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now The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

week of October 23


DAV ID AYL S W ORT H K RI S TEN CLI B URN LUCINDA CO B LEY PAT COLV ILLE B RAD ELLI S I B S EN E S PADA G ARLAND F IELDER LINNEA G LATT LARRY G RAE B ER S A M G U M M ELT RO B ERTA H ARRI S J ANE H EL S LANDER J ANE H ONO V IC H TERRELL J A M E S M IC H AEL K ENNAU G H W IN S TON LEE M A S CAREN H A S J E S Ú S M OROLE S S TE V E M URP H Y TO M ORR M C K AY OTTO AARON PARA Z ETTE J O H N PO M ARA S A M RE V ELE S M AR G O S AW YER G EOR G E S C H ROEDER H O WARD S H ER M AN C H ARLOTTE S M IT H LORRAINE TADY LI Z WARD M AC W H ITNEY LE S LIE W IL K E S J OAN W INTER S YDNEY P H ILEN YEA G ER

TEXAS ABSTRACT modern i contemporary by michael paglia, Jim edwards GALA EXHIBITION AND BOOK SIGNING OCTOBER 25, 5 - 8 PM Join the artists and authors for this special evening. An unprecedented attempt to reconcile the historic mid-twentieth century Abstraction in Texas with the vibrant contemporary abstract scene flourishing now in the early twenty-first century.

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SANTA FE

From the time of the ancient Anazasi, the Santa Fe area has been a trading center. The Santa Fe Trail is synonymous with the romance of the old west, and from the time of New Mexico statehood in 1912, Santa Fe has been a multicultural art center and shoppers’ paradise.

Free iPhone and Android app The Best of Santa Fe

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publisher’s note

2014

|

If you think Santa Fe’s flurry of activities are winding down, think again. A quick tour of our online calendar at santafeancalendar.com will assure you that things aren’t slowing down at all. In fact, may I suggest that this is a great weekend to return to our town’s musical roots—specifically, to those Santa Fe musicians who perform here every week and are practically institutions. Bill Hearne has been entertaining us with his brand of country music for as long as I can remember. Two-stepping or waltzing around a dance floor to his honky-tonk sound is pure Santa Fe. Salsa dancing at The Lodge is another wonderful local tradition that goes back to at least the early ’90s and probably before that. It’s the perfect activity to enjoy with guests when you want them to experience something very specific to this community. Another Santa Fe staple is Nacha Mendez, who performs Latin music at La Posada and El Farol. For something a bit quieter (except for the roar of the crowd), there’s the wonderful cabaret that David Geist does at Pranzo. My dear friend Matthew Andrae plays his style of classical guitar at the Inn and Spa at Loretto, and anyone who’s been around for some time is familiar with DJ Luna’s dance grooves, now being heard at Burro Alley Café. Santa Fe has all the musical bases covered, as evidenced by our own Santa Fe Chiles Dixie Jazz Band, which plays at the Cowgirl and has been jazzing up our town for years. No such discussion could be complete without mentioning pianist Doug Montgomery at Vanessie’s. Doug packs in a big crowd every time he performs, and he’s someone everyone remembers. While I’m thrilled with the staying power of these local musicians, there are many newer musicians who are equally talented and whom we’ve profiled in NOW. You won’t have any shortage of music this weekend, so get out there and enjoy!

Bruce Adams

Publisher

Find the best shops, restaurants, galleries, museums, parking locations, turn-by-turn directions, mobile deals, weather, news, and local-events with the free app from the iTunes App Store and from the Android Market. Look for the green sticker in the window of participating stores.

STEPHEN LANG

SantaFeDowntown.org

Santa Fe is a top US art center, with museums, shopping, Year-round outdoor activities, top flight restaurants, spas, and world famous cultural events. It’s not just your grandparents’ Santa Fe, it’s walkable, historic, charming, and exciting.A high desert destination of distinction and fun.

now

Artist Vladimir Kush and Lisa Rodgers, director of The Longworth Gallery, at the opening of Kush’s show Reflect the World Through the Mirror of Metaphor. For more photos from recent openings around town, go to Opening Night on page 20.

DAVID ROBIN

SHOPPING IN

OCT 23 – OCT 29


Liam Neeson kills hard

Cross Creek Pictures

Liam Neeson (left) stars in A Walk Among the Tombstones.

buzz

On October 23, the bell atop San Miguel Mission will ring for the first time in more than 140 years.

Jim Gautier

It’s morning in a Brooklyn cop bar. Matt Scudder tucks into a booth with a newspaper, a cup of coffee, and two whisky shots. A couple of crooks come in with a shotgun and blow away the bartender. Scudder pulls his piece and plugs them both. Then he runs into the street and puts down their driver. Three men are dead at the hands of Liam Neeson’s character, and we’re only about one minute into A Walk Among the Tombstones. Neeson has honed his cinematic killing skills in the incredibly popular Taken series, but fans of those flicks shouldn’t expect the same delights here. Taken and Taken 2 (and, presumably, the upcoming Taken 3) are PG-13 punch-and-kick fests. In A Walk Among the Tombstones, the killings are by gun, knife, and razor wire. This is darker, hard-R fare, strictly for adult fans of gritty, pulpy cop movies. And it totally delivers. Neeson is an ex-cop for most of the flick, which jumps forward 10 years after the opening bar scene. It’s 1999, and society is on the verge of a meltdown thanks to the Y2K bug. (Remember that?) A murderer reads about it in the paper and says to his accomplice, “People are afraid of the wrong thing.” These two bizarre men are kidnapping, torturing, and murdering the wives of drug dealers. Scudder, an unlicensed private eye, gets hired to find them. Eschewing computers and cell phones, he breaks the case with old-school, on-the-street investigating. Wading into the underworld, Scudder meets some dicey folks, but alcoholism and a guilty conscience have hardened him. He’s fearless. A Walk Among the Tombstones is based on a novel by famously prolific author Lawrence Block, and it has the feel of a cop-saga paperback. The characters are nasty and the dialogue is tight and tough: “You gonna attack me with that knife?” Scudder asks a creep who’s helping the killers. “What if I take it away from you and put it in your neck?” The creep can tell he’ll do it. Scudder has that look, because Neeson is the master of that look.—Phil Parker

the

the bell will toll Keep your ears peeled: At around 6:15 pm on Thursday, October 23, the bell at the top of the historic San Miguel Mission (also known as the San Miguel Chapel) will toll for the first time in more than 140 years, following the completion of a restoration of the bell tower that began in 2013. Believed to be the oldest church in the United States, San Miguel, which is owned by St. Michael’s High School, was built in 1610. “The bell tower collapsed in 1872 after a storm,” says Niña Johnson, executive director of Cornerstones Community Partnerships, which managed the renovation. “The tower was rebuilt, but the bell didn’t function. This restoration brings the tower back to a useful state.” The renovation of the bell tower is part of a larger five-year project that will see the chapel gaining a new roof, mud plastering on its exterior walls, and interior detailing.—Cristina Olds San Miguel Mission, 401 Old Santa Fe Trail, cstones.org October 23, 2014 NOW

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Welcome to Santa Fe! As a creative, cultural hub, Santa Fe offers an abundance of the world’s best art, attractions, and entertainment opportunities. Santa Fean NOW is an excellent source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local or a tourist visiting for the first time or the 100th, NOW ’s complete listings of everything from gallery openings to live music events will help you make the most of the city. We look forward to seeing you around the City Different. Should you need any extra tips, please stop by our information centers at the Santa Fe Railyard or off the Plaza at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center.

now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

amy hegarty samantha schwirck

GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

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whitney stewart

michelle odom, sybil watson

OPERATIONS MANAGER

ginny stewart

Wishing you a wonderful time, ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER

Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

MARKETING CONSULTANT

david wilkinson

andrea nagler

WRITERS

ashley m. biggers, cristina olds, phil parker anna i. sochocky, emily van cleve

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com Copyright 2014. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Fean NOW Volume 1, Number 24, Week of October 23, 2014. Published by Bella Media, LLC at 215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2014 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

