Page 1

now

The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

week of July 31


The Only 3 Generation, Full-time, Female, Painting Dynasty

Recorded in History

Featuring Helen Tindel’s HEL YEAH hand-painted hats & shoes

Margarete Bagshaw Helen Hardin (1943 - 1984) Pablita Velarde (1918 - 2006) 201 Galisteo St. Santa Fe, NM 505-988-2024 www.goldendawngallery.com


F R I E DMA N W I L S O N FRAMES Opening August  1st,  2014   3 0 2 2   C i e l o   C t . ,   S t e .   C S a n t a   F e ,   N M   8 7 5 0 7 Open  Tuesday  -­  Saturday,  9am-­5pm e m a i l   . . . . . . . . . . . .  f w f r a m e s @ g m a i l . c o m t e l e p h o n e   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 0 5 -­ 9 3 0 -­ 5 9 2 9


SANTA FE

From the time of the ancient Anazasi, the Santa Fe area has been a trading center. The Santa Fe Trail is synonymous with the romance of the old west, and from the time of New Mexico statehood in 1912, Santa Fe has been a multicultural art center and shoppers’ paradise.

SantaFeDowntown.org

Santa Fe is a top US art center, with museums, shopping, Year-round outdoor activities, top flight restaurants, spas, and world famous cultural events. It’s not just your grandparents’ Santa Fe, it’s walkable, historic, charming, and exciting.A high desert destination of distinction and fun.

Free iPhone and Android app The Best of Santa Fe

now 5 The Buzz Eliza Gilkyson at Skylight, summer festivals at Las Golondrinas, Sylvia at Santa Fe Playhouse, and a review of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 8 This Week A comprehensive calendar of goings-on around town 15 Into the Wild The Jean Cocteau Cinema hosts a benefit for the Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary 16 Festival of Song The intimate vocal series launches its fourth season

|

Find the best shops, restaurants, galleries, museums, parking locations, turn-by-turn directions, mobile deals, weather, news, and local-events with the free app from the iTunes App Store and from the Android Market. Look for the green sticker in the window of participating stores.

JULY 31 – AUG 6

2014

17 Eating + Drinking Sweet Lily Bakery and Bouche Bistro 18 Seen Around & Opening Night Photos from fun local events 21 Art Christopher Owen Nelson, Roseta Santiago, Jeremy Thomas, Billy Schenck, Marilyn Yates, Jeff Juhlin, Sheryl Zacharia, Melinda K. Hall, and gallery show openings 26 Style A Day at the Mind Spa and stunning homes for sale 28 Last Look Three bands, one night

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

|

COME DECEMBER, WHEN THE WINTER wind blows and we’re buttoning up our heavy coats, we’ll think back to this time of year. Did we take advantage of the many joys of summer when we had the chance? Did we jump in one of the local bodies of water accessible from Santa Fe? Did we hit the Plaza’s nightly bandstand concerts and savor the wonderful fellowship that this community offering brings? Did we really not go to one opera or one chamber music performance? And with all the gallery openings and events each weekend, did we really not once go and see where Santa Fe’s art scene is at this year? We’re a blessed group of people who get to be in Santa Fe during the prime summer months. The uncomfortably hot days are few, and the evenings are cool and pleasant. Creativity surrounds us and is available in so many forms for us to enjoy. This week, as the calendar flips to August, art-centered activities don’t slow down; if anything, they begin to hit their peak. Work can wait a bit, but summer can’t. Before the big festivals, markets, and performances come to an end, go out and grab some Santa Fe summer. Your well-chosen and deeply enjoyed Santa Fe summer experiences will be appreciated and savored as you’re huddled around your fireplace this winter. Enjoy it now, while you can.

Bruce Adams

Publisher

DAVID ROBIN

SHOPPING IN


Christopher Owen Nelson Subconscious Space

“Rooms with a View” 48 x 64 carved & painted plexiglass

July 29 through august 11 aRtiSt Friday, august 1 5 pm - 8 pm

exhibitiON dateS ReCeptiON FOR the

Waxlander Gallery celebrating thirty years of excellence

622 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, NM 87501 waxlander.com • 505.984.2202 • 800.342.2202


Welcome to Santa Fe! As a creative, cultural hub, Santa Fe offers an abundance of the world’s best art, attractions, and entertainment opportunities. Santa Fean NOW is an excellent source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local or a tourist visiting for the first time or the 100th, NOW ’s complete listings of everything from gallery openings to live music events will help you make the most of the city. We look forward to seeing you around the City Different. Should you need any extra tips, please stop by our information centers at the Santa Fe Railyard or off the Plaza at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. Wishing you a wonderful time, Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

amy hegarty samantha schwirck

GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

b.y. cooper

whitney stewart

michelle odom, sybil watson

OPERATIONS MANAGER

ginny stewart-jaramillo

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER MARKETING CONSULTANT

david wilkinson

andrea nagler

WRITERS

cristina olds, phil parker eve tolpa, emily van cleve

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com Copyright 2014. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Fean NOW Volume 1, Number 12, Week of July 31, 2014. Published by Bella Media, LLC at 215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2014 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

On the cover: Tom Palmore, Snowy Barn Owl, acrylic and oil on canvas, 48 x 36". Palmore’s show Big Cats and Birds opens at LewAllen Galleries in the Railyard on August 1. For details, see page 9. 4

santafeanNOW.com


Summer Festival and Territorial Law & Order Weekend

El Rancho de las Golondrinas, a living history museum in nearby La Cienega, transforms into an Old West town during its annual Summer Festival and Territorial Law & Order Weekend. Revelers can watch choreographed gunfights and enjoy wagon rides and hands-on activities like archery, tin stamping, mapmaking, and more. Kit Carson’s grandson John Carson talks about the life of the legendary guide and trailblazer, while federal judge Bruce Black discusses frontier justice in the late 19th century and the life of New Mexico gunman and politician Elfego Baca. “I remember

the

buzz

becoming intrigued with Baca after seeing him featured on Disney’s Wonderful World of Color television show in the 1950s,” Black says. “He was an outlaw who matured into a lawman and lawyer.” Volunteers bake bread, weave, and work in the musuem’s blacksmithing shop throughout the weekend. Other activities include a horse show featuring Peruvian Paso horses from La Estancia Alegre horse breeding and training facility, and visitors can check out a collection of Territorial-era documents on display in the museum’s exhibit hall.—Emily Van Cleve Summer Festival and Territorial Law & Order Weekend, August 2 & 3, 10 am–4 pm, $8 ($6 seniors and teens, free for kids under 13), El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 334 Los Pinos Road, La Cienega, 505-471-2261, golondrinas.org

Eliza Gilkyson

Singer/songwriter Eliza Gilkyson, a former Santa Fe resident, can’t stay away from the Land of Enchantment for too long. The prolific folk musician— who lives in Austin and has a home in Arroyo Seco, north of Taos—returns to town on August 3 to perform with her son Cisco Ryder (percussion, keyboard, and vocals) and guitarist Jim Henry. Presented by Heath Concerts, the trio will appear at Skylight, the brand-new nightclub spearheaded by local DJs Joe Ray Sandoval and Sol Bentley and located in the former Milagro restaurant space on

West San Francisco Street. Gilkyson’s first set will include a number of tunes from her latest album, The Nocturne Diaries. “While I was putting the album together, I didn’t realize that every song on it had been written deep in the night,” says the musician, who earned a Grammy nomination for her 2004 album Land of Milk and Honey and is a member of the Texas Music Hall of Fame. “You know how thoughts can be at night. Sometimes I worry about environmental disasters, a collapse of the financial system, or the widening gap between the rich and the poor.” Gilkyson’s second set is a free-for-all: She and her band are prepared to take requests, no matter how far back in time the music may lead them. “We’ll do intimate ballads, but we also can rock it pretty good,” she says.—EVC Eliza Gilkyson, August 3, 7 pm, $24, Skylight, 139 W San Francisco, 505-988-1234, skylightsantafe.com

CHERNIN ENTERTAINMENT

SCOTT NEWTON

Eliza Gilkyson at the new Skylight club

Apes rise to power in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes.

