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now The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

special two week issue! November 13


coming soon

Your new home for Authentic Native American Jewelry Southwestern Jewelry Weavings, Pottery, Art & Sculpture True West Santa Fe 130 Lincoln Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-982-0055 truwestsf@aol.com


now |

NOV 13 – NOV 26

2014

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

|

DAVID ROBIN

SUNDAY NIGHT AT THE Dave Grusin/Lee Ritenour benefit concert at The Lensic, Mr. Ritenour asked the audience if we realized what a treasure we had in Grusin, a Santa Fe resident. While I completely agree with Ritenour’s characterization, I couldn’t help but notice some of the other treasures sitting in the audience. In my row alone there was noted jazz pianist John Rangel and his highly accomplished wife, singer Barbara Bentree. The rest of the audience was peppered with treasures from various other walks of Santa Fe life. I would posit that most folks in Santa Fe are treasures within the many individual worlds that make up our city. In the literary field alone, the list is vast; the talents of those writers and the impact they make on our community certainly qualifies them as treasures. In many cases the impact of a local treasure reaches far beyond our county and state lines. From celebrity personal trainers to investment consultants, this town is full of talented men and women. The great news for us is that many of their talents emerge from behind the adobe walls for us to enjoy—as evidenced by Dave Grusin’s amazing performance. Keep an eye on NOW magazine. We’ll do our best to highlight our local treasures and inform you when they’ll be shining in our community.

Bruce Adams

Publisher

Laboratory of Anthropology Library

BO OK SALE

Saturday & Sunday

November 15 + 16 Saturday, 10am–4pm 10am–1pm early bird $10, 1–4pm $1 Sunday, 12–4pm Entrance Free All topics represented at every price point! The books are priced to sell -- Even the collectable books are priced below market! Prices start at just $1!

708 Camino Lejo Laboratory of Anthropology Building (off Old Santa Fe Trail on Museum Hill) indianartsandculture.org/booksale 505-476-1264

p a rt m e

De

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Ne

of Cultu r

Affairs •

Aviva Baumann performs in Sacred Body at The Lensic on November 14. For details, see page 13.

al

AUDREY DERELL

A fundraising event sponsored by the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture Rainmakers

w Mexico


SHOPPING IN SANTA FE

From the time of the ancient Anazasi, the Santa Fe area has been a trading center. The Santa Fe Trail is synonymous with the romance of the old west, and from the time of New Mexico statehood in 1912, Santa Fe has been a multicultural art center and shoppers’ paradise.

SantaFeDowntown.org

Santa Fe is a top US art center, with museums, shopping, Year-round outdoor activities, top flight restaurants, spas, and world famous cultural events. It’s not just your grandparents’ Santa Fe, it’s walkable, historic, charming, and exciting.A high desert destination of distinction and fun.

Free iPhone and Android app The Best of Santa Fe

Find the best shops, restaurants, galleries, museums, parking locations, turn-by-turn directions, mobile deals, weather, news, and local-events with the free app from the iTunes App Store and from the Android Market. Look for the green sticker in the window of participating stores.

the

buzz

Santa Fe Literary Review

On Thursday, November 13, the 2014 Santa Fe Literary Review launches with a reading and reception outside the Santa Fe Community College’s Visual Arts Gallery. The 270-page volume features poetry, fiction, nonfiction, short screenplays, visual art, and more from 200 of the 2,500 writers and artists who submitted pieces for consideration. Preference was given to work by SFCC students, faculty, and staff and anyone associated with the institution, but pieces from contributors around the world were also included. “What makes this literary review special is that it doesn’t just include student work like you tend to find in literary reviews published by other community colleges,” says SFCC associate professor Miriam Sagan, who serves as the review’s faculty advisor. “We have work from extremely creative people all over campus, including faculty in the math department and staff in food services.” Sagan, who’s also a poet and the director of SFCC’s creative writing program, founded the review nine years ago. Her goal was to give creative writing students the experience of taking a publication through the full production process—from reading and selecting submissions to laying out and designing pages. Local contributors are invited to read their published pieces during the November 13 reception, where 500 free copies of the review will be available to the public. The publication can also be read online at sfcc.edu. Anyone interested in being featured in the 2015 edition should send submissions to Sagan by December 1.—Emily Van Cleve Santa Fe Literary Review reception, free, November 13, 5–­7 pm, SFCC Visual Arts Gallery, 6401 Richards, sfcc.edu


LEGENDARY PICTURES/SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT

gunning down goons with pizazz

Keanu Reeves (above) and Adrianne Palicki (left) in John Wick

One kill stands out among many in John Wick. Wick—a retired assassin played by Keanu Reeves—claps his hand over a bad guy’s mouth, stabs him, and stares deep into his eyes, holding the look for several seconds as the man dies. Wick is not being intense; he’s being deliberate. I’m killing you, the look says, but these are the paths we chose. With just that look (no dialogue), we understand Wick’s particular cold professionalism. He’s the best at what he does. John Wick is great fun, a deep dive into an underworld of golden coins, eccentric villains, muscle cars, and the killer’s code of conduct (“no violence in the Continental”). John Wick the character, however, is stoic and solemn, tethering the film from orbiting out into farce. Wick has powerful, extremely personal motivations

for wanting the Russian mob in New York City wiped out. Get this: They killed his puppy. Bad move. Wick’s pursuit of righteous vengeance takes him through dozens of goons stacked in a bad-guy hierarchy reminiscent of video games. A main boss is at the top of the pyramid. Under the main boss are sub-bosses whose prominent faces make them easy to remember from previous scenes. These sub-bosses are especially hard to kill. They have extra training or something. Another tier down are the nameless goons who attack in waves but die easy. Wick mostly shoots them at close range. The first time we watch him work, Wick kills 12 men in just a few rooms of his house by dancing around and blasting their faces precisely. The pinnacle of pistol action remains The Killer, John Woo’s 1989 action classic in which Ah Jong (Chow Yun-Fat) shoots gangsters with a gun in each hand, alternating between left and right, keeping five balls in the air like a great juggler. John Wick is similar, perhaps even faster, but Wick trades up his weaponry as he climbs the badguy pyramid., going from pistols to a shotgun to an assault rifle to grenades. Ultimately, of course, there’s an epic fistfight in the rain. If this sounds like fun to you, John Wick must not be missed.—Phil Parker November 13, 2014 NOW

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Welcome to Santa Fe! As a creative, cultural hub, Santa Fe offers an abundance of the world’s best art, attractions, and entertainment opportunities. Santa Fean NOW is an excellent source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local or a tourist visiting for the first time or the 100th, NOW ’s complete listings of everything from gallery openings to live music events will help you make the most of the city. We look forward to seeing you around the City Different. Should you need any extra tips, please stop by our information centers at the Santa Fe Railyard or off the Plaza at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center.

now ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

amy hegarty samantha schwirck

whitney spivey and amy gross GRAPHIC DESIGNER

whitney stewart

michelle odom, sybil watson

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor

b.y. cooper

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

ADDITIONAL DESIGN

Wishing you a wonderful time,

bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ginny stewart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER

Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

MARKETING CONSULTANT

david wilkinson

andrea nagler

WRITERS

HeatH ConCerts presents

COMING LIVE TO SANTA FE

ashley m. biggers, cristina olds phil parker, emily van cleve

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com Copyright 2014. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

NOV 29 / BLACkALICIOuS ThE SkyLIGhT

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santafeanNOW.com

Santa Fean NOW Volume 1, Number 26, Week of November 13, 2014. Published by Bella Media, LLC at 215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2014 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

On the cover: Jane Filer, Crossing the Gorge, acrylic on canvas, 32 x 36". At Bill Hester Fine Art.