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On the cover: Howard Sherman, The Me That You Know Is Made Up of Wires, acrylic and marker on canvas, 70 x 60". See page 23 for details on Texas Abstract at Wade Wilson Art.


the must-see

buzz

mind games

Gone Girl is a Hitchcockian knot, tying together revenge, fame, murder, sex, and crazy people. Its twists thrill. Its characters are dark and unpredictable. Hatred and laid-off-middle-class angst mix among the themes, which also include the essence of marriage, shallow thrill-seeking among the media, and how parents affect their children’s emotions. At the beginning of the film, Nick Dunne and his twin sister Margo are playing the board game Life in the bar they own. That’s also what this movie is about: winning at the game of life. There’s hatred among the characters in this film partly because they’re competitors. Time will tell if Gone Girl goes down as one of those rare examples (like The Godfather, The Shawshank Redemption, and The Social Network) when a film is better than its book. Probably not. The Gone Girl novel, by Gillian Flynn (who also wrote the screenplay), was a blockbuster because it’s great. The book cuts back and forth between first-person narrators: Nick in the present story, after his wife Amy disappears, and entries from Amy’s diary, which go back to when the couple first met. These are such rich, interesting characters, and each endures a ridiculous ordeal. Nick becomes famous for being the number-one suspect in his wife’s murder and handles it terribly. Amy . . . well, we mustn’t say too much. (You just have to see the film.) Amy is a revelation. Her “cool girl” speech, about how women change themselves for men, has been brilliantly translated to the screen, as has everything else that makes the character special.

www.ArtMattersSantaFe.org

Regency Enterprises

Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike star in Gone Girl.

Amy’s psyche is as vast and complex as an ecosystem. Bravo to actress Rosamund Pike for taking on a glorious role and nailing it. David Fincher, director of Gone Girl and the aforementioned Social Network (as well as Fight Club), has a perfect story here for his style. Nine Inch Nails front man Trent Reznor has written a score with pulsing moments that crank on-screen intensity until you’re almost flinching. Fincher’s bluish, shadowy motif uses long fade cuts that inject literal darkness as masochistic scenes unfold. There’s no genre here. Gone Girl is part thriller, part comedy. Like Hitchcock’s Psycho, you just go where it takes you, startle and laugh at the escalating craziness, and walk away grateful and satisfied.—PP

Art Matters | Santa Fe, a series of city-wide art events and lectures sponsored by the Santa Fe Gallery Association to showcase the art galleries and museums in Santa Fe.

October 17 - 26, 2014 Participating galleries: David Richard Gallery Ellsworth Gallery Evoke Contemporary Heidi Loewen Porcelain Gallery Charlotte Jackson Fine Art Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Matthews Gallery New Concept Gallery Pippin Contemporary Sorrel Sky Gallery SITE Santa Fe TAI Modern Tansey Contemporary Wade Wilson Art Winterowd Fine Art

www.SantaFeGalleryAssociation.org October 23, 2014 NOW

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this week

October 23–October 29

October 23 thursday Alchemy of Mixed Media Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A workshop dedicated to creating mixed-media works. $159, 6–9 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Hungry Artist Life Drawing Artisan 2601 Cerrillos

Drawing group hosted in an open, public space with clothed models. Free, 11 am–1 pm, facebook.com/muse.artproject.

Coming to Terms Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Pioneering independent filmmaker Jon Jost introduces his latest film. $7–$10, 7 pm, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Apple Pie Master Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Master the art of creating the classic American dessert, apple pie. $50, 5:30–7:30 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com. 6

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America’s Most Crucial Presidential Election: The 1864 Reelection of Abraham Lincoln St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trl

A lecture by Jake Greene, a contractor with several government agencies who has a lifelong interest in the American Civil War, focusing on the 1864 presidential election and key political and military events that changed the course of history.

Material As Form: Artist Talk with Ric Gendron and Courtney Leonard Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Artists Ric Gendron and Courtney Leonard discuss their artistic practices and influences as well as how their choices regarding the materials they use effect the works they produce. Free, 6–7 pm, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Noonday Dialogue: Corn Grinding Pablita Velarde Museum of Indian Women in the Arts 213 Cathedral

Chris Monaghan

Greensky Bluegrass performs at Skylight on October 28. For details, see page 11.

Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Country/rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music by tenor Branden James. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Chris Ishee El Mesón 213 Washington

Jazz piano and acoustic bass duo. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Classic Rock & Folk by the Fire Terra Restaurant at Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado 198 State Rd 592

Folk and classic rock by guitarist Michael Umphrey. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-946-5700, fourseasons.com/santafe.

Guitarras Con Sabor El Farol 808 Canyon

A talk with Lois Ellen Frank (Kiowa) in conjuction with the exhibit Harvesting Traditions (see Ongoing section). $10 (discounts for seniors, students, and military), $5 for New Mexico residents, 1–3 pm, 505-988-8900, PVMIWA.org.

Live Spanish guitar music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Bartender 4 Mayor

Jaka Second Street Brewery at Second Street


Tickets can be purchased October 22 & 23 at SITE Santa Fe. $15–50, 7–9 pm, spreadsantafe.com.

1814 Second St

chris collins, viewmaster

Afro-pop music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Jazz with Pat Malone La Posada de Santa Fe Resort & Spa 330 E Palace Live jazz music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-986-0000, laposadadesantafe.com.

Live music from pianist John Rangel and vocalist Barbara Bentree. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Kristen Ford Duel Brewery 1228 Parkway Dr

Indie rock. Free, 7:30–10 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Latin Night Skylight 139 W San Francisco

Music by DJ Danny. Free, 9 pm–12 am, skylightsantafe.com.

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Karaoke with Michele. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Little Leroy & His Pack of Lies Evangelo’s 200 W San Francisco

Blues music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-9014.

Mito & Wes Swiss Bakery Pastries & Bistro 401 S Guadalupe

“Jazzamenco” and mamba flamenco favorites. Free, 7:30–9:30 pm, 505-988-1111, swissbakerysantafe.com.

Night Train La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Modern rock. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

The Saltanah Dancers Cleopatra Café 3482 Zafarano

Belly-dancing performance. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-474-5644, saltanahstudios.com.

The Sprints Tiny’s Restaurant 1015 Pen

Variety/dance music. Free, 8 pm–12 am, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Tim Easton with David Berkeley Skylight 139 W San Francisco

A concert with two singer/songwriters. $12, 7:30 pm, skylightsantafe.com.

a.

John Rangel and Barbara Bentree Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

October 24: SPREAD 5.0, presented by SITE Santa Fe

October 24 friday Eldorado Fine Arts and Crafts Fall Show St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trl

More than 45 artists exhibit a variety of work, including paintings, jewelry, ceramics, glass works, photographs, textiles, sculpture, and more. Free, 3–7 pm, eldoradoarts.org.

Friday Night Get Together Gallery 901 and Ronnie Layden Fine Art 901 Canyon

Music and refreshments in the courtyard. Free, 5–7 pm, 505-670-6793, ronnielaydenfineart.com.

A Will for the Woods The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

A screening of a documentary about a man who prepares for his own green burial in an attempt to make his last act a gift to the planet. A Q & A with the filmmakers follows. $10, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

AWAKE: The Life of Yogananda The Screen, Santa Fe University of Art and Design 1600 St. Michael’s

An unconventional biography about the Hindu swami Paramahansa Yogananda who brought yoga and meditation to the West in the 1920s and wrote the spiritual classic Autobiography of a Yogi. Call for times and ticket prices, 505-473-6494, thescreensf.com.

Red Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on class focused on red chile. $75, 9 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

SPREAD 5.0 Santa Fe Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta

During a community dinner, New Mexico–based artists make short presentations about their proposed projects and diners vote on who will receive all the funds collected at the door to put toward their work.

Best of Both Worlds Acosta Strong Fine Art 640 Canyon

New watercolor and oil paintings by Evelyne Boren. See preview on page 21. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-2795, johnbstrong.com.