relax, armed horse-riding monkeys Guns escalate interspecies tension and enable damaged, crazy apes to kill and take power through fear. These are interesting notions Dawn of the Planet of the Apes is dabbling in; if only it played with its toys more. There’s a scene when the great ape villain Koba is on a horse, jumping through flames and firing AK-47s from both hands, and it’s the one and only time the movie is fun. (There are other good scenes when Koba pretends to be funny so that he can disarm two humans, but things get dark quickly.) Saving Private Ryan has more humor than Dawn. Why would a movie you watch through 3-D glasses, featuring talking apes on horseback, take itself so seriously? The film’s special effects are astonishing. No complaints there. The forest and a post-apocalyptic San Francisco are rendered beautifully. The apes fill the screen many times and look absolutely real. The two most important ape characters, wise leader Caesar and his traumatized henchman Koba, are well-written and played with real depth by actors wearing motion-capture suits (skin-tight and covered in little white balls so the ape features can be inserted during post-production). But what about the humans? There are July 31, 2014

NOW

5


good actors (including Keri Russell and Gary Oldman) in these roles, yet they’re somehow playing people with no single interesting characteristic. If acting is about making a written character feel real, then Dawn is a failure for most involved. Apocalyptic science fiction affords an opportunity to say something profound about humanity. We often create, for terrible reasons, the instruments of mass death. Survivors are left reeling, stripped of society’s trappings, and thereby forced to reset conventional notions of how to live. But this is an ape apocalypse. An ape-ocalypse. You can have the hard drama but enjoy yourself, too. People remember the original Planet of the Apes for its great ending and for Charlton Heston yelling “Take your stinking paws off me, you damned dirty ape!” Dawn will be forgotten in a month.—Phil Parker

!"#$%&'&()*)+,-$"&'".&,/$&0-123&'4$5,&0$$.& 65".'%7&85953,&:7&;<=>&?&=@:<&AB& ',&,C)&D)",)(&0$(&D$",)2+$('(%&8(,3 1050 Old Pecos Trail · Santa Fe, NM 87505 · (505) 982-1338 · ccasantafe.org Light refreshments · Door prizes · Find out all about FUZE.SW 2014 Films start at 2:30 · First come, first served Q+A with filmmakers Gary Farmer and Alex Rivera follows the films This is a free community event Alex Rivera’s hilarious and troubling experimental documentary

Indigenous activist Gary Farmer presents

An adventure featuring potatoes, and couch potatoes, traveling from South America to the U.S. (U.S.-Peru, 1997, 26m)

A personal journey in exploration of the deep relationship between humans and corn. (Canada, 1999, 59m)

A'+'+'+E

FC)&G-0,

Anyone who loves dogs will appreciate A. R. Gurney’s Sylvia, a comedic play about a man, his wife, and his dog, which opens this week at the Santa Fe Playhouse. New York City resident Greg (Jonathan Richards) finds a stray dog Sylvia (Tallis Rose) in Central Park one afternoon and takes her home with him. Greg’s wife Kate (Barbara Hatch) isn’t happy with her husband’s new companion, as she sees the dog as a threat to the couple’s 22-year marriage. “I chose to present Sylvia partly because I’m a dog lover myself,” says director Robert Benedetti. “The play gives wonderful insights into the mind of a dog and the bond between people and dogs. It also appeals to non-dog lovers because it’s a traditional romantic comedy built around a love triangle— Barbara Hatch (left) and though in this case Tallis Rose rehearse a the ‘other woman’ scene from Sylvia. is a dog.” As an empty nester, Greg has lots of time on his hands, and he chooses to spend that time with Sylvia. Much of the play centers on the “conversations” Greg has with Sylvia, with Greg’s midlife crisis serving as the subject of some of those talks. Benedetti calls Sylvia “heartwarmingly funny” and notes that it’s the first project produced by his new theater group, The New Mexico Actors Lab. For tickets and further information, visit santafeplayhouse.org.—EVC Sylvia, July 31–August 17, $20 ($15 students and seniors; $10 for July 31 performance and $25 for the opening night gala on August 1 that begins with refreshments at 6:30 pm), Thursdays–Saturdays, 7:30 pm, Sundays, 4 pm, Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas, 505988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org

ROBERT BENEDETTI

!"#$ Food+Folklore Festival · September 12–14

a dog’s life


JEREMY THOMAS | Ditching the Cardigan

AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 31, 2014 Reception for the Artist Friday, August 1st, 5-7 P.M.

CHARLOTTE JACKSON FINE ART Railyard Art District 554 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 Tel 505.989.8688 www.charlottejackson.com Box Pink, 2014, forged mild steel and powder coat, 13 x 15.5 x 13 inches


this week

July 31–August 6

July 31 thursday Arts Alive! Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

Hands-on art-making in the outdoor classroom on Milner Plaza. Theme: Brazilian dolls. Free, 10 am–2 pm, 505-476-1200, internationalfolkart.org.

North African Sephardic Festival: El Gusto Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl El Gusto is the story of a group of musicians, Muslim and Jewish, torn apart by history and brought together by music. $15, 7–9 pm, 505-216-0672, santafejff.org.

Mmm . . . Cocktails! Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Bartender Rob Rittmeyer (of Rio Chama Restaurant) provides a fun evening of mojitos, margaritas, martinis, and Manhattans. $75, 5:30–7:30 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Native American Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Demonstration class with Lois Ellen Frank, a James 8

santafeanNOW.com

August 1: J. Q. Whitcomb (seen here) and other musicians pay tribute to trumpet master Woody Shaw. For details, see page 10.

Beard Award–winning author with a PhD in culinary anthropology. $85, 10 am–1 pm, 505-9835411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

James McGrath Morris St. John’s College 1160 Camino de Cruz Blanca

Cloacas Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Friends of the Santa Fe Public Library and St. John’s College present author and columnist James McGrath Morris. Morris speaks about the future of books and reading and outlines the changes shaking up the world of book publishing and reading. $7.50, 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantefe.org.

Salaam-Shalom: A Cultural Celebration for Peace Santa Fe Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Twenty young women from Palestine and Israel interact with the public at this festival of music, dance, and food provided by 20 local chefs and restaurants. $25, 4:30–6:30 pm, 505-982-3765, creativityforpeace.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Great American Songbook works plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Broadway/Cabaret

Music by David Geist. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Dana Smith: Original Country-Tinged Folk from the Heart Upper Crust Pizza 329 Old Santa Fe Trl

Live music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-0000, uppercrustpizza.com

Guitarras Con Sabor El Farol 808 Canyon

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Indulge Swiss Bakery Pastries & Bistro 401 S Guadalupe

Guitar by J. Vernier. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-1111, swissbakerysantafe.com.

Joe West Second Street Brewery at Second Street 1814 Second St


PETER SCHAAF

Psychedelic country music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

John Rangel “Duets” El Mesón 213 Washington

August 1 friday

John Rangel and guests. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

A Weekend with Utah Painter Bregelle Whitworth Davis Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art 702 Canyon

Karaoke. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Utah painter Bregelle Whitworth Davis demonstrates her contemporary painting technique, exhibits new works, and participates in a New Mexico House Rabbit Society fundraiser raffle. Free (raffle tickets starting at $5), demonstrations Friday 11 am and 4 pm, fundraiser reception Saturday 2–5 pm, 505-986-1156, giacobbefritz.com.

Night Wave Santa Fe Downtown Santa Fe

Live music and events at Skylight, Burro Alley Lounge, The Underground, Evangelo’s, The Matador, and The Palace. For details and a full lineup of events, visit nightwavesf.com.

Summer Flamenco Series El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–8 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

July 31: Tenor Alek Shrader performs in the fourth-annual Festival of Song recital series.

The Saltanah Dancers Cleopatra Café (Southside location) 3482 Zafarano

301 Opera Dr

Trio Bijou Zia Diner 326 S Guadalupe

Orion String Quartet New Mexico Museum of Art St. Francis Auditorium 107 W Palace

Belly-dancing performance. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-820-7381, saltanahstudios.com.

Jazz classics played with string instruments. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-988-7008, ziadiner.com.

