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now The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

santafeanNOW.com

PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

week of July 3


Presents

Harvesting Traditions

A One Woman Show by Kathleen Wall

Public Opening - Saturday, July 5, 2014 - 12:00 noon to 5:00pm Exhibit runs through January 4, 2015

213 Cathedral Place, Santa Fe, NM 505-988-8900 info@PVMIWA.org - www.PVMIWA.org


FOODIES

now 5 The Buzz The Soulshine music and yoga tour, Pancakes on the Plaza, and a review of Maleficent 7 This Week A comprehensive calendar of goings-on around town 15 EntreFlamenco The dynamic dance troupe begins its summer residency at The Lodge

Galisteo Bistro ranks amongst the TOP restaurants in Santa Fe by

OPEN TABLE TRIPADVISOR URBANSPOON YELP Join us and see for yourself why foodies are raving! NOW SERVING LUNCH Lunch Wednesday–Saturday, 11 am–2 pm Dinner Wednesday–Sunday, 5–9:30 pm Reservations Highly Recommended: 505-982-3700 OpenTable.com or GalisteoBistro.com

227 Galisteo Street, Santa Fe, NM

REWARD

Free Dessert with Entree

16 Santa Fe Wine Festival The popular event welcomes its 21st season

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17 Eating + Drinking El-Evation Bistro 18 Seen Around Photos from fun local events 20 Art Hannah Holliday Stewart, David Unger, Rebecca Tobey, and gallery show openings 27 Style Stunning homes for sale 28 Last Look Chris Robinson Brotherhood at Sol Santa Fe

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

santafeanNOW.com

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THIS JUST MIGHT BE SANTA FE’S BUSIEST weekend of the year. With Independence Day occurring this Friday, there’s so much going on, and the variety of offerings will satisfy every taste and interest. This month’s First Friday on Canyon Road, taking place on July 4, includes numerous gallery openings. I’m especially excited to see painter Ben Steele’s show at Giacobbe-Fritz and of course my dear friend Aleta Pippin’s opening at Pippin Contemporary. Donna Howell-Sickles, whom I first met more than 20 years ago, brings her brand of Western art to her new show at McLarry Fine Art. It’s been such a thrill for me to see her flourish over the decades. On the music front, the bars and performing arts venues are booked with great acts. Michael Franti & Spearhead at The Downs will be a fun party, and Barbara Bentree and John Rangel at Pranzo put on a romantic and fabulous show. There’s live music on the Plaza, with Little Leroy and His Pack of Lies bringing rock and roll to the Bandstand, the Santa Fe Opera is in full swing (everybody was buzzing about last weekend’s opening), and I’m going to check out EntreFlamenco’s show at The Lodge. And if that weren’t enough, there’s also the annual Santa Fe Wine Festival at El Rancho de las Golondrinas. All of this week’s can’t-miss events are covered in this issue of NOW, so be sure to get out there. It doesn’t get much better than this.

Bruce Adams

Publisher

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2014

DAVID ROBIN

WANTED

JULY 3 – JULY 9


ART SANTA FE INTERNATIONAL ART FAIR JULY 10-13, 2014 | SANTA FE CONVENTION CENTER

201 W. MARCY STREET | 505.988.8883 | www.artsantafe.com Tickets available at the Lensic Box Office: 505.988.1234 1st row: Andy Warhol, Art Collection Nakano, Japan; Daniel Kelly, The Tolman Collection of Tokyo, Japan 2nd Row: Pascal, GF Contemporary, New Mexico; Michael Carson, Bonner David Galleries, Arizona 3rd Row: Doris Hembrough, Wisconsin; Ziya TACIR, MERKUR, Turkey; Kusama Yayoi, Gallery EDEL, Japan

C O S TA R I C A | J A PA N | T U R K E Y | U N I T E D S TAT E S Opening Night Gala, lead sponsor Art & Antiques Art in America Party, lead sponsor Zane Bennett Contemporary Art


now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

Welcome to Santa Fe! As a creative, cultural hub, Santa Fe offers an abundance of the world’s best art, attractions, and entertainment opportunities. Santa Fean NOW is the premier source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local or a tourist visiting for the first time or the 100th, NOW’s complete listings of everything from gallery openings to live music events will help you make the most of the city. We look forward to seeing you around the City Different. Should you need any extra tips, please stop by our information centers at the Santa Fe Railyard or off the Plaza at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center.

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

b.y. cooper

amy hegarty samantha schwirck eve tolpa

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

michelle odom, sybil watson

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Wishing you a wonderful time, Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor

whitney stewart

ginny stewart-jaramillo

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER MARKETING CONSULTANT

Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

david wilkinson

andrea nagler

WRITERS

hannah hoel, cristina olds phil parker, emily van cleve

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300

BEN STEELE’S ART CIRCUS SHOW

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Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com Copyright 2014. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

works on view through July 20, 2014

Santa Fean NOW Volume 1, Number 8, Week of July 3, 2014. Published by Bella Media, LLC at 215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2014 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

MORGAN SMITH

Opening reception, Friday July 4, 5-7pm

702 Canyon Road giacobbefritz.com 505.986.1156 DAISY 10x8 mixed media on panel

Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444

On the cover: EntreFlamenco performs at The Lodge. For details, see page 15.


Pancakes on the Plaza

LAUREN DUKOFF

Michael Franti

the Soulshine music and yoga tour Yoga and music make excellent bedfellows during Michael Franti and his band Spearhead’s 35-city Soulshine tour. Part music concert, part yoga practice, Soulshine—being held at The Downs at Santa Fe on July 5—kicks off with an hour-long, all-level yoga session led by Aspen Yoga Society founder Gina Murdock and accompanied by a live acoustic performance by Franti and other musicians. After the session, attendees can relax, mingle, and groove to the sounds of a DJ before Michael Franti & Spearhead, SOJA, Sonna Rele, Brett Dennen, and Trevor Hall perform during a four-hour-long concert. “This has been the best tour I’ve ever been a part of,” says Franti, who’s been practicing yoga for more than 12 years and is well known for songs like his 2009 hit Say Hey (I Love You). “All the bands hang out and play music together offstage and then sit in on each other’s sets onstage,” he adds. “If you want to practice yoga to some great live music, then come early. If you just want to rock out, then come later for the bands.” For more information, visit soulshine.com.—Emily Van Cleve

the

buzz

In Santa Fe, it’s hard to think of the Fourth of July without thinking about Pancakes on the Plaza, the Rotary Club’s perennially popular community event, which is now in its 39th year. On Independence Day, 33 griddles are fired up just before 7 am, and throughout the day delicious pancakes are served with ham, strawberries, and maple syrup to the roughly 9,000 people who stop by to eat their breakfast at one of the dozens of picnic tables set up around the Plaza. But breakfast is only one part of the festivities. At 8 am the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #2951 Honor Guard of Santa Fe leads a presentation of the flags ceremony, and the Santa Fe Concert Band performs the National Anthem. At 9:30 am, there’s a Silly Hat Contest, with Steve Stucker of KOB-TV serving as judge. “We’ve revived the Silly Hat Contest from about four years ago,” says event coordinator Terry Williams-Keffer. “The first-, second-, and third-place winners receive gift certificates.” Musicians perform at the Plaza’s bandstand until about 2:30 pm, with Pancakes on the this year’s lineup including The Plaza begins at 7 am on July 4. Buffalo Nickel Band, Manzanares, The Maxpack, and American JeM. There’s also an arts and crafts show, and classic cars (many with owners who are members of the Santa Fe Vintage Car Club) are on view as well. Tickets for the 7 am to noon breakfast are $7 in advance and $8 on the day of the event. For more information, visit pancakesontheplaza.com.—EVC NOW

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the buzz

malevolent violence ruins Maleficent

Join St. John’s College for our 9th Annual Season Wednesday, July 9 Jazz Vocalist, Annie Sellick All concerts are free, family friendly, and hosted on the beautiful campus of St. John’s College. Music begins promptly at 6 p.m. and continues until 8 p.m. For complete information on this year’s artists and general information about Music on the Hill and St. John’s College, please visit www.sjc.edu.