Eros and Thanatos Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

New work by Michael Petry as part of his continued investigation into the contemporary aspects of the classical world. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Reconnecting to the Past Tansey Contemporary 652 Canyon

Patrick McGrath Muñiz discusses his art, which is on view in the gallery. Free, 5–7 pm, 505-995-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.

¡Saludos, Barcelona! 50 years of Polígrafa Prints Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

An exhibition of prints produced at the worldrenowned Polígrafa Obra Gráfica workshop in Barcelona, Spain. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

WHAT David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

Sculptures by Nancy Dwyer. Free, reception 5–7 pm, artist talk October 25, 2–3 pm, 505-983-9555, davidrichardgallery.com.

Year of the Horse McLarry Fine Art 225 Canyon

New works by Xiang Zhang. See profile on page 22. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-1161, mclarryfineart.com.

Friends of the Wheelwright Lecture Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian 704 Camino Lejo

Wheelwright curator Cheri Falkenstien-Doyle discusses how conflicting human relationships changed the meaning of turquoise and led to its pairing with silver in Native jewelry. $10, refreshments 2 pm, talk 2:30 pm, 505-982-4636, wheelwright.org.

Throwing of the Bones Ceremony Santa Fe Community Yoga Center 826 Camino de Monte Rey, Ste B1

Ceremony, led by JoAnne Dodgson, offering guidance with relationships, health, work, life transitions, and more. $30, 6–8 pm, 505-820-9383, santafecommunityyoga.org.

Alto Street Band

October 23, 2014 NOW

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Courtesy of joewestmusic.com

Rock, blues, and Americana. Free, 8:30 pm–12:30 am, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

a.

October 24–26: Joe West’s Theater of Death at The Engine House Theater

Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Bluegrass music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-989-3278, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Bella Gigante Skylight 139 W San Francisco

Live music. $10, 7 pm, skylightsantafe.com.

Ben Wright Tiny’s Restaurant 1015 Pen

Live music from singer/songwriter Ben Wright. Free, 5:30–8 pm, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music by tenor Branden James. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

C. S. Rockshow La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Live rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

Live music by acclaimed pianist David Geist. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

DJ Luna Burro Alley Café 207 W San Francisco

Live DJ. Free, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0601, burroalleycafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Happy Hours with Bill Hearne Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Country music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

JJ & The Hooligans Tiny’s Restaurant 1015 Pen 8

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Mark’s Midnight Carnival Show Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Indie/rock music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Music at the Museum New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

Live music on the museum’s patio and in its galleries. Free, 5:30–7:30 pm, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Music on the Patio Caffe Greco 233 Canyon

Alternative/blues/rock music with Alex Maryol. Free, 12–3 pm, 505-820-7996.

Pachanga The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St Francis

Salsa, cumbia, bachata, and merengue music and dancing. $5, 9:30 pm–1:30 am, 505-992-5800, lodgeatsantafe.com.

Paw & Erik The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Bluegrass music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

Railyard Reunion The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace Live bluegrass. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

The Alchemy Party Skylight 139 W San Francisco

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Poetics. Free, 9 pm–12 am, skylightsantafe.com.

The Bus Tapes Second Street Brewery at Second Street 1814 Second St Folk/rock music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

The Gruve El Farol 808 Canyon

Soul music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

The Jakes The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Classic rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón 213 Washington

Jazz piano trio with special guest. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Atrium String Quartet Great Hall, St. John’s College 1160 Camino de Cruz Blanca

A performance of works by Haydn, Mendelssohn, and Shostakovich by the Russian Atrium String Quartet. Presented by Performance Santa Fe. Part of the Santa Fe Arts Festival. $22.50–$45, 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Joe West’s Theater of Death The Engine House Theater 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Local entertainer Joe West hosts an evening of his original macabre plays with music. $20, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Some Girl(s) Greer Garson Theatre 1600 St. Michael’s

A performance of the Neil LaBute play about a man who visits his ex-girlfriends as he’s about to get married. Directed by Gail Springer. $5–$15, 7 pm, 505988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

October 25 saturday ARTsmart’s Boo at the Barn ARTbarn 1516 Pacheco

Kids can make masks for Halloween and parents


can learn about ARTsmart’s art education programs. Free, 1–4 pm, 505-992-2787, artfeast.org.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Clay: Throwing on the Pottery Wheel Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

Live music by tenor Branden James. Free, 6:30– 10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Learn the basics of the pottery wheel. $179, 9:30 am–12:30 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Broomdust Caravan Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Eldorado Fine Arts and Crafts Fall Show St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trl

October 25: Amy Scholder and Justin Torres speak at Unabridged at Armory for the Arts.

More than 45 artists exhibit a variety of work, including paintings, jewelry, ceramics, glass art, photographs, textiles, sculptures, and more. Free, 9 am–5 pm, eldoradoarts.org.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Park 1611 Paseo de Peralta

801 Cerrillos, Ste B

Painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and more by local artists. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-310-1555, santafeartistsmarket.com.

Free Halloween-themed comics for all ages are available at Big Adventure Comics. Everyone who visits the store can choose a special Halloween ComicFest book. Customers in costume get a second book, and every $10 spent earns another book. Free, 12–7 pm, 505-992-8783, bigadventurecomics.com.

Three Muses Drawing Extravaganza Muñoz Waxman Gallery Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

JoyceGroup Santa Fe Santa Fe Public Library Pick Room, Second Floor 145 Washington

Bring your easels and drawing materials for an evening of nude figure drawing. $18 (RSVP required), 5–9 pm, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

ARTsmart’s Unmasked Dinner Midtown Bistro 901 W San Mateo

ARTsmart reveals changes that will be seen in its upcoming 2015 season, new summer events, and the impact of its art education programs on the lives of local kids. Features food by Midtown Bistro’s executive chef, Angel Estrada, including a fall-inspired dessert. $110, 6:30–8 pm, 505-992-2787, artfeast.org.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Traditional New Mexican II Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Learn about the traditional foods of New Mexico during this hands-on class. $80, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Art Matters: Alice Leora Briggs EVOKE Contemporary 550 S Guadalupe

Alice Leora Briggs discusses the woodcuts, sgrafitto drawings, and burn drawings featured in her show Asylum, which centers on life and death in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. Free, 4–6 pm, 505-995-9902, evokecontemporary.com.

Halloween ComicFest Big Adventure Comics

Lovers of Irish writer James Joyce’s work meet every Saturday to discuss Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. Led by Adam Harvey, creator of the acclaimed one-man show Don’t Panic: It’s Only Finnegans Wake. Enthusiasts with all levels of knowledge are welcome. Free, 10 am–12:30 pm, joycegeek.com.

Michael Petry Book Signing and Artist Talk Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

Michael Petry presents his new book, Nature Morte: Contemporary Artists Reinvigorate the Still Life, to coincide with his exhibit (see October 24 listing). Free, 1:30–3 pm, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Remapping the Territory Santuario de Guadalupe 417 Agua Fria

Panel discussion with book presentation and signing by Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, author of Our America: A Hispanic History of the United States. Free (RSVP required), 2–3 pm, albuquerque.cervantes.es.

Unabridged Armory for the Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Lambda Literary’s first annual author series, Unabridged, features readings and discussions with nationally acclaimed LGBTQ authors. $25–$150, 7–9 pm, 505-984-1370, sfperformingarts.org.

Empowering Ourselves to Heal: A Workshop for Women with Breast Cancer Cancer Foundation for New Mexico 3005 S St. Francis Dr, Ste 3-B

A workshop for women with breast cancer, hosted by the Cancer Foundation for New Mexico and facilitated by Hollis Walker, a breast cancer survivor, board-certified chaplain, and ordained interfaith minister. Free, 1–4 pm, holliswalker.com.

“Cosmic country” and blues. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Carlos Gilbert Halloween Carnival Carlos Gilbert Elementary School 300 Griffin Street

The Carlos Gilbert Halloween Carnival (a Santa Fe tradition for almost 70 years) includes games, prizes, food, bouncy houses, magicians, treats, live music, jugglers, a costume contest, and more. $20–$25, 12–5 pm, carlosgilbertptk.com.