Zenobia La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Performance by Zenobia, a three-time Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter and former member of The Weather Girls. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

All Brahms New Mexico Museum of Art St. Francis Auditorium 107 W Palace

A Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival performance featuring Brahms’s cello sonatas nos. 1 and 2 performed by cellist Joseph Johnson and pianist Victor Santiago Asunción. $25, 12 pm, 505-983-2075, santafechambermusic.com.

Festival of Song: Alek Shrader and Daniela Mack St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trl

Duets by Santa Fe Opera stars Alek Shrader (tenor) and Daniela Mack (mezzo-soprano). Presented by Performance Santa Fe. See profile on page 16. $45–$75, 4 pm, 505-984-8759, performancesantafe.org.

Fidelio Santa Fe Opera

War II and the Korean War) lands at Santa Fe Municipal Airport. Tour the cockpit and purchase rides. $10 and up (kids free), 2–5 pm (9 am–5 pm August 1–3), 432-413-4100, airpowersquadron.org.

A performance of Beethoven’s Fidelio starring soprano Alex Penda and tenor Paul Groves. From $37, 8 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

A Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival performance featuring flutist Tara Helen O’Connor and pianist Victor Santiago Asunción in Schubert’s Introduction and Variations on Trockne Blumen and the Orion String Quartet in Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 15 and the U.S. premiere of Brett Dean’s String Quartet No 2, And Once I Played Ophelia. $35–$45, 6 pm, 505-983-2075, santafechambermusic.com.

A Romantic Evening with Brahms First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant

A performance of Brahms’s works for chorus and piano featuring the Santa Fe Desert Chorale and pianist Debra Byers. $15–$55, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

Sylvia Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E DeVargas

A performance of A. R. Gurney’s Sylvia directed by Robert Benedetti and starring Tallis Rose, Jonathan Richards, Barbara Hatch, and Nicholas Ballas. See profile on page 6. $20 (discounts for students and seniors), Thursday–Saturday evenings at 7:30 pm, Sundays at 4 pm, through August 17, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

CAF AirPower History Tour Santa Fe Municipal Airport 121 Aviation Dr

The only flying B-29 Superfortress (used in World

The Blues Brothers Santa Fe Railyard Park Guadalupe and Paseo de Peralta

Outdoor movie screening. Free, 8:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-5483, heathconcerts.org.

Flavors of the Southwest: Hot off the Grill Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta Southwestern grilling class. 6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

High Altitude Baking Workshop Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Tips and techniques for baking at a high altitude. 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Salsa Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on class focused on salsa. $75, 9 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Americas First Nations Liquid Outpost Gallery at the Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

American artist and photographer Angel Wynn presents a variety of work inspired by North America’s tribal cultures. Free, reception 4–6 pm, 505-983-6503, theliquidoutpost.com.

Back Roads and Gardens Sage Creek Gallery 421 Canyon

Paintings by Marilyn Yates. See profile on page 25. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-3444, sagecreekgallery.com.

Big Cats and Birds LewAllen Galleries at the Railyard 1613 Paseo de Peralta

Works by painter Tom Palmore. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-3250, lewallencontemporary.com. July 31, 2014

NOW

9


Corners: Photographs of the Southwest New Concept Gallery 610 Canyon

LewAllen Galleries at the Railyard 1613 Paseo de Peralta

Ditching the Cardigan Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 554 S Guadalupe

Bill Hearne Trio Second Street Brewery at Second Street 1814 Second St

Photographs by Steven A. Jackson. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-795-7570, newconceptgallery.com.

New work by Jeremy Thomas. See profile on page 23. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-989-8688, charlottejackson.com.

Eden Turned on its Side: Selections from Photosynthesis David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

Multimedia works by Meridel Rubenstein. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-983-9555, davidrichardgallery.com.

Foundation Collection David Rothermel Contemporary 142 Lincoln, Ste 102

Past and present paintings by David Rothermel. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 575-642-4981, drfa-sf.com.

Grace Blue Rain Gallery 130 Lincoln, Ste C

New works by painter Roseta Santiago. See profile on page 22. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-954-9902, blueraingallery.com.

Myth Maker POP Gallery 142 Lincoln

Paintings by Joel Nakamura. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-820-0788, popsantafe.com.

Rewind Replay: 1950–2014 David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

Paintings by Lilly Fenichel. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-983-9555, davidrichardgallery.com.

Subconscious Space Waxlander Art Gallery & Sculpture Garden 622 Canyon

New mixed-media works by Christopher Owen Nelson. See profile on page 21. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-984-2202, waxlander.com.

Survival Turner Carroll Gallery 725 Canyon

Group exhibition celebrating the work of artists who escaped the oppression of their birthplace and used art as a method of survival. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-986-9800, turnercarrollgallery.com.

The Raven & the Journey Manitou Galleries Downtown 123 W Palace

New works by sculptor Jim Eppler and painter B. C. Nowlin. Free, reception 5–7:30 pm, 505-986-0440, manitougalleries.com.

Withheld Narratives 10

santafeanNOW.com

Paintings by Christopher Benson. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-3250, lewallencontemporary.com.

Country and Americana music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Great American Songbook works plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Chango Junction 530 S Guadalupe

Live music from a popular cover band. Free, 10 pm–1 am, 505-988-7222, junctionsantafe.com.

Country Blues Revue Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Traditional blues and country music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-989-8585, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Friday Night Get Together Gallery 901 and Ronnie Layden Fine Art 901 Canyon

Music and refreshments in the courtyard. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-670-6793, ronnielaydenfineart.com.

Happy Hours with Brent Berry Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe Live music. Free, 5–7:30 pm,

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date.

14

All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.

505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Hou Dous La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Night Wave Santa Fe Downtown Santa Fe

Live music and events at Skylight, Burro Alley Lounge, The Underground, Evangelo’s, The Matador, and The Palace. For details and a full lineup of events, visit nightwavesf.com.

Pachanga The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis

Salsa, cumbia, bachata, and merengue music and dancing. $5, 9:30 pm–1:30 am, 505-992-5800, lodgeatsantafe.com.

Richard Martin El Farol 808 Canyon

American Western folk music. $5, 9–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Summer Flamenco Series El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–8 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

The John Kurzweg Band Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Live rock. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón 213 Washington

Jazz piano trio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

A Tribute to the Genius of Jazz Trumpet Master Woody Shaw Santa Fe Center for Spiritual Living 505 Camino de los Marquez

A tribute to Woody Shaw featuring two sets of his most characteristic compositions played by a quintet, which was his favorite ensemble type. Trumpeter J. Q. Whitcomb, trombonist Ben Finberg, bass player Andy Zadrozny, pianist John Rangel, and drummer John Trentacosta lead the tribute. $15, 7:30 pm,


As You Like It Monte del Sol Charter School 4157 Walking Rain Rd

A presentation of Shakespeare’s enduring pastoral comedy by the Santa Fe Shakespeare Society. Directed by Jerry Ferraccio. $5–$20 (sliding scale donation), 6 pm, 505-490-6271, sfshakespeare.com.

August 2: Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art holds a fundraiser for the New Mexico House Rabbit Society

BREGELLE WHITWORTH DAVIS, BERRY

505-983-5022, jqwhitcomb.com.

Opening Night Gala for Sylvia Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E DeVargas

A performance of Brahms’s works for chorus and piano featuring the Santa Fe Desert Chorale and pianist Debra Byers. $15–$55, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

Sephardic Sounds: Music of Morocco and Beyond New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

Singer, performer, scholar, and writer Vanessa Paloma brings the lyrical sounds of Jewish Morocco to Santa Fe. Part of the North African Sephardic Festival. $20, pre-concert talk 5 pm, concert 6–7:30 pm, 505-216-0672, santafejff.org.

The Impresario and Le Rossignol Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

A performance of Mozart’s The Impresario and Stravinsky’s Le Rossignol. From $39, 8 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

August 2 saturday 42nd Annual Girls Inc. Arts & Crafts Show Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Features a wide range of work by professional fine artists and crafts people. Proceeds from artists’ booth fees from this juried event benefit Girls Inc. of Santa Fe. Free, 9 am–5 pm, 505-982-2042, girlsincofsantafe.org.