St. John’s College | 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca | Santa Fe, New Mexico | 87505 | 505-984-6000 | www.sjc.edu

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so bad. Maleficent was once a beautiful, powerful creature with wings to match her curling horns. She and the king had a thing, which didn’t end well, and now he’s crazy. Jolie’s cheekbones get a fantastical digital lift (I think?), but that ruby-red smile is all hers, and it lights the screen on fire. Walt Disney Pictures built the entire movie on the actress’s ability to carry it, and she succeeds like Atlas. The shame about Maleficent is that it won’t ever be a smash hit like the recent animated film Frozen because, like Snow White and the Huntsman, Alice in Wonderland, and every other live-action fantasy these days, the kids get left behind for Lord of the Rings– style assaults. There’s the clanging battle at the beginning of the film, and at the end, when an awesome dragon should have sufficed as the final spectacle, there’s an awful moment when a huge man in armor is cheered as he beats Maleficent with heavy chains. It’s an ugly moment, and, sadly, typical.—Phil Parker

WALT DISNEY STUDIOS MOTION PICTURES

Enough with bloodless battles in kids’ movies. There are marvelous aspects of director Robert Stromberg’s Maleficent, including Angelina Jolie’s performance and dazzling scenes of her character sporting big, brown, beautiful wings. But this will never be a classic film, because the story is bookended by unnecessary, stupid violence. Movie producers, please write this down in ink: Humanity has a real history of men riding into battles on horseback with their swords drawn, and it’s horrible. Unless your movie is rated R and your characters can die brutally, you’ve only diminished it by including these scenes. They insult war. Maleficent could have been great. It’s a clever spin on the Sleeping Beauty fairy tale. Remember that one? A princess is born and her birthday celebration is crashed by an angry witch who curses the baby, saying that on her 16th birthday she’ll prick her finger on a spinning wheel and fall into a coma that she can only be woken from with a kiss from her true love. Maleficent isn’t about the princess, though; it’s about Clockwise rom top: the witch. Like Wicked (the book and Angelina Jolie, Sharlto hit Broadway musical that reimagines Copley, and Elle Fanning The Wizard of Oz), it gives us the villain’s star in Maleficent. backstory and shows that she really isn’t


Folk band Little Tybee appears at the GiG Performance Space on Monday, July 7. For details, see page 12.

this week July 3–July 9 July 3, 2014

NOW

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this week

Santa Fe Opera’s 58th season is in full swing. For details, see pages 11 and 12.

July 3 thursday

Great American Songbook works plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 6:30–9 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

July 4 friday

HBO John Adams Marathon Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Broadway/Cabaret Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

Art Demos and Music Little Bird at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

A screening of the HBO miniseries John Adams over a one-week period. Free (first come, first served basis), 7 pm, 505-466-5526, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Pop-Up Dinner: Great American Cookout Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

BBQ with chefs Rocky Durham and Tanya Story of the SFCA and Josh Baum, owner of The Ranch House. $45, 6:15 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Red Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on cooking class. Dishes include corn tortillas, roasted tomato and chipotle sauce, and red chile sauce. $75, 2 pm, 505-983-4688, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water 8

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Music by David Geist. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Chris Chickery La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Rock and roll with folk and world music influences. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com.

Guitarras Con Sabor El Farol 808 Canyon

Gipsy Kings–style music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Karaoke. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

The Saltanah Dancers Cleopatra Café (Southside location) 3482 Zafarano

Belly-dancing performance. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-820-7381.

Art demos by David K. John, David McElroy, and Roark Griffin. Music by the Robin Holloway Trio and Paula Rhae McDonald. Free, 3–9 pm, 505-820-7413, littlebirdatloretto.com.

Caddyshack Santa Fe Railyard Park Guadalupe and Paseo de Peralta

Outdoor movie screening. Free, sunset, 505-983-5483, heathconcerts.org.

Green Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on cooking class. Dishes include flour tortillas, green chile sauce, roasted tomatillo and cilantro sauce, and green chile, mint, and tamarind sauce. $75, 2 pm, 505-983-4688, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Pancakes on the Plaza Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl


Alpine Sports Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery Bahti Indian Arts Barbara Rosen Antique Jewelry Casa Nova Charlotte Jewelry Collected Works Bookstore Cowboys and Indians Santa Fe Cutlery of Santa Fe Daid Richard Gallery Design Warehouse Designs by Rocki Gorman Doodlet’s Dressman’s Gifts Evoke Contemporary Fairchild & Co Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Golden Dawn Gallery Goler Fine Imported Shoes Gusterman Silversmith Inn on the Alameda Jett Gallery John Rippel U.S.A. Keshi La Fonda Hotel Law Office of Robert Andreotti Lensic Performing Arts Center LewAllen Galleries Lorreen Emporium Lucchese Boot Co Lucille’s Malouf on the Plaza Manitou Gallery Monroe Gallery Museum of Contemporary Native Arts Native Jackets Norma Sharon O’Farrell Hat Company Ojo Optique Origins Plaza Cafe POP Gallery Sante Fe Pueblo Bonito Inn Santa Fe Culinary Academy Santa Fe Dry Goods Santa Fe Espresso Co. Santa Fe Goldworks Santa Fe Indian Trading Co Santa Fe School of Cooking Santa Fe Weaving Gallery Santa Fean Magazine Sock Magic Spirit of the Earth The Golden Eye The Petersom-Cody Gallery The Rainbow Man Things Finer Things Finer Home Tom Taylor Uli’s

SHOPPING IN SANTA FE

From the time of the ancient Anazasi, the Santa Fe area has been a trading center. The Santa Fe Trail is synonymous with the romance of the old west, and from the time of New Mexico statehood in 1912, Santa Fe has been a multicultural art center and shoppers’ paradise. Santa Fe is a top US art center, with museums, shopping, Year-round outdoor activities, top flight restaurants, spas, and world famous cultural events. It’s not just your grandparents’ Santa Fe, it’s walkable, historic, charming, and exciting. A high desert destination of distinction and fun.

SantaFeDowntown.org Free iPhone and Android app The Best of Santa Fe

Find the best shops, restaurants, galleries, museums, parking locations, turn-by-turn directions, mobile deals, weather, news, and local-events with the free app from the iTunes App Store and from the Android Market. Look for the green sticker in the window of participating stores.

July 3, 2014

NOW

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For the 39th year, this annual Independence Day celebration will include breakfast, a vintage car show, and arts and crafts. See profile on page 5. $8, 7 am–noon, 505-919-9709, pancakesontheplaza.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Piano and vocals. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

American Cowgirl McLarry Fine Art 225 Canyon

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

An Artistic Legacy Rediscovered Matthews Gallery 669 Canyon

Works by American modernist sculptor Hannah Holliday Stewart. See profile on page 21. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-992-2882, matthewsgallery.com.

Being True to My Creative Self Pippin Contemporary 200 Canyon

New works by Aleta Pippin. See preview on page 22. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com.

Ben Steele’s Art Circus Show Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art 702 Canyon

Paintings by Ben Steele. See preview on page 22. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-986-1156, giacobbefritz.com.

D. Arthur Wilson Art Gone Wild Gallery 130-D Lincoln

Works by wildlife expressionist artist D. Arthur Wilson. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-820-1004, artgonewildgalleries.com.

