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SU M OFF ME IC R

IAL OF MA CO GA LO ZIN R E

a hot summer season for

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet

International Folk Art Market

brings the world to Santa Fe

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

picks

santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

week of July 9


PRESENTING SPONSOR

Juan Siddi

SANTA FE

ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET July 10 July 31 September 4

July 12 July 21 July 26 August 1 August 29 September 5

PHOTOS: ROSALIE O’CONNOR

SEE EXTRAORDINARY DANCE AT For ticket info please visit: www.aspensantafeballet.com BUSINESS PARTNER 

MEDIA SPONSORS 

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GOVERNMENT / FOUNDATIONS 

Melville Hankins

Family Foundation

Partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission and the 1% Lodgers Tax, and made possible in part by New Mexico Arts, a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts.


VALERIE NAMOKI

OPEN EVERY DAY

130 LINCOLN AVE. SANTA FE NM 87501 505-982-0055 INFO@TRUEWESTSF.COM 1/2 BLOCK NORTH OF THE PLAZA

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/TRUEWESTSF


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THE RED THAT COLORED THE WORLD has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: exploring the human endeavor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this exhibition do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional support comes from the Museum of New Mexico Foundation, International Folk Art Foundation, International Folk Art Alliance, Cotsen Family Foundation, Newman’s Own Foundation, Brown Foundation, Inc. of Houston, and McCune Charitable Foundation. Lead sponsor: Hotel Santa Fe The Hacienda and Spa. Pictured: Firefighters’s ceremonial coat (Kajibanten), Japan, 18th–19th century, Edo period. John C. Weber Collection. Photograph by John Bigelow Taylor.

On Museum Hill in Santa Fe · 505-476-1200 · InternationalFolkArt.org 2

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WE CALL IT “HIGH SEASON” for a reason. With so many activities in full swing, it’s no wonder Santa Fe is on a growing “high.” Wherever you go, you can feel the energy in the streets—and read about it in this issue of Santa Fean NOW. This weekend, July 11 and 12, we have International Folk Art Market, which has rapidly become one of Santa Fe’s premier events. It usually sells out quickly (tickets to Friday’s opening night are long gone) and has generated rave reviews since its inception. IFAM is one of the rare opportunities for visitors not only to experience folk art from around the world, but to sample the international food, music, and dance that go along with it. Nothing is more fun than seeing guest artists roaming Santa Fe in traditional clothing from exotic and faraway nations. The other big event that has the world bringing art to us this weekend—from Thursday, July 9 through Sunday, July 12—is ART Santa Fe. In this case, however, the focus is generally on contemporary fine art which comes to us from throughout the United States and, again, from faraway countries. Charlotte Jackson does a wonderful service to our community by presenting ART Santa Fe and attracting a fine array of galleries to this colorful event, which is celebrating its 15th anniversary this year. The common factor in both of these festivals is that the art presented is not the variety we normally see in Santa Fe. It is rarely seen here, and I would suggest that much of it is not seen anywhere else in the world, either, other than in the home countries of these visiting artists and galleries. How lucky we are to be here and have the opportunity to soak in all of this amazing art. 

Bruce Adams

Publisher

DAVID ROBIN

free admission on sundays

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

2015

LISA LAW

As symbol and hue, red has risen to the pinnacle of the color spectrum. Yet few know of its most prolific and enduring source: cochineal. The Red that Colored the World looks through the centuries to consider the central role of color in art, history and culture.

JULY 9 –JULY 15

Mystic Latin, reggae, Afro-funk musician Fantuzzi performed an evening of “songs to move your soul” on June 27 at an invitational concert at local producer John Meade’s home in Santa Fe.


Andrée Hudson Illumination

The Horse 90 x 62 unf

acrylic

July 7 through July 20 ARTIST Friday, July 10 5 pm - 8 pm

EXHIBITION DATES RECEPTION FOR THE

Waxlander Gallery

celebrating thirty-one years of excellence

622 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, NM 87501 waxlander.com • 505.984.2202 • 800.342.2202


Welcome to Santa Fe! Santa Fe is rated one of the top ten destinations in the world for its abundance of high-quality art, shopping, attractions, outdoor adventures, food, and entertainment. Santa Fean NOW is your hands-on source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local resident, first time visitor, or a regular, NOW has the listings you need to navigate hundreds of weekly gallery openings, live music, and more to make the most of your time here. For extra tips and insider insights, please stop by our Visitor Centers at the Downtown Santa Fe Plaza, Santa Fe Railyard, or just off the Plaza at the Community Convention Center. This summer, ask about all the Summer of Color events, new exhibits, and our many famous festivals. Have a wonderful time in the City Different. Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR

b.y. cooper

anne maclachlan whitney spivey

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

elizabeth sanchez

EDITORIAL INTERN CALENDAR EDITOR

samantha schwirck whitney stewart

GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

michelle odom

sybil watson, hannah reiter OPERATIONS MANAGER

ginny stewart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER

david wilkinson

WRITERS

ashley m. biggers, ben ikenson cristina olds, phil parker, polly nell jones donna schillinger, eve tolpa, emily van cleve A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105 Santa Fe, NM 87505 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com Copyright 2015. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Fean NOW Volume 2, Number 22 Week of July 9, 2015. Published by Bella Media, LLC, at Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2015 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

Covering Santa Fe in a unique way. aBqJournal.com/subscribe 4

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On the cover: Aspen Santa Fe Ballet performs 1st Flash this summer. See story on page 6. Photo by Rosalie O’Connor.


CANADA | CHILE | COSTA RICA | CUBA | JAPAN | KOREA | SOUTH AFRICA | USA

THIS WEEK!

ART

SANTA FE . 2015

INTERNATIONAL CONTEMPORARY ART FAIR

JULY 9-12 | SANTA FE CONVENTION CENTER OPENING NIGHT GALA THURSDAY, JULY 9, 5-8 PM | CALL FOR INFO FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY | JULY 10, 11 & 12 | 11-6 PM | $10 AT THE DOOR Tickets for Opening Night & the Fair available at Lensic Box Office, 505.988.1234 email: inquiries@artsantafe.com | web: www.artsantafe.com | tel: 505.988.8883

C E L E B R AT I N G F I F T E E N Y E A R S above: Michael Turchin, Fragile, Acrylic/Stickers/Glitter on Canvas, 40 x 40 inches, CASS Contemporary, Florida

Opening Night Gala, lead sponsor Art & Antiques

BRING THIS AD to the Art Santa Fe ticket booth and receive 2 tickets for the price of 1 (individual ticket: $10). — Valid Friday, Saturday, Sunday, July 10-12, 11-6 PM, Santa Fe Convention Center, 201 West Marcy Street —


Santa Fe Desert Chorale

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet performs Beautiful Mistake as part of the summer season.

