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now

SU M OFF ME IC R

IAL OF MA CO GA LO ZIN R E

The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

this week’s

Wyland Galleries makes a splash with Santa Fe grand opening

top nightlife

and entertainment santafeanNOW.com

picks

PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

week of July 2


Monday, July 6, 1–4 p.m. PAINTING WITH COCHINEAL A hands-on project for ages 3 to 103 TEXTILE ARTIST DEMONSTRATIONS With Zarina Kendjaeva (Bukhara, Uzbekistan), Julia Gómez (Santa Fe, New Mexico), and Beatrice Maestas Sandoval (Las Vegas, New Mexico) BOOKSIGNING A Red Like No Other: How Cochineal Colored the World with co-editor Carmella Padilla

now |

2015

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

|

WHETHER OR NOT you’re an opera lover, there’s no question that the Santa Fe Opera is a world-renowned and iconic destination for so many who live in and visit our community. The organization does a wonderful job of sharing the magical world of drama and passion—and even laughter—set to powerful music. My friends in faraway places such as New York City and Heidelberg, Germany, are united in their praise of the Santa Fe Opera. Among aficionados, the company is a highly respected one, known for staging unique, top-quality productions. Our opera has also distinguished itself by bringing some of the world’s top vocal talent to Santa Fe. All this, and we haven’t even spoken about the wonderful facility that houses the company and provides a setting like no other in the world. The views alone—especially the sunsets—are spectacular and are worth the price of admission. The opening night of the Santa Fe Opera is also the kick-off to high season for the city as a whole. To make sure you can take advantage of that, all summer we will provide up-to-date listings of the great things happening in Santa Fe. The biggest challenge will be for you to decide which of the many activities to participate in. NOW magazine is created with the sole mission of assisting you in the process. Your difficult decisions begin when you turn the page and begin to see all that’s going on this weekend. Have fun!

Bruce Adams

DAVID ROBIN

Focus on The Red That Colored the World

JULY 2 – JULY 8

Publisher

THE RED THAT COLORED THE WORLD has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: exploring the human endeavor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this exhibition do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional support comes from the Museum of New Mexico Foundation, International Folk Art Foundation, International Folk Art Alliance, Cotsen Family Foundation, Newman’s Own Foundation, Brown Foundation, Inc. of Houston, and McCune Charitable Foundation. Lead sponsor: Hotel Santa Fe The Hacienda and Spa.

The Great Race, the world’s premier old car rally, stopped in Santa Fe for the first time since 1989. Tourism executive director Randy Randall and Mayor Javier Gonzales (pictured) were present to greet the 117 antique automobiles at the Plaza on June 23.

On Museum Hill in Santa Fe · 505-476-1200 · InternationalFolkArt.org

LISA LAW

free admission on sundays


JAMES PEACH

Open Every Day

130 LINCOLN AVE. SANTA FE NM 87501 505-982-0055 INFO@TRUEWESTSF.COM 1/2 BLOCK NORTH OF THE PLAZA

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/TRUEWESTSF


Welcome to Santa Fe! As a creative, cultural hub, Santa Fe offers an abundance of the world’s best art, attractions, and entertainment opportunities. Santa Fean NOW is an excellent source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local or a tourist visiting for the first time or the 100th, NOW ’s complete listings of everything from gallery openings to live music events will help you make the most of the city. We look forward to seeing you around the City Different. Should you need any extra tips, please stop by our information centers at the Santa Fe Railyard or off the Plaza at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. Wishing you a wonderful time, Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR

b.y. cooper

anne maclachlan whitney spivey

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

samantha schwirck whitney stewart

GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

michelle odom

sybil watson, hannah reiter OPERATIONS MANAGER

ginny stewart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER

david wilkinson

WRITERS

ashley m. biggers, ben ikenson, cristina olds, phil parker, donna schillinger, eve tolpa, emily van cleve A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105 Santa Fe, NM 87505 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com Copyright 2015. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Fean NOW Volume 2, Number 21 Week of July 2, 2015. Published by Bella Media, LLC, at Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2015 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

Covering Santa Fe in a unique way. aBqJournal.com/subscribe

On the cover: Robert Wyland, Green Flash, photograph, 27 x 21." For more on the Wyland Galleries of Santa Fe grand opening, turn to page 15.


Wyland Galleries of Santa Fe Welcomes World Renowned Artist

Wyland Grand Opening Event! FRIDAY • 4-8PM

JULY 3RD and

www.wylandkw.com Facebook: Wyland Galleries of Key West, Inc.

SATURDAY • 4-8PM

JULY 4

TH

MEET-&-GREET GATHERING

WYLAND GALLERIES OF SANTA FE 202 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 87501 844-795-7300


the

buzz

How does one celebrate Independence Day in America’s oldest capital city? For the past four decades, locals and tourists alike have raised a glass (of orange juice) to the good old USA at Pancakes on the Plaza. Hosted by the Rotary Club of Santa Fe, the event usually draws more than 9,000 guests, who flock to the heart of town to enjoy not only breakfast, but also a car show, silent auction, arts and crafts show, and live music. And although events run throughout the day (breakfast, however, only lasts until noon), we recommend arriving by 8 am to catch the opening ceremony, which includes a presentation of the flags, the Pledge of Allegiance, and the National Anthem.

DICK JONES

Pancakes on the Plaza, July 4, 7 am–5 pm, breakfast 7 am– 12 pm, $7–$8, Santa Fe Plaza, San Francisco Street, pancakesontheplaza.com

citizenship ceremony New Mexicans might not have access to fireworks on the National Mall or a view of the Statue of Liberty, but we can celebrate Independence Day in a way that’s all our own. Each Fourth of July, Bandelier National Monument (48 miles northwest of the Plaza) holds a naturalization ceremony for approximately 15 people who will take the oath of U.S. citizenship. Bandelier is one of only 11 national parks to host citizenship ceremonies this year, and the only park to do so on the Fourth of July. The event is “an opportunity for new citizens to have such a wonderful place and experience for their ceremony (a lot of times it’s usually done in an auditorium in Albuquerque),” says Bandelier superintendent Jason Lott. “For years and years, their families and their descendants will be able to come back to Bandelier and say ‘this is where Mom or Grandpa, or whoever became a citizen.’” The event, which is open to the public, is also an “opportunity for the rest of us to reaffirm ourselves as citizens of this country,” according to Lott.—Whitney Spivey Citizenship Ceremony, July 4, 11 am, $12 per vehicle, Bandelier National Monument, 15 Entrance, Los Alamos, nps.gov/band 4

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Tomorrowland: The protagonist asks, “Can we fix it?“ and so does reviewer Phil Parker.

WALT DISNEY PICTURES, A113, BABIEKA

Pancakes on the Plaza

just shut up, Tomorrowland Tomorrowland begs for optimism. We see its highschool hero, Casey, go from class to class; the threat of terrorism is discussed in one; in another it’s global warming. In English class, students read Orwell’s 1984, Huxley’s Brave New World, and Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, each novel set in a terrifying dystopia. “Can we fix it?” Casey asks her teachers. They’ve got nothing in response. It’s a sweet idea but gets no extra credit for earnestness. Tomorrowland is a mawkish waste of two hours. Director Brad Bird has created a PG-rated potential blockbuster, energized by hope, but he forgot to make it any good. Bird’s already proven himself a maestro of kinesis in films such as Ratatouille and Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, but the action scenes in Tomorrowland are short, loud, and lacking his characteristic cleverness. Bird also showed he could make a light, sweet and highly successful film by directing The Incredibles, a fantastic, pure action movie. Tomorrowland is, then, a step backward for such a talented filmmaker. The story’s prevailing idea is that mankind’s demise is a self-fulfilling prophecy. But 1984, Brave New World, and Fahrenheit 451 were meant as warnings. That’s why they exist. George Orwell’s concern about the future led him to devise a rich love story and let it be shattered by political insanity. In fact, the characters in Tomorrowland repeatedly reference the need to move away from politics if we’re to craft a bright future. But it’s only a shallow touch. Tomorrowland’s people believe fixing the planet is an act of personal will; that we need only decide to be helpful, and our problems will be solved. That’s simplistic and stupid. Even if Bird’s sermon were exactly correct about saving ourselves, this is still a bad movie. There’s constant exposition; and strange flashbacks muddle a plot that wastes the entire first hour. The machine they destroy in the climax is never explained—unless I just missed it because I’d stopped paying attention.—Phil Parker


July 4–5: Santa Fe Wine Festival at El Rancho de las Golondrinas

July 2–July 8

July 2 thursday

Free, reception 5:30–7:30 pm, 505-955-6780, santafelibrary.org.