Good to Be Home Joe Wade Fine Art 102 E Water

Works by John Oteri. See preview on page 23. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-2727, joewadefineart.com.

Grand Opening The Contemporary Tapestry Gallery 835 W San Mateo

Gallery grand-opening event with hand-woven fine art tapestries. Free, 3–6 pm, 505-231-5904, ladonnamayertapestry.com.

ERIC SWANSON

See preview on page 22. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-1161, mclarryfineart.com.

Rio: Brazil at Museum Hill Museum Hill Café 710 Camino Lejo

New works by sculptor Kevin Box. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-992-8877, selbyfleetwoodgallery.com.

Interpretations of bossa nova and jazz. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-8900, museumhillcafe.net.

Storyteller Bill Hester Fine Art 621 Canyon

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

The Persistence of Religion Tansey Contemporary 652 Canyon

Sierra La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-5511,

Bronze sculptures by Bill Unger. See profile on page 20. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-660-5966, billhesterfineart.com.

A group exhibition focused on work that exemplifies the persistent influence of religion or myth on human cultures both ancient and modern. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-995-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.

Western Regionalism Manitou Galleries 123 W Palace

Works by painters Kim Wiggins and William Haskell. See preview on page 22. Free, reception 5–7:30 pm, 505-986-9833, manitougalleries.com.

Year of the Horse Blue Rain Gallery 130 Lincoln, Ste C

Works by painter Rimi Yang and glass blower Shelley Muzylowski Allen. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-954-9902, blueraingallery.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Movement and Grace Ventana Fine Art 400 Canyon

Broadway/Cabaret Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

Paintings by Jean Richardson and sculpture by Rebecca Tobey. See preview on page 24. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 800-746-8815, ventanafineart.com. 10

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Salsa, cumbia, bachata, and merengue music and dancing. $5, 9:30 pm–1:30 am, 505-992-5800, lodgeatsantafe.com.

Paper Proof Selby Fleetwood Gallery 600 Canyon

Insight Out David Rothermel Contemporary 142 Lincoln, Ste 102

A new body of work by David Rothermel. See preview on page 22. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 575-642-4981, drcontemporary.com.

July 4: Santa Fe School of Cooking’s Green Chile Workshop

Pachanga The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St Francis

Great American Songbook works plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 8–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Music by jazz pianist John Rangel and vocalist Barbara Bentree. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

lafondasantafe.com.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón 213 Washington

Jazz piano trio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Don Pasquale Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

A performance of Donizetti’s Don Pasquale starring baritone Andrew Shore. From $84, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

July 5 saturday Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Park 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and more by local artists. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-310-1555, santafeartistsmarket.com.

Vision Journaling Robbi Firestone’s Studio Location details upon registration

Artist Robbi Firestone leads women through this workshop, during which attendees discover their inner artist, explore subconscious desires, and get in touch with unknown dreams in an intimate,


supportive, and joy-filled environment. From $75, 1–5 pm, 310-990-4018, youarethemasterpiece.com.

Carmen Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

Cooking New Mexican from the Harvey House Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Santa Fe Wine Festival El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos

An opportunity to sample New Mexico wines straight from the vintners, with food, music, and arts and crafts. See profile on page 16. $13 includes glass (teens $6, kids free), 12–6 pm, 505-471-2216, golondrinas.org.

Summer Cooking Class Estrella Del Norte Vineyard 106 N Shining Sun

Santa Fe Culinary Academy hosts a Southwesternthemed cooking class on Estrella Del Norte’s garden patio. Instructors demonstrate using a wood-fired oven and grill while wine experts discuss New Mexico’s wine history and production. $120, 10 am–12 pm, 505-455-2826, estrelladelnortevineyard.com.

Grand Opening The Contemporary Tapestry Gallery 835 W San Mateo

Gallery grand-opening event with hand-woven fine art tapestries. Free, 3–6 pm, 505-231-5904, ladonnamayertapestry.com.

Once Upon a Time In America Monroe Gallery of Photography 112 Don Gaspar

Photographs by Steve Schapiro, whose stunning images capture Robert F. Kennedy, Marlon Brando, Robert Redford, Andy Warhol, and many other celebrities and politicians. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-992-0810, monroegallery.com.

Zazenkai Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo

Day-long silent meditation retreat. $35 (includes meals), 7 am–9 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Black Sea Hotel GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St

A New York–based a cappella trio that draws inspiration from Balkan folk music. $20, 8 pm, gigsantafe.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

July 5: Black Sea Hotel

ROBERT WINGMAN

A hands-on class recreating dishes that made Fred Harvey’s Harvey Houses and rail-car café service famous. The menu includes albondigas soup, hot Mexican bean dip, chile rellenos à la Konrad, and chicken enchiladas with homemade tortillas—all from recipes in The Fred Harvey Cookbook by Stephen Fried. 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

A performance of Bizet’s Carmen starring mezzosoprano Daniela Mack and tenor Roberto De Biasio. From $84, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

The Soulshine Tour Downs at Santa Fe 27475 W Frontage

Michael Franti & Spearhead bring their music and yoga tour to Santa Fe. See profile on page 5. Yoga $10–$20, concert $44–$61, yoga starts at 3 pm, concert at 6 pm, 505-471-3311, ticketssantafe.org.

Great American Songbook works plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 8–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

July 6 sunday

Broadway/Cabaret Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

International Folk Arts Week/Between Two Worlds Exhibition Opening Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

Live performance by Julie Trujillo and David Geist. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Piano and vocals. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar with John Serkin Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen 1512 Pacheco Slack key guitar music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com.

Jazz (Off the Plaza) Swiss Bistro & Bakery 401 S Guadalupe

Live music on the patio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-988-1111, swissbakerysantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Noche de Flamenco El Mesón 213 Washington

Flamenco show. Reservations required, $10, 7–9:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Sierra La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country band. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com.

Events celebrating the opening of Between Two Worlds: Folk Artists Reflect on the Immigration Experience. Events include an artist discussion (1–2 pm) and a reception with international food and live music (2–4 pm). Free with museum admission ($6–$9), 505-982-4636, internationalfolkart.org.

HBO John Adams Marathon Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

A screening of the HBO miniseries John Adams over a one-week period. Free (first come, first served basis), 7 pm, 505-466-5526, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Fourth of July Weekend Cowboy Cookout on the Mesa Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa 1297 Bishop’s Lodge

A Bishop’s Lodge summer tradition, the Cowboy Cookout includes a BBQ, free pony rides, live music, dancing, and more. Reservations required, $20–$40, 6 pm, 505-819-4035, bishopslodge.com.

Santa Fe Wine Festival El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos

An opportunity to sample New Mexico wines straight from the vintners, with food, music, and arts and crafts. See profile on page 16. $13 includes glass (teens $6, kids free), noon–6 pm, El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 505-471-2216, golondrinas.org.

Grand Opening The Contemporary Tapestry Gallery 835 W San Mateo

Gallery grand-opening event with hand-woven fine art tapestries. Free, 3–6 pm, 505-231-5904, ladonnamayertapestry.com.

Boris & The Salt Licks—John Prine July 3, 2014

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Tribute Brunch Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Americana music. Free, 12–3 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Santa Fe Flute Immersion Concert Immaculate Heart of Mary Retreat and Conference Center 50 Mt Carmel

This very popular concert is the culmination of an annual flute master class, Santa Fe Flute Immersion, presented by the New Mexico Performing Arts Society. Free, 5:30 pm, 505-474-4513, nmperformingartssociety.org.

July 7 monday Japanese Kite Making Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

A Japanese kite making demonstration, presented in conjunction with the exhibit Tako Kichi: Kite Crazy in Japan. Free with museum admission ($6–$9), 1–4 pm, 505-982-4636, internationalfolkart.org.