the

ROSALIE O’CONNOR

“The 2015 Santa Fe Desert Chorale season has something for everyone—from intimate chamber music from Venice and England to the glorious sounds of the full ensemble in programs of sacred music,” says Joshua Habermann, the a cappella group’s music director. Four distinct programs with music spanning more than 400 years are part of the four-week summer season, which opens with the Transcendence program on July 9 at 8 PM at Cathedral Basilica of St.. Francis. The highlight of this concert is a presentation of Herbert Howells’s Requiem for unaccompanied chorus, which was written in six short movements in the 1930s. The masterfully composed Serenade to Music (1938) by Ralph Vaughan Williams is the centerpiece of the Chorale’s Serenade to Music program at the Church of the Holy Faith. Vaughan Williams used text from Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice in this work for 16 soloists and piano. The Santa Fe Desert Chorale sings pieces by Claudio Monteverdi in the Venetian Splendor concerts at Loretto Chapel, and presents a new commission by Orthodox priest Ivan Moody in the Hidden Treasures of Byzantium program at Cathedral Basilica.—Emily Van Cleve Santa Fe Desert Chorale’s 2015 Summer Festival July 9–August 9, Cathedral Basilica, Loretto Chapel, and Church of the Holy Faith; concerts on July 12 and August 9 at Cathedral Church of St. John in Albuquerque, $10–$65, desertchorale.org

on stage

buzz

The Aspen Santa Fe Ballet (ASFB) opens its summer season at The Lensic with the world premiere of Silent Ghost, a newly commissioned work by Spanish choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo, who is currently the resident choreographer at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago. Other contemporary performances include 1st Flash by Finland’s Jorma Elo and Beautiful Mistake by Spaniard Cayetano Soto. ASFB also presents the return of Juan Siddi Flamenco Santa Fe, an ensemble of 14 dancers and musicians led by dancer and artistic director Juan Siddi. In 2011, Siddi won the Santa Fe Mayor’s Award for bringing talented flamenco dancers from around the world to Santa Fe and for his dedication to preserving the dance’s ethnic and cultural art form.—Whitney Spivey

CORY KLOSE

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet summer season, July 10 and 31, September 4, 8 pm, $25–$75, The Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W San Francisco, aspensantafeballet.com

STEPHEN LANG

Santa Fe Desert Chorale opens its summer season on July 9.

Juan Siddi Flamenco Santa Fe summer season, July 12, 21, and 26, August 1 and 29, September 5, 8 pm, $25–$75, The Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W San Francisco, aspensantafeballet.com

the sounds of summer The 10th annual New Mexico Jazz Festival showcases local and worldrenowned jazz musicians on various stages in Albuquerque and Santa Fe. During two weeks of shows, highlights include a performance at The Lensic on July 25 by the legendary Count Basie Orchestra, directed by Scotty Barnhart with guest vocalist Carmen Bradford and the Kenny Barron Trio with Stefon Harris.—Cristina Olds New Mexico Jazz Festival, July 10–August 6, various times, prices, and locations, newmexicojazzfestival.org

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July 9 thursday ART Santa Fe Opening Night Gala Vernissage Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy An opening event for ART Santa Fe. See profile on page 16. $100, 5–8 pm, 505-988-8883, artsantafe.com, ticketssantafe.org.

The Hired Hand The Performance Space at La Tienda, 7 Caliente A screening of the 1971 Western directed by Peter Fonda. $5, 7 pm, 505-466-1634, reelnewmexico.com.

July 9–July 15

Native American Imagery in Advertising Shiprock Santa Fe, 53 Old Santa Fe Trl

An exhibit highlighting the iconography of Native American art and its incorporation into mainstream American culture. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-8478, shiprocksantafe.com.

Retablos: A New Voice William Siegal Gallery, 540 S Guadalupe

Peruvian retablos by Victor Huaman Gutierrez. Free, reception 4–7 pm, 505-820-3300, williamsiegal.com.

Folk Art Market Lecture Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeeshop 202 Galisteo

Edric Ong speaks about the Iban Textiles of Malaysian Borneo—the Indian Connection. Free, 3 pm, 505-988-4226, collectedworksbookstore.com.

Marsha Scarbrough Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeeshop 202 Galisteo

PAUL BLACKBURN

A Healing Stitch Turner Carroll Gallery, 725 Canyon

An exhibition of handmade embroideries. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-986-9800, turnercarrollgallery.com.

this week

142 W Palace

Karaoke with Michéle Leidig. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant, 58 S Federal Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

July 10: Mala Maña at the Santa Fe Plaza

Radio La Chusma Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Latin, reggae, and world beat music on the Plaza. Free, 7:15–8:45 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Transcendence Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis 213 Cathedral

Live cabaret. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Showcasing Howells’s reflective and personal Requiem, a stunning repertoire for double choir, and five centuries of great German music including works by Schütz, Brahms, and Buchenberg. See profile on page 6. $10–$65, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

Savor La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

July 10 friday

Sol Fire El Farol, 808 Canyon

ART Santa Fe Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy

The Saltanah Dancers Cleopatra Café (Southside location) 3482 Zafarano

Calligraphy Workshop Upaya Zen Center, 1404 Cerro Gordo

Robert Muller Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma

Cuban street music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

In celebration of International Folk Art Market, the local author reads from her book Honey in the River: Shadow, Sex and West African Spirituality. Free, 6–7 pm, 505-988-4226, collectedworksbookstore.com.

Pop-infused rock, R&B, and Latin influences. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Keeping Chaco Sacred Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Belly dancing performance. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-820-7381, saltanahstudios.com.

Sensei Kazuaki Tanahashi leads a class for beginners and experienced artists. $250, through July 12, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

The Santa Fe Revue Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Grand Opening Jeff Littrell Antiques, 1413 Paseo de Peralta

Wes Speight El Paseo Bar & Grill, 208 Galisteo

Home on the Range Preview Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado Santa Fe, 198 State Rd 592

A discussion of legal and community-based efforts to protect the San Juan Basin and its people from fracking. Hosted by the Western Environmental Law Center. Free, 5:30 pm, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

John Rangel Trio El Mesón, 213 Washington

Live jazz music. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon

Americana featuring Joe West. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Indie rock. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-992-2848.

Partizani Brass Band Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl New Orleans street brass on the Plaza. Free, 6–7 pm, santafebandstand.org.

See profile on page 16. $10, 11 am–6 pm, through July 12, 505-988-1234, artsantafe.com, ticketssantafe.org.

An opening event for Jeff Littrell’s art, antique, and jewelry store. Free, 6–11 pm.

A first look of Bobbi Bennett and Joan Scheibel’s latest collaborative work. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-577-5911, bealsandco.com.

International Folk Art Market Opening Party Museum Hill’s Milner Plaza, 706 Camino Lejo July 9, 2015 NOW 7


Summer Trunk Show Body of Santa Fe, 333 W Cordova

Restaurant Walk I Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Eat your way around town with stops at the Agoyo Lounge, Eloisa, La Boca/Taberna, and Il Piatto. $115, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Three days of summer fashions by Mimi and Coco. Free, 7:30 am–9 pm, 505-986-0362, bodyofsantafe.com.

Collection of Paintings by Santa Fe Indian School Students—1943 Adobe Gallery, 221 Canyon

Alumbrones—Unexpected, Short-Lived Bursts of Light Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy

Summer of Color Winterowd Fine Art, 701 Canyon

A documentary film screening looking at the work and lives of 12 contemporary Cuban artists living in Havana today. Part of Art Santa Fe. $10, 3–4:30 pm, 505-988-1234, artsantafe.com.

Cuisine of Mexico Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

A demonstration cooking class focused on the foods of our southern neighbor. $80, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

New Mexican Lunch on the Patio Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Chef Rocky Durham hosts a demonstration course focused on seasonal local fare. $75, 11 am–1 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

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See profile on page 24. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-955-0550, adobegallery.com.

A group exhibition to celebrate Museum Hill Partners’ Summer of Color series. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-992-8878, fineartsantafe.com.

MARY HELEN ANGERMAN

Shopping, dancing, music, food, and drinks to celebrate the opening of the International Folk Art Market. See profile on page 15. $225, 6:30–9 pm, 505-992-7600, folkartalliance.org.