RICHARD PHIBBS

this week

The Lensic and National Theatre Live present a screening of the Broadway production of Of Mice and Men on October 19. For details, see page 10.

November 13–November 19

November 13 thursday Hungry Artist Life Drawing Artisan 2601 Cerrillos

Drawing group hosted in an open, public space with clothed models. Free, 11 am­–1 pm, facebook.com/muse.artproject.

Life Drawing Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

Drawing the nude—from quick, warm-up, gesture drawings to two long studies per evening—improves drawing skills, awareness, and understanding of one of the oldest traditions in art. $145, 2­–4:30 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Reel Rock Film Tour Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

A dinner in celebration of National Native American Heritage Month at Luminaria Restaurant. The event’s five-course menu is presented by Navajo/Diné guest chef Freddie Bitsoie and Luminaria executive chef Marc Quiñones. $90, 6­–9 pm, 505-984-7915, innatloretto.com.

Live Spanish guitar music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Book Signing Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo

Jazz piano and acoustic bass duo. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Hollis Walker signs copies of her memoir, The Booby Blog: A Cancer Chronicle, and talks with Santa Fe author Carmella Padilla. Free, 6­–8 pm, 505-988-4226, collectedworksbookstore.com.

Santa Fe Literary Review Reading & Reception Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A reading and reception to launch the latest edition of the Santa Fe Literary Review. See profile on page 2. Free, 5­–7 pm, 505-428-1816, sfcc.edu.

The ninth annual Reel Rock Film Tour, presented by the Santa Fe Climbing Center, features a screening of Valley Uprising. $12­–$15, 7:30 pm, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Classic Rock & Folk by the Fire Terra Restaurant at Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado 198 State Rd 592

Native American Heritage Dinner & Art Show Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Guitarras Con Sabor

Folk and classic rock by guitarist Michael Umphrey. Free, 6:30­–8:30 pm, 505-946-5700, fourseasons. com/santafe.

El Farol 808 Canyon

Kirk Kadish Duo El Mesón 213 Washington

Latin Night Skylight 139 W San Francisco

Music by DJ Danny. Free, 9 pm­–12 am, skylightsantafe.com.

Little Leroy & His Pack of Lies Evangelo’s 200 W San Francisco

Rock music. $5, 9 pm­–12 am, 505-982-9014.

Melanie Devaney Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Americana music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Mito & Wes Swiss Bakery Pastries & Bistro 401 S Guadalupe

“Jazzamenco” and mamba flamenco favorites. Free, 7:30–9:30 pm, November 13, 2014 NOW

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505-988-1111, swissbakerysantafe.com.

Santa Fe Revue Tiny’s Restaurant 1005 St. Francis

Americana music. Free, 9 pm­–12 am, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

The Gruve La Fiesta Lounge, La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco Soul music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

The Saltanah Dancers Cleopatra Café 3482 Zafarano

Belly-dancing performance. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-474-5644, saltanahstudios.com.

Trio Bijou Zia Diner 326 S Guadalupe

Jazz classics played with string instruments. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-988-7008, ziadiner.com.

Gidion’s Knot Warehouse 21 1614 Paseo De Peralta

Santa Fe’s Chameleon17 Productions presents Johnna Adams’s Gidion’s Knot, which centers on a powerful encounter between two women (a parent and a teacher) whose lives become linked through tragedy. Directed by Wendy Chapin and starring Sabina Dunn and Lisa Foster. $15, 7:30 pm, 505-428-9572, warehouse21.org.

Quilters Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas

A musical about American pioneer women by Molly Newman and Barbara Damashek. Directed by Catherine Donavon. $10–$30, 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

The Santa Fe Community Orchestra 2014 Composition Competition New Mexico School for the Arts 275 E Alameda

Compositions by competition finalists are presented in an open rehearsal format. Free, 6 pm, 505-466-4879, sfco.org.

November 14 friday Friday Night Get Together Gallery 901 and Ronnie Layden Fine Art 901 Canyon

Music and refreshments in the courtyard. Free, 5–7 pm, 505-670-6793, ronnielaydenfineart.com.

Morphing Nature: Sculpture from Plant Materials Santa Fe Botanical Garden at Museum Hill 715 Camino Lejo

Students from the Institute of American Indian Arts and the Santa Fe University of Art and Design create 6

santafeanNOW.com

site-specific sculptures for the Santa Fe Botanical Garden at Museum Hill. Free, reception 3–5 pm, through April 26, 2015, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Fondue Fun with Trudeau Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Fondue demonstration and samples. Free, 1–3 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Tacos Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A hands-on taco cooking class. $98, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Turkey Time Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

A technique-driven class focused on turkey roasting. $85, 6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

VIP Dinner Dinner for Two 106 N Guadalupe

A benefit dinner to support the New Mexico Dance Coalition, in conjunction with the concert Sacred Body. See profile on page 13. $75, 5:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Get Set! Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia

Works by Paul Eshelman, Camila Friedman-Gerlicz, and Clay Leonard. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

In Nature’s Light Hunter Kirkland Contemporary 200-B Canyon

Oil paintings by Gregory Frank Harris. See profile on page 23. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-984-2111, hunterkirklandcontemporary.com.

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.

Katsina Imagey on Pueblo Cultural Objects Adobe Gallery 221 Canyon

An exhibition of more than 70 katsina carvings from the 1930s to the 1990s as well as pottery, basketry, and sculptures that feature katsina imagery. See profile on page 22. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-955-0550, adobegallery.com.

Bill Hearne Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Country music. Free, 5–7:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

C. S. Rockshow El Farol 808 Canyon

Rock-and-roll music. $5, 9 pm­–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Chris Abeyta Tiny’s Restaurant 1005 St. Francis

Singer/songwriter. Free, 5:30–8 pm, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Duo Rasminko The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Gypsy jazz. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

John Kurzweg Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Rock music and classic covers. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Melanie Devaney Duel Brewery 1228 Parkway Dr

Live Americana and folk music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Pachanga The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis

Salsa, cumbia, bachata, and merengue music and dancing. $5, 9:30 pm–1:30 am, 505-992-5800, lodgeatsantafe.com.

Pleasure Pilots La Fiesta Lounge, La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco Live rhythm-and-blues music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Pollo Frito Second Street Brewery at Second Street 1814 Second St New Orleans–style jazz and funk music. Free,


erine Donavon. $10–$30, 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

Sacred Body The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

A performance by local musicians and dancers that’s preceded by an art exhibit in the lobby of The Lensic. See profile on page 13. $25–$60, 7:30 pm, 505-9881234, ticketssantafe.org.

November 15 saturday November 15: The Twilight Angel at the Jean Cocteau Cinema

6–9 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Robin Holloway Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

Live jazz piano music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

The Alchemy Party Skylight 139 W San Francisco

UNDRESS with Paula Wilson Spector Ripps Project Space Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Artist Paula Wilson walks guests through her new exhibition, made specifically for the project space at CCA. Free, 2 pm, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Pretty Faces: The Story of a Skier Girl Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

A screening of a new documentary that celebrates female professional skiers and encourages younger generations. See profile on page 15. $10, 7:30 pm, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

SWAIA’s Moving Image Classification X Winners 2014 Museum of Contemporary Native Arts Helen Hardin Media Gallery 108 Cathedral

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Poetics. Free, 9 pm­–12 am, skylightsantafe.com.