C. S. Rockshow La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Dana Smith Upper Crust Pizza 329 Old Santa Fe Trl

Live music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-0000, uppercrustpizza.com

DJ Luna Burro Alley Café 207 W San Francisco

Live DJ. Free, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0601, burroalleycafe.com.

DJ Spaghetti El Paseo Bar & Grill 208 Galisteo

Live DJ. $5, 9 am–12 am, 505-992-2848.

Eryn Bent Second Street Brewery at Second Street 1814 Second St Indie/folk music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Felix y los Gatos The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Zydeco/swing/Tex-Mex music. Free, 3–7 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dancers and musicians perform during dinner. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Hawaiian Slack-Key Guitar Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen 1512 Pacheco

Slack-key guitar music by acclaimed musician John Serkin. See profile on page 15. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com. October 23, 2014 NOW

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October 23–26: Neil LaBute’s Some Girl(s) at the Greer Garson Theatre

Railyard Reunion The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace Live bluegrass. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Sean Ashby The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Guitar music from singer/songwriter Sean Ashby, who’s known for his work with Sarah McLachlan and other musicians. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

Showcase Karaoke Tiny’s Restaurant 1015 Pen

Karaoke. Free, 8:30 pm–1 am, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Swing Soleil Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

JD McPherson Skylight 139 W San Francisco

Live R&B and rock music. $16, 7:30 pm, skylightsantafe.com.

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant 113 Washington

Live guitar music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

Julie Trujillo & David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

Live music from vocalist Julie Trujillo and pianist David Geist. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Latin Music with Nacha Mendez La Posada de Santa Fe Resort & Spa 330 E Palace Latin world music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-986-0000, laposadadesantafe.com.

Little Leroy El Farol 808 Canyon

Blues music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Music on the Patio Caffe Greco 233 Canyon

Music by Lizette. Free, 12–3 pm, 505-820-7996. 10

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Gypsy-jazz music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-989-3278, secondstreetbrewery.com.

The Santa Fe Chiles Dixie Jazz Band Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe Live Dixie jazz. Free, 2–5 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Tierra Sonikete El Mesón 213 Washington

Brazilian jazz quintet. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Joe West’s Theater of Death The Engine House Theater 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Local entertainer Joe West hosts an evening of his original macabre plays with music. $20, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Some Girl(s) Greer Garson Theatre 1600 St. Michael’s

A performance of the Neil LaBute play about a man who visits his ex-girlfriends as he’s about to get married. $5–$15, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Celebrating Creativity in Elder Care: A Day of Learning New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A day-long workshop highlighting techniques developed by the Alzheimer’s Poetry Project that allow caregivers to reach people with memory issues through art, literature, and performance. $35 (includes light breakfast and lunch), 9 am–4 pm, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

October 26 sunday Cameras from the Kitchen New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

Bring an empty coffee can, oatmeal box, potato chip can, or shoebox (with lids) to make your own camera obscura and see the world through a pinhole of light. Free with museum admission ($6–$9), 2–4 pm, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

PLAY + WRITE + SHARE Muñoz Waxman Gallery Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Instructors and participants from an ongoing series of workshops read their poetry and prose and display their projects at this final celebratory event. Free, 2–3:30 pm, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Railyard Artisan Market Santa Fe Railyard Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta Meet local painters, fiber artists, potters, and others; watch demonstrations; and buy quality works. Free, 10 am–4 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Dining with Dad Café Fina 624 Old Las Vegas Hwy

Reel Fathers, an organization that “inspires men to build loving, committed relationships with their children through the dynamic use of film, story, reflective dialogue, and skill building,” hosts the first Dining with Dad, a series of benefits at local restaurants. 9 am–3 pm, 505-466-2295, reelfathers.org.

Alto Street Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Acoustic music that blends blues rock, folk, jazz, alternative country, and world music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Joe West’s Theater of Death The Engine House Theater 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Local entertainer Joe West hosts an evening of his original macabre plays with music. $20, 3 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Music on the Patio Caffe Greco


Kyle Zimmerman

who visits his ex-girlfriends as he’s about to get married. $5–$15, 2 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

October 27 monday Clay Hand-Building Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A workshop dedicated to hand-building in clay. $175, 6–9 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Burritos Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on burrito cooking class. $98, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

WORD WORD

October 27: Conductor Anthony Barrese hosts Mamma Mia! Now That’s Italian (Opera)!

233 Canyon

Country music with Bill Hearne. Free, 12–3 pm, 505-820-7996.

Nacha Mendez and Co. El Farol 808 Canyon

Latin world music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Sean Ashby The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Guitar music from singer/songwriter Sean Ashby, who’s known for his work with Sarah McLachlan and other musicians. Free, 3–7 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

The Shiners Club Jazz Band Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta Ragtime music. Free, 1–4 pm, 505-989-3278, secondstreetbrewery.com.

View and Brew Indie Film Series Duel Brewery 1228 Parkway Dr

A screening of Zach Clark’s Vacation! (2010), about a girls-only getaway, and a short by local filmmaker Jack Boubelik. Free, 8–10 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Wiley Jim La Posada de Santa Fe Resort & Spa 330 E Palace

Cowboy singer and storyteller. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-986-0000, laposadadesantafe.com.

Some Girl(s) Greer Garson Theatre 1600 St. Michael’s

A performance of the Neil LaBute play about a man

Mamma Mia! Now That’s Italian (Opera)! Unitarian Universalist Congregation 107 W Barcelona

Anthony Barrese, artistic director and principal conductor for Opera Southwest, explores the origins of opera in Italy. Presented by the Santa Fe Opera Guild. $10 (free for students and guild members), 5:30–7 pm, 505-629-1410, guildsofsfo.org.

A workshop dedicated to crocheting. $115, 10 am–12 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Contemporary Southwest II Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A hands-on class about contemporary Southwestern cuisine. $82, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Metta Refuge Council Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo

An opportunity for people who are struggling with loss in a variety of forms to share life experiences in a setting of compassion and confidentiality. Free, 9:45 am–12:05 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Argentine Tango Milonga El Mesón 213 Washington

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music by tenor Branden James. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Hillary Smith and Company El Farol 808 Canyon

Live blues. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Jazzy blues, gospel-inflected R&B, and soul. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Santa Fe Swing Old Fellows Lodge 1125 Cerrillos

A dance lesson followed by a group dance. $8 lesson and dance, $3 dance only, 7 pm lesson, 8 pm dance, santafeswing.com.

October 28 tuesday Basic Crochet Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol 808 Canyon

Greensky Bluegrass Skylight 139 W San Francisco

Acoustic bluegrass/rock music. $15, 7:30 pm, skylightsantafe.com.

Les Gens Bruyants Evangelo’s 200 W San Francisco

Free jambalaya and live Cajun music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9014.

Open Mic Tiny’s Restaurant 1015 Pen

Hosted by Randy Mulkey. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com. October 23, 2014 NOW

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Malia_James

Steel Toed Slippers Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

The Reggae/World Beat Party Skylight 139 W San Francisco

With Ralph Alessi (trumpet), Gary Versace (piano), Drew Gress (double bass), and Nasheet Waits (drums). $20, 7:30–10 pm, gigsantafe.com.

Santa Fe Scrabble Flying Star Café 500 Market

Music from around the world. Free, 9 pm–12 am, skylightsantafe.com.

Tournament-style one-on-one play, presented by the Official North American Scrabble Players Association. $1, 5:30–9:30 pm, 505-426-1753, scrabbleplayers.org.