Burritos Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 S Guadalupe

A hands-on class that teaches you how to prepare three different versions of burritos. $98, 10 am, 505-983-4688, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Little Tybee GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St

Atlanta-based folk rock bank with vocalist/guitarist/pianist Brock Scott, eight-string guitarist Josh Martin, violinist Nirvana Kelly, bassist Ryan Donald, and percussionist Pat Brooks. $20, 8 pm, gigsantafe.com.

July 8 tuesday Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com. 12

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Tango Milonga El Mesón 213 Washington

onstrating with recipes for sweet hot mustard, marinated pork tacos, creamy chile dip, and mango salsa. $75, 5:30–7:30 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

July 9 wednesday

Susanna Trilling: Oaxacan Cuisine Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 S Guadalupe

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Breakfast with the Curators Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

Join artist Luis Tapia and the MoIFA’s director of its Gallery of Conscience, Suzy Seriff, and its community engagement coordinator, Laura Marcus Green, for a behind-the-scenes look at Between Two Worlds: Folk Artists Reflect on the Immigrant Experience. Reservations required, $25–$30, 8:30–10 am, 505-476-1215, internationalfolkart.org.

Wednesday Night Slide Lecture Series Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia

Linda Christianson presents a slide lecture on her work, which is currentlly on view to the public. Free, 7–8:30 pm, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

HBO John Adams Marathon Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma A screening of the HBO miniseries John Adams over a one-week period. Free (first come, first served basis), 7 pm, 505-466-5526, jeancocteaucinema. com.

Spice 101: A Tasting of World Spices Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Kate Wheeler, local chef and owner of The Savory Spice Shop, teaches a class about spices, dem-

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date.

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All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.

Susanna Trilling, founder and director of the Seasons of My Heart Cooking School in Oaxaca, Mexico, teaches a demonstration-style class on authentic Mexican cooking. $85, 6 pm, 505-983-4688, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

C. S. Rockshow La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Classic rock covers. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com.

Gary Paul Returns to Duel Brewing Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

A blend of Celtic, Americana, and blues music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Karaoke Night Junction 530 S Guadalupe

Karaoke. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-988-7222, junctionsantafe.com.

Don Pasquale Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

A performance of Donizetti’s Don Pasquale starring baritone Andrew Shore. From $84, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

Music on the Hill St. John’s College 1160 Camino de Cruz Blanca

One of six free jazz concerts on the college’s athletic field. Annie Sellick performs. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-6199, sjc.edu.

Santa Fe Bandstand 2014: Santa Fe Opera Apprentices Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

A performance by apprentices from Santa Fe Opera’s Apprentice Program, which is internationally recognized as one of the best of its kind. Free, 6–7 pm, 505-986-6054, santafebandstand.org.

Ongoing Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, Saturdays 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.


Bio-Morphed Turner Carroll Gallery 725 Canyon

Glenorchy Gerald Peters Gallery 1011 Paseo de Peralta

Shawn Smith, Rex Ray, and Josh Garber share perspectives on the natural world. See preview on page 25. Free, through July 27, 505-986-9800, turnercarroll.com.

Paintings of Glenorchy, New Zealand by Mike Glier. Free, through July 5, 505-954-5700, gpgallery.com.

Plein Air Santa Fe 2014 InArt Gallery 219 Delgado

Paintings and Works on Paper Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 554 S Guadalupe

The work of 49 juried plein air artists. Free, through July 6, 505-983-6537, inartsantafe.com.

Works by Anne Truitt. See preview on page 23. Free, through July 27, 505-989-9898, charlottejackson.com.

Wilderness Within Hunter Kirkland Contemporary 200 B Canyon

Into the Moonlight Bindle Stick Studio 616 ½ B Canyon

A new series of works by Santa Fe painter Rick Stevens. See preview on page 24. Free, through July 6, 505-984-8111, hunterkirklandcontemporary.com.

Golden Paths New Concept Gallery 610 Canyon

Acrylic and gold leaf paintings by Edwina Milner. Free, through July 7, 505-795-7570, newconceptgallery.com.

Seasons of Color Waxlander Gallery 622 Canyon

Paintings by Marshall Noice. Free, through July 7, 505-984-2202, waxlander.com.

Animales Marigold Arts 424 Canyon

Watercolor paintings by Ruth Tatter and oil paintings by Janice Griffin. Free, through July 10, 505-982-4142, marigoldarts.com.

Dawn to Dusk Nedra Matteucci Galleries 1075 Paseo de Peralta

Landscapes by Chris Morel. Free, through July 12, 505-982-4631, matteucci.com.

Down the Rabbit Hole Eggman & Walrus 130 W Palace

Installation with Sandra Butler, Jeff Madeen, and Joan Levine Russell, with special guests. Free, through July 12, 505-660-0048, eggmanwalrus.com.

Pottery of the Western Pueblos: Acoma, Laguna, and Zuni Adobe Gallery 221 Canyon

A selection of traditional pottery pieces. Free, through July 12, 505-955-0550, adobegallery.com.

Luís Gonzalez Palma Owings Gallery 120 E Marcy

New work by contemporary Latin American photographer Luís Gonzalez Palma. Free, through July 14, 505-983-4215, owingsgallery.com.

A new series of narrative works by Jeffrey Schweitzer. Free, through July 30, 917-679-8080, jeffreyschweitzer.com. Ongoing: Australian Contemporary Indigenous Art III at Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art

Power Objects Tansey Contemporary 652 Canyon

Handblown glass sculptures by Noel Hart. See preview on page 23. Free, through July 15, 505-9958513, tanseycontemporary.com.

Byways: Paintings by Damien Stamer Complications: Works in Glass by Matthew Szösz Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

Landscapes by Damien Stamer and glassworks by Matthew Szösz. See preview on page 25. Free, through July 18, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Elements Art Quilt Exhibit with Poetry La Tienda Exhibit Space in Eldorado 7 Caliente

An exhibit of contemporary mixed-media fiber art. Free, through July 18, poetry reading 6–7 pm, 505-428-0024, theexhibitspace.com.

Hopper Meditations photo-eye Gallery 541 S Guadalupe

Photo-eye Gallery hosts a grand opening event with an exhibition of works by photographer Richard Tuschman, who’s inspired by painter Edward Hopper. Free, through July 19, 505-988-5150, photoeye.com.

ruah William Siegal Gallery 540 S Guadalupe

Mixed-media work by Judy Tuwaletstiwa. Free, through July 22, 505-820-3300, williamsiegal.com.

Heads Up David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

Sculptures by Judy Chicago. Free, through July 26, 505-983-9555, davidrichardgallery.com.

Magic Square Chalk Farm Gallery 729 Canyon

Paintings by Lukáš Kándl. Free, through July 30, 505-983-7125, chalkfarmgallery.com.

Finished with Fire Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia

Work by Bonnie Lynch and Mary Roehm. Free, through August 2, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

James Surls Wade Wilson Art 217 W Water

Works by James Surls. See preview on page 23. Free, through August 2, 505-660-4393, wadewilsonart.com.

Australian Contemporary Indigenous Art III Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art 702 ½ Canyon

Abstract paintings by contemporary Australian indigenous artists. See preview on page 25. Free, through August 3, 505-992-0711, chiaroscurosantafe.com.

Martin Cary Horowitz Yares Art Projects 123 Grant

Sculptures by Martin Cary Horowitz. See page 25. Free, through August 11, yaresartprojects.com.

Forms in Balance Gerald Peters Gallery 1011 Paseo de Peralta

Sculptures by Will Clift. Free, through August 16, 505-954-5700, gpgallery.com.

Rumi on Canvas Longworth Gallery 530 Canyon

Paintings by Rahileh Rokhsari. Free, through August 31, 505-989-4210, thelongworthgallery.com.