Fundraiser Reception Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art 702 Canyon

Reception featuring works by painter Bregelle Whitworth Davis and a raffle to raise money for the New Mexico House Rabbit Society. Free (raffle tickets starting at $5), 2–5 pm, 505-986-1156, giacobbefritz.com.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Park 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Great American Songbook works plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Country Blues Review Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Opening night gala for A. R. Gurney’s Sylvia (see listing on July 31). $25 (includes food and refreshments), gala at 6:30 pm, show at 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

A Romantic Evening with Brahms First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant

Authors Eric Shonkwiler and Meg Tuite read from their recently published books. Free, 3:30–5 pm, 505-428-0321, opcit.com.

Features an opening set by Roberta Donnay. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com. more by local artists. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-310-1555, santafeartistsmarket.com.

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar with John Serkin Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen 1512 Pacheco

The Auteurs: Andrei Tarkovsky’s Andrei Rublev CCA Cinematheque Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Jazz (Off the Plaza) Swiss Bistro & Bakery 401 S Guadalupe

Movie-viewing presented by St. John’s College to celebrate major contributors to cinematic history and to teach viewers how to “read” great films. $7–$9.50, 10:30 am–1 pm, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Cooking for the College Bound Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta Shopping tips and one-dish cookery for college-bound students. 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Green Chile Workshop

Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe Demonstration class focused on green chile. $75, 2 pm, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, 7 am–12 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Iris Rhizome Sale DeVargas Center 564 N Guadalupe

Annual iris rhizome sale sponsored by the Santa Fe Iris Society. Free, 10 am–12 pm, 505-577-3854.

Slack key guitar music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com.

Live music on the patio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-988-1111, swissbakerysantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Night Wave Santa Fe Downtown Santa Fe

Live music and events at Skylight, Burro Alley Lounge, The Underground, Evangelo’s, The Matador, and The Palace. For details and a full lineup of events, visit nightwavesf.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Rumelia Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Balkan/world/folk music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Summer Flamenco Series El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–8 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Cochineal: Empire-Making Insect Cerrillos Hills State Park Visitor Center 37 Main

The Alto St. Band Second Street Brewery at Second Street 1814 Second St

Lecture about the cochineal. Donation, 2–4 pm, 505474-0196, cerrilloshills.org.

Irreverent bluegrass. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com

Eric Shonkwiler and Meg Tuite Op.cit Bookstore 500 Montezuma

Tone and Co. El Farol 808 Canyon July 31, 2014

NOW

11


August 2 & 3: Summer Festival and Territorial Law & Order Weekend at El Rancho de las Golondrinas

Summer Festival and Territorial Law & Order El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos

Meet the lawmen, desperados, and mountain men who put the “wild” in “Wild West.” Events include a Peruvian Paso horse show. See profile on page 5. $8 (discounts for kids and seniors), 10 am–4 pm, 505-471-2261, golondrinas.org.

Carmen Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

A performance of Bizet’s Carmen starring soprano Ana María Martínez. From $39, 8 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

All Handel New Mexico Museum of Art St. Francis Auditorium 107 W Palace

A Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival program featuring mezzo-soprano Sasha Cooke. $25, 5 pm, 505-983-2075, santafechambermusic.com.

As You Like It Monte del Sol Charter School 4157 Walking Rain Rd

A presentation of Shakespeare’s enduring pastoral comedy by the Santa Fe Shakespeare Society. Directed by Jerry Ferraccio. $5–$20 (sliding scale donation), 6 pm, 505-490-6271, sfshakespeare.com.

James McMurtry Santa Fe Railyard Park Guadalupe and Paseo de Peralta

Outdoor concert by American rock and folk-rock/ Americana musician James McMurty with special guest Johnny Burke. Free, 7–9:30 pm, 505-983-5483, heathconcerts.org.

Santa Fe Musical Theatre Festival Greer Garson Theatre 1600 St. Michael’s

Staged readings of four new musicals written by a new generation of writers and directed by internationally acclaimed artists. From $10, through August 9, 505-946-2468, sfmtf.org.

The Mysterious Mr. Z Armory for the Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

An evening of original, 1920-era entertainment from the Jewel Box Cabaret. Features jazz, gangsters, flappers, speakeasies, mystery, mayhem, and more. $20, 8–10:30 pm, 505-984-1730, holdmyticket.com.

The New World: Music of the Americas Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi 131 Cathedral Pl

Santa Fe Desert chorale presents works ranging from traditional spirituals to interpretations of Spanish language classics. Arrangements and works by Samuel Barber and Joseph Jennings plus new works from composers from throughout the Americas. $15–$65, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org. 12

santafeanNOW.com

to teach viewers how to “read” great films. $7–$9.50, 10:30 am–1 pm, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org. COURTESY OF EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS

Blues music. $5, 9–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

August 3 sunday 42nd Annual Girls Inc. Arts & Crafts Show Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Features a wide range of work by professional fine artists and crafts people. Proceeds from artists’ booth fees from this juried event benefit Girls Inc. of Santa Fe. Free, 9 am–5 pm, 505-982-2042, girlsincofsantafe.org.

Life Drawing Series Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Draw from a live model while enjoying beer and waffles. $22, 11 am–1 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Plein Art Painting on the Patio New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

The patio is open for a “personal adventure in art.” Admission to patio free, museum admission $6–$9, 9 am–12 pm (museum opens at 10 am), 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org

Furthest from the Wild Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Book Signing Garcia Street Books 376 Garcia

Leza Lowitz and Shogo Oketani speak about and sign their new book Jet Black and the Ninja Wind. Free, 2–3 pm, 505-986-0151, garciastreetbooks.com.

Morocco: Jewish/Muslim Coexistence Travel Bug 839 Paseo de Peralta

Slide presentation on Morocco’s culture. Free, 2–3 pm, 505-992-0418, mapsofnewmexico.com.

Meditation Instruction Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo

Upaya’s head priest, Shinzan Palma, offers instruction on meditation and temple etiquette for those who are new to meditation and practice at Upaya. Free (prior registration recommended), 3–4 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Bella Donna Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Jazz ensemble. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Eliza Gilkyson Skylight Santa Fe 139 W San Francisco

Singer/songwriter Eliza Gilkyson performs at the brand-new nightclub Skylight. See profile on page 5. $24, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Filmmaker Alex Tello presents two screenings of his documentary Furthest from the Wild as a benefit for the Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary. See profile on page 15. $12, 1:30 pm and 3:30 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Nacha Mendez El Farol 808 Canyon

FUZE.SW Food and Folklore Festival Presents The Gift CCA Cinematheque Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Hot Honey Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

A viewing of Gary Farmer’s The Gift and Alex Rivera’s Papapapá as part of a celebration of local culinary culture. Includes refreshments, door prizes, and Q&As with both directors. $7–$9.50, 1:30 pm, films start at 2:30 pm, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

The Auteurs: Andrei Tarkovsky’s Andrei Rublev CCA Cinematheque Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl Movie-viewing presented by St. John’s College to celebrate major contributors to cinematic history and

Latin world music. Free, 7 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Live music music. Free, 1–4 pm, 505-989-8585, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Summer Flamenco Series El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–8 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Summer Festival and Territorial Law & Order El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos


Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

KYLE ZIMMERMAN

Meet the lawmen, desperados, and mountain men who put the “wild” in “wild west!” Events include a Peruvian Paso horse show. See profile on page 5. $8 (discounts for kids and seniors), 10 am–4 pm, 505-471-2261, golondrinas.org.

A performance of Donizetti’s Don Pasquale starring baritone Andrew Shore. From $39, 8 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

Night Music New Mexico Museum of Art (St. Francis Auditorium) 107 W Palace

As You Like It Monte del Sol Charter School 4157 Walking Rain Rd

A presentation of Shakespeare’s enduring pastoral comedy by the Santa Fe Shakespeare Society. Directed by Jerry Ferraccio. $5–$20 (sliding scale donation), 6 pm, 505-490-6271, sfshakespeare.com.

Festival of Song: Corinne Winters and Steven Blier St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trl

August 5: Author Daniel Abraham (aka James S. A. Corey) reads at the Jean Cocteau Cinema.

A performance featuring Santa Fe Opera star Corinne Winters (soprano) and pianist Steven Blier. Presented by Performance Santa Fe. See profile on page 16. $45–$75, 4 pm, 505-984-8759, performancesantafe.org.