Timbo Jam The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Savor La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Salsa music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Jam session. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

The Royal Ballet of Cambodia The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

A performance by The Royal Ballet of Cambodia, “renowned for its graceful hand movements, precision poses, and elaborate costumes.” $20–$40, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

October 29 wednesday Encaustic Painting Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

Learn the basics and explore the possibilities of working with encaustics. $185, 6–9 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Knife Skills & Pumpkin Carving Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Learn how to properly handle and maintain your kitchen knives, and then use your new skills to carve creative jack-o’-lanterns to take home. $50, 5:30–7:30 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Fred Harvey, the Hotel Castañeda, and the Future of the Past in Railroad New Mexico New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A lecture by Stephen Fried, author of the best-selling biography of Fred Harvey called Appetite for America. Free, 12 pm, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Honoring the Doughboys: Following My Grandfather’s World War I Diary Collected Works Bookstore & Coffehouse 202 Galisteo

Santa Fe–based journalist and photographer Jeff Lowdermilk gives a talk and signs copies of his latest book, “a vivid, moving, and deeply felt portrait of a U.S. soldier’s experiences on the front lines of the Great War.” Free, 6–8 pm, 505-988-4226, collectedworksbookstore.com. 12

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Trash Disco The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace October 29: Ziggy Marley at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center

Dharma Talk Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo

A dharma talk called Zazen: The Heart of Zen, led by Upaya’s head priest, Shinzan Palma. The evening begins with a 15-minute meditation. Free and open to the public, 5:30–6:30 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music by tenor Branden James. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Electric Jam Tiny’s Restaurant 1015 Pen

Hosted by Nick Wymett. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Ian McFeron and Alisa Milner Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Alt-folk/rock/Americana music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Joaquin Gallegos El Mesón 213 Washington

Flamenco guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

John Kurzweg El Farol 808 Canyon

Rock music and classic covers. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Ralph Alessi Baida Quartet GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St

DJ Oona performs. Free, 9 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Ziggy Marley Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy

Grammy winner and eldest son of the legendary Bob Marley brings his socially conscious reggae music to an all-ages show. $33, 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Ongoing The Measure of a Man Winterowd Fine Art 701 Canyon

New mixed-media works by Emilio Lobato. Free, through October 23, 505-992-8878, fineartsantafe.com.

Bit’ Hahodiishtaa Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

Abstract paintings by David Johns. Free, through October 24, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Hot Mess Offroad Productions 2891-B Trades West Rd

A group exhibition featuring works by arists Caity Kennedy, Phillip Vigil, Todd Ryan White, Shane Nichols, and Sue Begy. Guest curated by Kathryn M. Davis. Free, through October 25, 505-670-9276.

Opening Back Street Bistro (Artspace) 513 Camino de Los Marquez

Mixed-media pieces by Patricia Wyatt. Free, through October 25, 505-982-3500, patriciawyatt.com.

Recent Paintings and Sculpture James Kelly Contemporary 1611 Paseo de Peralta

James Kelly Contemporary’s first exhibition of work by Arizona-based artist Matt Magee. Free, through October 25, 505-989-1601, jameskelly.com.


New Handwoven Rugs Marigold Arts 424 Canyon

Handwoven rugs by Connie Enzmann-Forneris. Free, through October 29, 505-982-4142, marigoldarts.com.

Painted Meditations on the Landscape Pippin Contemporary 200 Canyon

Paintings by Michael Monroe Ethridge. Free, through October 29, 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com.

David Bottini Greenberg Fine Art 205 Canyon

Paintings by David Bottini. Free, through October 30, 505-955-1500, greenbergfineart.com. Ongoing: Imaginate, abstract paintings by Peter Burega at Hunter Kirkland Contemporary

Texas Abstract Wade Wilson Art 217 W Water

A book signing and exhibition viewing. See profile on page 23. Free, through October 25, 505-660-4393, wadewilsonart.com.

Urban Wilderness: Chaos Transformed and Gracia VERVE Gallery of Photography 218 E Marcy

Works by Irving Greines and Ysabel LeMay, respectively. Free, through October 25, 505-982-5009, vervegallery.com.

Asylum EVOKE Contemporary 550 S Guadalupe

New woodcuts, sgraffito drawings, and burn drawings by Alice Leora Briggs. Free, through October 26, 505-995-9902, evokecontemporary.com.

Imaginate Hunter Kirkland Contemporary 200-B Canyon

Abstract paintings by Peter Burega. Free, through October 26, 505-984-2111, hunterkirklandcontemporary.com.

Measure of Days: Drawn to the Wall III Patina Gallery 131 W Palace

Abstract paintings by Daniel Kosharek. Free, through October 26, 505-986-3432, patina-gallery.com.

Modiste Nuart Gallery 670 Canyon

Paintings by Erin Cone. Free, through October 26, 505-988-3888, nuartgallery.com.

Kimono Gallery 901 901 Canyon

Works by Gina Marie Erlichman. Free, through October 28, 908-757-9211, gallery901.com.

Lessons from the Land Sage Creek Gallery 421 Canyon

Landscape paintings by Bill Gallen. Free, through October 31, 505-988-3444, sagecreekgallery.com.

New Paintings and New Sculptures Mark White Fine Art 414 Canyon

Works by artist and gallerist Mark White. Free, through October 31, 505-982-2073, markwhitefineart.com.

POP Femme Sugar Coated Strange 2014 Pop Gallery 142 Lincoln, Ste 102

Seventh annual benefit for the Southwest CARE Center featuring contemporary work by female artists. Free, through October 31, 505-820-0788, popsantafe.com.

The Landscape: Real to Abstract Karan Ruhlen Gallery 225 Canyon Road

Painters Martha Mans, Kurt Meer, and Stephen Pentak perceive, interpret, and translate the reality of nature into the language of art. Free, through October 31, 505-820-0807, karanruhlen.com.

The Uncanny S. R. Brennen Galleries 124 W Palace

Paintings by Teresa Oaxaca, David Gluck, and Katherine Stone. Free, through October 31, 505-428-0274, srbrennengalleries.com.

Investigations of the Environment LewAllen Galleries at the Railyard 1613 Paseo de Peralta Photographs by Diane Burko. Free, through November 2, 505-988-3250, lewallencontemporary.com

Logos LewAllen Galleries at the Railyard 1613 Paseo de Peralta

New paintings by Dirk de Bruycker. Free, through November 2, 505-988-3250, lewallencontemporary.com

Messages from the Wounded Healers Spector Ripps Project Space Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

An exhibit of Sam Scott’s series of large paintings, The Wounded Healers. Free, through November 2, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

New Perspectives Muñoz Waxman Gallery Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Sculpture by Chuck Ginnever. Free, through November 2, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

A Walk in the Woods The William&Joseph Gallery 727 Canyon

Paintings by Tim Althauser. Free, through November 10, 505-982-9404, thewilliamandjosephgallery.com.

Sam Atakra Haozous and Melissa Dominguez Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Humorous images of masked models by Sam Atakra Haozous and an exploration of darker human experiences in various mediums by Melissa Dominguez. Free, through November 12, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Face it! INTRIGUE Gallery 238 Delgado

Paintings by Pamela Frankel Fiedler. Free, through November 14, 505-820-9265, intriguegallery.com.

20 Year Retrospective: Lisa Gordon The William&Joseph Gallery 727 Canyon

A retrospective of work by bronze sculpture artist Lisa Gordon. Free, through November 15, 505-982-9404, thewilliamandjosephgallery.com.

Fall Group Show Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art 702 ½ Canyon

Abstract paintings by Lawrence Fodor, photographs by Bonnie Bishop, mixed-media paintings by Jay Tracy, new work by Rebecca Bluestone, and more. Free, through November 15, 505-992-0711, chiaroscurosantafe.com.

Homegrown photo-eye Gallery 541 S Guadalupe

An exhibition of photographs by Julie Blackmon. Free, through November 15, 800-227-6941, photoeye.com.

Mountain. Desert. Mirror. Cinematheque Gallery Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Twelve diptychs sources from the Instagram accounts of photographers Erin Azouz and Ja Soon Kim. Free, through November 16, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Aggie Damron October 23, 2014 NOW

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Flying Fish Gallery 821 Canyon

Paintings by Aggie Damron. Free, through November 17, 505-577-4747, flyingfishsantafe.com.

Tony DeLap: Selected Works from Fifty Years of Making Art Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 554 S Guadalupe

Works by Tony DeLap. Free, through November 17, 505-989-8688, charlottejackson.com.