In the Mood ViVO Contemporary 725 Canyon

Local musicians and artists. See preview on page 24. July 3, 2014

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Free, through September 2, 505-982-1320, vivocontemporary.com.

to renovations of mission churches throughout the Americas and, all too often, the casting off of centuries-old artwork. $6–$9, through March 29, 2015, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

William Albert Allard, Kevin Bubriski, and Greg MacGregor VERVE Gallery of Photography 219 E Marcy

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo

Three separate but concurrent shows feature works by documentary photographers. Free, through September 6, 505-982-5009, vervegallery.com.

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture presents its extensive collection of Southwestern turquoise jewelry and educates on the geology, mining, and history of the stone. $6–$9, through May 2016, 505-467-1200, indianartsandculture.org.

A New Look at the Old Southwest Manitou Galleries 225 Canyon

Mabel Dodge Luhan & Company: American Moderns and the West The Harwood Museum of Art 238 Ledoux, Taos

Group show featuring Southwestern artists. Free, ongoing, 877-986-9833, manitousantafean.com.

Calais David Rothermel Contemporary 142 Lincoln, Ste 102

Gallery works and new works. Free, ongoing, 575-642-4981, drcontemporary.com.

High Desert Meditations Meyer East Gallery 225 Canyon

New paintings by David Jonason. Free, ongoing, 505-983-1657, meyereastgallery.com.

Voice of the West Wiford Gallery 403 Canyon

Oil works by Barry Thomas. Free, ongoing, 505-982-2403, wifordgallery.com.

Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

The best of groundbreaking artwork from Santa Fe’s formative artistic years of approximately 1915 to 1940. $6–$9 (kids free), through July 27, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Tako Kichi: Kite Crazy in Japan Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

An exhibition of traditional kites from various regions of Japan explores cultural, historic, and artistic perspectives of kite making and kite flying. Also features kite-making workshops and kite flying on the plaza at Museum Hill. $6–$9, through July 27, 505-982-4636, internationalfolkart.org.

Brandywine Workshop Collection Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

A collection of works by indigenous artists, donated by the Brandywine Workshop (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) opens to the public. $10 (kids free), Monday–Saturday 10 am–5 pm (closed Tuesday), through July 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

We Hold These Truths Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Shan Goshorn’s exhibit of contemporary paper baskets, inspired by traditional Cherokee baskets, opens in the museum’s North Gallery. Goshorn’s work incor14

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Judy Chicago, The Return of the Butterfly. Courtesy of the New Mexico Museum of Art Collection.

porates Native American themes such as treaties, laws, and land allotments and offers “an opportunity to reinterpret penned history.” $10 (kids free), Monday–Saturday 10 am–5 pm (closed Tuesday), through July 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams: The Hawaii Pictures Georgia O’Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson

The first exhibition to feature artwork created in Hawaii by American modernists and friends Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams. $6–$12 (kids free), through September 14, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

Intimate and International: The Art of Nicolai Fechin Taos Art Museum and Fechin House 227 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos

An exhibit of 25 paintings and 30 drawings by Nicolai Fechin—known for emotive, vivid, and idiosyncratic art—will be exhibited at the late artist’s Taos home and studio. $8, through September 21, 575-758-2960, taosartmuseum.org.

Local Color: Judy Chicago in New Mexico New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

An exhibition of Judy Chicago’s large-scale projects and smaller-scale personal artworks opens to the public in honor of the artist’s 75th birthday. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through October 12, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A collection of nearly 225 photographs and 40 cameras that show how a light-tight box with a tiny hole can help capture amazing photos. $6–$9, through March 2015, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Painting the Divine: Images of Mary in the New World New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A 1960’s ecclesiastical wave of urban renewal led

Mabel Dodge Luhan (1879–1962) was a Taos icon and a political, social, and cultural visionary who collected modern works relevant to painting, photography, drama, psychology, radical politics, and social reform. $8–$10, through September 2016, 575-758-9826, harwoodmuseum.org.

Santa Fe Bandstand Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Annual summer-long music festival on the Plaza in downtown Santa Fe. A full range of diverse music is presented nightly, from Americana and indie to country, jazz, world, New Mexico classics, and more. Free, through August 28, 505-986-6054, santafebandstand.org.

City Tours

Walking tours of Santa Fe with various companies including Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505-983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), and New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

EntreFlamenco The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis

See page 15. $25–$45, 8 pm nightly (except Tuesdays), through August 31, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.


EntreFlamenco the dynamic dance troupe begins its

MORGAN SMITH

summer residency at The Lodge at Santa Fe IF A CERTAIN “something” about EntreFlamenco’s summer performances at The Lodge at Santa Fe reminds audiences of famed dancer and choreographer Maria Benitez’s shows, there’s a good reason: The company’s directors, the husband and wife team of Antonio Granjero and Estefania Ramirez, danced with Benitez’s Teatro Flamenco. Granjero, who studied classical Spanish dance, ballet, and flamenco in Spain beginning at age 10 and founded the award-winning EntreFlamenco in 1998, was handpicked by Benitez during one of her annual recruitment trips to Spain. Granjero later joined Teatro Flamenco as a soloist and choreographer in 1995 and has collaborated with Benitez for nearly two decades. Ramirez, who grew up studying ballet, modern dance, and African dance and then majored in dance at the University of New Mexico, toured nationally with

by Emi ly Va n Cle ve

“I learned from Maria Benitez that to produce a good show, you have to give great importance to each and every detail and be concentrated on the project 100 percent,” says EntreFlamenco’s Antonio Granjero.

Pablo Rodarte’s Dance España as the principal female dancer immediately after graduation. When Benitez asked her to be part of a Teatro Flamenco tour in the United States and Canada, she agreed. “I learned from Maria that to produce a good show, you have to give great importance to each and every detail and be concentrated on the project 100 percent,” Granjero says. “I also learned how to make each element synchronized perfectly to achieve a natural flow.” From July 2 through August 31, EntreFlamenco is the resident Spanish flamenco dance company at the Maria Benitez Cabaret venue (named for Granjero and Ramirez’s mentor) at The Lodge on North St. Francis Drive. Granjero—who, according to his company’s mission statement, founded EntreFlamenco “to promote, share, and educate the public about the history and evolution of flamenco culture”— has created new choreography for the show, which his troupe performs six nights a week, as well as original costumes and set designs. He and Ramirez are the principal soloists, and dancers Alice Blumenfeld, Miquela Wiegel, and Keyana De Aguero join them onstage. José Vega and Alex Jordan play guitar, Roberto Lorente sings, and Francisco Orozco sings and plays percussion. Two brief musical numbers highlight the musicians’ talents. For more information, visit entreflamenco.com or lodgeatsantafe.com. July 3, 2014

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Santa Fe Wine Festival the popular event welcomes its 21st season by Emily Va n C le ve

It’s a tart wine that’s often served with light meats and heavy seafood. Traditional Spanish wines are available at Casa Abril Vineyards and Winery’s booth. “We serve varietals— no blends and no wines with fancy names,” says owner Raymond Vigil, whose winery is located in Algodones. “We’ll be bringing 14 different wines to the festival.” Tempranillo, a wine native to Spain, and Malbec, a variety grown in Argentina, are among Casa Abril’s offerings.