10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Fajitas Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Mayor Javier Gonzales Keynote Santa Fe Community College, 6401 Richards

Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Make fajitas that include chipotle-marinated steak, avocado salsa, and habanero pickled onions. $80, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Salsa I Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Prepare four spicy sauces in this hands-on class. $78, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Santa Fe’s mayor speaks at SFCC’s Paramedicine Program commencement, held in the Jemez Rooms. Free, 1–3 pm, 505-428-1820, sfcc.edu.

Asher Barreras Trio El Mesón, 213 Washington

Live jazz music. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

El Oro Es Color Bella Artes Gallery, 653 Canyon

Bus Tapes La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Forms and Places Santa Fe Public Library, 145 Washington

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Work by Olga de Amaral. A Summer of Color event. Free, through August 29, 505-983-2745, bellasartesgallery.com.

Twenty-one pieces by landscape painter Liz Pawlak. 6

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Folk/R&B/soul music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Karaoke with Michéle Leidig. Free,

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant, 58 S Federal

The Saltanah Dancers Cleopatra Café (Southside location) 3482 Zafarano

Belly dancing performance. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-820-7381, saltanahstudios.com.

Trio Bijou Zia Diner, 326 S Guadalupe

Jazz classics played with string instruments. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-988-7008, ziadiner.com.

July 3 friday First Friday Art Walk Multiple venues, downtown Santa Fe

Galleries and museums close late. Free, 5–7:30 pm,

COURTESY EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS

this week


MMI CI CH H AA EE L LMM OO NN RR OO EE EE TT HH RR I DI D GG EE

Serenity,Harmony, Harmony,Wonder Wonder Serenity, the ART of EMOTION the ART of EMOTION

505-982-1648, santafegalleryassociation.org.

The Wizard of Oz Santa Fe Railyard Park, 1611 Paseo de Peralta A screening of the 1939 film, as part of the Santa Fe Railyard Summer Movie Series. Free, 8–10:30 pm, 505-982-3373, railyardsantafe.com.

Celebrating the Chiles of New and Old Mexico Las Cosas Cooking School, 181 Paseo de Peralta A hands-on cooking class focused on dishes such as tortilla soup and shrimp empanadas. $85, 6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Restaurant Walk III Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe Eat your way around town with stops at Agave Lounge, Dinner for Two, The Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi, and L’Olivier. $115, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Southwest Barbecue Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

A demonstration class featuring ribs with chipotle barbecue sauce, frijoles charros, and more. $82, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Art for Intimate Outdoor Spaces and Small Garden Sanctuaries Sorrel Sky Gallery, 125 W Palace

See profile on page 21. Free, reception 5–7:30 pm,

Harmony of the Wild, acrylic, 36x36”

Harmony of the Wild, acrylic, 36x36”

Opening Reception - Friday, July 3, 5-7p Opening Reception - Friday, July 3, 5-7p Show runs July 2 - 14 Show runs July 2 - 14

Ethridge’s paintings evoke three tranquil emotions Ethridge’s paintings evoke three tranquil emotions serenity, harmony, wonder. Painted in his signature serenity, harmony, wonder. Painted in his signature style of tropical abstract landscape, his new work style of tropical abstract landscape, his new work will vary in color palettes to define each emotion. will vary in color palettes to define each emotion.

“a sensory experience of color mood” “a sensory experience of color and and mood”

Canyon Road, Santa 87501 200200 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, Fe, NMNM 87501 (505)795-7476 pippincontemporary.com (505)795-7476 pippincontemporary.com

505-501-6555, sorrelsky.com.

ArtKamp Canyon Road Contemporary, 403 Canyon

Oil paintings by Pat Hobaugh and Amanda Banker. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-983-0433, canyoncontemporary.com.

Beneath Southwestern Skies Mark Sublette Medicine Man Gallery 602A Canyon

Work by Dennis Ziemienski. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-820-7451, medicinemangallery.com.

Black Arrow Pop Gallery 125 Lincoln, Ste 111

Jeff Brock debuts black arrow gem stones mined and hand milled by Rocket Heads Studio. Free, reception 5pm, 505-820-0788, popsantafe.com.

Cause and Effect Verve Gallery of Photography, 219 Marcy

Fine-art images by environmental photographers. Free, reception July 17, 5–7 pm, 505-982-5009, vervegallery.com.

Dan Gerhartz Meyer Gallery, 225 Canyon

Work by the Wisconsin-based artist. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-983-1434, meyergalleries.com.

David Dornan Meyer East Gallery, 225 Canyon, Ste 11

Work by the Utah-based painter. A Summer of Color event. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-983-1657, meyereastgallery.com.

Drawn to the Wall 2: The Medium is the Message Patina Gallery, 131 W Palace

See profile on page 25. Free, reception 5–7:30 pm, 505-986-3432, patina-gallery.com.

Energetic Representations of the Natural World Outside Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art 558 Canyon Axle Contemporary presents an exhibit by Christina Hall-Strauss and Leah Siegel. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-670-5854, axleart.com.

Essential New Mexico Manitou Galleries

Work by William Haskell and Jerry Jordan. Free, reception 5–7:30 pm, 800-283-0440, manitougalleries.com.

Figurative Group Show Sage Creek Gallery, 421 Canyon

Works by exhibiting and invited figurative artists. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-3444, sagecreekgallery.com.

Forms of Joy and Meditation Bill Hester Fine Art, 621 Canyon

Bronze sculptures by David Unger. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-660-5966, billhesterfineart.com. July 2, 2015 NOW 7


David Unger, Daydreamer, bronze, 12 x 15 x 23"

Transitions Lacuna Galleries, 124 W Palace

and grandchildren of the Portal artisans. Free, 9 am–3 pm, through July 5, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Tread Softly Wiford Gallery, 403 Canyon

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Work by Clarissa James. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-467-8424, lacunagalleries.com.

Work by L. Scooter Morris. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-2403, wifordgallery.com.

Buffalo Nickel La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta July 3: Forms of Joy and Meditation at Bill Hester Fine Art

Grand Opening Wyland Galleries of Santa Fe, 202 Canyon See profile on page 15. Free, 4–8 pm, 844-795-7300, wylandgalleries.com.

John Oteri Joe Wade Fine Art, 102 E Water

See preview on page 26. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505988-2727, joewadefineart.com.

Light Conversation Selby Fleetwood Gallery, 600 Canyon

See preview on page 26. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505992-8877, selbyfleetwoodgallery.com.

Love, Death, and Revenge Tansey Contemporary, 619 Canyon

See preview on page 26. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505995-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.

Nature Diversified New Concept Gallery, 610 Canyon

See profile on page 23. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-795-7570, newconceptgallery.com.

Revealed Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art, 558 Canyon

More than a dozen abstract nature oil paintings by Chris Richter. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-992-0711, chiaroscurosantafe.com.

Santos Eye on the Mountain Gallery, 614 Agua Fria Iconic and sacred art by El Moises and others. Free, reception 5–9 pm, 928-308-0319, eyeonthemountaingallery.com.