Poems of Divine Colors Catenary Art Gallery 616 ½ Canyon

Ongoing: Fall Group Show at Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art

Watercolor paintings by Vassia Alaykova. Free, through November 19, 505-982-2700, catenaryartgallery.com.

Traveling exhibition of paintings and related works by Spokane artist Ric Gendron. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

From Kilimanjaro to Provence: Taking Paints on the Road Silver Sun 656 Canyon

Saligaaw (it is loud-voiced) Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Plein air paintings by Lee MacLeod. Free, through November 30, 505-983-8743, silversun-sf.com.

Reflect the World through the Mirror of Metaphor The Longworth Gallery 530 Canyon

Works by Russian-born artist Vladimir Kush. Free, through December 31, 505-989-4210, thelongworthgallery.com.

Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw Golden Dawn Gallery 201 Galisteo

Paintings by acclaimed Native American artists (and family members) Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw. Free, ongoing, 505-988-2024, goldendawngallery.com.

Rural Light Gallery 822 822 Canyon

Oil paintings by Brandon Bailey. Free, ongoing, 505-989-1700, gallery822.com.

Cameraless New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

A group exhibition of photo-media works. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through December 7, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

LEVEL/LAND Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Works by Courtney M. Leonard (Shinnecock Nation) that question our relationship to cultural landscape and sustainable continuity. Free, through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Rattlebone Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral 14

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Alaskan artist Da-ka-xeen Mehner celebrates the lasting and profound relationship between the Tlingit language and song. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

The Desert Never Left “The City” Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Mario Martinez’s artwork pays reverence to nature through the influences derived from his deeply rooted Yaqui cultural background and commitment to Western Modernism. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Harvesting Traditions Pablita Velarde Museum of Indian Women in the Arts 213 Cathedral

A solo exhibition of work by Kathleen Wall. $10 (discounts for seniors, students, and military), $5 for New Mexico residents, through January 4, 2015, 505-988-8900, PVMIWA.org.

Spiral Lands, Chapter 2, 2008 Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

A slide and sound installation by Andrea Geyer in collaboration with SITE Santa Fe as part of SITElines: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through January 11, 2015, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Drawing a Composition Line Georgia O’Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson

An exhibition of artwork by Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias (1904–1957), who’s best known for his caricatures of famous figures published in magazines in the 1920s and 1930s. This show reveals Covarrubias’s influential role within a global network of modernists that included Georgia O’Keeffe, as well as his contribution to the history of modern art. $6–$12

(kids free), 10 am–5 pm, through January 18, 2015, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

Alcove Shows 1917–1927 New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

Works by 24 artists in the museum’s permanent collection. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through February 23, 2015, 2015, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Syncretism New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

Photographs by Delilah Montoya. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through March 15, 2015, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Painting the Divine: Images of Mary in the New World New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A 1960s ecclesiastical wave of urban renewal inspired mission churches throughout the Americas to undergo renovations and, all too often, cast off centuries-old art work. $6–$9, through March 29, 2015, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A collection of nearly 225 photographs and 40 cameras that show how a light-tight box with a tiny hole can help capture amazing photos. $6–$9, through March 2015, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture presents its extensive collection of Southwestern turquoise jewelry and educates on the geology, mining, and history of the stone. $6–$9, through May 2016, 505-467-1200, indianartsandculture.org.

City Tours

Walking tours of Santa Fe with various companies including Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505-983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), and New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.


John Serkin Years ago musician John Serkin gave up a decade-long career as a professional French hornist and decided to explore playing the Hawaiian slack-key guitar instead. He’s never regretted that decision.

Catherine Kurland

“Slack-key guitar music is from the heart,” says John Serkin. “Slack-key guitar music is from the heart,” says Serkin, who’s visited Hawaii eight times and has been playing soothing Hawaiian tunes at Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen every Saturday night for the past 18 months. “The slack-key guitar is much easier to play than any classical instrument, but to play a phrase perfectly requires effort and lots of practicing,” he notes. Serkin grew up in a musical family. His late father was Rudolf Serkin, one of the most venerated classical pianists of the 20th century; his late mother, Irene Busch Serkin, was the daughter of concert violinist Adolf Busch; and his siblings include pianist Peter Serkin and cellist Judith Serkin. Serkin became proficient on the piano, the French horn, and the double bass, but it’s the slack-key guitar that gets his artistic juices flowing. His first guitar, purchased more than 25 years ago, was a cheap instrument with a plastic top that cost $125. Today he plays an old Yamaha that he thinks of as a dear friend. “It’s got a deep, rich, warm sound,” he says. With tuning nobs that look like keys and strings that are tuned looser than regular guitar strings, the slack-key guitar can produce a meditative sound,

which is appealing to Serkin. “I choose to play music that comes from a transcendental place,” he says. “Most of the tunes have been in the Hawaiian culture since the early 1900s. I’ve written a few songs of my own, but they’re all written in a traditional Hawaiian nahenahe [soft and sweet] style. I leave that virtuosic stuff, the kind I used to do when I was a classical musician, behind for others to play.” Alan Pearlman

by Emi ly Va n C le ve

the renowned musician brings Hawaiian tunes to Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen

John Serkin at Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen, free, Saturday nights, 6–8 pm, 1512 Pacheco, sweetwatersf.com

John Serkin performs every Saturday night at Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen.

October 23, 2014 NOW

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The Menla Center for Yoga and the Healing Arts a new center that promotes health and healing opens in Eldorado

Necessity can be the mother of invention, and it can also lead to successful collaboration. The Menla Center, the first comprehensive yoga and healing arts studio in the Santa Fe community of Eldorado, was born out of a need among local healing arts practitioners and their students for a dedicated space they could call their own. Prior to the opening of Menla, Jacci Gruninger, one of the center’s instructors, taught yoga classes in a ballet studio in Eldorado’s La Tienda complex. Four additional yoga instructors taught their own classes in the same location. “While each of us enjoyed teaching, none of us wanted to manage a studio on our own,” Gruninger says. After talking with their students, the instructors realized that there was a demand for a dedicated yoga center in Eldorado. Students David McDonald and Sandy Szabat joined forces with the instructors and created the community’s first holistic healing arts center. After a year of planning, the Menla Center opened in September. Gruninger joined instructors Jodie Pagett, Lorelei Chappell, Viktoria Shushan, Wendy 16

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Singer, Ruth Allen, and Neela Richardson to form the nucleus of the center. McDonald and Szabat manage the business side of the operation, drawing on McDonald’s background as a school administrator in Sedona, Arizona, and Szabat’s degree in public communications and professional experience with media relations and conference planning. According to the center’s mission statement, menla “is a Tibetan word meaning health or contemplative healing.” In accordance with its mission of “promoting physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health and well-being through a variety of healing modalities designed to lead to life-affirming changes,” the center offers classes and workshops in yoga, Pilates, Tai Chi, qigong, meditation, nutritional counseling, body work, and psychotherapy. “Our seven teachers don’t just run in to teach a class,” says McDonald. “They’re part of a larger family. Not all studios speak to the idea of community. My vision is to grow our family to offer the healing arts to veterans, seniors, and other underserved populations.” While the teachers’ multidimensional backgrounds inform the depth of students’ experiences at the center, it’s the collaborative, welcoming atmosphere running through every thread of the center that brings students back. The Menla Center for Yoga and the Healing Arts, 7 Avenida Vista Grande, Ste B-10, 505-629-7405, menlacenter.org.

Daniel Quat

by Anna I . So c ho c k y


Pranzo Italian Grill

douglas merriam

Pranzo Italian Grill has been a premier Santa Fe dining destination for 25 years, and chef Steven Lemon is hoping for many more years of continued success in the future. After serving as Pranzo’s first chef for six years, Lemon left to pursue other ventures, but in 2013 he returned as head chef and in April he bought the restaurant. The oven-roasted bronzino dish seen here wasn’t on Pranzo’s original menu, although many classic items remain. “This is one of our newer dishes in our evolution,” Lemon says, “but it’s still a modern interpretation of Italian cuisine with a Mediterranean influence. We scale the fish, pull the head off, and take the pin bones out of it. Then we roast it until it’s nice and crisp on the skin side and white and moist on the inside,” he explains. The fish, which has lemon slices, fresh thyme, and sea salt inside it, is served with duck-fat potatoes, escarole, Castelvetrano olives, and red peppers, most of which Lemon buys at the Santa Fe Farmers Market during his three weekly visits.—Cristina Olds Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma, pranzosantafe.com

eating+ drinking

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Seen Around photographs by Stephen Lang

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Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.