NOW IN ITS 21ST YEAR, the Santa Fe Wine Festival is popular with wine lovers who enjoy small wine-tasting events that offer ample opportunity to talk directly with the vintners. “Only 2,000 to 2,500 people come each day, and there are never very long lines,” says Amanda Crocker, director of programs and marketing at El Rancho de las Golondrinas, which hosts the event. “For us, it’s the perfect wine festival,” she adds. The event, which takes place from noon to 6 pm on July 5 and July 6, features a standout selection of wines from 17 New Mexico wineries. Acequia Vineyards & Winery in Corrales brings five different kinds to the festival, including their Osprey, which is an off-dry white wine that’s blended with Vidal blanc and muscat. “It’s got a little bit of spice at the end of it,” says owner Al Knight. “It’s a wine that goes well with just about anything—from turkey and pumpkin pie to shrimp. It makes a great gift when you don’t know what someone likes.” If dry rosé is your thing, try Acequia Vineyard’s Cooper’s Hawk Rosé made from Léon Millot grapes. 16

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“Only 2,000 to 2,500 people come to the Santa Fe Wine Festival each day, and there are never very long lines. For us, it’s the perfect wine festival,” says Amanda Crocker of El Rancho de las Golondrinas, which hosts the event.

Other participating wineries include Amaro Winery, Anasazi Fields Winery, Black Mesa Winery, Corrales Winery, Don Quixote Distillery & Winery, Estrella Del Norte Vineyard, Gruet Winery, La Chiripada Winery, Luna Rossa Winery, Matheson Winery, Ponderosa Winery, St. Clair Winery, Tierra Encantada Vineyards and Winery, Tularosa Vineyards, and Wines of the San Juan. For more information, visit santafewinefestival.com.

COURTESY OF EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS

Attendees of the Santa Fe Wine Festival enjoy wines from more than a dozen New Mexico wineries.


summertime is salad time

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

For the perfect light but satisfying summer salad, head to El-Evation Bistro. Chef Andres Portugues uses arugula, spinach, and mixed greens for his base and then adds jicama and carrots for a crunchy texture, ruby-red grapefruit and pomegranate seeds for sweetness, and a light honey-chipotle vinaigrette for a dressing. Portugues says that the key ingredient in his dressing is fresh chipotle adobo, which is uniquely New Mexican but doesn’t overwhelm the senses. Top off your salad with grilled chicken or shrimp, and then enjoy it on the bistro’s outdoor patio.—Cristina Olds El-Evation Bistro, 103 E Water, 505-820-0363

eating+ drinking

July 3, 2014

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Seen Around photographs by Adrian Wills

LUISA KOLKER

KAREN SCHULD

KAREN SCHULD

Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.

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Covering Santa Fe in a unique way. aBqJournal.com/subscribe July 3, 2014

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art

openings | reviews | artists

David Unger The dynamic, fluid figures David Unger sculpts transcend the seemingly static medium of clay cast in bronze. “I’ve always liked using my hands,” Unger says. “You can feel the energy of what you’re doing. When working with a tool, I don’t feel like I’m imparting what I’m feeling in my body into the piece.” Unger hits his stride portraying two figures interacting, where a head tilt conveys emotion and narrative. The Tucson-based artist exhibits at galleries in Arizona and Maine in addition to Santa Fe’s Bill Hester Fine Art, where his solo show Storyteller runs July 4–July 31 (reception July 4, 5–7 pm).—Ashley M. Biggers Bill Hester Fine Art billhesterfineart.com

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David Unger, Tango, bronze, 21 x 14 x 24"


art

PROFILE

An Artistic Legacy Rediscovered Matthews Gallery honors the late sculptor Hannah Holliday Stewart b y Hannah Hoe l

AN ARTISTIC LEGACY REDISCOVERED, opening July 4 at Matthews Gallery, shows 50 never-before-seen works by the late abstract sculptor Hannah Holliday Stewart (1924–2010). Two years after Stewart passed away in Albuquerque, Matthews Gallery began managing her estate and sifting through her untouched studio. “Imagine walking into an artist’s studio that had been kept private for 20 years and discovering artwork that hardly anyone knew still existed,” says gallery owner Lawrence Matthews. Matthews has noted in the past that Stewart enjoyed a successful career and worked hard to build her legacy, only to mysteriously turn her back on the art world. His curiosity about her reasons and about why she isn’t better known today was a driving force behind this exhibition, which showcases works Stewart created during the last decades of her life, including a totemic nine-foot bronze sculpture.

Hannah Holliday Stewart

Foreground: Ockum’s Razor, bronze, 31 x 36 x 7". In back: Clotho, bronze, 27 x 10 x 6".

“Imagine walking into an artist’s studio that had been kept private for 20 years and discovering artwork that hardly anyone knew still existed,” says Lawrence Matthews of Matthews Gallery. Born in Alabama, Stewart was part of a small group of influential female sculptors working in the late 20th century. After graduating from Michigan’s Cranbrook Academy of Art, she lived and worked in Houston, Texas, where she built her reputation as a sculptor whose interests included ancient myths, goddess imagery, science, and natural phenomena. Stewart wrote in a statement that her goal was “to render visible the hidden realities of pent-up contained energy.” This sentiment visibly informs the strength of Stewart’s dynamic bronze shapes and speaks to her victory of female authorship in a less welcoming era, as evidenced by her monumental sculpture for Houston’s Hermann Park, which was commissioned in 1972. During Stewart’s lifetime, her work was shown at the Smithsonian Institution, the San Francisco Museum of Art, the Dallas Museum of Fine Art, and the High Museum in Atlanta, among other institutions. At the peak of her career, she unexpectedly left Houston for Albuquerque and never exhibited again. This mysterious upheaval is still being explored, and Matthews hopes that An Artistic Legacy Rediscovered will shed light on a career that “helped lead the way for generations of women sculptors.” Hannah Holliday Stewart, An Artistic Legacy Rediscovered, July 4–July 18, reception July 4, 5–7 pm, Matthews Gallery, thematthewsgallery.com July 3, 2014

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opening art receptions

Donna Howell-Sickles, Every Cowgirl Has a Story, acrylic on canvas, 45 x 30"

Donna Howell-Sickles: American Cowgirl McLarry Fine Art 225 Canyon, mclarryfineart.com July 4–July 18, reception July 4, 5–7 pm While pursing her BFA at Texas Tech in Lubbuck in the early 1970s, Texas native Donna Howell-Sickles happened upon a ca. 1935 postcard depicting a strong, confident cowgirl, and the artist was immediately inspired. Since then, she’s gone on to make the iconic female image central to her paintings, as seen in her latest show, which features new acrylic and mixedmedia works.

Kim Wiggins and William Haskell: Western Regionalism Manitou Galleries 123 W Palace, manitougalleries.com July 4–July 18, reception July 4, 5–7:30 pm Painters Kim Wiggins and William Haskell, renowned for their dramatic and evocative Western landscape paintings, join forces for their latest show.

David Rothermel, Gypsum, acrylic on panel, 48 x 54"

David Rothermel: Insight Out Daivd Rothermel Contemporary 142 Lincoln, Ste 102, drcontemporary.com Through July 15, reception July 4, 5–8 pm Part of an ongoing series of work diving deep into mixed theories of abstraction, modernist design, and color-field experimentation, David Rothermel’s new show explores formal painting with deliberate tonality. The pleasing color values dance with contrast, while spatial structures adhere to a trained formalist practice. Careful interplay between layered and diminished brushstrokes within structuralist rigidity leads to compositions that perpetually attract the viewer’s gaze and, Rothermel says playfully, “achieve the breath of abstract art. In and out . . . insight and out.”—B.Y. Cooper

William Haskell, Santa Ana Light, acrylic, 36 x 24"

Aleta Pippin, How Deep Is the Ocean, acrylic, acrylic panels, Mylar, LED lighting, 36 x 12 x 3"

Ben Steele: Ben Steele’s Art Circus Show Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art, 702 Canyon, giacobbefritz.com July 4–July 20, reception July 4, 5–7 pm Ben Steele uses the language of visual puns to create what can be described as meta-mashup paintings. His process of employing silkscreen and other application techniques results in pieces that are—in the tradition of Warhol, one of his influences—reproducible. In the past Steele has reinterpreted classic works of art; here he turns his eye to the circus and all its components: performers, animals, spectators, and concessions.—Eve Tolpa Ben Steele, Gourd-geous, oil on canvas, 30 x 25"