Juan Siddi Flamenco Santa Fe The Lensic Performing Arts Center 215 W San Francisco

A performance by Juan Siddi Flamenco Santa Fe, which comprises 13 dancers and musicians. Presented by Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. $25–$72, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Night Music New Mexico Museum of Art St. Francis Auditorium 107 W Palace

A Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival program featuring John Harbison’s Twilight Music for horn, violin and piano; Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 14 in C-sharp Minor (“Moonlight”), featuring Victor Santiago Asunción; Arthur Foote’s Nocturne and Scherzo for flute and string quartet; and Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night). $55–$75, 6 pm, 505-983-2075, santafechambermusic.com.

Schola Cantorum New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

Schola Cantorum performs Echoes of Mary, seldom-heard sacred music dedicated to the Virgin Mary from the cathedrals of Mexico City and Cuba to the capillas of Northern New Mexico. Free with museum admission ($6–$9; kids under 17 free), 2–3:30 pm, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

August 4 monday Gallery Conversations New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

Every Monday the museum invites a new speaker—leaders, writers, artists, and others—to give an informal tour through the museum, offering his or her unique point of view. $6–$9, 12:15–1 pm, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org

Rellenos Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on class focused on traditional rellenos. $98, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

The Auteurs: Andrei Tarkovsky’s Andrei Rublev CCA Cinematheque Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl Movie-viewing presented by St. John’s College to celebrate major contributors to cinematic history and to teach viewers how to “read” great films. $7–$9.50, 5:30 pm, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm,

A Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival program featuring John Harbison’s Twilight Music for horn, violin and piano; Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 14 in C-sharp Minor (“Moonlight”), featuring Victor Santiago Asunción; Arthur Foote’s Nocturne and Scherzo for flute and string quartet; and Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night). $55–$75, 6 pm, 505-983-2075, santafechambermusic.com.

August 5 tuesday Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

100 Rings Patina Gallery 131 W Palace

Artist Peter Schmid presents work from German jewelry studio Atelier Zobel—100 rings in oxidized silver, high-karat gold, and platinum—in celebration of Patina Gallery’s 15th anniversary.

Author Reading: Daniel Abraham (aka James S. A. Corey) Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Local author Daniel Abraham (aka James S. A. Corey) reads from The Widow’s House, the latest title in his series The Dagger and the Coin. $10, 7 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Byrd & Street Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Tiho Dimitrov El Farol 808 Canyon

Tango Milonga El Mesón 213 Washington

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Don Pasquale

Americana music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Fidelio July 31, 2014

NOW

13


August 6: A Monty Python reunion will be broadcast at the Jean Cocteau Cinema.

this event at the Jean Cocteau Cinema. $20, 8 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

The Hold Steady performs with opener Cheap Girls. Presented by Heath Concerts. $25, 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Contemporary Southwest Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Ongoing

Hands-on class focused on contemporary Southwestern cuisine. $82, 10 am, 505-983-5411, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Foods of Classic Operas: Carmen Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

A performance of Beethoven’s Fidelio starring soprano Alex Penda and tenor Paul Groves. From $37, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

Mozart, Schubert, Chopin Piano New Mexico Museum of Art St. Francis Auditorium 107 W Palace

A Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival performance featuring Mozart’s Sonata for Piano Four Hands in D Major, Schubert’s Fantasia for Piano Four Hands in F Minor, Poulenc’s Flute Sonata, and Chopin’s Andante Spianato and Grande Polonaise. $20–$25, 12 pm, 505-983-2075, santafechambermusic.com.

Ray LaMontagne Santa Fe Downs 27475 W Frontage

Award-winning folk rocker Ray LaMontagne, who released his fifth album, Supernova, in April, makes his first appearance as a headliner in Santa Fe. $40–$62, 6:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Spanish Mystics Loretto Chapel 207 Old Santa Fe Trl

A selection of choral works from the Renaissance and beyond by Spanish master composers exploring the theme of mysticism. Performed by the Santa Fe Desert Choral. Features lutenist Richard Savino and percussionist Angela Gabriel. $20–$60, 8–9:30 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

August 6 wednesday Wednesday Night Slide Lecture Series Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia

Sculptor Lisa Clague presents a slide lecture on her work. Free, 7–8:30 pm, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

Monty Python Live (Mostly) Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma

Earlier this year, comedy legends from Monty Python performed live on stage for the first time in more than three decades. The performance was broadcast from London’s O2 Arena and played in cinemas around the globe in July, and it will be broadcast again during 14

santafeanNOW.com

Learn about the backstory and food-related themes in Bizet’s Carmen from opera lecturer Mark Tiarks while Chef Rocky Durham serves a Basque-themed menu. $95, 5–7 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Great American Songbook works plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Big Wide Grin The William&Joseph Gallery 727 Canyon

Acoustice folk band Big Wide Grin. Free, 7–8 pm, 505-982-9404, thewilliamandjosephgallery.com.

John Kurzweg El Farol 808 Canyon

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Les Malzman Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Retro groove rock. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Night Train La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Live music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Two Be Announced: Lydia Clark and Jeff Hett Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe Classic and contemporary rock covers. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Carmen Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

A performance of Bizet’s Carmen starring soprano Ana María Martínez. From $39, 8 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

The Hold Steady Santa Fe Sol Stage & Grill 37 Fire

Storyteller Bill Hester Fine Art 621 Canyon

Bronze sculptures by Bill Unger. Free, through July 31, 505-660-5966, billhesterfineart.com.

James Surls Wade Wilson Art 217 W Water

Sculptures by James Surls. Free, through August 10, 505-660-4393, wadewilsonart.com.

Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw Golden Dawn Gallery 201 Galisteo

Paintings by acclaimed Native American artists (and family members) Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw. Free, ongoing, 505-988-2024, goldendawngallery.com.

Harvesting Traditions Pablita Velarde Museum of Indian Women in the Arts, 213 Cathedral

A solo exhibition of works by Kathleen Wall. Free, through January 4, 2015, 505-988-8900, 505-988-8900, pvmiwa.org.

Santa Fe Bandstand Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

A full range of diverse music is presented nightly, from Americana and indie to country, jazz, world, New Mexico classics, and more. Free, through August 28, 505-986-6054, santafebandstand.org.

EntreFlamenco The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis

World-class Spanish dance ignites an intimate theater setting in a series of performances by flamenco stars Antonio Granjero and Estefania Ramirez. $25–$45, 8 pm nightly (except Tuesdays), through August 31, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.


into the wild the Jean Cocteau Cinema hosts a benefit for the Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary

A wolf at the Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary in Ramah, New Mexico

by Eve Tolpa

Director Alex Tello (foreground) and writer Samuel Tello (in back) working on the documentary Furthest from the Wild

GEORGE R. R. MARTIN isn’t just the author of the epic Song of Ice and Fire novels and the owner of the Jean Cocteau Cinema. He’s also an advocate for rescued wolves and wolfdogs. Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary, in Ramah, New Mexico, is one of his and his wife Parris’s longtime pet causes. In fact, Martin named 10 of the sanctuary’s wolf-dogs after characters in his books, and they’re now known as the Westeros Pack. (Westeros is the continent on which the Song of Ice and Fire series is set.) Wild Spirit is one of the many nonprofit animal sanctuaries featured in Alex Tello’s documentary Furthest from the Wild, which was shot in California and across the Southwest and this weekend is being screened at the Cocteau as a benefit for Wild Spirit. Tello will be at the screening, as will Wild Spirit’s traveling ambassador wolf, accompanied by the sanctuary’s director. Tello became interested in animal sanctuaries when he volunteered at one years ago. “I was fascinated with what was going on,” he says. “You can get so close to these animals, as opposed to in

a zoo.” He realized that helping every week wasn’t enough and wanted to spread the word about the work animal sanctuaries do. (He posits that 80 to 90 percent of the world’s population doesn’t even know such places exist). Most animals relocated to sanctuaries are wild animals (often primates, big cats, and wolves) that were kept as pets. According to Tello, the animal trade is the third-largest illicit profit business after drugs and guns—“a way to make a big quick buck with minimal risk”—because laws are lax or nonexistent, especially in the South and Midwest. “I could go on Craigslist right now and find something,” he says. Tello’s number-one suggestion for the public regarding what we can do to help wild animals? Learn as much about them as you can. Whenever you’re planning to visit a zoo, a live animal show, or even a sanctuary, do your research. Look into how the animals are treated and where the organization’s money goes. And, of course, check out his documentary, Furthest from the Wild. Furthest from the Wild, a benefit for the Wild Spirit Wolf Sanctuary, August 3, screenings at 1:30 and 3:30 pm, $12 ($10 senior/students, $8 kids), Jean Cocteau Cinema, 418 Montezuma, jeancocteaucinema.com July 31, 2014