October 23, 2014 NOW

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Opening Night

STEPHEN LANG

SL

As one of the largest art markets in the country, Santa Fe is always hosting openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was recently out and about at a number of opening-night receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we hung out with.

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art

openings | reviews | artists

Evelyne Boren became a fine artist in 1962 after enjoying an “aquatic career” that had her working as an underwater stunt double for two James Bond films. The artist will be present at the opening of her show Best of Both Worlds at Acosta Strong Fine Art, which features 28 new watercolor and oil works. The Munich, Germany, native paints impressionistic interpretations of scenes in the Southwest, Mexico, and Europe from her studios in Santa Fe and Sayulita, Mexico. “My heart belongs to Santa Fe, where I have lived for the last 30 years,” Boren says. “I love everything about it: the light, the people, the way of life. I will always call it home.” —Cristina Olds Evelyne Boren: Best of Both Worlds, October 20–November 9, reception October 24, 5–7 pm, Acosta Strong Fine Art, 640 Canyon, johnbstrong.com

Evelyne Boren, Morning Glow Rio Chama, oil on canvas, 48 x 60"

October 23, 2014 NOW

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art

PROFILE

Xiang Zhang

Santa Fe Wedding, oil on canvas, 46 x 72"

t he pain te r ’s n e w show at McL a r r y Fine Art cele brate s t he ye a r of t h e hor s e a nd t he storied hi stor y of t he Am e rica n We st After Chinese-born Xiang Zhang earned his first major oil painting award in 1995 while living in Dallas, a cable television reporter asked him if he had ever considered painting cowboys. “A big, wonderful idea!” Zhang says with characteristic enthusiasm while sitting in the studio at his home in McKinney, Texas. “It reminded me [I was] in a cowboy state!” Zhang (whose full name is pronounced Shang Zang) was born in 1954—which, like 2014, is the year of the horse, according to the Chinese zodiac. As a boy in Sichuan, Zhang would pass plodding horses pulling farm carts during his daily walk to school, so horses were the first subjects of his frequent childhood sketches. They were his entry into a lifelong love of drawing and painting, and they remain a central feature in his widely collected art. As a young man, Zhang studied set design at the Central Academy of Drama in Beijing, where coursework included four hours of oil painting instruction every morning. His painting professors were influenced by the Russian masters, and Zhang was also greatly impressed by works in 22

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by G u s si e Faunt le roy

traveling European and American museum shows. He earned a full scholarship to Tulane University in New Orleans, graduating with an MFA at the top of his class. During his time in the Big Easy, he spent hours painting jazz musicians in the French Quarter and worked as a set designer for New Orleans’s opera house and, later, as a float designer for the Mardi Gras Parade. While Zhang continues to paint dancers, portraits, and the like for his figurative work, he discovered his true artistic calling while sitting on fence railings and photographing (and later painting) Texas ranch hands at work. For years he’s depicted the drama and dusty action of roundups, roping, branding, and cattle drives, portraying contemporary cowboys while excluding references to modern paraphernalia like pickup trucks. Recently the artist began reaching more deeply into the history of the American West. His upcoming show at McLarry Fine Art, Year of the Horse, features large-scale imagined narratives from the past, like longhorns being driven down a street in late-1800s Austin, Texas, as a vegetable seller wrangles prices with the cattle boss and a cook. Another image, inspired by Zhang’s ongoing research into New Mexico history, depicts a turn-of-the-20th-century wedding party with musicians and onlookers on a Santa Fe street. Fascinated by all genres of art and continually exploring new directions and nuances in his work, the painter muses good-naturedly about what might come next. “Maybe Western cowboy surrealism? You never know!” Xiang Zhang, Year of the Horse, October 24–November 7, reception October 24, 5–7 pm, McLarry Fine Art, 225 Canyon, mclarryfineart.com


Texas Abstract

art

PROFILE by Emily Va n Cle ve

a b o ok s igni ng a nd exhibition at Wade Wi l s on Ar t Albuquerque-based Fresco Books continues its series of high-quality products that trace TEXAS the history of abstract art in the ABSTRACT Southwest with Texas Abstract, which will be at the center of a book signing at Santa Fe’s Wade Wilson Art on October 25. Coauthored by Michael Paglia and Jim Edwards, the 248-page hardbound book, which features 200 color images, is the third book put together by publishers Kay Fowler and Nancy Stem, who released the New Mexico–centered Abstract Art in 2003 and Colorado Abstract in 2009. The work of 33 present-day Texas abstract artists, most of whom live in the Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston areas, are included in the book. Twenty-two of those artists have works on view at a show, also called Texas Abstract, at Wade Wilson Art that opened earlier this month and culminates with the October 25 book signing. Both of the book’s authors and at least 15 of the contributing artists will be in attendance for the event. “We didn’t know how strong the Texas abstract art scene was years ago and [how strong it] still is until Michael Paglia, who curated our book about Colorado abstract artists, told us about it,” says Fowler, who founded Fresco Books with Stem in 1999. “After listening to Michael, Nancy and I decided to [make a book that focused] on Texas abstract art.” According to Fowler and Stem, abstract art first appeared in Texas in the 1930s. The book documents the role that Texan artists played in the history of abstraction, covering various styles—from Cubist-related abstraction to abstract expressionism— that were part of the Texas art scene from the 1930s through the 1960s. The book, which costs $85, includes work by artists such as Aaron Parazette, Larry Graeber, Kristen Cliburn, and Margo Sawyer. MOD ER N

CON TE MPORA RY

MICHAEL PAGL IA

Texas Abstract, exhibit and book signing, October 25, 5–8 pm, Wade Wilson Art, 217 W Water, wadewilsonart.com, frescobooks.com

J IM E DWARD S

Kristen Cliburn, It Isn’t Greener, acrylic on canvas, 15 x 20"

Above: Larry Graeber, A Stray Few, oil on canvas, 33 x 27" Left: Roberta Harris, Ziggurat II, enamel and acrylic on paper, 50 x 39" October 23, 2014 NOW

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art

PROFILE

celebrating a living tradition a ne w ex hibit ion f o cu sing on pot t e r y in t he Ame rica n Sout h ope ns at t he Mu se um of Int e r nat ional Folk Ar t by Ashle y M. Big ge rs

Wood-fired, alkaline-glazed jars by Harvey Reinhardt (left, 1920s–1930s), Burlon Craig (center, 1982), and Kim Ellington (right, 2011). All three artists are master potters from the Catawba Valley in North Carolina.

Pottery of the U.S. South: A Living Tradition, October 24–January 2016, reception October 24, 5:30–7:30 pm, Museum of International Folk Art, 706 Camino Lejo, internationalfolkart.org 24

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addison doty

Vernon Owens, Jug (detail), 2010, wood-fired, salt-glazed stoneware with ash runs. This and the below image are courtesy of the Museum of International Folk Art.