Serenity, Harmony, Wonder: The Art of Emotion Pippin Contemporary, 200 Canyon Abstract landscapes by Michael Monroe Ethridge. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com. 8

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Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

The Alchemy Party Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

CCA and St. John’s Film Institute present The Auteurs Film Series, with Luis Buñuel’s 1972 comedy. $7–$10, 11 am, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Brewery Tour Santa Fe Brewing Company, 35 Fire Pl

See where local brews such as Happy Camper IPA and Santa Fe Pale Ale are made. Free, 12 pm, 505-424-3333, santafebrewing.com.

Rellenos Santa Fe School of Cooking , 125 N Guadalupe

Learn to make New Mexican tempura rellenos, ancho chile rellenos, cream cheese-stuffed jalapeños en escabeche, and chiles en nogada. $98, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Juicebox Ray. $7, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Fresh produce and handmade goods from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón, 213 Washington

Santa Fe Wine Festival El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 334 Los Pinos

Swinging jazz piano trio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Daughter of the Regiment Santa Fe Opera, 301 Opera

The 2015 season opens with Gaetano Donizetti’s romantic comedy, which is sung in French but has spoken words in English. $38–$300, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

July 4 saturday Outdoor Fine Art Show First National Bank on the Plaza Parking Lot 107 W San Francisco

Members of the Santa Fe Society of Artists exhibit and sell their work. Free, 9 am–5:30 pm, santafesocietyofartists.com.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Plaza, 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and more by local artists. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-310-1555, santafeartistsmarket.com.

Santa Fe Art Classes: Paint Moment Saturday Art Sanctuary, 621 Old Santa Fe Trl

A guided painting class to inspire your inner artist. $45, 6–8 pm, 575-404-1801, santafeartclasses.com.

Young Natives Artists’ Show and Sale New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln Art, jewelry, pottery, and more from children

Sample and celebrate the wines of New Mexico at a historic Southwest ranch. $13 (free for kids 12 and younger), 12–6 pm, through July 5, 505-471-2261, santafewinefestival.com.

Fourth of July Show Nambe Trading Post, 20 Summer

An exhibit at the historic trading post. Free, 12–7 pm, 505-455-2819, nambetradingpost.com.

Grand Opening Wyland Galleries of Santa Fe, 202 Canyon

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.


See profile on page 15. Free, 4–8 pm, 844-795-7300, wylandgalleries.com.

JoyceGroup Santa Fe Santa Fe Public Library, 145 Washington

Lovers of Irish writer James Joyce’s work discuss Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. All enthusiasts welcome. Free, 10 am–12:30 pm, joycegeek.com.

Buffalo Nickel La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant, 113 Washington

Live guitar music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

Nacha Mendez on the Patio La Casa Sena, 125 E Palace

Latin world music during lunch. Free, 12–2 pm, 505-988-9232, lacasasena.com.

We have made the decision to relocate our business to New York City. We wish to thank all of our wonderful customers in Santa Fe. It has been a pleasure serving your jewelry needs for the last 18 years.

We will be closing at the end of September. Of course we wish to thank everyone in a tangible way, so please join us in one, final “LEAVING SANTA FE SALE.” Everything in our Store will be marked down substantially. Drop in for your opportunity to get a remarkable treasure at a remarkable price.

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant, 58 S Federal Noche de Flamenco El Mesón, 213 Washington

Flamenco show with Flamenco Conpaz. $10, 7–9:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Citizenship Ceremony Bandelier National Monument 15 Entrance, Los Alamos

See profile on page 4. 11 am, $12 per vehicle, nps.gov/band.

Pancakes on the Plaza Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

See profile on page 4. $7–$8, 7 am–12 pm, 505-919-9709, pancakesontheplaza.com.

Rigoletto Santa Fe Opera, 301 Opera

The 2015 season continues with Giuseppe Verdi’s intense but familiar opera, which is based on Victor Hugo’s Le roi s’amuse. $38–$300, 8:30 pm, 505-9865900, santafeopera.org.

July 5 sunday Artisan Market Farmers Market Pavilion, 1607 Paseo de Peralta Artists, craftspeople, psychics, healers, live music, and food. Free, 10 am–4 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

213 W. San Francisco, Santa Fe | 505-992-3000 mrbr@cybermesa.com | barbararosen.com Outdoor Fine Art Show First National Bank on the Plaza Parking Lot 107 W San Francisco

Members of the Santa Fe Society of Artists exhibit and sell their work. Free, 9 am–5:30 pm, santafesocietyofartists.com.

Santa Fe Wine Festival El Rancho de las Golondrinas, 334 Los Pinos

Sample and celebrate the wines of New Mexico at a historic Southwest ranch. $13 (free for kids 12 and younger), 12–6 pm, through July 5, 505-471-2261, golondrinas.org.

505-476-1250, internationalfolkart.org.

Matthew Andrae La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Nacha Mendez & Co. El Farol, 808 Canyon

Latin world music. Free, 7–10 pm, July 4: Rellenos at Santa Fe School of Cooking

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie Center for Contemporary Art, 1050 Old Pecos Trl CCA and St. John’s Film Institute present The Auteurs Film Series, with Luis Buñuel’s 1972 comedy. $7–$10, 11 am, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Between Two Worlds: Folk Artists Reflect on the Immigrant Experience Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

Fiber arts, carving, paintings, and works on paper about immigrant journeys and transitioning to a new home. Accompanying events include the lecture Home, Displacement, and Belonging with Dr. Suzanne Seriff (1–2 pm) and a reception with the Women’s Board of the Museum of New Mexico Foundation (2–4 pm). $6-9, through January 17, 2016,

ERIC SWANSON

Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

July 2, 2015 NOW 9


505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant, 58 S Federal Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Ramon Bermudez on the Patio La Casa Sena, 125 E Palace

new mexico’s premiere professional ensemble of 24 singers from across the nation presents its 33rd summer season of the finest classical choral music. purchase your tickets today by calling our box office at {505} 988-2282 or online at desertchorale.org

2015

SUMMER FESTIVAL TRANSCENDENCE

SACRED ENGLISH + GERMAN MASTERWORKS

VENETIAN SPLENDOR INTIMATE MUSIC OF THE ITALIAN BAROQUE

SERENADE TO MUSIC SACRED + SECULAR ENGLISH CHORAL GEMS

HIDDEN TREASURES OF BYZANTIUM DIVINE + MEDITATIVE EASTERN ORTHODOX MUSIC JULY 9 | 8PM

TRANSCENDENCE | CATHEDRAL BASILICA, SANTA FE

JULY 10 | 8PM

TRANSCENDENCE | CATHEDRAL BASILICA, SANTA FE

JULY 11 | 8PM

Classical guitar during lunch. Free, 12–2 pm, 505-988-9232, lacasasena.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Tone and The Major Dudes Evangelo’s, 200 W San Francisco Blues, rock, and R&B. $5, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-9014.

July 6 monday Artist Demonstrations Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

Embroiderers teach their craft; guests can paint with cochineal and tour The Red That Colored the World exhibit. A Summer of Color event. $6–9, 1–4 pm, 505-476-1250, internationalfolkart.org.

Celebration of Color and Light Brigitte Bruggemann Gallery, 667 Canyon

Abstract paintings inspired by nature. Free, 505-614-5762, brigittebruggemann.com.