Aleta Pippin: Being True to My Creative Self Pippin Contemporary, 200 Canyon, pippincontemporary.com Through July 22, reception July 4, 5–7 pm Artist and gallery owner Aleta Pippin presents new mixed-media works that celebrate the spirit of exploration she’s cultivated throughout her career. In her latest show, she explores “the transparency of acrylic panels, LED lighting, and metals incorporated with her signature color.” 22

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Andrée Hudson, Sunset Riders, acrylic on canvas, 30 x 60"

Andrée Hudson: Wild for Color Waxlander Art Gallery & Sculpture Garden 622 Canyon waxlander.com July 8–July 21 Reception July 11, 5–8 pm Whether her brushy, expressionistic pieces capture human figures, wildlife, or landscapes, Andrée Hudson employs a bold color palette to build her forms, keeping their internal structures foremost in mind. Along with Hudson’s paintings, Waxlander also unveils a clay pre-casting of the artist’s first bronze—a new direction for Hudson but not an unexpected one. “I always think about things in 3-D anyway,” she says.—ET

Noel Hart, Blossom-Headed Parrot, handblown glass, 22 x 16 x 4"

Anne Truitt, Quick, acrylic on canvas, 22 x 42"

James Surls Wade Wilson Art 217 W Water, wadewilsonart.com Through August 2 In recent years James Surls has hosted an annual open-studio weekend in Aspen, drawing collectors, curators, and critics nationwide. For 2014, he brings the event to Santa Fe, giving an artist talk and leading both a tour of his public sculptures (in conjunction with Creative Santa Fe) and a discussion panel. A portion of proceeds from exhibition sales benefit select local arts organizations.—ET

Anne Truitt: Paintings and Works on Paper Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, 544 S Guadalupe, charlottejackson.com Through July 27 This show features rarely seen works from the 1960s through the 1980s by Anne Truitt (1921–2004), who’s known mostly for her wooden sculptures. Born in Baltimore, Maryland, Truitt studied psychology at Bryn Mawr College and treated shell-shocked soldiers in a Boston hospital before she enrolled in Washington, D.C.’s Institute of Contemporary Art in 1948. Her paintings are striking for their deliberate colors and forms, and for the layers of emotions and experiences they evoke or bring to the surface. “Once it had occurred to me that I could use color metaphorically for content,” Truitt said, “I realized that I could go ahead with new freedom.” Power Objects Tansey Contemporary 652 Canyon, tanseycontemporary.com Through July 15 Noel Hart, who’s worked in various mediums but has primarily focused on glass since 2000, has said that the motivation behind his work is “a consuming passion for an abstract or semiabstract personal iconography, reflecting an interest in nature and ecology.” His solo show Power Objects features hand-blown glass sculptures.

art

PREVIEWS

James Surls, Stem Cell Seeing, bronze and stainless steel, 26 x 22 x 21"

John Oteri, Settled in Chimayó, watercolor on paper, 16 x 20"

John Oteri: Good to Be Home Joe Wade Fine Art July 4–July 13, reception July 4, 5–7 pm

John Oteri describes himself as a selftaught artist, but the Texas native, who retired with his wife to Santa Fe 24 years ago, possesses a background in architecture and has, he says, “been able to draw since I was 5 or 6.” His paintings range from realist landscapes to more abstract, stylized, and graphically inspired figurative “vignettes” that intentionally “leave a little bit to the imagination.” Regardless of subject matter, Oteri aims to capture “the expressions of the Southwest,” adding that “what [they] really evoke to me has to do with weather, history, and nostalgia.”—ET July 3, 2014

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art

PREVIEWS

David Jonason, Big Weather, oil on canvas, 30 x 30"

David Jonason: High Desert Meditations Meyer East Gallery, 225 Canyon meyereastgallery.com Through July 3, reception June 20, 5–7 pm Meyer East presents new work by David Jonason, whose stylized, geometric oil-on-canvas pieces depict the multitudinous landscapes of the Southwest. Whether he’s capturing the dramatic rock formations of Utah’s Monument Valley, the saguaro cacti that populate Arizona, or the high desert cliffs of New Mexico, Jonason’s sources of inspiration are apparent: cubism, art deco, and (fittingly) the Taos School, to name a few.—ET

Rick Stevens Hunter Kirkland Contemporary 200 B Canyon hunterkirklandcontemporary.com Through July 6 In a new series of work featuring both oils and pastels, Santa Fe painter R ick Stevens explores the continuum of energy present in natural phenomena. Whatever his subject—be it the dynamism of a sunset or a rainstorm— the artist contends that “it’s all alive—there are no inanimate substances. Even the rocks in the desert serve as hosts for entire ecosystems.”—ET

Rick Stevens, Interpenetrated by the Void, oil on canvas, 50 x 50"

In the Mood ViVO Contemporary, 725 Canyon vivocontemporary.com Through September 2, musical events every Friday through August 29, 5–7 pm In the spirit of their previous shows pairing visual art and poetry, ViVO presents a collaboration of gallery artists and various local musicians. Printmaking, calligraphy, book art, kiln glass, sculpture, and mixed-media are complemented by compositions employing everything from harmonica to jazz saxophone and classical strings to vocals. Visitors listen to recorded music corresponding with works of art for an interactive multimedia experience.—ET George Duncan, Radiant Bridges, acrylic on panel, 24 x 18"

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: Rebecca Tobey

Rebecca Tobey, Merlin, bronze, 19 x 28 x 17" 24

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Though she makes watercolor paintings, jewelry, fine-art glass, and bronzes, Rebecca Tobey considers herself primarily a ceramic sculptor. But, she says, “I create stylized animals, which work well in all media,” noting that whatever the material, she is first and foremost a colorist. Tobey moved to Santa Fe in 1975, when she realized “this town was where I was supposed to be.” At first, she felt “boxed in” by being characterized as a Southwestern artist, but labels no longer bother her, especially as she keeps turning her attention to the city itself. “It has continued to influence me and my work through its colors, vibrancy of life, and culture,” she says. “I still find it enchanting.” From July 4 through July 16, Tobey’s work can be seen in a show at Ventana Fine Art called Movement and Grace, which also features paintings by Jean Richardson. A reception is being held July 4 from 5 to 7 pm.—ET


art

ongoing

PREVIEWS

Byways: Paintings by Damien Stamer Complications: Works in Glass by Matthew Szösz Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe, zanebennettgallery.com Through July 19 Damien Stamer’s dreamy landscapes reference memories of his childhood home in North Carolina—which, he says, “exists more in my mind than here on Earth”— and explore notions of time, comfort, and secrets. Oakland-based Matthew Szösz creates intricate glass pieces that allow him to navigate the space between what he calls the “restraint of learned technique and the manic populist energy of the rock-throwing iconoclast.”—ET

Martin Cary Horowitz, Bronze Disc 1, 23 kt gold on bronze, 33 x 33 x 6"

Martin Cary Horowitz Yares Art Projects, 123 Grant yaresartprojects.com Through July 31 Since he created his first gilded piece 40-plus years ago, sculptor Martin Cary Horowitz has been, as he puts it, “committed to both the material and to the simple elegance of the minimalist form.” His sleek pieces have undergone numerous transitions in terms of material and composition, and in more recent years he’s pushed artistic boundaries by applying karat leaf to both bronze and glass.—ET

Josh Garber, Flutter, stainless steel, 10 x 14 x 14"