A film program featuring SWAIA’s Indian Market Moving Image Classification X winners. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through February 12, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón 213 Washington

The Twilight Angel Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Jazz piano trio with special guest. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Trio Bijou Starlight Lounge at Montecito Santa Fe 500 Rodeo

Vintage string jazz. $2 (non-members), 7–9 pm, 505-428-7777, lifehousehs.com/home/santa-fe-assisted-living.

Death and the Maiden Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie

A presentation of Chilean playwright Ariel Dorfman’s 1990 play about the ordeal of political prisoner Paulina Salas. Directed by Rick Vargas. $8–$15, 7:30 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

Quilters Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas

A musical about American pioneer women by Molly Newman and Barbara Damashek. Directed by Cath-

The world premiere of The Twilight Angel, by local artists and filmmakers James Koskinas, John Witham, and Julie Schumer. The film centers on the artistic crisis of a man who’s completing a series of 12 paintings of angels for an exhibition. $5–$7, 3 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Chocolate Tour Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

Join chocolate historian Mark Sciscenti in a tour of chocolate houses in Santa Fe. $85, 10 am–2 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Cuisines of Mexico III Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A cooking class that explores the diverse foods of Mexico. $82, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Fondue Fun with Chef Johnny Vee Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School

181 Paseo de Peralta

Fondue mini-class. $35, 10 am–12 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Fondue Fun with Trudeau Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Fondue demonstration and samples. Free, 1–3 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Holiday Pie Mania Builders Source Appliance Gallery 1608 Pacheco

Enjoy tastings of Santa Fe chefs’ signature holiday pies, and then bid on your favorites in an auction that benefits The Food Depot. $10–$15, 1–4 pm, 505-847-3333, holidaypiemania.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce and handmade goods from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Chunky Monkey: Ice Cream and Activism Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy

An evening with Ben Cohen of Ben & Jerry’s that includes ice cream as well as a presentation on business practices and activism. Presented by the Santa Fe Green Chamber of Commerce $20, 6:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

JoyceGroup Santa Fe Santa Fe Public Library Pick Room, Second Floor 145 Washington

Lovers of Irish writer James Joyce’s work meet every Saturday to discuss Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. Led by Adam Harvey, creator of the acclaimed one-man show Don’t Panic: It’s Only Finnegans Wake. Enthusiasts with all levels of knowledge are welcome. Free, 10 am–12:30 pm, joycegeek.com.

The Laboratory of Anthropology Library Annual Book Sale Museum of Indian Arts and Culture 710 Camino Lejo

MIAC’s 21st book sale, with scarce, rare, and firstedition finely printed and small literary press books on diverse topics. $10 (10 am–1 pm), $1 (1–4 pm), 505-476-1250, indianartsandculture.org.

50 Watt Whale Duel Brewery 1228 Parkway Dr

Indie/rock music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

Live music by acclaimed pianist David Geist. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Felix y Los Gatos The Mine Shaft Tavern November 13, 2014 NOW

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2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Live dance music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

Railyard Artisan Market Santa Fe Railyard Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta

November 16: Nia Workshop: Dance Yes and Manifest!

Meet local painters, fiber artists, potters, and others; watch demonstrations; and buy quality works. Free, 10 am–4 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dancers and musicians perform during dinner. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Wine and Hard Cider Barrel Tasting Estrella Del Norte Vineyard 106 N Shining Sun

Hawaiian Slack-Key Guitar Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen 1512 Pacheco

Join wine- and hard cider-makers for a barrel tasting and education session. $10–$15, 2–4 pm, 505-455-2826, estrelladelnortevineyard.com.

Slack-key guitar music with renowned musician John Serkin. Free, 6­–8 pm, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com.

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant 113 Washington

Notes on Music Eldorado Hotel 309 W San Francisco

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Pleasure Pilots La Fiesta Lounge, La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco Live rhythm-and-blues music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Showcase Karaoke Tiny’s Restaurant 1005 St. Francis

Karaoke. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

The Gregg Daigle Band Second Street Brewery at Second Street 1814 Second St Electric Americana rock. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Tierra Sonikete El Mesón 213 Washington

Flamenco and jazz fusion music. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Tone & Company El Farol 808 Canyon

Blues music. $5, 9 pm­–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Death and the Maiden Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie

A presentation of Chilean playwright Ariel Dorfman’s 8

santafeanNOW.com

JEFF STEWART

Live guitar music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

1990 play about the ordeal of political prisoner Paulina Salas. Directed by Rick Vargas. $8–$15, 7:30 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

Gidion’s Knot Warehouse 21 1614 Paseo De Peralta

Santa Fe’s Chameleon17 Productions presents Johnna Adams’s Gidion’s Knot, which centers on a powerful encounter between two women (a parent and teacher) whose lives become inextricably linked through tragedy. Directed by Wendy Chapin and starring Sabina Dunn and Lisa Foster. $15, 7:30 pm, 505-428-9572, warehouse21.org.

Northern Exposures with Some Southern Hospitality Burlesque Show The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis

Zircus Erotique kicks off their season in Santa Fe with several of their favorite out-of-town guests, including former Zircus members Tallulah St. James and Zoe Ziegfeld. $15–$20, 8:30–11 pm, zeburlesque.com.

Quilters Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas

A musical about American pioneer women by Molly Newman and Barbara Damashek. Directed by Catherine Donavon. $10–$30, 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

November 16 sunday Life Drawing Series Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Draw from a live model while enjoying beer and waffles. $22, 11 am–1 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Joseph Illick gives an hour-long talk (with music examples) about Vienna’s “waltz king,” Johann Strauss II, followed by champagne and waltzing (lessons included). $17.50–$35, 4 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

The Laboratory of Anthropology Library Annual Book Sale Museum of Indian Arts and Culture 710 Camino Lejo

MIAC’s 21st book sale, with scarce, rare, and firstedition finely printed and small literary press books on diverse topics. Free, 12–4 pm, 505-476-1250, indianartsandculture.org.

Holistic Healing Fair Blessings Spiritual Cooperative DeVargas Center, 562 N Guadalupe

Astrologers, tarot card readers, body workers, energy healers, and more. Free, 1–5 pm.

Nia Workshop: Dance Yes and Manifest! Body of Santa Fe 333 Cordova

Celebrate Nia’s “Year of the Yes” through movement, community, and guided meditation during this threehour workshop with Nia cofounder Debbie Rosas. $75–$99, 2–5 pm, nianow.com.

Connie Long & Willow Doug The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Folk/alt music. Free, 3–7 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

Friends of Archaeology Holiday Party Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

An annual party and auction that provides a rare opportunity for the public to learn how New Mexico’s first inhabitants lived. $20, 3–6 pm, 505-982-7799, ext. 5, museumfoundation.org/ friends-archaeology.com.

Nacha Mendez and Co. El Farol 808 Canyon

Latin music. Free, 7–10 pm,


powerful encounter between two women (a parent and a teacher) whose lives become linked through tragedy. Directed by Wendy Chapin and starring Sabina Dunn and Lisa Foster. $15, 4 pm, 505-428-9572, warehouse21.org.

November 18: The Lensic and National Theatre Live present a screening of the West End production of Skylight

Heaven and Earth Immaculate Heart of Mary Chapel 50 Mt Carmel

The Cantu Spiritus Chamber Choir, under the direction of Karen Marrolli, presents sacred and secular choral music of the Renaissance. $20 (students free), 3–4:30 pm, 505-988-1975, ihmretreat.com.