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

CCA and St. John’s Film Institute present The Auteurs Film Series, with Luis Buñuel’s 1972 comedy. $7–$10, 6 pm, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

TRANSCENDENCE | CATHEDRAL BASILICA, SANTA FE

JULY 12 | 4PM

TRANSCENDENCE | CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST. JOHN, ABQ

JULY 21 | 8PM

VENETIAN SPLENDOR | LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

JULY 23 | 8PM

SERENADE TO MUSIC | CHURCH OF THE HOLY FAITH, SANTA FE

JULY 24 | 8PM

VENETIAN SPLENDOR | LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

JULY 25 | 8PM

SERENADE TO MUSIC | CHURCH OF THE HOLY FAITH, SANTA FE

JULY 28 | 8PM

VENETIAN SPLENDOR | LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

JULY 29 | 8PM

SERENADE TO MUSIC | CHURCH OF THE HOLY FAITH, SANTA FE

JULY 30 | 8PM

VENETIAN SPLENDOR | LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

JULY 31 | 8PM

SERENADE TO MUSIC | CHURCH OF THE HOLY FAITH, SANTA FE

AUGUST 4 | 8PM

VENETIAN SPLENDOR | LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

AUGUST 6 | 8:30PM

Kid’s Summer Cooking Camp Las Cosas Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

The 15th annual week-long event introduces kids to the world of cooking. $300, 10 am–12:30 pm, through July 10, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Summer II Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe A hands-on cooking class on the patio that utilizes the grill and wood-fired oven. $110, 11 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Tacos Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Build your own meal by personalizing filling, salsa, and garnish in this hands-on cooking class. $98, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

HIDDEN TREASURES OF BYZANTIUM | CATHEDRAL BASILICA, SANTA FE

AUGUST 8 | 8:30PM

HIDDEN TREASURES OF BYZANTIUM | CATHEDRAL BASILICA, SANTA FE

AUGUST 9 | 4PM

HIDDEN TREASURES OF BYZANTIUM | CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST. JOHN, ABQ

Poetry Open-Mic Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie, Ste B

Santa Fe Poetry Trails presents a poetry open-mic. Free (donations accepted), 6 pm sign-up, 6:30 pm readings, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

RuPaul Drag Race Blue Rooster, 101 W Marcy

A weekly drag contest. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-206-2318, blueroosterbar.com.

July 7 tuesday Contemporary Southwest I Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Combine cultural traditions with new ideas to create grilled salmon with poblano-lime jam, and more. $82, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Red Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe Learn how to handle this spicy vegetable safely in the kitchen. $78, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Argentine Tango Milonga El Meson, 213 Washington

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol, 808 Canyon

Blues, rock, and R&B. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Son Como Son Santa Fe Plaza, San Francisco Street

Santa Fe Bandstand kicks off its 2015 season with a Cuban street party featuring one of New Mexico’s longest-standing and most popular salsa ensembles. Free, 6–8:30 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Make it Orange, Plants for a Vibrant Garden Santa Fe Botanical Garden, 715 Camino Lejo

Learn some unexpected and fun ways to incorporate the color orange into your landscape. A Summer of Color event. $15–$20, 9–11 am, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Packing Light: Carry Less and Enjoy it More REI, 500 Market Learn to become an ultralight backpacker. Free, 6–7:30 pm, 505-982-3557, rei.com.

Track Night Santa Fe High School, 2100 Yucca

An organized track workout for runners of all speeds.


Free, 5:50 pm (slow runners), 6 pm (fast runners), santafestriders.org.

July 8 wednesday Paint Moment Art Workshop Inn and Spa at Loretto, 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Explore the vibrant colors of the Southwest through a hands-on workshops provided by Santa Fe Art Classes. $60, 2:30–4:30 pm, 575-404-1801, santafeartclasses.com.

4 Seasons/4 Techniques: Summer Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Chef Lauren Slaff shares four culinary techniques used to develop restaurant quality flavors at home. $85, 5:30–8:30 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Summer Slide Lecture Series Santa Fe Clay, 545 Camino de la Familia

Christina West presents a slide lecture on her work. Free, 7–8:30 pm, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

Dharma Talk Upaya Zen Center, 1404 Cerro Gordo

A lecture by Allan Lokos, founder and guiding teacher of the Community Meditation Center in New York City. Free, 5:30–6:30 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

International Folk Art Market Community Celebration St. John’s College, 1160 Camino de Cruz Blanca The International Folk Art Market (July 10) festivities kick off with a concert co-presented with St. John’s College’s Music on the Hill. Dizu Plaatjies and Ibuyambo perform. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-992-7600, folkartalliance.org.

Joaquin Gallegos El Mesón, 213 Washington

Flamenco guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Latin Groove Blue Rooster, 101 W Marcy

Weekly Latin-themed night. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-206-2318, blueroosterbar.com.

Lifesongs Village Band Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Upbeat, original songs; part of the Santa Fe Bandstand series. Free, 12–1 pm, santafebandstand.org.

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant, 58 S Federal

Syd Masters & The Swing Riders Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Country and Western swing on the Plaza. Free, 7:15–8:45 pm, santafebandstand.org.

The Rifters Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

July 4-5

NOON - 6:00

Americana and folk music on the Plaza. Free, 6–7 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Karaoke Junction 530 S Guadalupe

Hosted by Michéle Leidig. Free, 10 pm–1 am, 505-988-7222, junctionsantafe.com.

Daughter of the Regiment Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera

Donizetti’s romantic comedy is sung in French but has spoken words in English. $38–$300, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

Where Artisans Demonstrate Traditional Crafts Every Weekend!

santafewinefestival.com 505.471.2261 334 Los Pinos Rd. • Just south of Santa Fe Support provided by Santa Fe Arts Commission and Santa Fe County Lodgers Tax Advisory Board. Media Sponsorships The Albuquerque Journal, KBAC, KVSF, KUNM and Santa Fean Magazine.

Ongoing Benevolent Forest Canyon Road Contemporary, 403 Canyon

Diane Naylor that captures surreal and magical landscapes. Free, through July 4, 505-983-0433, canyoncontemporary.com.

Stephen Lang True West Santa Fe, 130 Lincoln, Ste F

Abstract black and white photography. Free, through July 4, stephenlangphotography.com.

Maps, Doors, and Coffins: Locating Absence Tai Modern, 1601 Paseo de Peralta

Paintings and monotypes in conjunction with handcrafted doors and coffins by Katherine Lee. Free, through July 5, 505-984-1387, taimodern.com.

Mending the World Through a Dream Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Derek Chan references mythological explanations of natural phenomena via painting and video. $5, through July 5, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Savor La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Cosmopolitan Color Contemporaries Ventana Fine Art, 400 Canyon

Cuban street music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Taste wine from 21 wineries! *NEW* Purchase Tickets ONLINE! Skip the line!

Work by John Axton and Jennifer Davenport. Free, through July 8, 800-746-8815, ventanafineart.com.

Disappearing Act Marigold Arts, 424 Canyon

New watercolors of endangered species by Ruth Tatter. Free, through July 8, 505-982-4142, marigoldarts.com.

Pablo Antonio Milan The Signature Gallery, 102 E Water

Expressionist works that reveal a love for the colors and imagery of the Southwest. Free, through July 10, 505-983-1050, thesignaturegallery.com.

Fun and Games Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art, 702 Canyon

Nostalgic paintings by Ben Steele. Free, through July 12, 505-986-1156, giacobbefritz.com.

Rick Stevens Hunter Kirkland Contemporary, 200-B Canyon

Pastels by Rick Stevens. Free, through July 19, 505984-2111, hunterkirklandcontemporary.com.

Botanica LewAllen Galleries at the Railyard 1613 Paseo de Peralta

Botanical images by John Fincher. Free, through July 26, 505-988-3250, lewallencontemporary.com.