Colors Remembered and Imagined Ventana Fine Art, 400 Canyon

Work by Doug Dawson and Tamar Kander. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 800-746-8815, ventanafineart.com.

July 9: Wes Speight at El Paseo Bar & Grill

Euphorie de Couleur Greenberg Fine Art, 205 Canyon

Illumination: Andrée Hudson Waxlander Gallery, 622 Canyon

High Country Southwest Marigold Arts, 424 Canyon

Japanese Bamboo and the World Expo: A Century of Discovery Tai Modern, 1601 Paseo de Peralta

A solo exhibition featuring work by Joseph Breza and a Summer of Color event. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-955-1500, greenbergfineart.com.

Work by Albuquerque painter Phil Hulebak. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-4142, marigoldarts.com.

Meet the artist at the exhibit opening. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-984-2202, waxlander.com.

A preview exhibition. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-984-1387, taimodern.com.


Lemon Yellow Bill Hester Fine Art, 621 Canyon

Joseph Breza “Euphorie de Couleur”

See preview on page 21. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-660-5966, billhesterfineart.com.

OPENING RECEPTION: July 10, 5–7pm |

Possibilities and Pulse GF Contemporary, 707 Canyon

Work by Rachel Darnell and Michael Wilding. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-983-3707, gfcontemporary.com.

SHOW DATES: July 10–23

it’s time for a new show!

“UNDER THE SURFACE: REFLECTIONS”

Rumi on Canvas The Longworth Gallery, 530 Canyon

Meet the artist Rahileh Rokhsari. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-989-4210, thelongworthgallery.com.

Opening Reception March 20th, from 5-7pm

Western Perspectives: 100 Years of Western Paintings The Owings Gallery, 120 E Marcy

Show Dates: March 20 through April 2

An exhibition showcasing more than 100 years of Western painting. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-6244, owingsgallery.com. LAURIN MCCRACKEN “The Original Old Time” Watercolor 18 x 13"

What Can’t Be Spoken Tansey Contemporary, 652 Canyon

See profile on page 25. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-955-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.

Do Books Matter? Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy

Radius Books’ publisher and designer, David Chickey, talks about the process of what it takes to publish in today’s world. Part of ART Santa Fe. $10, 1–2 pm, 505-988-1234, artsantafe.com.

Folk Art Market Lecture Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeeshop 202 Galisteo

Barbara Arlen speaks about the Psychology of Color: How People Change Their Color Preferences. Free, 10 am, 505-988-4226, collectedworksbookstore.com.

50 Watt Whale Second Street Brewery at Second Street July 10–August 16: The Santa Fe Shakespeare Society performs The Tempest

“Fields of Lavender and Gold” 32 x 52” Oil on Canvas

GREENBERG

Greenberg Fine Art 205 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.955.1500 greenbergfineart.com/NOW 1814 Second

Rock-n-folk-n-roll country music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

A local three-piece rock band. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Live piano music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol, 808 Canyon

$25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Jimmy Stadler La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant, 58 S Federal Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

The Alchemy Party Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Juicebox Ray. $7, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com. PHILIP HOLT

fine art

The Sean Healen Band Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

See profile on page 6. $25–$72, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Naked Romance GiG Performance Space, 1808 Second

New York poet/performance artist Davida Singer teams up with award-winning Santa Fe composer/ pianist John Rangel for the New Mexico premiere of the live performance featuring poetry from Singer’s latest book set to original music by Rangel. $20, 7 pm, gigsantafe.com.

Julius Caesar Scottish Rite Temple, 463 Paseo de Peralta

Upstart Crows of Santa Fe, a theater group for ages 10–18, presents an uncut production of the Shakespearean play. $5, 7 pm, 505-466-3533, upstartcrowsofsantafe.org.

Mala Maña Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Latin, cumbia, reggaeton, and merengue on the Plaza. Free, 6–7 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Marcia Griffiths Sol Santa Fe Stage & Grill, 37 Fire Pl

A concert with “the Queen of reggae.” $28–$33, 8 pm, ampconcerts.org, solofsantafe.com. July 9, 2015 NOW 9


and Coco. Free, 8:30 am–9 pm, 505-986-0362, bodyofsantafe.com.

Bicycle Thieves Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

We have made the decision to relocate our business to New York City. We wish to thank all of our wonderful customers in Santa Fe. It has been a pleasure serving your jewelry needs for the last 18 years.

We will be closing at the end of September. Of course we wish to thank everyone in a tangible way, so please join us in one, final “LEAVING SANTA FE SALE.” Everything in our Store will be marked down substantially. Drop in for your opportunity to get a remarkable treasure at a remarkable price.

213 W. San Francisco, Santa Fe | 505-992-3000 mrbr@cybermesa.com | barbararosen.com Paa Kow Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Afro-fusion music on the Plaza. Free, 7:15–8:45 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Rigoletto Santa Fe Opera, 301 Opera

Verdi’s opera, based on Victor Hugo’s play Le roi s’amuse. $40–$300, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

The Tempest Monte del Sol Charter School 4157 Walking Rain

The Santa Fe Shakespeare Society’s Summer Shakespeare returns for the fifth year with The Tempest on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays through August 16. $10–$20 (suggested donation), 6–8 pm, 505-490-6271, sfshakespeare.com.

Transcendence Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis 213 Cathedral

See profile on page 6. $10–$65, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

July 11 saturday ART Santa Fe Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy

See profile on page 16. $10, 11 am–6 pm, through July 10

santafeanNOW.com

12, 505-988-1234, artsantafe.com, ticketssantafe.org.

International Folk Art Market Museum Hill’s Milner Plaza, 706 Camino Lejo See profile on page 15. $15–$20, 9 am–5 pm, 505-992-7600, folkartalliance.org.

Outdoor Fine Art Show First National Bank on the Plaza Parking Lot 107 W San Francisco

Members of the Santa Fe Society of Artists exhibit and sell their work. Free, 9 am–5:30 pm, santafesocietyofartists.com.

Paint Moment Saturday Art Sanctuary, 621 Old Santa Fe Trl, Ste 16 A two-hour guided painting class. $45, 6 pm, 575-404-1801, santafeartclasses.com.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Plaza, at the park ramada 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and more by local artists. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-310-1555, santafeartistsmarket.com.

Vision Board/Journaling Art Sanctuary, 621 Old Santa Fe Trl, Ste 16

Collage meets creative visualization in this workshop hosted by Santa Fe Art Classes. $50, 10 am–12 pm, 575-404-1801, santafeartclasses.com.

Summer Trunk Show Body of Santa Fe, 333 W Cordova

Three days of summer fashions by Mimi

CCA and St. John’s Film Institute present The Auteurs Film Series, with a screening of the 1948 drama. $7–$10, 11 am, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Cooking Class with Lois Ellen Frank Estrella Del Norte Vineyard, 106 N Shining Sun A demonstration class that includes a three-course luncheon at Estrella Del Norte Vineyard. $125, 10 am–12:30 pm, 505-455-2826, estrelladelnortevineyard.com.

Hot Sauces Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe Learn to prepare the only three spicy sauces you’ll ever need. $78, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Traditional New Mexican II Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe Learn to make local cuisine such as calabacitas and sopapillas. $80, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Ghostland + Shadows & Light photo-eye Gallery, 541 S Guadalupe

Concurrent exhibitions by photographers Keith Carter (Ghostland) and Kate Breakey (Shadows & Light). A Summer of Color event. Free, reception 3–5 pm, 505-988-5152, photoeye.com.