Judy Collins The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

JOHN HAYNES

The singer/songwriter performs works culled from the dozens of albums she’s recorded over the course of her five-decade career. $42–$62, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Social Dance Classes Genoveva Chavez Community Center 3221 Rodeo

West Coast swing from 2 to 3:15 pm and waltzing from 3:30 to 4:45 pm. Register in advance (donna_ jhowell@hotmail.com), 505-955-4000, chavezcenter.com.

Stanlie Kee and Step in Blues Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

The Barbwires The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Blues music. Free, 3–7 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

Zenobia Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Live performance by Zenobia, a Grammy-nominated singer, Broadway actress, and background singer on The Weather Girls’ hit “It’s Raining Men.” Free, 12–3 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Death and the Maiden Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie

A presentation of Chilean playwright Ariel Dorfman’s 1990 play about the ordeal of political prisoner Paulina Salas. Directed by Rick Vargas. $8–$15, 2 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

Gidion’s Knot Warehouse 21 1614 Paseo De Peralta

Santa Fe’s Chameleon17 Productions presents Johnna Adams’s Gidion’s Knot, which centers on a

Misadventures or I Don’t Know What I’m Doing Greer Garson Theatre 1600 St. Michaels

808 Canyon

Jazzy blues, gospel-inflected R&B, and soul. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Santa Fe Great Big Jazz Band Tiny’s Restaurant 1005 St. Francis

Big band favorites with Joan Kessler. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Santa Fe Swing Old Fellows Lodge 1125 Cerrillos

A dance lesson followed by a group dance. $8 lesson and dance, $3 dance only, 7 pm lesson, 8 pm dance, santafeswing.com.

The People of New Mexico from A to Z Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A class that focuses on colorful New Mexico personalities—famous, infamous, and not-sofamous. $49, 6–8:30 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

A play by Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright Donald Margulies. Directed by Gail Springer. $15, 2 pm, 4 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

November 18 tuesday

Quilters Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas

Basic Crochet Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A musical about American pioneer women by Molly Newman and Barbara Damashek. Directed by Catherine Donavon. $10–$30, 2 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

A stress-free guide to learning about crochet. November 18: My Life Is My Message: An Evening with Mahatma Gandhi at Unity Santa Fe

Serenata of Santa Fe: The Art of Bach First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant

A performance with L. P. How (violin), Christof Huebner (viola), and Felix Fan (cello). $15–$30 (discounts for students and kids), 3 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

November 17 monday Bill Hearne La Fiesta Lounge, La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

$115, 10 am–12 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

My Life Is My Message: An Evening with Mahatma Gandhi Unity Santa Fe 1212 Unity Way

Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Doggie Happy Hour Junction 530 S Guadalupe

Bring your dog for happy hour on the patio. Free, 4–8 pm, 505-988-7222, junctionsantafe.com.

Hillary Smith and Company El Farol

Director-producer Kell Kearns and coproducer Cynthia Lukas tour with a preview of the footage for their documentary, Gandhi’s Gift. Free, 7 pm, 505-501-2600, globalizedsoul.org.

Skylight The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

The Lensic and National Theatre Live present a screening of Stephen Daldry’s production of David November 13, 2014 NOW

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PAOLO AIZZA

November 19: California Guitar Trio at The Lodge at Santa Fe

Hare’s Skylight. Starring Bill Nighy and Carey Mulligan. $22, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Holiday Entertaining: New Mexico Style Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta Holiday recipes that celebrate New Mexico’s favorite ingredients. $85, 6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce and handmade goods from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Traditional New Mexican II Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A cooking class exploring the traditional foods of New Mexico. $80, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Patrick Nagatani with Lucy R. Lippard Armory for the Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

An event with Japanese photographer Patrick Nagatani and author Lucy R. Lippard. $5–$10, 6 pm, 505-989-1199, sitesantafe.org.

Metta Refuge Council Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo

An opportunity for people who are struggling with loss in a variety of forms to share life experiences in a setting of compassion and confidentiality. Free, 9:45 am–12:05 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Acoustic Open Mic/Song Night Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta Open songs night with Ben Wright. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-989-8585, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Argentine Tango Milonga El Mesón 213 Washington

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com. 10

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Ben Ballinger Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Bill Hearne La Fiesta Lounge, La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco

Rock-and-roll musicc. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol 808 Canyon

Live blues music. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Les Gens Bruyants Evangelo’s 200 W San Francisco

Free jambalaya and live Cajun music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9014.

Open Mic Tiny’s Restaurant 1005 St. Francis

Hosted by John Cole. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

The Reggae/World Beat Party Skylight 139 W San Francisco

Music from around the world. Free, 9 pm­–12 am, skylightsantafe.com.

Timbo Jam The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Jam session. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

November 19 wednesday Fun with Watercolor Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards

A class that explores professional-quality techniques, composition possibilities, and advanced strategies for watercolor painting. $165, 1:30–4:30 pm, 505-428-1270, sfcc.edu.

Let’s Take a Look Museum of Indian Arts and Culture 710 Camino Lejo

Curators from the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and the Laboratory of Anthropology are in the MIAC lobby to evaluate your treasures. Free, 12–2 pm, 505467-1200, indianartsandculture.org.

Of Mice and Men The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

The Lensic and National Theatre Live present a screening of the Broadway production of Of Mice and Men. Starring James Franco and Chris O’Dowd. $22,

C. S. Rockshow La Fiesta Lounge, La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco

Chuscales El Mesón 213 Washington

Flamenco guitar music. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Electric Jam Tiny’s Restaurant 1005 St. Francis

Hosted by Nick Wymett. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Half Broke Horses Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Honky-tonk and Americana music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

John Kurzweg El Farol 808 Canyon

Rock music and classic covers. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Karaoke Night Junction 530 S Guadalupe

Hosted by Michelle. Free, 9 pm­–12 am, 505-988-7222, junctionsantafe.com.

California Guitar Trio The Lodge at Santa Fe, Maria Benitez Theater 750 N St. Francis A guitar trio that crisscrosses rock, jazz, world music, surf music, and classical music. $25–$29, 7:30 pm, 800-838-3006, southwestrootsmusic.org.

Ongoing Railyard Artisan Market Santa Fe Railyard Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta Local artisans and demonstrations. Free, Sundays, 10 am–4 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Face it! INTRIGUE Gallery 238 Delgado

Paintings by Pamela Frankel Fiedler. Free, through November 14, 505-820-9265, intriguegallery.com.

Year of the Horse McLarry Fine Art 225 Canyon

New works by Xiang Zhang. Free, through


renowned Polígrafa Obra Gráfica workshop in Barcelona, Spain. Free, through November 22, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Eros and Thanatos Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

Ongoing: Homegrown at photo-eye Gallery

November 14, 505-988-1161, mclarryfineart.com.

20 Year Retrospective: Lisa Gordon The William&Joseph Gallery 727 Canyon

A retrospective of work by bronze sculpture artist Lisa Gordon. Free, through November 15, 505-982-9404, thewilliamandjosephgallery.com.

Homegrown photo-eye Gallery 541 S Guadalupe

An exhibition of photographs by Julie Blackmon. Free, through November 15, 800-227-6941, photoeye.com.

Mountain. Desert. Mirror. Center for Contemporary Arts/Cinematheque Gallery 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Twelve diptychs sourced from the Instagram accounts of photographers Erin Azouz and Ja Soon Kim. Free, through November 16, 505-216-0672, ccasantafe.org.