Visceral/Gravity Wheelhouse Art, 418 Montezuma

Work by Erik Gellert and Lauren Mantecon. Free, through July 30, 505-919-9553, wheelhouseart.com. July 2, 2015 NOW 11


July 8: The Rifters on the Santa Fe Plaza

Kiss My Glass The William & Joseph Gallery 727 Canyon

WEDNESDAY CONCERTS

July 8

Dizu Plaatjies and Ibuyambo Co-presented with St. John’s College and the International Folk Art Market | Santa Fe

TONIGHT’S SCHEDULE 5 p.m. Agalu – The Spirit of Drumming 5:45 p.m. International Folk Art Market | Santa Fe Procession 6:30-8 p.m. Dizu Plaatjies and Ibuyambo All concerts are free, family friendly, and hosted on the beautiful campus of St. John’s College.

PREMIER LEAD SPONSOR

LANB Creating a better way.

LEAD SPONSOR

BAND SPONSOR

PARTNER SPONSORS ALH Foundation

MEDIA SPONSORS

This project is supported in part by New Mexico Arts, a division of the Department of Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

For complete information on this year’s artists and general information about Music on the Hill and St. John’s College, please visit www.sjc.edu. 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca | Santa Fe | New Mexico 87505 | 505-984-6000

Meditations on Looking and Seeing GVG Contemporary 202 Canyon

JIM COX

Join St. John’s College for our 10th Annual Season

See preview on page 26. Free, through July 31, 505-982-9404, thewilliamandjosephgallery.com.

New work in steel by sculptor Jeffie Brewer. Free, through July 31, 505982-1494, gvgcontemporary.com.

Native American Imagery in Advertising Shiprock Santa Fe 53 Old Santa Fe Trl

An exhibit highlighting the iconography of Native American art and how it’s been incorporated into mainstream American culture. Free, through July 31, 505-982-8478, shiprocksantafe.com.

Programme One Peters Projects 1011 Paseo de Peralta

In celebration of the gallery’s first anniversary, a series of complementary ceramics, design, installation, and other exhibitions. Free, through August 1, 505-954-5800, petersprojects.com.

Chromatic Contrasts Addison Rowe Fine Art 229 E Marcy

Work by Beatrice Mandelman, Raymond Jonson, and John De Puy. Free, through August 7, 505-9821533, addisonrowe.com.

Obscure Structures David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

Work by Bryan Whitney. Free, through August 9, 505-983-1284, davidrichardgallery.com.

Postapocalyptic Black David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

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Work by 14 artists that examines the premise that the beginning of transformation is imagination. Free, through August 11, 505-982-1320, vivocontemporary.com.

Red Galerie Zuger 120 W San Francisco

A group show featuring artists who favor this summer’s hot color: Red. Free, through August 20, 505-984-5099, galeriezuger.com.

Beautiful Resistance Pushkin Gallery, 550 Canyon

Work by artists who chose to work outside of the tenets set forth by the repressive Soviet totalitarian regime. A Summer of Color event. Free, through August 25, 505-982-1990, pushkingallery.com.

Trois Mois de Couleurs   Gaugy Gallery, 418 Canyon

An invitational featuring more than 20 artists; each month is devoted to a specific hue: red (July), and green (August). Free, through August 31, 505-984-2800, gaugygallery.com.

Blank Canvas Mark White Fine Art, 414 Canyon

A show focused on hues of white. Free, through September 2, 505-9822073, markwhitefineart.com.

Black and White and Read All Over Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery 100 W San Francisco

Work by Gabriel J. Shuldiner. Free, through August 9, 505-983-1284, davidrichardgallery.com.

Hand-painted black and white pottery of the Native American Pueblos. Free, through September 7, 505-986-1234, andreafisherpottery.com.

Rumi on Canvas The Longworth Gallery 530 & 532 Canyon

Color Triangles Canyon Road Contemporary Art 403 Canyon

See preview on page 26. Free, through August 31, 505-989-4210, thelongworthgallery.com.

Transformations: In Color 12

Vivo Contemporary, 725 Canyon

Work by Kathy Beekman, Mark Horst, and Joy Richardson. A Summer of Color event. Free, through September 7, 505-983-0433, canyoncontemporary.com.


Line, Color, Composition Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, 217 Johnson

An exploration of Georgia O’Keeffe’s creative process. Through September 13. $10–$12 (kids free), through September 26, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

Monarch: Orange Takes Flight Santa Fe Botanical Garden, 715 Camino Lejo

Orange predominates in the container gardens on view, with other plants of complementary colors mixed in. A Summer of Color event. $5–$7 (free for kids 12 and younger), through September 13, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

The Red That Colored the World Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

An exhibition focused on the color red and the history of cochineal, an insect-based dye that produces the hue. A Summer of Color event. $6–9, through September 13, 505-476-1250, internationalfolkart.org. Ongoing: Maps, Doors, and Coffins: Locating Absence at Tai Modern

Memories of Golden Summer Russian Art Gallery, 216 Galisteo

A group exhibition by emerging and established contemporary Russian artists. A Summer of Color event. Free, through September 7, 505-989-9223, russianart.us.com.

Blue on Blue: Indigo and Cobalt in New Spain Museum of Spanish Colonial Art 750 Camino Lejo

An exhibition exploring the history, use, and popularity of the color blue in art in the area that was New Spain. A Summer of Color event. $8, through February 29, 2016, 505-982-2226, spanishcolonial.org.

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com. Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo

An extensive collection of Southwestern turquoise jewelry. $6–$9, through May 2016, 505-467-1200, indianartsandculture.org.

City Tours

Walking tours of Santa Fe with various companies, including Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505-983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), and New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

Entreflamenco The Lodge at Santa Fe, Maria Benitez Cabaret 744 Calle Mejia

See profile on page 14. $25-$50, 8 pm nightly (except Tuesdays), through August 30, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

July 2, 2015 NOW 13


MORGAN SMITH

Entreflamenco dancers Antonio Granjero and Estefania Ramirez perform nightly by Elizabet h Sa nchez

Founded in 1998, Entreflamenco has traveled through the Iberian Peninsula, Europe, the Americas, and Asia. Here, Antonio Granjero and Estefania Ramirez perform during the 2014 summer season at the Maria Benitez Cabaret.

NEW MEXICO IS MORE than 5,000 miles from Spain, but that doesn’t mean you can’t highlight your summer with world-class flamenco dancing. From July 2 to August 31, world-renowned company Entreflamenco, led by Antonio Granjero and Estefania Ramirez, will perform nightly at the Maria Benitez Cabaret, located inside the Lodge at Santa Fe. Entreflamenco performs traditional flamenco songs and dances accompanied by elaborate lighting and costume design, as well as original choreography and music composition. Every season of Entreflamenco performances is unique, so audience members are guaranteed to see a different show than in past (or future) years. Ramirez, Granjero’s partner in life and on the dance floor, explains that between his style of “precision, speed, and character” and hers of “femininity, fluidity, and curvilinear design,” the two make an excellent “tag team.” He choreographs performances, and she polishes them during studio rehearsals. Ramirez began performing professionally at age 17, while Granjero was considered a “child prodigy” and performed professionally starting at age nine. “As dancers, I think we all dance because it’s what fulfills our passion and our soul,” Ramirez continues. “Most of us have always danced and known that we were going to be dancers. Our purpose is exploration and enjoyment of human emotion.” 14

santafeanNOW.com

The company is “very innovative,” according to Maresa Thompson, senior marketing and creative director for Heritage Hotels and Resorts. “They’re respected nationally as well as internationally within the flamenco community…We are extremely excited to have Entreflamenco return to the Lodge at Santa Fe as our premier summer program.” Ramirez is similarly excited to be performing in the City Different. “Santa Fe, besides being the oldest Spanish capital in the United States, is the richest place for the tradition of flamenco,” she says. “New Mexico in general has integrated flamenco into part of the heritage and identity here. We are also the resident company at the Maria Benitez Cabaret, the longestrunning and most prestigious venue in North America for flamenco.” Entreflamenco, nightly (except Tuesdays) through August 30, 8 pm, $25–$50, The Lodge at Santa Fe, 744 Calle Mejia, ticketssantafe.org.