Australian Contemporary Indigenous Art III Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art 702 1/2 Canyon chiaroscurosantafe.com Through August 3 Reception June 27, 5–7 pm In the wake of the success of its 2012 Aboriginal art exhibit, Chiaroscuro teams up with the Vivien Anderson Gallery in Melbourne, Australia, to showcase abstract paintings by contemporary Australian indigenous artists expressing their culture through colors, symbols, and shapes. Acrylic-on-canvas pieces by featured artist Judy Watson Napangardi are joined by a special selection of bark paintings by major artists from the Yirrkala community in Northeast Arnhem Land.—ET

Damien Stamer, South Lowell 14, oil on panel, 24 x 36"

Kay Baker, Kalaya Tjukurpa, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, 47 x 79"

Shawn Smith, Rex Ray, and Josh Garber: Bio-Morphed Turner Carroll Gallery 725 Canyon, turnercarroll.com Through July 27 Three artists share perspectives on the natural world. Josh Garber, whose metal structures resemble aquatic organisms, says he’s “fascinated by the intricate patterns in neurology and microbiology.” The vibrant colors and shapes in Rex Ray’s abstractions are reminiscent of those seen under a microscope, and Shawn Smith investigates the relationship between nature and technology with wooden sculptures and three-dimensional prints.—ET July 3, 2014

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DALLAS-BASED interior designer Jason Lenox had just launched his company J. Alexander Rustic Interior Design when he was inspired to create a line of home accessories. Among his offerings is a series of elegant accent pieces made from German silver (an alloy containing nickel and copper) that includes various-sized boxes, candlestick holders, wine coasters, napkin holders, tissue-box covers, picture frames, letter openers, cigar ashtrays, and a vanity mirror. The entirely handmade collection, which combines art and functionality, features hand-stamped Navajo-inspired designs with a burnished vintage look. Lenox embellishes the silver with one-of-a-kind turquoise cabochons from Sonoran Desert mines, and he lines many of his boxes’ interiors with luxurious black felt. The designer says his silverwork was inspired by trips he took to Mexico, and his pieces are now made in a central Mexican village. The collection can be found at Nathalie Home on Canyon Road, where it’s been popular since arriving two years ago.—Zélie Pollon

storied past

Sculpt Santa Fe the first-ever event brought out top talent

CRISTINA OLDS

The first-ever Sculpt Santa Fe filled the pavilion at the Eldorado Hotel & Spa from June 27 through June 29, with some of the 45 artists’ works spilling onto the sidewalk along Sandoval. Thomas Bowker constructed Santuario, which he says will be steel or bronze when it’s fabricated, Siri Hollander installed her steel Tamarindo, and Scarlett Kanistanaux displayed her four-foot-tall clay piece Quiet Mind.—Cristina Olds

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Twentieth-century New Mexico painter Fremont Ellis once lived on this 4.76-acre property with spectacular views just a few miles south of town. In the 1920s there was an adobe home and a bread horno on the land, and while the horno remains, the adobe burned down in the 1980s during a party hosted by musician Glenn Frey of the Eagles, who owned the property at the time. The current 3,485-square-foot home, built in 2002, has many elegant touches, including slate flooring, vigas, latillas, and a stone fireplace, and there’s even a guest apartment upstairs. A stand-alone four-room studio, which was designed by a music producer and outfitted as a recording studio, features a kitchenette and deck and can be used as a yoga or art studio or as a guesthouse. List price: $1.085 million Barker Realty, Jane Hiltbrand, 505-946-8475, santaferealestate.com

LAURIE ALLEGRETTI

sophisticated German silver home accessories

[on the market]

JASON LENOX

style the perfect accent


Johnson Street Experience

[on the market]

a free block party brings community spirit to a downtown neighborhood

Superb views of the Sangre de Cristo and Jemez mountains can be seen from this 2,980 square-foot contemporary Southwestern-style home located in a community close to the 599 Bypass. Owned by a chef, the residence features a gourmet kitchen with stainlesssteel appliances, granite countertops, and a breakfast bar crafted from 100-year-old oak. Each of the home’s three bedrooms has direct access to the exterior grounds, and portals around the residence offer plenty of shade. The master suite includes a kiva fireplace and an en suite bathroom with a claw-foot tub. A 1,200-square-foot one-bedroom guesthouse has a professional recording studio attached to it, and the roof of the guesthouse includes a deck with 360 degree views of the surrounding area. List price: $1.045 million Keller Williams Team R & L, Ralph Larranaga, 505-465-9597, homes4saleinsantafenm.com

Heidi Loewen of Heidi Loewen Porcelain Gallery & School invited her neighbors along Johnson Street to come out for an afternoon of music, art, and food on Saturday, June 21. The Smokin’ Bachi Taiko drumming band and a marimba ensemble entertained the crowd, artists led demonstrations and art-making events, restaurants shared sample snacks and beverages, and four-legged companions received complimentary pedicures.—CO

GABRIELLA MARKS

COURTESY OF KELLER-WILLIAMS

Southwestern sleek

July 3, 2014

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| L A S T LO O K |

The psychedelic jams and cosmic kelp dancing of the 1960s and ’70s were alive and grooving during the Chris Robinson Brotherhood’s performance at Sol Santa Fe on Thursday, June 26. Playing rambling, guitar-driven originals from their new vinyl release, Phosphorescent Harvest, as well as covers of songs by influential predecessors like the Grateful Dead, the band was digging the sound and the vibe, and so was its audience. “There was a kind of glowing warmth and reception from the crowd—a ‘love’ thing,” says photographer Gabriella Marks, who took the images seen here. “And, in return, the band members seemed comfortable, like that stage really felt like home—right down to Chris Robinson’s bare feet with the star tattoos.” Incense and patchouli (and other things?) wafted on the evening breeze, as the vibe, Marks says, was one of peace, love, and, naturally, brotherhood. “The dusky light was like a visual reverb effects pedal, with the golden sunset of a mid-summer evening adding to that sense of warmth.”—Cristina Olds 28

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GABRIELLA MARKS

Chris Robinson Brotherhood


museum of indian arts and culture presents

2014 SUMMER PROGRAMS

July 10th & 11th @ 7PM Greer Garson Theatre Santa Fe ➤

Concert and Devotional Chant Online: TicketsSantaFe.org By phone: 505.988.1234 or at the Lensic Box Office

PUEBLO SASH WEAVING DEMONSTRATION SUNDAY MARCH 9, 2014 10AM–4PM

(services charges apply)

Reserved Seating: $36.50 in advance $45 at the door Presented by

Center For Inner Truth & Transitions Radio Magazine

SUNday, July 6th & MONDAY, JULY 7th 10:00 am–4:00 pm

Native Portrait Studio Create a memory of your visit to MIAC! Step into the mobile photo booth In the Lloyd Kiva New Gallery and an automatic digital photo will be produced. You are invited to add one print to the Community Gallery.

NEXT UP wednesday, JuLY 9th, 1:00–4:00 pm

Southwest Pottery Artist Demonstration with Erik J. Fender (San Ildefonso Pueblo) Ongoing series of demonstrations and discussions of various techniques, clays, and styles by Native artists from different Southwest tribes. All are free with paid admission, 16 and under always free. New Mexico residents with ID always free on Sundays.

Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on Museum Hill 710 Camino Lejo (off Old Santa Fe Trail) 505-476-1250 indianartsandculture.org


Jane Filer, Hotel California, acrylic on canvas, 58.5" x 51" David Unger Beloved, bronze billhester@billhesterfineart.com

BillHesterFineArt.com (505) 660-5966

621 C anyon R oad 830 C anyon R oad

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Santa Fean NOW July 3 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW July 3 2014 Digital Edition

Santa Fean NOW July 3 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW July 3 2014 Digital Edition

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