Aggie Damron Flying Fish Gallery 821 Canyon

702 ½ Canyon

New work by Michael Petry as part of his continued investigations into the contemporary aspects of the classical world. Free, through November 22, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Fall Group Show Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art

Abstract paintings by Lawrence Fodor, photographs by Bonnie Bishop, mixed-media paintings by Jay Tracy, and new work by Rebecca Bluestone. Free, through November 22, 505-992-0711, chiaroscurosantafe.com.

Selections: Then and Now David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

A survey of paintings, watercolors, and monotypes from 1976 to 2014, by Eugene Newmann. Free, through November 22, 505-983-9555, davidrichardgallery.com.

Dean Howell: Primal II Tarnoff Art Center 107 Wildflower Ln, Rowe

A solo exhibition of work by Dean Howell. Free, through November 29, 505-919-8888, tarnoffartcenter.org.

From Kilimanjaro to Provence, Taking Paints on the Road Silver Sun 656 Canyon

Paintings by Aggie Damron. Free, through November 17, 505-577-4747, flyingfishsantafe.com.

Paintings by plein air artist Lee MacLeod. Free, through November 30, 505-983-8743, silversun-sf.com.

Selected Works from Fifty Years of Making Art Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 554 S Guadalupe

IAIA Blood Quantum Drive: Making Relatives IAIA, Allan Houser Sculpture/Foundry Building 83 Avan Nu Po Rd

Works by Tony DeLap. Free, through November 17, 505-989-8688, charlottejackson.com.

Poems of Divine Colors Catenary Art Gallery 616 ½ Canyon

Watercolor paintings by Vassia Alaykova. Free, through November 19, 505-982-2700, catenaryartgallery.com.

¡Saludos, Barcelona! 50 years of Polígrafa Prints Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

An exhibition of prints produced at the world-

IAIA students collaborate with Axle Contemporary to educates the public about historical and controversial indigenous issues. Free, through December 4, 505-670-5854, axleart.com.

WHAT David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

Sculptures by Nancy Dwyer. Free, through December 6, 505-983-9555,davidrichardgallery.com.

New Work LewAllen Galleries 1613 Paseo de Peralta

Works by neoimpressionist Tracy Rocca.

Free, through December 7, 505-988-3250, lewallengalleries.com.

Anomaly Turner Carroll Gallery 725 Canyon

New works by painter Georges Mazilu. Free, through December 31, 505-986-9800, turnercarrollgallery.com.

Ghost Dance: Spirits & Angels American Indian Photography & Art Studio 1036 Canyon

A photography show by Angel Wynn that gives the illusion of haunting encounters at historical locations. Free, through December 31, 505-819-1103, marilynangelwynn.com.

Reflect the World through the Mirror of Metaphor The Longworth Gallery 530 Canyon

Works by Russian-born artist Vladimir Kush. Free, through December 31, 505-989-4210, thelongworthgallery.com.

Carpoolers photo-eye Bookstore + Project Space 376-A Garcia

Photographs by Alejandro Cartagena. The latest series in an ongoing project investigating the shifting political, economic, and physical landscape of Mexico. Free, through January 10, 2015, 505-9885152, photoeye.com.

Group Landscape Show VERVE Gallery of Photography 219 E Marcy

Landscape-based photographs by Duane Monczewski, Blue Mitchell, Beth Moon, Jennifer Schlesinger Hanson, and Takeshi Shikama. Free, through January 10, 2015, 505-982-5009, vervegallery.com.

End of Days Santa Fe Community Convention Center Gallery 201 W Marcy A group exhibition presented by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission. Free, through January 31, 2015, 505-955-6705, santafeartscommission.org.

Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw Golden Dawn Gallery 201 Galisteo

Paintings by acclaimed Native American artists (and family members) Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw. Free, ongoing, 505-988-2024, goldendawngallery.com.

Rattlebone Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Traveling exhibition of paintings and related works by Spokane artist Ric Gendron. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Harvesting Traditions Pablita Velarde Museum of Indian November 13, 2014 NOW

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Women in the Arts 213 Cathedral

A solo exhibition of work by Kathleen Wall. $10 (discounts for seniors, students, and military), $5 for New Mexico residents, through January 4, 2015, 505-988-8900, pvmiwa.org

Spiral Lands, Chapter 2, 2008 Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

A slide and sound installation by Andrea Geyer in collaboration with SITE Santa Fe as part of SITElines: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through January 11, 2015, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Drawing a Composition Line Georgia O’Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson

Covering Santa Fe in a unique way. aBqJournal.com/subscribe

CO M PA NIO NS GR OOMING AND

DOWNTOWN DOGGIE DAYCARE

239 Johnson Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501

Photo: Frances Ehrenberg-Hyman

(505) 982–7882

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(505) 954–1049

An exhibition of artwork by Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias (1904–1957), who is best known for his caricatures of famous figures published in magazines in the 1920s and ’30s. Covarrubias’s exhibit reveals his influential role in a global network of modernists including Georgia O’Keeffe, as well as his contribution to the history of modern art. $6–$12 (kids free), 10 am–5 pm, through January 18, 2015, 505946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

Hunting + Gathering New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

A sampling of artworks that have entered the museum’s collection in the last five years. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through March 29, 2015, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

City Tours

Walking tours of Santa Fe with various companies including Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505-983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), and New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.


Sacred Body promoting well-being and self-respect via the performing arts by Emi ly Va n C le ve

AUDREY DERELL

Film and TV actress (and Santa Fe native) Aviva Baumann will be one of the performers in Sacred Body on November 14.

THE BODY IS A TEMPLE, and, according to the folks at the New Mexico Dance Coalition, it’s time to start worshiping. Enter Sacred Body, a multiplatform event presented by the NMDC that producer Tess Yong says “honors the sacred and sensuous in the human form and expression, and inspires a healthier relationship with the body.” Being held at The Lensic on November 14, Sacred Body brings together members of Northern New Mexico’s performing arts community for a concert that features modern, African, hip-hop and belly-dancing performances from artists such as Julie Brette Adams, Elise Gent, and Soriba Fofana. “Our dancers take turns exploring the body’s seven different chakras, which are the centers of spiritual energy,” notes Yong, who opens the concert with a shamanic dance celebrating the root chakra, the first and most physical of the seven. For an additional $75, those wanting to nourish their bodies can attend a VIP meal two hours before the show at the restaurant Dinner for Two. At 6:30 pm, all ticket holders can view related works by local painters, photographers, sculptors, jewelers, and mixed-media artists in an exhibit in The Lensic’s atrium. (The exhibit will also be on display at Wheelhouse Art, a gallery in Santa Fe’s Railyard district, after November 21).