Wyland, Last Whale, giclée on canvas, 45 x 23"

Wyland

t he e nv i ronm e nt a l a rti st ope ns a ne w g al le r y on Ca nyon Roa d

by Ashle y M. Big ge rs

LEADING NATURE ARTIST and conservationist Robert Wyland is set to open a Santa Fe gallery this weekend—the 26th location across the U.S. devoted to his work. Although best known for paintings of marine life, Wyland believes his work will find a place in Southwest collectors’ homes. “Everything we do in the desert and the mountains finds its way to the ocean,” says the Michigan native. “Plus, there’s no gallery like the Wyland gallery. It’s really something unique to Santa Fe.” At age 14, the Detroit-born artist saw his first whale off the coast of Laguna Beach, California, where he later founded his first gallery in 1978 and also painted his first life-size Whaling Wall mural. Since then, he’s painted 99 additional murals (which are seen by an estimated one billion people each year) depicting migrating gray whales, breaching humpbacks, and other marine life. Wyland painted his most recent mural, Hands Across the Ocean, with the help of student artists from 110 countries. Displayed in October 2008 at the National Mall in Washington, D.C., the half-mile-long work was honored by the National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution, White House Council on Environmental Quality, and the U.S. Department of the Interior. In addition to maintaining a prolific art career, Wyland spearheads the Wyland Foundation, which teaches schoolchildren to be ocean stewards. The nonprofit also sets a national mayor’s challenge for water conservation in 3,600 cities across the U.S., including Santa Fe. Even after 37 years, Wyland finds himself continuously inspired both by nature and his mission to conserve it. “I’ve realized that to save the ocean, we need to protect lakes, streams, wetlands, rainforests, and deserts,” he says. “Everything I see, all that beauty, finds its way into my art.”

Above: American artist Robert Wyland is best known for his outdoor murals, which feature images of marine life. Left: Wyland, Backdoor Pipeline, giclée on canvas, 32" round

Although he’s known for paintings and sculpture, at his new gallery location he will also offer fine-art photography—a new medium for him—and drawings from his sketchbook, the latter of which collectors have begun to covet. He’ll create even more original works when he paints live at the grand opening—à la his PBS series Wyland’s Art Studio, which shares his inspiration and process with viewers, along with tips for helping the environment. Wyland Galleries of Santa Fe grand opening, July 3–4, free, 4–8 pm, 202 Canyon, wylandgalleries.com

July 2, 2015 NOW 15


eating drinking +

Bambini’s From Greek-inspired sandwiches and vegetarian combos to beer-battered onion rings and hand-crafted cannolis, Bambini’s has something for everyone, but it’s the Bampeño cheesesteak sandwich (pictured here) that has us lined up beside this food truck. Made with Angus sirloin steak, your choice of cheese, fresh jalapeños, and Bambini’s trademark secret spice mix (used on every sandwich), the Bampeño “is a very crafted sandwich with a lot more kick” than a traditional Philly cheesesteak, according to Chef Chip Storm. Usually parked at 905 S St. Francis, Bambini’s serves up as many as 100 sandwiches every day, Tuesday through Saturday, from 11 am—3 pm. This weekend, however, look for Bambini’s at El Rancho de las Golondrinas, where a Bampeño might just be the perfect food to hold down all that vino you’ll be drinking at the Santa Fe Wine Festival.—Elizabeth Sanchez

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

bambinissantafe.com

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eating+ drinking Plaza Cafe

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

Located on the northwest side of the Santa Fe Plaza, the Plaza Cafe was first opened in 1905 by the Ipiotis brothers from Greece; the family sold the restaurant to another Greek immigrant in 1947. Today the casual diner still offers Greek fare alongside New Mexican dishes. Just take a look (clockwise from top right) at the sampling on this page: chicken mole plate with sour cream, pinto beans, and Spanish rice; Greek combo plate with Greek salad and fried calamari; chicken souvlaki plate with dolmas, tzatziki sauce, and pita bread; and a tostada salad with cabbage, tomatoes, and corn. Not pictured: the café’s giant pastry case, in which you’re guaranteed to find a treat to satisfy your sweet tooth.—Cristina Olds thefamousplazacafe.com

July 2, 2015 NOW 17


Seen Around

Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the streets to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s a sampling of the people we saw.

photographs by Stephen Lang

Fantase Fest photographs by Stephen Lang

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a multimedia, interactive light festival that brought together musicians and artists of all stripes at De Vargas Skate Park on June 20


Nightlife

photographs by Pamela Macias

Review Santa Fe photographs by Lisa Law

Experts critiqued fine-art and documentary photography by 100 artists during this workshop, some of which took place at the Drury Hotel.

July 2, 2015 NOW 19


Opening Night As one of the largest art markets in the country, Santa Fe is always hosting openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was recently out and about at a number of opening-night receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we encountered.

photographs by Stephen Lang

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At Last

photographs by Lisa Law

Photographer Cissie Ludlow’s latest exhibit, now on view at Philspace, showcases four decades of her work.


openings | reviews | artists

Star Liana York, Itch, clay, life-size

The outdoors come inside on July 3, when a new exhibit by Star Liana York opens at Sorrel Sky. The Abiquiu artist’s life-size bronze sculptures depicting wildlife and American Indian imagery will be presented within the gallery, surrounded by foliage and greenery to give a sense of how they might look alfresco. “Throughout the gallery, new works and life-size sculptures are displayed to illustrate the relationship between wild creatures and the human viewer,” explains Sorrel Sky’s marketing and events coordinator Martha Goetz, noting that lounging pumas will greet gallery visitors at the front door. “On the upper level, a balcony terrace has been reinvented to create a wildlife sanctuary complete with trees, flowers ... and a moving water feature,” she continues. “The design draws people back toward the beautiful bronze maiden dipping her toe into the water while a doe and her fawns turn to gaze toward the observer.” York agrees. “It should be fun to show people how sculpture can be expanded to be shown outdoors so they don’t have to necessarily show it in their houses,” she says, adding that the Southwest is an ideal location to display her work outside because the patinas hold up well in the drier climate. “Small patios and intimate outdoor spaces can lend more focus to those outdoor areas and give them the feel of a sanctuary.”—Whitney Spivey

Star Liana York, Water Song, bronze, life-size

Star Liana York, Virgin Spring, bronze, life-size

Art for Intimate Outdoor Spaces and Small Garden Sanctuaries, July 3–31, reception July 3, 5–7:30 pm, Sorrel Sky Gallery, 125 W Palace, sorrelsky.com

COURTESY SORREL SKY GALLERY

A visitor to the gallery admires the doe and fawns of York’s bronze group, Morning Mist.

art

July 2, 2015 NOW 21


art

STUDIO

Lisa Bick first fell in love with encaustic during a trip to Santa Fe several years ago. “I was awestruck while standing in front of a painting by Shawna Moore,” she remembers. “I felt my old primal need to learn a new skill; I immediately scheduled a workshop with her.” The rest, as they say, is history. “What I found that I loved the most about encaustic was my ability to ‘weave’ by layering the wax—it felt like textiles because images or scrims of color could layer on top of each other like veils of sheer silk,” Bick says. “I loved the idea that I could encrypt poetry and maps and hidden meanings and threads and leaves and all those expressive things that I was used to incorporating into my work—into wax.” Through her paintings, Bick traces her moments in her life. “My paintings depict the aura of life and art—of loss, desire, longing and death, memory and fragments of information,” she says. “I have always been a journal keeper and suddenly I find that my paintings are journals, too.” Bick’s work can be found locally at Wheelhouse Art on Montezuma Avenue. —Whitney Spivey lisabick.com

Lisa Bick

Bick says long walks in the Santa Fe National Forest “instill a calmness that is new for me because I usually suffer from a catastrophic anxiety about time itself.”

the encaustic artist creates topographies of emotion

“I struggle between the desire to let loose and express freedom and my natural inclination to follow my instinct and build or construct my story,” Bick says. “Always, the visual image is secondary to my stored emotional catalog and not one piece is anything but a self confession.”