Home on the Range Palace Avenue Arts Satellite 828 Paseo de Peralta

A collaboration between photographer Bobbi Bennett and painter Joan Scheibel. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-333-8354, palaceavenuearts.com.

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.


Building the 21st Century Museum: Crystal Bridges and Beyond New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln

A keynote address by Don Bacigalupi, president of the new George Lucas Museum of Narrative Art in Chicago. An ART Santa Fe event. $10, 6:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Dramatic Northern Italy Tour Travel Bug, 839 Paseo de Peralta

This talk follows the scenes and traces the locations of Shakespeare’s plays set in northern Italy. Free, 5–6 pm, 505-992-0418, mapsofnewmexico.com.

Gallery Discussion David Richard Gallery, 544 S Guadalupe

A gallery discussion and closing reception for Op Infinitum: “The Responsive Eye” Fifty Years After (Part II) with curators Peter Frank and David Eichholtz. Free, 3–5 pm, 505-983-1284, davidrichardgallery.com.

Controlled Burn El Farol, 808 Canyon

Rock music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Crow & The Captain Second Street Brewery at Second Street 1814 Second Jazz/folk/country music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant, 113 Washington

Live guitar music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com/en/inn-of-the-anasazi-santa-fe.

Jimmy Stadler La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

The Santa Fe Chiles Dixie Jazz Band Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe Live jazz with a twist. Free, 1–4 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Tierra Sonikete El Mesón, 213 Washington

Jazz and flamenco music featuring Joaquin Gallegos and J. Q. Whitcomb. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Run for Los Niños Rancho Viejo Plaza, 55 Canada Del Rancho

The fifth annual 5K walk/run to benefit Los Niños de Santa Fe Dance Group. $30, 7:45 am, 505-307-6468.

Bill Palmer & Stephanie Hatfield Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Americana and rock music on the Plaza. Free, 7:15–8:45 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Daughter of the Regiment Santa Fe Opera, 301 Opera

Donizetti’s opera, conducted by Speranza Scappucci. $38–$214, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

Greg Butera & The Gunsels Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl Americana music on the Plaza. Free, 6–7 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Nathaniel Bartlett: Next Apex Railyard Performance Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta

The premiere of the performance Next Apex. $10, 6:30 pm, nathanielbartlett.com.

Transcendence Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis 213 Cathedral

See profile on page 6. $10–$65, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

Directing for the Theatre Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

A workshop with master director Shep Sobel. $125, 10 am–5 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

July 12 sunday ART Santa Fe Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy

See profile on page 16. $10, 11 am–6 pm, 505-988-1234, artsantafe.com, ticketssantafe.org.

International Folk Art Market Museum Hill’s Milner Plaza 706 Camino Lejo

See profile on page 15. $15–$225, 9 am–5 pm, 505-992-7600, folkartalliance.org.

Outdoor Fine Art Show First National Bank on the Plaza Parking Lot 107 W San Francisco Members of the Santa Fe Society of Artists exhibit and sell their work. Free, 9 am–5:30 pm, santafesocietyofartists.com.

Bicycle Thieves Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

CCA and St. John’s Film Institute present The Auteurs Film Series, with a screening of the 1948 film.


New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant, 58 S Federal

COLLECTION OF PAINTINGS BY SANTA FE INDIAN SCHOOL STUDENTS CLASS OF 1943 Opening Friday, July 10th 5-7pm reception

Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858 osteriadassisi.com.

Ramon Bermudez La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco

Classical guitar music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Silver Crow Asylum Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Americana music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Tone and The Major Dudes Evangelo’s 200 W San Francisco

Blues, rock, and R&B. $5, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-9014.

Juan Siddi Flamenco Santa Fe The Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W San Francisco 221 Canyon Road, Santa Fe 505.955.0550 info@adobegallery.com www.adobegallery.com $7–$10, 11 am, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Boris McCutcheon Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Modern Americana during brunch. Free, 12–3 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Ramon Bermudez La Casa Sena, 125 E Palace

Classical guitar on the patio during lunch. Free, 12–2 pm, 505-988-9232, lacasasena.com.

Sunday Brunch Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen, 1512 Pacheco Max Hatt and Edda Glass of Rio perform during brunch. Free, 11 am–1 pm, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com.

Denise Low and Molly Kirschner Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

A reading presented by Red Mountain Press. Free, 5 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Nacha Mendez and Friends El Farol, 808 Canyon

Latin world music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com. 12

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See profile on page 6. $25–$72, 8 pm, 505-988-1234 ticketssantafe.org.

Julius Caesar Scottish Rite Temple, 463 Paseo de Peralta

Upstart Crows of Santa Fe, a theater group for ages 10-18, presents an uncut production of the Shakespearean play. $5, 2 pm, 505-466-3533, upstartcrowsofsantafe.org.

Transcendence Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis 213 Cathedral

See profile on page 6. $10–$65, 4 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

Directing for the Theatre Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

Silent Community Qigong Practice MogaDao Institute 703 Camino de la Familia, #3103

This bimonthly practice of the foundational set of qigong forms, MogaDao Morning Medical Qigong, is silently led in a sacred atmosphere of practitioners and teachers. By donation, 8:30–9:30 am, mogadaoinstitute.com.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Hillary Smith and Co. El Farol, 808 Canyon

Blues music. $5, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

July 14 tuesday Benefit Auction Preview James Kelly Contemporary 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Preview the contemporary artworks slated for sale in SITE Santa Fe’s live and silent auctions, which take place on July 16. Free, 10 am–5 pm, 505-989-1199, sitesantafe.org.

Green Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe A cooking workshop focused on our state vegetable. $78, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Ann Hamilton, Northern Leopard Frog, digital scan

A workshop with master director Shep Sobel. $125, 10 am–4 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

July 13 monday Bicycle Thieves Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

A screening of the 1948 drama. $7-$10, 11 am, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Tamales Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe Learn the intricacies of making traditional tamales in this hands-on class. $98, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

July 15: SITE Santa Fe First Look


El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Sky Smeed and Joe Mack Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe Americana, folk, and country music. Free, 7 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

July 15: Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers, Music on the Hill at St. John’s College

Native American I Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe Learn about Native American food and culture with Lois Ellen Frank, a James Beard Award–winning author and PhD in culinary culture. $85, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Joseph Badal Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeeshop 202 Galisteo The author reads from his first mystery novel, Borderline. Free, 6 pm, 505-988-4226, collectedworksbookstore.com.

The Magic of Transformation: The Art of Theatrical Makeup Unitarian Univeralist Congregation 107 W Barcelona

The Guilds of the Santa Fe Opera present Beckie Kravitz in discussion about her 30-year career as makeup artist, mask-maker, and sculptor, with a demonstration of her makeup artistry. $10, 5:30 pm, 888-666-3430 ext. 100, guildsofsfo.org.

Sesshin: Dogen and Circle of the Way Upaya Zen Center, 1404 Cerro Gordo

Led by Joshin Brian Byrnes and Sensei Kazuaki Tanahashi, this intensive meditation retreat explores Zen Master Dogen’s profound teachings on the unity of practice and awakening, and on the indivisibility of Buddha, Dharma and Sangha. $430, through July 19, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Argentine Tango Milonga El Mesón, 213 Washington

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Flamenco Dinner Show

KATHRIN MILLER

Track Night Santa Fe High School, 2100 Yucca

An organized track workout for runners of all speeds. Free, 5:50 pm (slow runners), 6 pm (fast runners), santafestriders.org.