Immediately following the performance, guests can attend the Sacred Body Dance Celebration, which features yoga dances, refreshments, face painting, and chair massages at The Palace Restaurant and Saloon. A $10 donation is requested. Proceeds from the concert will help jump-start the creation of the Young Adult Scholarship Program for Healing Movement Arts, which the NMDC will administer. Scheduled to launch this spring, the program will offer therapeutic services for young adults dealing with emotional and psychological trauma. Sacred Body, November 14, 7:30 pm, $25­–$60, The Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W San Francisco, sacredbodysantafe.com, ticketssantafe.org November 13, 2014 NOW

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Sunstone Healing Arts by Ashle y M. Big g e r s

THE HOLIDAY SEASON MIGHT BE THE MOST wonderful time of year, but it can also be the most stressful. To ensure you’re actually feeling thankful on Thanksgiving, check out Sunstone Healing Arts, which offers several one-of-a-kind (at least in the City Different) healing treatments that can take you from harried to heavenly. Michelle Diggs opened Sunstone Healing Arts in February. After working as an international flight attendant for 13 years, she turned to yoga and massage school, and to local, organic foods, to transform her own health. Today she focuses on healing others with treatments like lomi lomi, a form of touch therapy that originated in her native Hawaii and that centers on full-body strokes, from the ankle to the shoulder. “It’s a very flowing massage,” Diggs says, noting that the treatment is fitting for people who are looking to relax rather than relieve pain. “It helps you switch into a different brain state of being able to let everything go,” she says. Diggs also offers Chi Nei Tsang, a Daoist abdominal massage that not only releases tension but also relieves digestive problems. The technique also benefits people who’ve gone through abdominal surgery or recently given birth. During the treatment, Diggs presses and holds points in the abdominal cavity, which is sometimes referred to as the “second brain” because of the millions of neurons that reside there. By tapping into the abdomen and into its signal-sending cells, Diggs creates physical and emotional release throughout the body. In the winter, Diggs uses hot stones in almost all her treatments. The stones are warm and comforting for her clients, and for Diggs they’re useful tools for “melting the muscles a little more,” she says. Applying coconut oil with sage is another way Diggs releases layers of tension, as is myofascial release therapy. The latter is a type of medical massage that focuses on the body’s connective tissues and uses very little oil or lotion. “A lot of people don’t even know it’s happening, but they like it,” Diggs says. “[The treatment] is a very effective way of releasing tension; it takes the nervous system out of 14

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Hot basalt stones help “melt” tight muscles.

the fight-or-flight response.” To complement her work, Diggs encourages all forms of body movement, including yoga, dancing, cycling, and walking. In fact, clients who arrive at Sunstone Healing Arts by bike, foot, or train receive a 10 percent discount. If you can’t make it to Sunstone’s Lena Street location for a treatment, Diggs recommends a few simple practices for handling holiday stress at home. “Do any kind of deep-breathing technique,” she says. “Listen to your body and honor it by stretching, walking, and soaking—that’s the best.” Sunstone Healing Arts, 1600 Lena, Building C, #16, sunstonehealingarts.org

GENEVIEVE RUSSELL/STORYPORTRAIT MEDIA

restorative treatments that help you stay centered

Owner Michelle Diggs attended yoga school in Detroit and massage school in San Diego before settling in Santa Fe.


DANA ALLEN

Rachael Burks does a backflip in a flying squirrel suit in Retallack, British Columbia. Right: Paige Fitzgerald and Louise Linthilac in Quebec.

Lynsey Dyer skiing in Retallack, British Columbia.

Pretty Faces: The Story of a Skier Girl by Cri stina Olds

HERE AND ABOVE: FREYA FENNWOOD

a new documentary seeks to inspire young women to follow their dreams TƑHE FILM PRETTY FACES—whose title is a reference to picturesque mountain slopes— isn’t your typical ski porn. The crowd-funded documentary is filled with footage of pro skiers and snowboarders hucking themselves off stunningly beautiful mountains, but the athletes are all women, and there’s a plot. Professional skier Lynsey Dyer grew frustrated when footage of her skiing was consistently being cut from ski movies that wound up featuring her male counterparts (only 14 percent of the athletes in last year’s ski movies were women), so she solicited several filmmakers for their unused film. Five years later she released Pretty Faces: The Story of a Skier Girl, which celebrates female professional skiers and aims to inspire younger generations. One of Pretty Faces’ producers is native Santa Fean Claire Smallwood, a professional skier who also works as a private chef in Salt Lake City and a ski guide in South America. In 2007, Smallwood and Dyer cofounded the nonprofit SheJumps, which works to increase female participation in outdoor activities. A portion of the proceeds from Pretty Faces, in which top women skiers talk about their fears and challenges, will benefit the organization. “SheJumps isn’t about turning out professional athletes so much as it’s about helping women do something they feel good about,” says Smallwood, who notes that as a young skier in New Mexico she had few female role models. “It felt kind of lonely, which was the core inspiration for starting SheJumps. The mountains are a great avenue for finding that community and helping girls feel proud of who they are.” Since premiering in Boulder, Colorado, on September 30, every showing of Pretty Faces has sold out. Smallwood, a fifth-generation New Mexican, says that her entire family will be supporting her at the Santa Fe premiere on November 15. “One of the big tenets of the film is: If she can do it, so can I,” Smallwood says. But, as a fellow producer told her, Pretty Faces isn’t just “a good film for girls. It’s a good film, period.” Pretty Faces: The Story of a Skier Girl, November 15, 8 pm, $10, Center for Contemporary Arts, 1050 Old Pecos Trl, unicornpicnic.com November 13, 2014 NOW

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Il Piatto Chef Matt Yohalem says the Fall Harvest Gnocchi dish pictured here exemplifies the variety of fresh, seasonal vegetables Il Piatto sources locally for its long list of regular menu items and daily specials. This colorful dish features roasted pumpkin from Gemini Farm in Las Trampas, tricolor cauliflower and baby carrots from Romero Farms, oyster mushrooms, and a brown butter sauce. The dish is topped with crispy pumpkin that’s thinly cut with a mandoline and then flash-fried in olive oil. Yohalem learned his craft from world-renowned chefs such as Michael Romano, Emeril Lagasse, and Sirio Maccioni, and he skillfully makes Il Piatto’s ravioli and gnocchi by hand. “For the gnocchi, we dry roast Dixon potatoes in rock salt to extract the liquid, then we put them through a meat grinder to puree the potatoes into a fine flour,” Yohalem says. He works in eggs and adds a bit of nutmeg and Parmesan cheese to achieve the perfect consistency for the dough. A rich brown butter sauce made from high-fat-content, European-style butter finishes the dish. “We serve the sauce just when it gets that hazelnut aroma while it’s bubbly hot and frothing,” he says. “We add pine nuts, sage, and a little bit of garlic and parsley. Delicious.” —Cristina Olds Il Piatto, 95 W Marcy, ilpiattosantafe.com

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

eating+ drinking

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eating+ drinking

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

The Den

The sexy Frostbite Martini, available at the downtown lounge The Den, is simply gin or vodka stirred with liquid nitrogen and garnished with a twist of lemon rind. “The liquid nitrogen dissipates before you consume the cocktail,” says The Den’s owner and master mixologist, Quinn Stephenson. “It makes the coldest martini you can imagine—perfect for all the people getting off work at 5 pm.” The Den’s gourmet cocktail menu includes a number of other drinks with the instantly freezing nitrogen. “The alcohol won’t freeze, and there’s no taste,” Stephenson says. But it must be prepared correctly. Otherwise, he cautions, “you could have sorbet.”—Cristina Olds The Den, 132 W Water, thedensantafe.com

November 13, 2014 NOW

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Seen Around

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photographs by Stephen Lang Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.


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WINTER INDIAN MARKET® THANKSGIVING WEEKEND Saturday, Nov 29 9a–5p Sunday, Nov 30 10a–5p

Opening Night photographs by Stephen Lang

As one of the largest art markets in the country, Santa Fe is always hosting openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was recently out and about at a number of opening-night receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we hung out with.

WINTER Indian Market

®

S O U T H W E S T E R N A S S O C I AT I O N F O R I N D I A N A R T S

SANTA FE COMMUNITY CONVENTION CENTER Admission is $10 per day. $15 for a weekend pass. Members and children are free. Tickets are available at the door.