NOW

15


Festival of Song

the intimate vocal series launches its fourth season by Eric G u st af s on

ON THURSDAY, JULY 31, Performance Santa Fe presents the first of four Festival of Song recitals. The popular concert series features stars of the Santa Fe Opera singing in a scaled-down and intimate setting, with American tenor Alek Shrader and Argentine mezzosoprano Daniela Mack kicking things off in a program of duets by Rossini and songs from Argentina. Joseph Illick, founding artistic director of Performance Santa Fe (formerly known as the Santa Fe Concert Association), accompanies the singers at the piano. “Song recitals present a different challenge to both singer and audience, expanding horizons for both,” Illick says. “They offer an insight into the talent of the singer not seen on the larger-than-life opera stage.”

Joseph Illick

The second program in the series, held on Sunday, August 3, features soprano Corinne Winters singing songs in the various dialects of Spain. Learning those dialects involved much linguistic study, but the vibrant Winters reports that the endeavor suited her voice, and that it worked! The idea to perform those songs came from a suggestion by Winters’s pianist, Steven Blier, who helped the singer push her boundaries and try vocal colorations. “Doing a song cycle is a healthy contrast to singing operatic roles,” Winters says. “It’s wonderful to do both. I love recital singing for the intimacy of the experience, but my heart and soul [are] in opera. I perform in five or six productions each year, both around the U.S. and 16

santafeanNOW.com

abroad,” she adds. Winters’s new CD of Spanish songs, Canción Amorosa, will be available for purchase at the concert. American tenor Paul Groves returns for another successful season in Santa Fe, and for the Mezzo-soprano third Festival of Song program, Daniela Mack held Friday, August 8, he performs songs by Duparc, Liszt, and Britten accompanied by Illick. Since making his debut at The Metropolitan Opera in 1992 in the role of the steersman in Wagner’s Der fliegende Holländer (The Flying Dutchman), Groves has enjoyed a global career, appearing at La Scala in Milan, the Vienna State Opera, Lyric Opera of Chicago, and the Paris and San Francisco Operas, among many other venues. The final recital, on Sunday, August 10, features American soprano Brenda Rae, whose numerous appearances include Carnegie Hall, the Glyndebourne Festival, and the Bavarian State Opera. Here she displays her striking vocal talents in songs by Schubert, Strauss, and Rachmaninoff, accompanied by pianist In Sun Suh. All Festival of Song recitals are held at St. John’s United Methodist Church on Old Pecos Trail and include a post-performance meet-theartists reception. For further information, visit performancesantafe.org. Festival of Song, July 31—August 10, $45 (general admission)—$75 (reserved seating). For tickets, visit performancesantafe.org or ticketssantafe.org or call 505-984-8759 or 505-988-1234.

ILLICK AND WINTERS: COURTESY OF PERFORMANCE SANTA FE. MACK: DARIO ACOSTA PHOTOGRAPHY.

Soprano Corinne Winters


eating+ drinking

JONATHAN BLAUSTEIN

how sweet it is

B.Y. COOPER

Eating Around

Bouche Bistro, Saturday, July 26, 7 pm: Black mussels in white wine and red chili with plain frites, $35. Demerara crème brûlée, $8. bouchebistro.com

BAKER MELINDA GIPSON takes great satisfaction in creating and sharing homemade desserts with fans of her new bakery, Sweet Lily. “I love seeing the repeat customers and giving them their cinnamon roll each day,” she says. “I find the whole process very gratifying.” Gipson opened Sweet Lily on May 31 and says that glowing word-of-mouth references have been bringing new patrons to her doorstep daily. Gipson previously worked her magic in the kitchens of Harry’s Roadhouse and Dulce Bakery, but now she serves her own traditional American bakery fare as well as gluten-free options. Having made “500 million or so” pies (her favorite dessert to both bake and eat) over the last 20 years, Gipson says that her quintessentially flaky crusts paired with seasonal fruit fillings provide just the right balance of sweetness and don’t overwhelm the palate. Gipson took the name of her bakery from translations of her five-year-old daughter’s name, Zuzu. “Zuzu—after the character in the film It’s a Wonderful Life—translates to ‘sweet’ in Yiddish and ‘lily’” in Scandinavian, she says. “For me, dessert is very family-oriented and memory-oriented, so I wanted to include [thoses aspects] in my first venture,” she adds. In addition to its treats, Sweet Lily offers locally sourced quiche and sandwiches for lunch, adding tasty touches like fig butter to sweeten items like ham, fontina cheese, and greens on homemade foccacia. “I have a list a mile long of things I want to add to Melinda Gipson the menu,” Gipson says, noting that her staff of three (plus herself as the sole baker) is starting off small but making plans to grow. —Cristina Olds Sweet Lily Bakery, 229a Johnson, sweetlilybakery.com

KAREN SCHULD

Send Santa Fean NOW pictures of your meal (with the info we’ve included here) and we might run them in the magazine! Email info@santafean.com. July 31, 2014

NOW

17


Seen Around

photographs by Adrian Wills

DIANE STROMBERG

KAREN SCHULD

KAREN SCHULD

KAREN SCHULD

LISA LAW

KAREN SCHULD

Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a sampling of what we got to see.

18

santafeanNOW.com


LISA LAW

versatile/tesuque

11 McGregor Lane. Northern New Mexico-style home with floor-to-ceiling windows and an open floor plan. Presently divided into two living spaces; easily re-opened to create one larger space. Separate casita/office plus a 4-car garage/workshop. MLS #201403059 $653,000

expect more.

tel: 505.989.774 1 â&#x20AC;˘

www.dresf.com

LISA LAW

LISA LAW

LISA LAW

A Full Service Real Estate Brokerage

Covering Santa Fe in a unique way. aBqJournal.com/subscribe July 31, 2014

NOW

19


AJ

Opening Night

20

santafeanNOW.com

ANDREW JOHNSON, ADRIAN WILLS, DIANE STROMBERG, AUDREY DURRELL

AJ

AJ AJ

AJ

AD

DS

AJ

DS

AD

AW

AJ

AW

AJ

AJ

AJ

AW

DS

AJ

Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a sampling of what we got to see.


art

openings | reviews | artists

Christopher Owen Nelson, Improv, carved and painted Plexiglas, 52 x 83"

Having first shown his works as a self-taught teenage artist, Denver native Christopher Owen Nelson went on to study at the Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design and eventually developed his own standout style. His latest show at Waxlander Art Gallery & Sculpture Garden, Subconscious Space (through August 11, reception August 1, 5–8 pm, 622 Canyon, waxlander.com), includes new mixed-media pieces that demonstrate what’s been referred to as Nelson’s “pioneering explorations of carved and manipulated acrylic and bold use of color.”