Humming House Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Americana on the Plaza. Free, 7:15–8:45 pm, santafebandstand.org.

The Broomdust Caravan Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl Cosmic country and blues on the Plaza. Free, 6–7 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Tom Russell Jean Cocteau Cinema, 418 Montezuma

Alternative-country singer/songwriter. $40, 7 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

July 15 wednesday Master Weaver Demonstration Museum of Spanish Colonial Arts 750 Camino Lejo

Learn from acclaimed master weaver Bulmaro Mendoza. $8 (free for kids 12 and younger), 9 am–12 pm, 505-982-2226, spanishcolonial.org.

SITE Santa Fe First Look SITE Santa Fe, 1606 Paseo de Peralta

A cocktail reception and preview of SITE Santa Fe’s summer exhibitions. $300–$350, 6–7:30 pm, 505-989-1199, sitesantafe.org.

Summer Slide Lecture Series Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia

Sunshine Cobb presents a slide lecture on her work. Free, 7–8:30 pm, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

Community Drum Circle La Tienda Performance Space 7 Caliente Rd, Eldorado

Monthly drum circle hosted by Rick Cormier. Free, 7–9 pm, differentdrummersdrumcircle.com.

Dharma Talk Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo

A conversation with by Joshin Brian Byrnes, Upaya Vice-Abbot and Zen priest. Free, 5:30–6:30 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Chuscales El Mesón 213 Washington

Classic and modern flamenco guitar music. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers St. John’s College, 1160 Camino de Cruz Blanca Part of Music on the Hill, in conjunction with the 10th annual New Mexico Jazz Festival. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-6199, sjc.edu.

Little Leroy and His Pack of Lies El Farol, 808 Canyon Dance music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Mary Scholz and Sarah Ault Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

July 9, 2015 NOW 13


Lyric folk and pop rock. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant 58 S Federal

new mexico’s premiere professional ensemble of 24 singers from across the nation presents its 33rd summer season of the finest classical choral music. purchase your tickets today. call our box office at {505} 988-2282 or order online at desertchorale.org

ABSOLUTELY

” “

CONCERT SCHEDULE

SANTA FE DESERT CHORALE 2015 SUMMER FESTIVAL

SPIRITUAL AND

JULY 9 | 8PM

JULY 10 | 8PM

TRANSCENDENCE | CATHEDRAL BASILICA, SANTA FE

JULY 11 | 8PM

TRANSCENDENCE | CATHEDRAL BASILICA, SANTA FE

JULY 12 | 4PM

R&B music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Verdi’s opera, based on Victor Hugo’s play Le roi s’amuse. $40–$300, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

Tracey Whitney Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

INSPIRATIONAL

TRANSCENDENCE | CATHEDRAL BASILICA, SANTA FE

Zenobia La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco

Rigoletto Santa Fe Opera, 301 Opera

PHENOMENAL

SOUL STIRRING,

Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Smooth jazz and soul on the Plaza. Free, 6–7 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Writers Workshop Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po

A five-day intensive summer writing workshop presented by The Sundance Institute and IAIA. Through July 19, iaia.edu, sundance.org.

Ongoing

TRANSCENDENCE | CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST. JOHN, ABQ

JULY 21 | 8PM

VENETIAN SPLENDOR | LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

Forms of Joy and Meditation Bill Hester Fine Art, 621 Canyon

JULY 23 | 8PM

Bronze figurative sculptures by David Unger. Free, through July 31, 505-660-5966, billhesterfineart.com.

JULY 24 | 8PM

Star Liana York Sorrel Sky Gallery, 125 W Palace

SERENADE TO MUSIC | CHURCH OF THE HOLY FAITH, SANTA FE VENETIAN SPLENDOR | LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

JULY 25 | 8PM

SERENADE TO MUSIC | CHURCH OF THE HOLY FAITH, SANTA FE

JULY 28 | 8PM

VENETIAN SPLENDOR | LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

JULY 29 | 8PM

SERENADE TO MUSIC | CHURCH OF THE HOLY FAITH, SANTA FE

JULY 30 | 8PM

VENETIAN SPLENDOR | LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

Life-size bronze Native American- and wildlifeinspired sculptures. Free, through August 31, 505-501-6555, sorrelsky.com.

Spring Show David Rothermel Contemporary Fine Art 142 Lincoln, Ste 102

A group exhibition including works by Sedona painter Jill Amundsen. Free, ongoing, 575-642-4981, drcontemporary.com.

JULY 31 | 8PM

SERENADE TO MUSIC | CHURCH OF THE HOLY FAITH, SANTA FE

AUGUST 4 | 8PM

VENETIAN SPLENDOR | LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

AUGUST 6 | 8:30PM

HIDDEN TREASURES OF BYZANTIUM | CATHEDRAL BASILICA, SANTA FE

AUGUST 8 | 8:30PM

HIDDEN TREASURES OF BYZANTIUM | CATHEDRAL BASILICA, SANTA FE

AUGUST 9 | 4PM

HIDDEN TREASURES OF BYZANTIUM | CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST. JOHN, ABQ

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.


International Folk Art Market the 12th annual event showcases artists and goods from around the world

by Whitne y Spive y

SANTA FE’S POPULATION JUMPS by about 30 percent July 10–12 when more than 20,000 visitors descend upon Museum Hill for the 12th annual International Folk Art Market. “This is the largest international folk art market of its kind in the world,” says publicist Clare Hertel. “It is a leading international destination for cultural art—not to mention a whole lot of fun.” More than 150 artists from 57 countries participate in the weekend, including approximately 60 new artists from places such as China, Burkina Faso, and Paraguay, many of whom have never before left their villages. Chosen by a panel of experts from more than 400 applicants, they arrive in Santa Fe through some combination of buses, boats, camels, cars, and planes. Their work often reinterprets ancient, cultural traditions—beadwork, carvings, ceramics, glass, jewelry, and more—that makes Santa Fe feel as if all the art in the world is perched on Museum Hill. “It would take a lifetime to travel and find the exceptional folk art treasures that are readily available at this market,” says cofounder Judy Espinar. “By keeping the vitality and cultural values of [the artists’] homelands alive through their art amidst a mass-produced world, the Market is the real thing.” New this year—thanks to President Obama’s announcement in December 2014 that he would normalize diplomatic relations with Cuba and increase travel and commerce with the island country— is a large contingent of master Cuban painters. These men and women are known for their arte naïf paintings, which are dynamic,

In 2014, attendees collectively purchased more than $2 million worth of handmade art that included pottery, woven tapestries, jewelry, and toys.

colorful, and immediate works that capture scenes from everyday life: baseball, farming, music, religion, and more. “The first thing that our work demonstrates is the sense of belonging and the great love that we the painters have for our community and all its parts,” explains artist Louis Joaquin Rodriguez. “Our objective is to guarantee that the traditions of our community are preserved along with our cultural identity.” The same is true for all artists at the International Folk Art Market. “Each object becomes the starting point for a journey that leads to the artists and the stories behind their work,” Espinar says. “When you touch a piece of extraordinary art, you can’t help but be touched by the artists themselves.” International Folk Art Market, July 10–12, times vary, $15–$225, Museum Hill, 706 Camino Lejo, folkartalliance.org July 9, 2015 NOW 15


