to the other. GABRIELLA MARKS

List price: $759,000 Contact: Moo Thorpe, Sotheby’s International, 505-780-0310, sothebyshomes.com

“Mushroom identification is not something to toy with,” says chef Rocky Durham. “Educate yourself and be absolutely certain of what you’ve picked.”

Where do you usually find your mushrooms? We have secret spots that we sneak into under the cover of darkness, but there are plenty of easy-to-get-to (and over-picked) areas right in the ski basin parking lot. What are your favorite mushrooms and why? My favorite has to be the chanterelle, but don’t confuse it with the similarin-appearance death cap [which is toxic]. Mushroom identification is not something to toy with—[educate yourself and] be absolutely certain of what you’ve picked. —Cristina Olds September 11, 2014 NOW

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| L A S T LO O K |

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Fiesta–goers love their parades, and this one is a long-standing, family-friendly crowd pleaser. The Desfile de los Niños has been a favorite Santa Fe Fiesta event since the early 1920s, and although its literal translation is “children’s parade,” it’s always included the kids’ furry and feathered friends. Horses, dogs, goats, frogs, snakes, chickens, rabbits, turtles, hamsters, one super mellow cat, and more than 2,000 kids in costumes of every kind filled the streets around the Plaza on September 6. Bernadette Anton-Williams considers the Pet Parade “second only to Zozobra” for Fiesta fun, and she’s attended since she was a child growing up in Santa Fe. This year, four generations of her extended family joined the float themed “Game of Zo.” “The shy kids get braver in costume,” she says, remembering two cousins dressed as little black dragons who were roaring at the crowd. Her group of 20 adults, 10 kids, and three dogs (“We made armor for the dogs—they were soldiers.”) won the Most Original honors. “It’s kind of a fall ritual for our families,” she says.—Cristina Olds

STEPHEN LANG

pets on parade during Fiesta de Santa Fe


Lucha Libre Exotica

Music on two stages // Art booths //

MEXICO CITY

Pop-up performance // Cash bar //

Inner Oceans

Food trucks // Vendors

DENVER

FLCON FCKER HOUSTON

The Fledgling by Christian Ristow

Saturday Sept. 13 @ El Museo Cultural TICKETED Sunday Sept. 14 @ Railyard Plaza FREE

THE RAILYARD S

E AN T A F


621 C anyon R oad 830 C anyon R oad billhester@billhesterfineart.com

BillHesterFineArt.com (505) 660-5966

Sean Wimberly Autumn Carpet acrylic on canvas 40" x 30" Jane Filer Bird, Bee, & Rabbit acrylic on canvas 22" x 22"

Margaretta Caesar Harvest Color Series oil on canvas 30" x 38"

Santa Fean NOW September 11 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW September 11 2014 Digital Edition

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