STEPHEN LANG

Lisa Bick creates art in her Tesuque studio, “conveniently located about a block and a half from the Tesuque Market margaritas,” she says.

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art

PROFILE

Nature Diversified u p -c lo s e , fa mil ia r, a nd a bs t rac t e d la nds ca p e s at Ne w C onc ep t G alle r y by Emi ly Va n Cle ve

PLANTS AND LAND FORMATIONS HAVE inspired the paintings created by Ann Hosfeld and Reg Loving, who share the show Nature Diversified at New Concept Gallery. Hosfeld, the gallery’s director, is particularly excited by the colors, shapes, and shadows found in agaves and cacti, which feature prominently in her work. She likes to get up close and personal with her subject matter, often choosing to focus on one plant or only a part of a plant. “Recently, I was inspired by the Jardin Marjorelle at the Yves Saint Laurent tropical gardens in Morocco,” she says. “I took a lot of photos of the cacti when I was there and did a series of landscapes from the photographs.” In addition to new works, Hosfeld exhibits two older and larger (about 50 x 50") paintings of abstracted agaves that have never been shown before. For the past four years, Loving has been enamored with the mesas near the village of Algodones, located between his Albuquerque home and Santa Fe. “I’m interested in the places where arroyos and mesas meet and come together,” he explains. “Around Algodones there are large mesas that intersect with smaller ones. They fascinate me. So far, I’ve done eight paintings in my Algodones series.” Loving complements these works with paintings from a more abstract series that combines landscape with other imagery. In one painting, for example, an abstracted female figure assumes the center image while several geometric shapes are off to the side. “It was after I completed the painting that I noticed one of the geometric shapes looked like a simple head and in my mind represented an artist,” he says. “What I see now is an artist observing the center female figure, his model.” Nature Diversified, July 3–August 3, reception July 3, 5–7 pm, free, New Concept Gallery, 610 Canyon, newconceptgallery.com

Above: Reg Loving, Interior-Exterior with Piano & Figures, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36" Left: Ann Hosfeld, Allusions, acrylic on canvas, 50 x 50" July 2, 2015 NOW 23


art

Darlene Olivia McElroy

STUDIO

queen of glue

California native Darlene Olivia McElroy spent childhood summers on her family’s Santa Fe ranch, so it’s no surprise that as an adult, she has chosen to create mixed-media art locally. The prolific artist also gives workshops, classes, and demonstrations for individuals and groups in her City Different studio, online, and at other locations throughout Santa Fe. McElroy has written several books on her craft, specifically on image transfer, surface treatment, and mixed media. Her DVDs and YouTube clips offer tutorials on assemblage artwork. —Cristina Olds Darlene Olivia McElroy, darleneoliviamcelroy.com

McElroy creates her assemblage art with acrylics, collage, paper clay, gold leaf, and dimensional objects.

A work in progress in McElroy’s studio called With New Loves, Old Ones Are Forgotten.

STEPHEN LANG

“I am a narrative artist,” McElroy says. “Most of my work is based on symbolism, stories, the feminine, and time and the links that join the individual to the continuum of past, present, and future.”

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art

by Emi ly Va n C le ve

PROFILE

Seth Anderson, Shaped Piece 6, mixed media on film paper on wood, 16 x 20 x 2"

Isolde Kille, Stardust II, oil on wood, 14 x 11"

The Medium is the Message t he m et hod s of t h r ee lo cal a r ti sts que stion s pace, ti me, volume, line, a nd sh ape THREE SANTA FE-BASED ARTISTS who work with limited color palettes and materials share Patina Gallery’s Drawn to the Wall 2: The Medium is the Message show, which runs July 3–August 29 at the Palace Avenue gallery. “We are thrilled to give three fantastically talented local artists the opportunity to exhibit their works at Patina Gallery, given that none of them have gallery representation,” say gallery owners Ivan and Allison Barnett, who co-curated the exhibit. “All of them bring a marvelous variation to what has become a wonderful conversation of three unique artists’ aesthetics, all complementing each other in a different way.”  Isolde Kille’s abstract paintings, which are spray-painted on canvas and covered with glass, were black and white when she lived in New York City but have been infused with blue since moving to Santa Fe three years ago. “I’m very repetitive,” Kille says about her work, which has been exhibited in the U.S. and abroad. “It adds up to a reality that connects to space and time.” Landscape and topography inspire Seth Anderson’s minimally painted wood panel pieces with sweeping black lines. Anderson is fascinated by maps and structure. “Some of the maps in his works are actually of this area,” says Maeve Sullivan, the gallery’s director of media and communications. “He sees a relationship between himself and the landscape and views these works as self-portraits.”

Michael Motley, Obsidian River 2, mixed media, 40 x 14 x 6"

Roots and sticks found in area arroyos, many of them from juniper trees, are wrapped in gauze in Michael Motley’s lightweight wall sculptures. The primal and primitive qualities in ancient artifacts, weapons, and tools inspire Motley, who is also known in town as a graphic designer. He has been showing his artwork in Santa Fe for the past three decades, although this show is his first public exhibition in more than 10 years. Drawn to the Wall 2: The Medium is the Message, July 3–August 29, reception July 3, 5–7 pm, free, Patina Gallery, 131 W Palace, patina-gallery.com July 2, 2015 NOW 25


art style

PREVIEWS

opening art receptions

Jason Chakravarty and Sean Hennessey: Kiss My Glass The William&Joseph Gallery, 727 Canyon thewilliamandjosephgallery.com, Through July 31 “These two artists have created bodies of work that make us laugh, make us think, and ask us to see glass in a new light,” says gallery owner Mary Bonney about the works of Jason Chakravarty and Sean Hennessey, both of whom employ mixed media. Chakravarty likes to use neon, while Hennessey incorporates materials such as concrete, wood, and steel.—Emily Van Cleve Sean Hennessey, Electricity, mixed media on cast glass, 18 x 24"

Rahileh Rokhsari: Rumi on Canvas The Longworth Gallery, 530 & 532 Canyon thelongworthgallery.com Through August 31, reception July 10, 5–8 pm In her latest solo exhibition, Iranian-born Rahileh Rokhsari showcases paintings inspired by Sufi dervish dancing, the words of 13th-century Persian poet Rumi, and the artist’s international travels. “Subject plays a central role in my paintings’ structure,” says Rokhsari, who left Iran in 2005, traveled to India and Southeast Asia, and now calls Turkey home. “I prefer to have real elements surrounded by abstract atmosphere.”—EVC Rahileh Rokhsari, Eternal Water of Life, oil on canvas, 16 x 20" Rahileh Rokhsari, Eternal Water of Life, oil on canvas, 16 x 20"

Beckie Kravetz: Love, Death, Revenge Tansey Contemporary, 619 Canyon, tansycontemporary.com, July 3–August 31, Reception July 3, 5–7 pm Almost nothing evokes passions as well as the great operas; however, inspired by the classics of Verdi, Bizet, Wagner, Puccini, and Ponchielli, Beckie Kravetz has created dynamic, multilayered sculptures that elicit deep emotions. Kravetz’s mixed-media work features key operatic themes sculpted into each piece, such as Carmen, a bust of Bizet’s Spanish gypsy with her love, the toreador Escamillo, and tarot cards. —Anne Maclachlan