ART Santa Fe a weekend of modern art in old downtown

IN JULY, ART SANTA FE turns 15 and celebrates with an Opening Night Gala Vernissage (July 9, 5–8 pm, $100) followed by a weekend-long fair featuring modern and contemporary art from more than 150 artists from seven countries. “We will be highlighting art from Cuba with a special installation of kinetic sculptures by Aurora Molina, called Los Pioneros; and a film about 12 Cuban artists, entitled Alumbrones, which will be shown throughout the weekend,” says operations manager Liane McMillian. “There will also be a very exciting installation coming from Japan called the Puzzle Project.” Other highlights of the weekend include a talk hosted by Radius Books about publishing art books and a keynote speech by Don Bacigalupi, resident of the new George Lucas Museum of Narrative Art in Chicago, Illinois. ART Santa Fe was recently ranked the Fourth Best Art Festival in the country by USA Today, which gives a shout-out to Santa Fe’s art scene as a whole. “After enjoying the eye candy at the Santa Fe Convention Center event,” the author writes, “festival attendees have their pick of the city’s some 240 art galleries and handful of world-class museums to enjoy.” Sounds like a good weekend to us. ART Santa Fe, July 9–12, $10, 11 am–6 pm, Santa Fe Convention Center, 201 W Marcy, artsantafe.com Clockwise from top right: Andrew Tshabangu, Rain on Windshield, fiber-based print, 50 x 75 cm Tania Bakalarz, A Different Perspective 1, mixed media, 20 x 20" Takashi Inaba, Puzzle Project, installation at ART OSAKA, size varies

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by Whitne y Spive y


eating drinking +

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

Hotel Chimayó’s Low ‘n Slow Bar Travel back in time at the automobile-themed Low ’n Slow Bar inside Hotel Chimayó de Santa Fe, which features custom-car-inspired décor such as glass-topped steering wheel tables and a hubcap-adorned hanging light fixture. The Smoky Manhattan cocktail seen here gets its name from Santa Fe Spirits’ Colkegan whiskey, made from 100 percent mesquite-smoked, malted barley. Trendy but authentic Angostura aromatic bitters add hints of cardamom, nutmeg, and cinnamon; and a sweet vermouth gives the attractive beverage a glowing red tone. A secret ingredient finishes the concoction. “Our menu was designed by Santa Fe Spirits, so it’s their secret ingredient,” says bartender Wesley Scott (pictured), whose lips are sealed. “But I will say that Colkegan is a very mild whiskey, very balanced, just perfect for this light sipping drink.”—Cristina Olds hotelchimayo.com July 9, 2015 NOW 17


Seen Around

Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.

photographs by Stephen Lang

Nightlife photographs by Pamela Macias

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Make Music Santa Fe photographs by Lisa Law

Presented by the Santa Fe Music Alliance on June 21 at the Railyard, Make Music Santa Fe featured live bands, a mobile art gallery, and Silver, the psychedelic ‘60s bus.


International Folk Art Market

on arts the eastside railyard district

photographs by Daniel Quat A rainbow of colors, textures, and talents of the world creates a visual feast during Santa Fe’s International Folk Art Market.

2,700+ sq. ft. of exhibition space for sale in the Railyard Arts District. 333 Montezuma, Suite 4. The contemporary design of the gallery boasts

natural light and polished concrete floors that complement expansive walls for presenting very large paintings, and intimate spaces for highlighting smaller works. This location is equally suited for an art gallery or an art - related retail business. The gallery offers a parking lot in front of the building for patrons. This is one of the best, and certainly most affordable, gallery spaces in Santa Fe. MLS #201500705 $750,000

expect more.

tel: 505.989.774 1 •

www.dresf.com

A Full Service Real Estate Brokerage

July 9, 2015 NOW 19


Opening Night As one of the largest art markets in the country, Santa Fe is always hosting openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was recently out and about at a number of opening-night receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we hung out with.

photographs by Stephen Lang

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art

openings | reviews | artists The Poetry of Color: Susanna Hester

Susanna Hester interprets the colors she paints, rather than simply painting the colors she sees. She calls this “the poetry of color, not the replication of what we thought we saw and try to remember.” Citing Ludwig Wittgenstein’s “Remarks on Colour,” in which the Austrian philosopher states, “There is no such thing as the pure colour concept,” Hester challenges us to remember what we experience when we observe a landscape. “At most we capture an emotion,” she says; these she recaptures in the forms of colors. “My favorite painting is Red Mesa,” continues Hester, “because it dislocates my preconditions and logic. I look for all art to do that for me so I can experience without the layers of prejudice.” The public is invited to view Hester’s landscapes to experience these very personal moments firsthand. Each poetic interpretation will differ from that of the previous viewer, or the next. —Anne Maclachlan The Poetry of Color, July 10–August 31 Opening reception July 10, 5–7 pm, free, Bill Hester Fine Art, 613 Canyon, billhesterfineart.com

From top: Aspen Vista, oil on canvas, 16 x 20"; Red Mesa, oil on canvas, 12 x 16"; Rocky Coast, oil on canvas, 18 x 24"

July 9, 2015 NOW 21


“I am an artist and a thinker,” Stanziola says. “Everything I put in and leave out has a meaning.”

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Laura Stanziola

the uncanny artist

“In the last 20 years, I’ve found myself using traditional women’s craft techniques—knitting and embroidery—in fine arts,” Stanziola says. “I’ve been knitting since I was seven years old, so I knit pretty quickly.”

This head is part of a 5-foot, 7-inch human figure that hung in the middle of a 17th-century anatomical theater surrounded by 24 pairs of knitted conjoined twins. The installation showed at CCA in 2000.

Before she was an artist, Laura Stanziola was a psychotherapist—a career that still lingers in her current work. Her journals, for example, explore themes such as sexual perversity. In black ink, she pens her research, and in red ink, she creates dialogue. “I process the information through my thoughts,” she says, noting that she also fills the pages with original artwork so that the people who purchase the notebooks “are not just buying my thinking.” Stanziola is perhaps best known for her anatomically correct knitted wire sculptures of the organs. Recently, though, she says, “I’m kind of moving away from that,” noting that her new body of work focuses on monsters. “I don’t want to die known as the conjoined twin artist.”—Whitney Spivey Laura Stanziola, uncannyartist.com

STEPHEN LANG

art

STUDIO


art

PROFILE

Rumi Vesselinova, Crosshatching 2, archival print on cotton rag paper, 17 x 27"

Sketches in Charcoal and Fire Rum i Ve s s el i n ova ’s ne w t a k e on la nd s cap e photo graph y

by As h le y M . Big ge rs

IN 2011, A TREE FELL on a power line near Los Alamos, sparking a wildfire that seared through more than 150,000 acres of the Santa Fe National Forest. The smoke rose dramatically into the skies over Santa Fe, drawing the gazes of awed spectators and the lens of fine-art photographer Rumi Vesselinova. Since moving to Phoenix, Arizona, from her native Bulgaria in 1997, Vesselinova has captured the landscapes of the Southwest. She’s followed the sun from dramatic rise to colorful set, and taken in both epic expanses and its finest grain of sand. But in recent years, her attention has focused on a variation: humans’ impact on the landscape. Although not documentary in style—her latest images are still quite stylized—this direction is somewhat of a return for Vesselinova, who spent much of her early career working for a national photography service in Bulgaria. “Photography was my first vocation and love,” she says. “It’s very immediate, and it gets right to the point. As long as you’re able to do it properly, a good photograph is a very potent medium. It’s such a succinct way to express emotion.” Her photography has taken her to Costa Rica, Greece, Mexico, and Hawaii, to name just a few. Vesselinova accompanied her husband to Phoenix and then to Santa Fe, when he was offered a position in 2000 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he works in environmental science. Indeed, it was his position in Los Alamos that allowed her to explore off-limits areas shortly after the 2011 Los Conchas fire, the subject of her most recent series of images. In Sketches in Charcoal and Fire, Vesselinova shares two perspectives on the