July 31, 2014

NOW

21


art

PROFILE

A Young Man’s Fancy, oil on linen, 34 x 49" 22

santafeanNOW.com

Roseta Santiago

a ne w show hig hlig ht s t he huma n conne ct ion in t he paint e r ’s re ali st wor ks by Eve Tolpa

ASK MOST ARTISTS what brought them to Santa Fe, and you’re likely to hear a familiar litany of responses: the light, the mountains, the tricultural environment. Not so for Roseta Santiago: She was drawn to the City Different primarily because of its reputation as a thriving art market. “I moved here in 2000,” says the self-taught artist, who had previously been living in Atlanta and building and designing nightclubs throughout the Southeast—a line of work that also utilized her skills in graphic design, advertising, and mural painting. “I promised myself after doing all these jobs that I would finally have my dream of being a fine-art painter.” Santiago promptly got busy charting the course for her new career. “Half of me is a pragmatist and half is a dreamer,” she says. “When I focus on something, I try to get it done.” When she wasn’t painting in her studio, “I find people really fascinating,” Santiago was invessays Roseta Santiago. “Some kind tigating galleries and doing “a lot of market of interior beauty—that’s what study to figure out what I had to say that I like to try to capture.” was different.” She knew she was “going to find a way to make people look at what I’m looking at,” and although at that point she hadn’t yet settled on the exact subject Taos Man from El Salto, matter for her pieces, it was clear she wanted to create oil on linen, 20 x 16" still lifes. “I find things that somebody made,” Santiago says, “and I try to see the story in it.” Case in point: the Native earthenware vessels that populate so many of her dramatically lit paintings. Santiago is especially transfixed by the human connection inherent in handmade objects, which she sees as oblique portraits of their creators. “I’m meeting them through their work,” she says. “The connection between these artists and me. . . . What is it that makes us the same?” By 2008, Santiago had branched out into depicting the figure. Not surprisingly, it’s the sense of the human story that engages her. “I find people really fascinating,” she says, noting that her latest show, at Blue Rain Gallery, features several paintings of one particular model, a Taos Pueblo man. The show’s title is Grace, a word that for Santiago refers to “some kind of interior beauty. That’s what I like to try to capture,” she says. Roseta Santiago: Grace, August 1–August 16, reception August 1, 5–7 pm, Blue Rain Gallery, 130 Lincoln, blueraingallery.com


art

PROFILE

Ditching the Cardigan a r ti st Je re my Thoma s delves into new territory by Eve Tol pa

Top: Tinsely Pink, forged mild steel, powdered coat, nail lacquer, 18 x 19 x 12". Bottom: Ling Blue, forged mild steel and powdered coat, 17 x 15 x 23".

IT’S HARD NOT TO BE subtly reminded of fortune cookies when viewing Jeremy Thomas’s bulbous metal sculptures, which he calls, simply, “inflatables.” At his studio in Española, Thomas cuts steel plates, folds them into patterns (often circle-based shapes), welds those pieces together, and then, finally, injects air into them. The process of inflation has an element of uncertainty—and for Thomas it’s the most fun. “I’ve learned how they respond to each other,” he says of the interacting elements. “I’ve been inflating these things for about 10 years, and you tend to get into a groove.” He can’t, however, know exactly what will happen. Depending on the weight of a piece or the relative heat of any of its sides, the material will react differently. Unexpected folds and wrinkles may appear. The pieces are interesting enough as pure form, but Thomas adds another

Salmon Orange, forged mild steel and powdered coat, 19 x 23 x 17"

element: highly specific, carefully chosen color, which he juxtaposes with oxidized metal. “We all have color memories,” he says, “like when you smell a smell from your childhood and it brings particular circumstances back to you.” Some of his earlier works incorporated what he terms “macho” colors, inspired in part by a fascination with farm equipment from his own childhood in Oklahoma. Now (for very small pieces only!) he’s more likely to use nail polishes, which have “a surface, a gloss to them” that’s similar to car paint. The title of Thomas’s latest show, Ditching the Cardigan, is a reference to an article about the late Fred Rogers, of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood fame. It’s about leaving behind established frames of reference, an idea that resonates with Thomas, who says that recently his work has been “moving into an area that’s more unresolved.” Part of that evolution is a trend toward creating larger pieces. Because his forge is only four feet cubed, going bigger means inflating pieces cold rather than hot. As a result, Thomas is now limited only by the size of sheet plate steel he can find. That, and his imagination. Jeremy Thomas: Ditching the Cardigan, August 1– August 31, reception August 1, 5–7 pm, Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, 554 S Guadalupe, charlottejackson.com July 31, 2014

NOW

23


South by Southwest

art

PROFILE

Billy Sch e nc k ex p lor e s t he icon s a nd m y t h s of t he stori e d Ame rica n We st by Emily Va n C le ve

BILLY SCHENCK’S UNIQUE VISION of the American West is evident in his new show South by Southwest, which runs through August 8 at Sorrel Sky Gallery. Schenck builds a mythology using iconic characters and prefers to let the images in his paintings—cowboys and cowgirls, Navajo sheepherders, and Apache women with baskets—speak for themselves. A few of the almost two-dozen paintings in the show focus on a few of his favorite locations: Monument Valley and Canyon de Chelly. “I go to those two places two or three times a year, and I’ve been doing that for years,” Schenck says. “I use the same exact locations in a lot of my work. I like to think that as I get older I find more mature ways of seeing and painting Free Range Cowgirl, those places.” Schenck’s style is part of the oil on canvas, 18 x 14" Western pop-art movement. Influenced in the early days Sunset in the Red River of his career by Warhol and Valley, oil on canvas, Lichtenstein, Schenck still 55 x 40" draws inspiration from their work. He’s a painter always looking for new possibilities and ways to revisit old subject matter. Case in point: In the 1980s, Schenck began experimenting with halftone dots in his work, and he recently decided to re-explore that process and create two such paintings especially for his new show. “The process involves scanning slides, taking out the background, and putting halftone dots in the images; running the images on my computer where I create or eliminate some of the details; projecting the images on an overhead projector; and drawing the images on canvas,” he says. “I made a small painting of a woman wearing high heels with spurs hanging off them for the show. The other piece is a life-size portrait of a cowgirl with one breast exposed.” Schenck is excited to be featuring halftone dot works at Sorrel Sky Gallery because, although he’s exhibited such pieces in other venues in the past, he’s never shown them in Santa Fe. Billy Schenck, South by Southwest, through August 8, Sorrel Sky Gallery, 125 W Palace, sorrelsky.com 24

santafeanNOW.com

Sheryl Zacharia, Hipster, ceramic sculpture, 21 x 14 x 5"

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: SHERYL ZACHARIA A former singer/songwriter, ceramist Sheryl Zacharia still brings musicality to her nonfunctional pottery. “I wrote music and lyrics, [so] I go for a kind of poetry in my work,”she says. “Pattern and form are rhythm. The palette is harmony. The lines are lyrical.” Zacharia hand-works the abstract forms (often they bear her finger marks), finishing the surfaces with various slips, oxides, underglazes, and glazes, working in layers much the way a painter might. The Manhattan artist is drawn to slips that crack, marrying the new with a weathered look. In 2010, New York’s Museum of Arts and Design honored her with an extended residency, and that same year (and again in 2013) she earned a creative grant from the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance. Zacharia’s solo show People, Places, and Things runs through August 19 at Tansey Contemporary on Canyon Road. −Ashley M. Biggers tanseycontemporary.com


art

PREVIEWS

opening art receptions

Melinda K. Hall: My Modern Bestiary Meyer East Gallery, 225 Canyon, meyereastgallery.com August 1–August 14, reception August 1, 5–7 pm When Melinda K. Hall started her artistic career, “it was really about working with the paint,” she says. “Most of my work was very abstract.” Over the years she added flat images and simple shapes to her pieces—everyday objects, the animals in her life— while maintaining her dedication to creating sophisticated surfaces. The resulting aesthetic, which she terms “contemporary naïve,” combines humor and narrative with exuberant color. “I think it’s approachable work,” Hall says, positing that the initial contact with the canvas leads the eye into the background’s subtleties, created by layers of paint. For her, a piece is “only completed when a viewer takes it in and it brings up their own experiences.”—ET

Marilyn Yates, Summer Entrada, acrylic on board, 11 x 14"

Melinda K. Hall, Know Your Chicken Parts, oil on canvas, 24 x 24"

Jeff Juhlin, Cloud Hidden, encaustic and mixed media on panel, 30 x 30"