FESTIVAL OF TREES Benefit Reception & Concert featuring Robert Mirabal & Robby Romero Saturday 5-7pm

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art

openings | reviews | artists

New Mexico master weavers Sandy Voss, Connie Enzmann-Forneris, and Barbara Marigold have studied, practiced, and refined their craft for more than 30 years. Now permanent artists at Marigold Arts on Canyon Road (which Barbara Marigold owns), the women are showcasing their tapestries, rugs, and wearable art in the gallery’s group show, Handwoven for the Holidays. “All three women consciously work on reviving and renewing weaving traditions and adding new elements,” says Cate Moses, Marigold Arts’ publicity director. In certain pieces on display, Voss weaves rag rugs using recycled silk neckties and Pendleton wool selvage; EnzmannForneris makes dyed-wool tapestries that depict animals in a style reminiscent of ancient petroglyphs; and Marigold creates “transparent” linen tapestries that feature intentional gaps so light can pass through the representations of landscapes near her home in Madrid.—Cristina Olds Handwoven for the Holidays, November 21–January 2, reception November 21, 5–7 pm, Marigold Arts, 424 Canyon, marigoldarts.com

Clockwise from top left: Connie Enzmann-Forneris, Cats, studio-dyed yarns, 54 x 30"; Sandy Voss, Red Happy Rug, wool, 56 x 32"; Barbara Marigold, City of Gold, cotton and silk, 29 x 29".

November 13, 2014 NOW

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art

Katsina Imagery on Pueblo Cultural Objects

PROFILE

IN ITS LATEST EXHIBITION, Adobe Gallery is opening its vaults to share a collection of 75 vintage katsinas made by Hopi and Zuni artists from the 1930s to the 1990s, as well as pottery, basketry, and sculptures that feature katsina imagery. Because katsinas are religious figures of Puebloan spirits, they’re traditionally left unsigned by the artist, eschewing the telltale mark of human handiwork, but in some cases the carvers are known. In addition to the dozens of katsinas on view, Katsina Imagery on Pueblo Cultural Objects features bronze sculptures of katsinas by Lowell Talashoma (1950–2003) and four unusual katsina puppets made in the ’50s and ’60s by Hopi carvers Henry Seeni and Jimmie Koots. “No one has seen [the puppets] since,” says gallery owner Alexander E. Anthony Jr. “Whether [that’s because] people didn’t receive the making of katsinas as toys well or no one else was interested in making puppets, we’ll never know.” A cross-legged katsina, inspired by a Hopi who was physically disabled and took up residence on the pueblo’s plaza, where he told stories to passersby, is another noteworthy piece in the show. The katsina’s “feet are crossed to represent that person,” Anthony says. “It has a nice story, and it’s a nice carving, too. There are some really outstanding examples here.”

Lauren Honyouti (Hopi), Cottonwood Avachhoya (Spotted Corn) Katsina Doll, cottonwood and pigments, 15"

Katsina Imagery on Pueblo Cultural Objects, November 14–January 31, 2015, reception November 14, 5–7 pm, Adobe Gallery, 221 Canyon, adobegallery.com

Unknown Hopi carver, Masha’n (Flower) Katsina Doll, wood, paint, and feathers, 11" 22

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COURTESY OF ADOBE GALLERY

traditiona l k at si na dol l s a nd a r t wor k depic t i ng k at si na s a re on v i e w at Adob e G a l le r y by Ash le y M. Big ge rs


art

PROFILE

In Nature’s Light features several “big sky” images that focus on the low horizon and expansive heavens of the Southwest—something Harris missed when he was living in Connecticut. (He relocated to Santa Fe a decade ago after previously living here in the late 1990s.) Harris has worked in several genres, including figurative painting and photography, but he promised himself when he returned to New Mexico that he’d focus on painting the area’s grand landscapes and light. Works such as Eventide, a standout in the show, depict dramatic purpleclouded skies at sunset, with the last rays casting an orange hue on a single tree. Harris’s images are romanticized and beautiful, yes, but the paint surface is equally important to the artist. “Beyond creating a visual scene people can get lost in or escape to,” he says, “I want to create interest in the paint itself.”

In Nature’s Light

In Nature’s Light, November 14–30, reception November 14, 5–7 pm, Hunter Kirkland Contemporary, 200-B Canyon, hunterkirklandcontemporary.com Eventide, oil on linen, 65 x 58"

a n e w show f e at ur ing la nds cape s by G r eg or y Fra n k Ha r ri s ope ns at Hun t e r Kir kla nd Conte mpora r y by Ashle y M. Big g e r s

ARTISTS DON’T OFTEN INCLUDE window squeegees among their painting tools—especially not for use when smearing their work—yet that’s precisely what Gregory Frank Harris employs to masterful effect in his Southwest landscapes. By mapping out a composition, squeegeeing the canvas, and then blocking in a few details, Harris boldly blurs colors together, abstracting the image and creating a dreamlike scene. In his latest show, In Nature’s Light, which opens November 14 at Hunter Kirkland Contemporary, Harris deploys this method on a dozen works that evoke the images of fellow tonalist George Ennis (1884–1936). “I want [the paintings] to be otherworldly, even if they’re representational and regional,” Harris says. “I want them to evoke something beyond just rendering trees and grass. I want them to be beyond all that.” Foreground Chamisa, acrylic on linen, 40 x 44" November 13, 2014 NOW

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art

PROFILE

Jane Filer paints out North Carolina–based painter Jane Filer was one of the more than 100 artists who took to the streets for some plein air action during the Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out on October 18. Santa Fean NOW captured her in the process of creating a new work for Bill Hester Fine Art, where she shows her work locally. “Abstract expressionism is an important movement in art history for me,” Filer says. “The abstract is suggestive of emotion. . . . The paintings are developed through multiple layers—what I call free-falling.” While layering acrylic paint on her canvas, Filer defines details with charcoal. “The paintings grow in a long, slow fashion,” she notes. “They’re a visual story that unravels bit by bit.”—Cristina Olds

Filer finished painting Mariposa in Thin Air (seen in its incomplete state in the far right photo) at Ghost Ranch the week after the Paint Out. 24

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Filer calls Bill Hester (left), who represents her work at Bill Hester Fine Art, “a poet [who] really knows and loves art.”

STEPHEN LANG

“I keep my brushes in a hollow bamboo tube that a friend [bought me] in Thailand and that fits perfectly in my paint travel bag,” Filer says.


art

opening art receptions

Deconstructing Coyote GF Contemporary, 707 Canyon gfcontemporary.com eileenbraziel.com November 21–December 19 Reception 5–7 pm GF Contemporary’s show Deconstructing Coyote features works in diverse mediums that explore the idea of the coyote as “trickster” in Native American lore. The artists—including Tony Abeyta, Bert Benally, Chris Collins, Bill Dambrova, Jaque Fragua, Marcus Kenney, Cannupa Hanska Luger, Beth Olsen, and Will Wilson—were chosen by guest curator Eileen Braziel for their individual perspectives on the Southwest. The coyote, Braziel says, has for decades been the “romantic” symbol “of the wild Southwest.” The art in this show, she adds, “becomes transformative as the artists deconstruct dogmatic or stereotypical meanings of coyote.”—Cristina Olds

PREVIEWS

Jaque Fragua, Mokuhsins, neon and plexiglass, 10 x 24 x 3"

ongoing

Vladimir Kush: Reflect the World through the Mirror of Metaphor, The Longworth Gallery, 530 Canyon thelongworthgallery.com, through December 31 Versatile Russian-born artist Vladimir Kush first attended art school at the age of seven. Today he paints in oil and watercolor, creates limited-edition giclées, and sculpts in bronze. Through the juxtaposition of previously unrelated objects, he makes reference to deeper meanings and metaphors while maintaining a realistic approach to representation in a style he refers to as “metaphorical realism.”—Emily Van Cleve Vladimir Kush, Moonlight Sonata, giclée on canvas, 16 x 20"