Rumi Vesselinova, Burnt Forest 3, archival print on cotton rag paper, 10 x 20"

wildfire: one of billowing smoke over the skies of Santa Fe (taken in 2011), the second of hillsides strewn with ash and blackened tree trunks (taken 2012–2015). The latter results in nearly monochromatic images of the altered landscape that look much like charcoal drawings or etchings. “It is clear now that drought and warming of the Southwest will make disasters such as the Las Conchas fire more common and more dangerous,” she says. “My work acknowledges this new reality . . . not in any political terms but rather as an artistic message. Then again, art is never apolitical per se.” Of late, Vesselinova’s muses have led her in yet a new direction. She’s begun capturing how humans and computers interact, and the light emissions from gadgets—the technological landscape that is changing our surroundings as rapidly and dramatically as a wildfire. Sketches in Charcoal and Fire, July 24–September 24, reception July 24, 5–7 pm, free, Catenary Art Gallery, 616 Canyon, catenaryartgallery.com July 9, 2015 NOW 23


Festival Countdown Season Sampler Here!

CONCERT VENUES – SFA: St. Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W. Palace Ave. and LEN: The Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W. San Francisco St.

Glorious music performed by a star-studded cast of artists at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival! Below is just a sampling of the more than 40 concerts we’re presenting this season.

MOZART & TCHAIKOVSKY

SUN Jul 19 + MON Jul 20 • 6 PM @ SFA Two of the world’s great pianists — Jon Kimura Parker and Kirill Gerstein—on the same program! MONDAY CONCERT SPONSORED BY OMAHA STEAKS

GOLDBERG VARIATIONS FOR STRINGS SAT Jul 25 • 5 pm @ SFA

Benjamin Beilman, Lily Francis, and Ronald Thomas play Sitkovetsky’s exhilarating arrangement of Bach’s masterpiece.

art

PROFILE

Indian School paintings

Above: Rita Martinez, Taos Lady Getting Water, watercolor on paper, 7 x 13" Below: Augustine Bird, Three Deer, watercolor on paper, 7 x 13"

SPONSORED BY THORNBURG INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

by Polly Nell Jone s

CLASSICAL GUITAR FAVORITES

wor k s by t he c la s s of 19 43 final ly s e e t he s p ot l ig ht at Adobe G al le r y

Acclaimed guitarist Łukasz Kuropaczewski will astound your senses.

CHECK YOUR COLLECTIONS. The Studio at Santa Fe Indian School (1932–1962) produced a host of world-class artists: Allan Houser, Harrison Begay, Pablita Velarde, among others. Adobe Gallery is hosting a special exhibit of 10 watercolors on paper by eight students from The Studio class of 1943. Although only two of these young talents continued with their art careers, these iconic two-dimensional works represent a generation of artists fostered to express their cultural traditions through representative art. The works were acquired by gallery owner Alexander E. Anthony Jr., as a unit from a collector in Albuquerque, without a definitive provenance. The set, which is uniformly framed in wood, is thought to have been purchsed by Conrad Hilton for his Albuquerque hotel, which he opened in 1939. Most pieces have notations on the back indicating that they were Hilton properties at one time. In a recent interview, Ramos Sanchez (San Ildefonso Pueblo), a student in 1943, remembers being paid $400 by Conrad Hilton for his painting of two eagle dancers. At the time, Sanchez recalls, his usual payment was only a few dollars. From a distinguished family of artists, Sanchez, in his 80s, has recently returned to painting and now shows at Indian Market. Delicate and evocative of traditional themes, the colelction ranges from ceremonial (as in the work of Sanchez) to a sensitive corn and melon rendering with rain clouds by Reyes Lovato (Santo Domingo), and represents The Studio direction of Dorothy Dunn, who encouraged “flat-style” painting. Poignant in its clear connections with nature and the earth and its passion for the subject, as in Rita Martinez’s Taos Lady Getting Water, this exhibit inhabits the Southwest and haunts us with its purity and authenticity.

SAT AUG 8 • 5 PM @ SFA

SPONSORED BY THORNBURG INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

VIVALDI’S FOUR SEASONS SAT AUG 15 • 5 pm @ LEN

The boldest of all baroque music is almost 300 years old. Sure you’ve heard it before. But you’ve never heard it like this! SPONSORED BY THORNBURG INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

MOZART FOR TWO PIANOS

MON Aug 17 • 6 PM @ LEN 5pm Pre-Concert Talk Pianists Soyeon Kate Lee and Ran Dank perform Mozart’s Sonata in D and the world premiere of Alexander Goehr’s “Seven Impromptus”. SPONSORED BY OMAHA STEAKS

ALAN GILBERT CONDUCTS MOZART SAT AUg 22 • 6 pm @ LEN

New York Philharmonic music director Alan Gilbert conducts Mozart’s “miracle in sound”, the “Gran Partita”. SPONSORED BY THORNBURG INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

Tickets and Full Season Information 505.982.1890 SantaFeChamberMusic.com Ticket Office: NM Museum of Art, 107 W. Palace Ave.

Marc Neikrug, Artistic Director

JULY 19 – AUGUST 24, 2015

The Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival is funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission and the 1% Lodgers’ Tax, and New Mexico Arts, a division of the Office of Cultural Affairs.

Collection of Paintings by Santa Fe Indian School ­Students—1943, July 10–August 8, reception July 10, 5–7 pm, Adobe Gallery, 221 Canyon, adobegallery.com


art

PROFILE

What Can’t Be Spoken Hila r io Gutie r r e z exhibits hi s de s e r t la nds cape s at Ta ns e y C onte m p ora r y

Above: Hilario Gutierrez, Breaking Light, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 64" Below: Hilario Gutierrez, Look Outside, acrylic on canvas, 55 x 48"

by Emi ly Va n C le ve

ACRYLIC PAINTS AND THE TECHNIQUES used to apply them to canvas are the tools Hilario Gutierrez employs when channeling his deepest feelings into his abstract paintings. Eleven new works from his Strata series were created for his solo show What Can’t Be Spoken, which opens July 10 at Tansey Contemporary. Gutierrez isn’t trying to convey any particular message through these new works. However, he does hint at the feelings he was experiencing when he conceived their titles. Each painting started with a story created in his mind. Then, before paint was applied to canvas, came the title. “The title is important to identifying the painting,” Gutierrez explains. “It’s the way I want viewers to connect themselves to the work. They read the title, which opens the door for them to find their own meaning in the painting.” An artist of 20 years, Gutierrez left a career as a hair stylist and salon owner to become a full-time painter. He had an aha moment during a trip to Monument Valley on New Year’s Day in 1995 when he realized that he needed to start painting—even though he had never worked with paints before. “I bought acrylics and spent the next two years learning how to control paint,” says the Phoenix, Arizona–based artist. “I worked on my own during those two years.” Part of his early process included spending time in the Sonoran Desert and other areas of the Southwest, observing the intricacies of the landscape. He’s inspired by what he calls “the chaos in nature.” Rather than documenting land formations, rocks, and minerals through drawings or photos and using these materials for reference, he’s always been more interested in what he feels about the desert. Viewing himself as a brush rather than a creator, he translates his emotions and feelings into strokes on canvas. His paintings are an expression of the emotions and feelings that pass through him. “The paintings aren’t about me at all,” he says. “They have a life of their own. I’m as surprised at the end of the painting process as anyone else.” This is not to say that Gutierrez is unconcerned about his audience when he creates new paintings. “I do paint for the viewer,” he says. “I need the public to respond to my work.” What Can’t Be Spoken, July 10–August 8, reception July 10, free, 5–7 pm, Tansey Contemporary, 652 Canyon, tanseycontemporary.com