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: MARILYN YATES Marilyn Yates loves hollyhocks, lilacs, and adobe houses. When she can find all three together, it’s a great day for painting. “I love the way lilacs spill over adobe walls,” says the Eldorado resident. “I don’t have adobe walls at my house, so I often drive over to the east side of town to look for a scene like that.” At least 15 recent paintings of New Mexico’s landscape are part of her solo show at Sage Creek Gallery that opens this weekend. Although spring and summer are glorious times to paint, Yates says that she’s including work created throughout the year. There are winter scenes from the Taos and Santa Fe ski areas, and an autumn landscape captures fall colors found not too far from Alamosa, Colorado. Paintings of the church in Golden, New Mexico, and the little chapel at El Rancho de las Golondrinas in La Cienega are also on display. And then there are the flowers. Peonies and sunflowers are among Yates’s favorites, and many of her works are inspired by the roses, lilacs, and peonies in her garden. Regardless of the subject matter, however, Yates likes to keep her paintings intimate in size. “They’re like small, special secrets,” she says. Something that surprises many viewers is that Yates only uses acrylics in her work. She made the switch from watercolors to acrylics two decades ago, when she realized that her watercolors were becoming more opaque. Over the years she discovered a way to paint with acrylics that’s reminiscent of other media. “Most people think I’m using oils or pastels because they think acrylics have a hard edge,” she says, “but my acrylics are more painterly.”—EVC Marilyn Yates, solo exhibition, August 1–August 14, reception August 1, 5–7 pm, Sage Creek Gallery, 421 Canyon, sagecreekgallery.com

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: JEFF JUHLIN

Jeff Juhlin combines layers of wax, paper, and other media—sometimes fusing up to 20 layers of materials—in one painting. He then goes back to excavate and expose previous stratums. The intimate and relatable works on panel bare witness to this process and become metaphors for his discovery; the non-objective, earthy surfaces that emerge evoke weathered wood and storied objects. “The intention,” says Juhlin, “is to seduce you into getting involved . . . then hopefully you will do some exploration and excavation of your own.”—Hannah Hoel Ellsworth Gallery, ellsworthgallery.com July 31, 2014

NOW

25


[on the market]

ongoing

MARSHALL ELIAS PHOTOGRAPHY

James Surls, Rough God 4, steel, 67 x 85 x 60"

James Surls Wade Wilson Art 217 W Water, wadewilsonart.com Through August 10 In recent years James Surls has hosted an annual open-studio weekend in Aspen, drawing collectors, curators, and critics nationwide. For 2014, he brings the event to Santa Fe, giving an artist talk and leading both a Laila Ionescu, tour of his public Longer Meditation, sculptures (in conSure Illumination, junction with Creporcelain and ative Santa Fe) and a stoneware, 24" discussion panel. A portion of proceeds from exhibition sales benefit select local arts organizations. —ET

Laila Ionescu: The Shiver of Clay Atelier 55 55 Ellis Ranch lailafarcasionescu.com Through August 2 Romanian-born ceramist Laila Ionescu presents 55 figurative free-standing and bas-relief pieces in the home of a Japanese architect—an unorthodox setting that recontextualizes both the art and its environment. Ionescu, who is also a jeweler, sometimes incorporates silver and gold inlays into her work—which, as she puts it, deals with everyday situations from a “point of view that is a little bit skewed.”—ET 26

santafeanNOW.com

covetous compound Equestrians will find this 40-acre property south of town in the Galisteo Basin perfect for owning and taking care of multiple horses, given its full-size indoor arena, foaling barn, and eight-stall stable with tack and feed storage. The land also has 10-acres’ worth of irrigation rights. The property’s 4,641-square-foot main house is made of adobe construction and has an open floor plan and private bedroom suites. The recently remodeled 2,360-squarefoot guesthouse features custom finishes and wood craftsmanship. An apartment in the foaling barn has one bedroom and a bath, and a large workshop (which includes plumbing and electricity) could be used as an artist’s studio. List price: $1.295 million Contact: Maureen Mestas, Sotheby’s International Realty, 505-310-1050, sothebyshomes.com


a day at the mind spa [on the market]

secluded space COURTESY OF A DAY AT THE MIND SPA

This 5,545-square-foot, threebedroom Pueblo-style home sits on 1.75 acres southeast of Santa Fe’s downtown plaza. There’s a huge living and dining room, two quiet guest suites with private outdoor areas, and a master suite in its own wing of the house. Among the home’s special features are skylights in the kitchen and entry hall, decorative corbels, travertine marble floors, and custom-made granite countertops. Beautifully maintained outdoor spaces envelop the house, and there are two arbored patios (one of which is perfect for outdoor dining) as well as lush gardens with flowering plants, grasses, and trees. The east side of the home has a pool and a hot tub.

COURTESY OF SOUTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

List price: $1.875 million Contact: Tim Van Camp, Sotheby’s International Realty, 505-690-2750, knowingsantafe.com

style

LAURIE MORGAN SILVER’S FIVE-YEAR-OLD Santa Fe business A Day at the Mind Spa is like preventive medicine for the mind. “Emotional, mind, and brain wellness are the foundation of all wellbeing,” Silver says. A licensed clinical social worker and licensed psychotherapist, Silver aims to help clients with things like cultivating coping strategies, improving relationships, and redirecting their careers. To this end, she offers not only private coaching and psychotherapy sessions in an Eastside casita but programs that range from mind-wellness days to retreats and destination experiences as well. A mind-wellness day is a half- or full-day customized

Laurie Morgan Silver (left) leads clients in mindwellness days, retreats, and destination adventures.

program that includes personal counseling, conversation, interactive exercises, and relaxation techniques centered on certain subjects or areas of concern. Silver’s retreats are single-day or weekend-long events that cater to 10 or fewer participants and delve into life transitions, relationship issues, or the challenges of creating a work/life balance. Destination experiences are seven- or eight-day trips that include daily journaling and guided meditation sessions as well as periodic group discussions. If you’re interested in having your own mind-wellness experience, “you can gather a group of friends, select your own theme and location, and come to us to design a lifeenhancing, unforgettable trip,” says Silver. Or, she adds, “I can completely design a trip for you.”—Emily Van Cleve For further information, contact Silver at 505-983-5777 or visit adayatthemindspa.com. July 31, 2014

NOW

27


| L A S T LO O K |

28

santafeanNOW.com

AMY GROSS

Wednesday night, July 23, was a Santa Fe music-lover’s dream, as Goldenboy (above) killed it at Duel Brewing, Alto Street (right) rocked out at Cowgirl BBQ, and Bruce Robison and Kelly Willis (below, right) wooed the crowds at the Santa Fe Bandstand. Southern California–based indie-pop group Goldenboy was passing through on their summer tour from Texas to California. For years, Goldenboy’s frontman, Shon Sullivan, performed with iconic singer/songwriter Elliott Smith, who dubbed Sullivan “golden boy” during a tour in 2000. Alto Street is a local acoustic power trio (Joseph Salack, Steve McCormick, and Steve Linger) that performs a mix of blues rock, folk, alternative country, jazz, and world music. Austin’s reigning music couple Bruce Robison and Kelly Willis—who are sometimes compared to Johnny Cash and June­Carter Cash—had the crowds on the Plaza dancing the night away to their harmonizing Americana sound. —Cristina Olds

GABRIELLA MARKS

GABRIELLA MARKS

one night, three hot bands


PHOTOGRAPH BY AL ABRAMS

ALLAN HOUSER (WARM SPRINGS CHIRICAHUA APACHE, 1914–19914), HOMEWARD BOUND, 1989. © ALLAN HOUSER, INC.

native arts

2014

Need-to-Know Native American painters, sculptors, weavers, writers, dancers, poets, and more

PUBLIC OPENING SUNDAY, AUGUST 3, 2014, 1–5 PM An exhibition honoring the hundreth birth year of world-renown artist/mentor Allan Houser, and featuring the works of thirteen Native American sculptors whose lives he changed forever: larry ahvakana · don chunestudey cliff fragua · craig dan goseyun · rollie grandbois bob haozous · phillip mangas haozous · doug hyde oreland joe · tony lee · estella loretto bill prokopiof · robert shorty More information available at indianartsandculture.org

Museum of Indian Arts & Culture Museum Hill in Santa Fe | (505) 476-1250


Read a profile about Jane Filer in the current issue of the Santa Fean

Jane Filer, Riding the Big White, acrylic on canvas, 46" x 40"

Walter Horak Troupe, bronze

621 C anyon R oad 830 C anyon R oad

billhester@billhesterfineart.com

BillHesterFineArt.com (505) 660-5966

Profile for Bella Media Group

Santa Fean NOW July 31 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW July 31 2014 Digital Edition

Santa Fean NOW July 31 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW July 31 2014 Digital Edition

Profile for santafean