November 13, 2014 NOW

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Katsina Dolls

Opening Friday, Nov 14 5-7pm

221 Canyon Road, Santa Fe 505.955.0550 info@adobegallery.com www.adobegallery.com

Georges Mazilu, La Course, acrylic on linen, 26 x 32"

Georges Mazilu: Anomaly, Turner Carroll Gallery 725 Canyon, turnercarrollgallery.com, through December 1 Georges Mazilu has a signature style that links contemporary surrealism with the art of the northern Renaissance. Through an abstract world of fantasy filled with a distinct cast of characters, Mazilu’s paintings portray mysterious figures seemingly caught in deep contemplation or frozen in the midst of enigmatic rituals. His work is part of museum collections in San Francisco, Denver, and Tucson.—EVC 26

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Lawrence Fodor, Without Gravity VII, oil, linseed oil, and alkyd resin on canvas, 60 x 60"

ongoing

Fall Group Show Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art 702 ½ Canyon chiaroscurosantafe.com Through November 22 Abstract paintings by Lawrence Fodor, whose work delves into the highly personal to find the universal, are part of Chiaroscuro’s fall group show, which includes photographs by Bonnie Bishop and mixed-media paintings by Jay Tracy. Also on view is new work by Rebecca Bluestone, a traditional tapestry artist who uses hand-dyed silks of varied textures and metallic threads woven on a cotton warp as her medium.—EVC

JD Challenger, White Bird, acrylic on canvas, 24 x 18"

The Western Scene, Manitou Galleries 123 W Palace, manitougalleries.com, through November 21 The story of the American West—from its land to its Native inhabitants—is celebrated in the works of JD Challenger and Nicholas Coleman. “I realized that the knowledge and the experiences of these people had to be preserved,” says Challenger, who paints powerful and poignant Native American portraits and stories. Coleman is also passionate about preserving the heritage of the region and depicts human figures in expansive landscapes.—EVC


Rippel Metal Fabrication cu stom me t al pie ce s f or your home or of f ice from a se cond-g e ne rat ion me t al a r t i st by Kelly Koepke

style

Gabe Rippel welds

an educational abode

Built as a schoolhouse in 1925, this renovated two-bedroom, 2.5-bathroom Arroyo Hondo residence is now enveloped by mature trees. The building’s original vigas were reset above the dining room and kitchen, and 160-year-old repurposed ash beams create a vaulted ceiling in what’s now the living room. Hardwood floors and custom doors and cabinetry are found throughout the interior. A large portico wraps around three sides of the house, and an outdoor kiva provides ambience and warmth during cool fall evenings. The 3.18-acre property, which also features an oversized two-car garage and a one-car carport with a heated utility room, is surrounded by a private neighborhood trail system and 86 acres of open space. List price: $895,000 Contact: Gary Bobolsky, Sotheby’s International Realty, 505-470-0927, sothebyshomes.com

Find Gabe Rippel’s custom furniture at Santa Fe Modern (santafemodern.com) or visit Facebook for the latest Rippel Metal Fabrication projects.

COURTESY RIPPEL METAL FABRICATION

MARSHALL ELIAS

[on the market]

the railings that GABE RIPPEL loves metal. Steel, surround the Second specifically. Steel with acid washes and Street Brewery in the antique bronze finishes that form earthSanta Fe Railyard. toned patinas. “Much like fine wood grains, steel has patterns. And it has more character than other metals,” he says. For the past 10 years, Rippel’s custom tables, gates, awnings, and railings have graced private homes and commercial buildings around New Mexico. Four years ago, with demand for his modern metalwork pieces soaring, he opened his own company, Rippel Metal Fabrication. Rippel’s love affair with metalwork is genetic. His father, John Rippel, is a Santa Fe silversmith who’s well known for his handmade jewelry. Growing up, Gabe learned to make rings under his father’s guidance. “My dad was a big inspiration,” he says. “What we do is similar; my work is just on a larger scale.” Gabe found further inspiration while observing a metal fabricator doing work on a construction site, which led him to apprentice with sculptor Lex Lucius, who’s known for his large installation pieces. Rippel honed his creative process by collaborating with artists and with residential and commercial builders across the region, from Santa Fe to Marfa, Texas. Whatever he designs, his goal is to harmonize the straight angles of a conspicuously modern aesthetic with nonlinear Southwestern elements. That said, there are certain kinds of pieces Rippel prefers working on. “I enjoy furniture,” he says, “because it demands a quality standard that people expect with something they’re face-to-face with every day.”

November 13, 2014 NOW

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style Detail from a monkey wood table at Sequoia Santa Fe showing pebbles in clear resin.

Sequoia Santa Fe

(sequoiasantafe.com) is known for its contemporary yet earthy designs in iron and wood featuring rich textures and clean lines. Owner and designer Sequoia Pawan Madan sources and handpicks salvaged maka and monkey wood in Thailand for his slab dining tables, which are supported by iron legs. Madan kiln-dries the wood in Thailand at his workshop and further cures it in Santa Fe before custom crafting it to his clients’ specifications.

[on the market]

Situated on a knoll just 10 miles northwest of downtown, this 10.58acre property offers expansive views of the Sangre de Cristos to the east and the Jemez mountains to the west. A winding path leads through a double-gated entryway to a landscaped courtyard outside the 3,350-squarefoot house, which was designed by Ted Luna in 1978. Inside, the twobedroom, threebathroom home has a contemporary flair with a soaring octagonal ceiling and large windows in the living room. Although the main house is one story, a bookshelflined loft makes for a quiet library retreat. Access to the property’s three-car garage and onebedroom, one-bathroom guesthouse are via portals outside the home. JONATHAN TERCERO

A reclaimed teak bench.

GABRIELLA MARKS

a lofty location

List price: $850,000 Contact: Penelope Vasquez; Sotheby’s International Realty, 505-690-3751, sothebyshomes.com 28

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| L A S T LO O K |

GABRIELLA MARKS

Ziggy Marley

David Nesta Marley, better known as Ziggy, recently came to Santa Fe to carry on the reggae tradition of his legendary father, Bob Marley. On October 29, the 46-year-old musician, entrepreneur, and activist bounced and jammed across the Santa Fe Community Convention Center stage to the delight of the multigenerational audience. Touring in support of his fifth solo studio album, Fly Rasta, which features his sisters Cedella and Sharon Marley on background vocals, Marley’s bestreceived tunes of the night were the ones made famous by his dad. “If you closed your eyes and cocked your head just right,” said Rob, a concertgoer from Albuquerque, “it was almost like being at a Bob Marley show—backup singers and dancers and everything.” At eight years old, Marley, along with four of his younger siblings, formed the band the Melody Makers at his father’s suggestion. Marley has since gone on to win several Grammy Awards for his group and solo albums, and he’s also founded his own line of organic hemp seeds and coconut oil, written a children’s book, and collaborated on a comic book.—Cristina Olds November 13, 2014 NOW

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Jane Filer

Mariposa in Thin Air, acrylic on canvas, 55" x 47"

621 C anyon R oad 830 C anyon R oad billhester@billhesterfineart.com BillHesterFineArt.com (505) 660-5966

Santa Fean NOW November 13 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW November 13 2014 Digital Edition

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