July 9, 2015 NOW 25


art style

Sean Wimberly

PREVIEWS Beckie Kravetz: Love, Death, Revenge Tansey Contemporary 619 Canyon, tanseycontemporary.com Through August 31 Almost nothing evokes passions as well as the great operas; however, inspired by the classics of Verdi, Bizet, Wagner, Puccini, and Ponchielli, Beckie Kravetz has created dynamic, multilayered sculptures that elicit deep emotions. Kravetz’s mixed-media work features key operatic themes sculpted into each piece, as in the ill-fated lovers Siegmund and Sieglinde (below); forever gazing yet never to touch. —Anne Maclachlan

inspired by nature

The artist in his east mountains studio in front of Chamisa Canyon, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 60"

art

STUDIO

Sean Wimberly can often be found strolling the tree-lined trails near his Albuquerque home. “I like to paint a more intimate view of New Mexico landscapes,” he says, “such as walking down a colorful pathway through an aspen forest, wondering what lies around the bend, or looking through a shady, partially open Santa Fe gate and into the garden beyond.” The self-taught acrylic artist developed his impressionistic style of laying thick strokes of color on canvas with a palette knife after years of trial and error; today his work can be found in the New Mexico State Fair permanent collection, and as prints for the Albuquerque Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Weems Artfest. In Santa Fe, he’s represented by Bill Hester Fine Art, where he’s pictured below painting Golden Sunset, (acrylic on canvas, 24 x 24") en plein air as part of last year’s Paint Out event.—Cristina Olds seanwimberly.fineartstudioonline.com

Beckie Kravetz, Detail of Siegmund and Sieglinde, from Wagner’s Die Walküre, bronze, copper, 24-karat gold leaf, and ash wood, 22 x 23 x 11"

Wimberly works full time as an engineer for the water authority in Albuquerque and paints in the evenings and on weekends.

Jason Chakravarty and Sean Hennessey: Kiss My Glass, The William&Joseph Gallery 727 Canyon, thewilliamandjosephgallery.com Through July 31 “These two artists have created bodies of work that make us laugh, make us think, and ask us to see glass in a new light,” says gallery owner Mary Bonney about the works of Jason Chakravarty and Sean Hennessey, both of whom employ mixed media. Chakravarty likes to use neon, while Hennessey incorporates materials such as concrete, wood, and steel. —Emily Van Cleve 26

santafeanNOW.com

Autumn Drive, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 72"

STEPHEN LANG

Sean Hennessey, Electricity, mixed media on cast glass, 18 x 24"


style

Join St. John’s College for our 10th Annual Season WEDNESDAY CONCERTS

July 15

Lavay Smith and Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers All concerts are free, family friendly, and take place on the beautiful campus of St. John’s College. Music begins promptly at 6 p.m. and continues until 8 p.m. Co-presented with St. John’s College and The New Mexico Jazz Music Festival

PREMIER LEAD SPONSOR Designer and owner of Millicent Furniture Emily Henry in her downtown Santa Fe studio

LANB Creating a better way.

GABRIELLA MARKS

LEAD SPONSOR

BAND SPONSOR

PARTNER SPONSORS ALH Foundation

Emily Henry carvi n g ol d-wor ld sty le in new w ay s Emily Henry, owner and designer of the furniture line Millicent, is launching a line of one-of-a-kind pieces and new work, including tables and stools, this week. Henry creates hand-carved modern Americana pieces featuring poplar and brass in the hope, she says, of “reviving and updating the Northern New Mexico woodworking cottage industry.”—Cristina Olds Millicent Launch Party, July 9, 5 pm, 227 E Palace, Ste E millicentfurniture.com

MEDIA SPONSORS

This project is supported in part by New Mexico Arts, a division of the Department of Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

For complete information on this year’s artists and general information about Music on the Hill and St. John’s College, please visit www.sjc.edu. 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca | Santa Fe | New Mexico 87505 | 505-984-6000 July 9, 2015 NOW 27


JAMES BLACK

[on the market]

Rooms with a view Located in the northeast part of the city, just minutes from Hyde Park Road, this gracious two-bedroom, three-bathroom home is practically en route to Ski Santa Fe. Inside the 3,950-square-foot house, the main bedroom has a sitting room that opens to a large sunroom. A special wing, created by the current owners and designed by architect Blaine Young, features a den, a bathroom, a walk-in closet and a 20- by 18-foot art studio with a high ceiling, a fireplace, and French doors leading to a garden. Outside the home are a flagstone patio, decks, and a walkway. On cool summer evenings, enjoy sitting by the water fountain surrounded by piñon and juniper trees.

Santa Fashion Photographer Mark Steven Shepherd proves Santa Fe style is a real thing with his candid shots of locals around town.

List price: $1.295 million, Contact: Laurie Farber-Condon, 505-412-9912, Santa Fe Properties, santafeproperties.com | L A S T LO O K |

GABRIELLA MARKS

123

28

santafeanNOW.com

Created and performed by an eightperson ensemble, the recent dance performance 123 was composed of solo, duet, and trio performances braided together into one 45-minute show. Performed June 5–7 at the New Mexico School for the Arts, 123 explored themes of self, community, and habitat; the energetic performance was filled with contemporary movement that integrated the gymnasium’s ladder, scoreboard, and doors. “The narrative was seated in this peculiar sort of microscopic view of human relationships,” says performer and choreographer Micaela Gardner. The ensemble also included Adam McKinney, Sarah Ashkin, Brittany Delany, Spencer Toll, Miles Tokunow, Ehren Natay, and Sophia Rog, who are part of a collective called Ground Series. “The work was very accessible and the response was great,” Gardner adds. “There were places to hook into the exuberance, and the pure athleticism of the performance had everyone glowing.”—Cristina Olds


| L A S T LO O K |

GABRIELLA MARKS

The Mil-Tones at Music on the Hill

What do you get when you cross two trumpets, two saxophones, two sousaphones, two trombones, an electric guitar, a bass drum, a snare drum, a tuba, some percussion, and a whole lot of talent? Answer: The MilTones Brass Band and—as in the case of their June 17 show at St. John’s College—one outstanding performance. At the summer’s second Music on the Hill concert, the Mil-Tones dazzled the crowd with their original New Orleans–style songs, alongside Jelly Roll Morton and Led Zeppelin covers. Trumpeter J. Q. Whitcomb calls the band’s sound an “eclectic mix” developed by band leader and Louisiana native Milton Villarrubia III. “The music’s gone in a lot of different directions,” Whitcomb says, which, really, is exactly what you’d expect from a 10-pieceplus, high-energy brass ensemble.—Elizabeth Sanchez

July 9, 2015 NOW July 9, 2015 NOW 29


Visit the

Your journey begins with us. Take the train south to Santa Fe, exit at South Capitol and take the free shuttle to the event. There is no on-site parking available at the market.

nmrailrunner.com

Santa Fean Now July 9 2015 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean Now July 9 2015 Digital Edition

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