“Tradition is dynamic. It’s not a static thing,” says Museum of International Folk Art guest curator Karen Duffy. Artists’ lively interpretations of and contributions to convention are on display in Pottery of the U.S. South: A Living Tradition, an exhibition of 89 pieces of earthenware from the Southeast. The exhibition opens October 24 with a reception that will include the strumming of local folk duo Round Mountain. The show begins with a trio of 1880 containers exemplifying the distinct styles of three subregions in the South; however, the majority of the items are contemporary. The southern potters are distinct in their art in that they dig their own clay, giving their creations a very literal sense of place. “They’re connected with the process from the very beginning,” says Duffy. The ceramics are also wood fired, rather than gas- or electric-kiln fired (which is the typical process today). “Wood firing is difficult and unpredictable. . . . The pieces are not highly decorated. The attitude is that the firing creates the decoration. A good potter can facilitate the effects, but they can never completely control it,” Duffy notes. Depending on the potter’s geographic location on the Piedmont plateau, he or she may use a salt or alkaline glaze for these largely functional designs. Composed of mostly food-storage jars and dairy churns, which are now part of the museum’s permanent collection, the exhibition includes some face jugs—perhaps the most identifiable regional style. “I compare them to storytellers [in Native American pottery],” Duffy says. “They’re charming, expressive, and fun, but they’re a sideline and the potters would be upset if that’s what we focused on.” Instead, the exhibit pinpoints the regional artistry behind the ceramics and the evolving human creativity that created them. For more information, visit internationalfolkart.org.


art

PREVIEWS David Johns: Bit’ Hahodiishtaa Zane Bennett Contemporary Art, 435 S Guadalupe zanebennettgallery.com, through October 24

David Johns, Canyon Reflection, acrylic on canvas, 56 x 40"

“My creations on paper or canvas do not come from a place of preconception—they come from the innermost chambers of my soul,” says David Johns about his abstract work. Inspired by his formal arts training at Northern Arizona University and the traditional Diné teachings and philosophy he learned as a child, Johns expresses his impressions of the land and the people around him.—Emily Van Cleve

Vladimir Kush, Moonlight Sonata, giclée on canvas, 16 x 20"

Vladimir Kush: Reflect the World Through the Mirror of Metaphor The Longworth Gallery, 530 Canyon, thelongworthgallery.com Through December 31 Versatile Russian-born artist Vladimir Kush first attended art school at the age of seven. Today he paints in oil and watercolor, creates limited-edition giclées, and sculpts in bronze. Through the juxtaposition of previously unrelated objects, he makes reference to deeper meanings and metaphors while maintaining a realistic approach to representation in a style he refers to as “metaphorical realism.”—EVC


artist’s haven

List price: $1.7 million; Contact: David Rosen, Sotheby’s International Realty, 505-470-9383, hometeamsantafe.com

October 15, 2 pm. Barbecue salad with organic greens, romaine, black beans, grilled corn, tomatoes, cucumbers, Tillamook sharp cheddar, tortilla strips, BBQ ranch dressing. $7.95.

midcentury marvel

CHRIS CORRIE PHOTOGRAPHY

Located on 17.7 acres northwest of town at the crest of a hillside, this contemporary, light-filled, 3,488-squarefoot home is ideal for artists and art lovers. The home’s entryway serves as a gallery, with ample wall space to hang large paintings, and well-lit walls perfect for hanging art are found throughout the three-bedroom, four-bathroom house. A lowerlevel multipurpose room with glass doors offers temperature-controlled wine storage, and an outdoor patio lies between the home and a plumbed 1,348-square-foot professional artist studio that could also be used a guesthouse. Solar panels on the roof of the studio provide the home and the studio with electricity.

Ranch House

[on the market]

[on the market]

This 7,000-square-foot William Lumpkins–designed house is situated on a five-acre hilltop near the Santa Fe Plaza. Lumpkins sited the fourbedroom, four-bathroom home (and placed windows accordingly) so that the views could be enjoyed from almost every room. An opaque glass sky roof in the living room brings extra light to the space, while a 600-square-foot brick dining patio offers stunning views of the surrounding landscape. Extras include a huge wine cellar that can accommodate a table and chairs and a two-story photography studio (which has a balcony) that can also be used as a media room. List price: $2.95 million Contact: Kevin Bobolsky, Santa Fe Properties, 505-470-6263, homesinsantafenm.com

Eating Around

Send Santa Fean NOW pictures of your meal (with the info we’ve included here) and we might run them in the magazine! Email info@santafean.com. 26

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B.Y. COOPER

Joseph Deats Photography

October 15, 2 pm. Enchiladas with red chile, Tillamook sharp cheddar, refried beans, and green chile brisket. $11.45, theranchhousesantafe.com.


high desert gardening expert tips from landscape designer Judith Phillips by Emily Van Cleve Landscaping in the high desert may seem daunting, but it doesn’t have to be, says Judith Phillips, author of books like New Mexico Gardener’s Guide (Cool Springs Press) and Southwestern Landscaping with Native Plants (Museum of New Mexico Press). The key to making the experience relatively easy is to “mimic nature as much as possible,” Phillips says. “A great way to know which plants thrive in which specific high desert environments is to see where they grow [naturally]. If a plant is growing at the base of a boulder, it’s getting moisture condensation. Plants growing on a hillside prefer better-drained soil.” A small change in a plant’s location can impact how the plant grows, since certain microenvironments may have more water, sunlight, or oxygen. “A friend of mine found that when she switched the positions of two plants located 12 feet apart in her lawn that weren’t growing very well, they began to thrive,” Phillips notes. Plants that are typically easy to grow in a variety of high desert conditions include the three-leaf sumac, Rocky Mountain penstemon, Apache plume, New Mexico olive, and desert willow, all of which “are either shrubs or herbaceous perennials [that] live many years and are attractive through several seasons of each year,” Phillips says. “The sumac and New Mexcio olive have colorful fall foliage, and the Apache plume is semi-evergreen.” Describing herself on her website as a “landscape designer, garden writer, teacher, and activist with 30 years experience designing aridadapted and native gardens in the high desert,” Phillips offers a number of hands-on services through her company, Judith Phillips’ Design Oasis (judithphillipsdesignoasis.com). “I design gardens to suit the needs of the people using them, making the best use of the spaces available . . . [and] relying on native and climate-adapted plants to make gardens resourceefficient and easy to maintain,” Phillips says. “It’s easier to create gardens that are beautiful and relaxing to be in when you take advantage of natural patterns.”

style

JUDITH PHILLIPS

Below: Perennial buffalo and blue grama grasses. Top right: Lavender, Perky Sue, and winecups. Right: Phillips designs gardens to suit the needs of the people using them, whether the gardens are on acres of sprawling land or in a partially shaded courtyard, as seen here.

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| L A ST LOO K |

Zenobia, a singer-songwriter with deep roots in the music industry, performed at La Fonda’s Fiesta Lounge one recent evening to an enthusiastic crowd of dancing fans. Zenobia recently won the best religious/gospel song award from the New Mexico Music Awards for “One More Night,” featured on her soon-to-be-released CD Resurrection. Besides singing backup with numerous musicians from the 1970s through the 2000s—including The Weather Girls, on their enduring disco hit “It’s Raining Men”—Zenobia is also a music producer and composer who plays keyboards, guitar, harmonium, and drums. At La Fonda, Zenobia and her band performed original tunes and covers of classics by the likes of B. B. King and Bonnie Raitt. Bass guitarist Trixie Merkin is also a legendary musician, and, according to a local concertgoer, is “a hoot! She’s the coolest, suavest bass player, age be damned!”—Cristina Olds 28

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Gabriella Marks

Zenobia at La Fonda


| L A ST LOO K |

David Geist at Pranzo Italian Grill

Gabriella Marks

David Geist brings world-class piano-playing to the Southwest. The San Diego native makes regular musical appearances around Santa Fe, charming diners with his renditions of famous tunes. The concert pianist is also a cabaret performer, composer, conductor, and educator who draws from his vast experience working on Broadway productions of Cats, Les Miserables, The Lion King, Miss Saigon, Wicked, and many other hits. “David likes interacting with the crowd,” says Pranzo owner Steven Lemon. “People come specifically to see him and the performers he brings in.” The Geist Cabaret, which was launched at Pranzo in 2006, hosts various big names who appear alongside Geist. “He’s not just background,” Lemon notes. “Everyone loves David here.”—CO

October 23, 2014 NOW

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Jane Filer High Tide at Afon Bridge acrylic on canvas 36" x 32"

Sean Wimberly Abstract Reflections acrylic on canvas 60" x 48"

621 C anyon R oad 830 C anyon R oad billhester@billhesterfineart.com BillHesterFineArt.com (505) 660-5966

Santa Fean NOW October 23 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW October 23 2014 Digital Edition

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