Kevin Box: Light Conversation Selby Fleetwood Gallery, 600 Canyon selbyfleetwoodgallery.com July 3–16, reception July 3, 5–7 pm It took two years of experimentation for Kevin Box to develop his process of casting paper into bronze and another seven years to perfect the process. His latest work includes limited-edition wall pieces that were inspired by visits to 37 cities. Some of the pieces in the show have international coins rubbed Kevin Box, Light Conversation, into paper like passport stamps; others are bronze painted cast aluminum, 16 x 20" sculptures the size of a postcard stamp.—EVC

Beckie Kravetz, Siegmund and Sieglinde, from Wagner’s Die Walküre, bronze, copper, 24-karat gold leaf, and ash wood, 22 x 23 x 11"

John Oteri, Joe Wade Fine Art, 102 E Water joewadefineart.com, July 3–12, reception July 3, 5–7 pm John Oteri’s background as an award-winning architect has influenced his style of painting, which has a strong compositional element. His interest in how nature is affected by man-made structures is also reflected in his works. “I find it very fascinating attempting to depict how humans live within the restrictions imposed by this [Southwestern] landscape,” he says.—EVC John Oteri, Spiritual Confluence, oil on board, 15 x 32" 26

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[on the market]

second street style

SERGIO SALVADOR

Santa Fe might be known for adobe, but it was this contemporary house that took home a design award from the local American Institute of Architects chapter in 2006. Designed by architect Joseph Andrade, the compound consists of two independent structures—a 1,600-square-foot main house and a 400-square-foot guesthouse—arranged to create a central courtyard. The large outdoor space, which offers plenty of room for entertaining or sitting quietly, is almost an extension of the home’s living area, thanks to the wall of large windows that separates the two. Thoughtful interior features, such as Bosch appliances, radiant heat, wide-plank wood floors, and granite in the kitchen and baths, maintain the modern motif, as does the second story, which is offset from the first to create a balcony off the master suite. A two-car, drive-through garage allows easy access from both Second Street and an alley on the north side of the property. And if driving’s not your thing, the home is only a quartermile from the Rail Trail and walking distance to Backroad Pizza and the original Second Street Brewery. List price: $539,000, Contact: Francesca Stedman, Sotheby’s International Realty, 505-670-5566, stedmansantafe@gmail.com, sothebyshomes.com

Rulan Tangen

JONATHAN TERCERO

mov ing aut he ntica l ly t hr ou g h li f e Rulan Tangen’s contemporary indigenous dance company, Dancing Earth—founded in 2004 and based in San Francisco and Santa Fe—is strongly rooted in a sense of place. The Bay Area, says Tangen, feeds her and her colleagues’ commitment to social and environmental activism, while the high desert “is our source for ancient and pervading truths and our distinctive quality of movement. The wondrous and dramatic beauty of this corner of the American Southwest is not only an inspiration, but it choreographs me,” she adds. “New Mexico inspires me to peel away layers of experience of ballet, modern [dance], opera, circus, [and] powwow . . . to discover movements that are even more deeply authentic and organic.” To call Tangen multitalented is an understatement. In addition to serving as Dancing Earth’s artistic director and choreographer, she’s also a teacher, a writer, and a member of the Screen Actors Guild. Not surprisingly, her company is also multifaceted, focusing on innovative collaborations among Native dancers, composers, poets, costumers, filmmakers, painters, photographers, and musicians. Tangen takes a democratic approach to her art, believing first and foremost that “dance should be out and about in the everywhere, with everyone—not something exclusive and privileged.” Ritual, too, plays an important role in Dancing Earth’s performances. For Tangen, it’s a way of “making the sacred and special present in the everyday”—an act, she contends, that “is powerful beyond words.”—Eve Tolpa July 2, 2015 NOW 27


Eating Around Counter Culture June 27, 10:49 am Black coffee, enormous madefrom-scratch, frosted cinnamon roll ($5.14), double soy latte. Send Santa Fean NOW pictures of your meal (with the info we’ve included here) and we might run them in the magazine! Email info@santafean.com.

pieces of the past Adob e G al le r y’s Al A nt hony h a s a pa s sion for Pu e blo p ot t e r y When Al Anthony talks about historic Pueblo pottery, the glow in his eyes suggests the same contained fire that baked so many of his showpieces in indigenous kilns. With Adobe Gallery on Canyon Road, which he opened in 2001 (after 23 years in Albuquerque), he has created something of a shrine to his passion for historic pieces. One of Santa Fe’s leading Native American art galleries, Adobe is filled with contemporary pottery and other Native objets d’art. But it’s the historic, weather-worn Pueblo pottery that lends the place an archaeological air: various shapes and sizes adorned with patterns, images and the traditional black, white, and burnt umber. “This pottery is phenomenally beautiful and ethnographically important,” Anthony says. “Unlike pottery made to sell, these items were made to be used, and their evidence of use is especially appealing to collectors.” It wasn’t until 1957, while stationed at Kirtland Air Force Base, that he bought his first Pueblo pot. He collected for the next 19 years and, in 1978 opened Adobe Gallery in Albuquerque’s Old Town, selling mostly contemporary pieces. In the mid-1980s, he was offered 13 historic Native pots; though he knew little about historic pottery, his passion was ignited. In 2001, Anthony moved shop to Santa Fe, where he is now a very well-respected, selftaught expert in historic Pueblo pottery. Anthony originally dealt directly with Pueblo potters, often driving out to meet them; these days he is approached by art sellers and collectors. A recent acquisition, an 1889 San Ildefonso Pueblo vessel, came from an estate agent. About the size of a large beach ball, the pot’s images seem to tell the story of a horse theft. A man walks, horse at his side; a second man rides in; the two fight. The names “Juan” and “Jose” Al Anthony, owner are scrawled on the vessel’s body, but only “Juan” is on the lid. of Adobe Gallery on “We assume the pot was made in Juan’s honor,” says Anthony. Canyon Road, says Pueblo pottery is “We just don’t know whether he won or lost the fight.” That’s a mystery that Anthony—and a future buyer—can “phenomenally Photographer Mark beautiful and live with. In fact, it’s part of the vessel’s allure. “The exciting Steven Shepherd ethnographically thing for me is always when new stuff comes in,” he says. proves Santa Fe style important.” is a real thing with his “But I certainly enjoy what I have on display here.” candid shots of locals —Ben Ikenson around town.

Santa Fashion

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WHITNEY SPIVEY

SERGIO SALVADOR

style


GABRIELLA MARKS

| L A S T LO O K |

Currents: New Media Festival In June, 124 artists from 18 states and 21 countries exhibited innovative and extraordinary work during the sixth annual Currents New Media Festival, presented by Parallel Studios in more than a dozen venues in Santa Fe and around the state. During the free festival, contemporary art merged with 21st century technologies—such as art videos, 3-D printed projects, and interactive installations—was made accessible to the general public. Additionally, Currents partnered with Motion Conference 2015 (June 12–14), an annual event that brought together filmmakers, animators, VFX artists, and other key players in storytelling.—Donna Schillinger currentsnewmedia.org July 2, 2015 NOW 29


Museum of International Folk Art

Museum Hill in Santa Fe

New Mexico is rich in color. And color in all its shades and hues is

shows its true colors.

on vivid display this summer on Museum Hill in Santa Fe. The Museum of International Folk Art, presents The Red That Colored the World through September 13, 2015. New research and original scholarship explore the history and use of cochineal, an insect-based dye that produces brilliant reds. Follow the use of cochineal from Mexico to Europe and beyond with a display of more than 130 objects. internationalfolkart.org Summer of Color Museum Hill partners also include: • Museum of Indian Arts and Culture • Museum of Spanish Colonial Art • Santa Fe Botanical Garden • Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian • International Folk Art Market Santa Fe For more information, visit summerofcolorsantafe.org.

PHOTO: ADDISON DOTY

The National Endowment for the Humanities and the Museum of International Folk Art together: Exploring the human endeavor.Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this exhibition do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Santa Fean Now July 2 2015 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean Now July 2 2015 Digital Edition

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