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now The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

this week’s

top nightlife and entertainment

Nacha Mendez performs

Homage to Chavela

santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

picks

week of July 23


The Week Ahead:

Join us for the second of six sizzling weeks of wondrous chamber music. Incredible variety, cherished favorites, and dazzling discoveries lie ahead, featuring some of the world’s greatest chamber musicians! CONCERT VENUE – SFA: St. Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W. Palace Ave.

now |

GOLDBERG VARIATIONS FOR STRINGS SAT Jul 25 • 5 pm @ SFA

Benjamin Beilman, Lily Francis, and Ronald Thomas play Sitkovetsky’s exhilarating arrangement of Bach’s masterpiece. SPONSORED BY THORNBURG INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

PIANO & CLARINET QUINTETS

SUN Jul 26 + MON Jul 27 • 6 PM @ SFA The legendary Miró Quartet electrifies in Haydn’s “Quinten” String Quartet and Brahms’s Clarinet Quintet with Todd Levy. MONDAY CONCERT SPONSORED BY OMAHA STEAKS

MIRÓ QUARTET PLAYS BEETHOVEN THU JUL 30 • 6 PM @ SFA

The Miró Quartet returns with Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 14. Violinist Soovin Kim and pianist Marc-André Hamelin perform Prokofiev’s buoyant Sonata No. 2.

VIVALDI & BACH

SAT Aug 1 • 5 pm @ SFA Vivaldi’s shining Concerto in G Minor and the baroque beauty of J.S. Bach’s stunning Trio Sonata in G. SPONSORED BY THORNBURG INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT

JULY 23 –JULY 29

2015

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

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ALTHOUGH SANTA FE IS RENOWNED for its arts and culture, a variety of other exciting events happens each week in the City Different. On the musical front this weekend, the New Mexico Jazz Festival presents the Legendary Count Basie Orchestra. As a jazz fan who has experienced this fabulous orchestra firsthand, I strongly recommend it. Also in the music world, the Santa Fe Concert Band (an all-volunteer group that started offering community concerts way back in 1865) is presenting a free midsummer concert, featuring patriotic marches, Broadway show tunes, and classical favorites on July 26 at 2 PM in the park at the old courthouse. That beautiful, historic venue alone makes it worth the effort. The big event this weekend is Spanish Market, our opportunity to experience the exquisite craftsmanship and traditions of Spanish artisans. There is also a wealth of gallery openings Friday night. Don’t miss the contemporary and culinary art—such as what’s happening at GF Contemporary, where Pat Block from Barrio Brinery will be sampling his famous pickles. Yes. Pickles.  For those who love outdoor recreation, on July 25, there’s a twilight hike in Cerrillos Hills State Park. Don’t forget the Santa Fe Summer Series Horse Show, a major equestrian event with premium riders and horses from all over the country. It’s also a great excuse to be outside and to be around these beautiful animals. Finally, there are performances of Grease at The Armory for the Arts Theater, a community performance venue on Old Pecos Trail. This is why we love being here. Wherever your mood takes you this week, there’s an exciting and unique activity awaiting your particular taste. Hopefully, this will take you in several different directions.

Bruce Adams

MENDELSSOHN & ORNSTEIN

Publisher

SUN Aug 2 + MON Aug 3 • 6 PM @ SFA The Johannes String Quartet plays Mendelssohn’s passionate String Quartet No. 6. Marc-André Hamelin joins them for the untamed emotion of Ornstein’s Piano Quintet.

DAVID ROBIN

SANTA FE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

MONDAY CONCERT SPONSORED BY OMAHA STEAKS

MUSIC AT NOON Noon @ SFA

TUE JUL 28 • BEETHOVEN QUARTETS THU JUL 30 • MARC-ANDRÉ HAMELIN PIANO RECITAL GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY THE EDGAR FOSTER DANIELS FOUNDATION

505.982.1890 SantaFeChamberMusic.com Ticket Office: NM Museum of Art, 107 W. Palace Ave.

LISA LAW

Tickets and Full Season Information Marc Neikrug, Artistic Director

JULY 19 – AUGUST 24, 2015

The Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival is funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission and the 1% Lodgers’ Tax, and New Mexico Arts, a division of the Office of Cultural Affairs.

Santa Fe native Joshua Oppenheimer screened two of his documentary films— The Act of Killing and Look of Silence—at the CCA Cinematheque on July 11–12.


GIBSON NEZ COLLECTION ONLY AT TRUE WEST

Open Every Day

130 LINCOLN AVE. SANTA FE NM 87501 505-982-0055 INFO@TRUEWESTSF.COM 1/2 BLOCK NORTH OF THE PLAZA

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/TRUEWESTSF


Welcome to Santa Fe! Santa Fe is rated one of the top ten destinations in the world for its abundance of high-quality art, shopping, attractions, outdoor adventures, food, and entertainment. Santa Fean NOW is your hands-on source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local resident, first time visitor, or a regular, NOW has the listings you need to navigate hundreds of weekly gallery openings, live music, and more to make the most of your time here. For extra tips and insider insights, please stop by our Visitor Centers at the Downtown Santa Fe Plaza, Santa Fe Railyard, or just off the Plaza at the Community Convention Center. This summer, ask about all the Summer of Color events, new exhibits, and our many famous festivals. Have a wonderful time in the City Different. Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR

b.y. cooper

anne maclachlan whitney spivey

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

samantha schwirck

EDITORIAL INTERN

elizabeth sanchez whitney stewart

GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

michelle odom

sybil watson, hannah reiter OPERATIONS MANAGER

ginny stewart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER

david wilkinson

WRITERS

cristina olds, emily van cleve

GRACE POTTER

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105 Santa Fe, NM 87505

COMING LIVE TO SANTA FE

Telephone 505-983-1444

FRIDAY / AUGUST 7 / LENSIC PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

info@santafean.com

Fax 505-983-1555 santafeanNOW.com Copyright 2015. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Fean NOW Volume 2, Number 24 Week of July 23, 2015. Published by Bella Media, LLC, at Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2015 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

FOR TICKETS CONTACT TICKETSSANTAFE.ORG / 505.988.1234 2

santafeanNOW.com

On the cover: Nacha Mendez performs from the Chavela Vargas songbook on July 25. Photo by Marghreta Cordero.


Marghreta Cordero

Homage to Chavela, July 25, 7:30 pm, $25, Scottish Rite Temple, 463 Paseo de Peralta, mesaprietapetroglyphs.org

Carla Kountoupes

the

buzz

The artist’s studio.

O’Keeffe Home and Studio Tour

The living room of the Georgia O’Keeffe House in Abiquiu.

Through November 25, Georgia O’Keeffe aficionados can have a glimpse into the beloved artist’s life via guided tours of her Abiquiu home and studio. In 1945, O’Keeffe bought a compound on a bluff overlooking the valleys and mountains that she would paint exhaustively for the next 35 years; tour-goers will appreciate the inspiration the iconic modern artist found in the stunning landscape of the area. O’Keeffe and her staff used existing water rights and terraced gardens to create a vibrant estate surrounding the home on four acres. O’Keeffe went so far as to have the gnarly sage bushes sculpted into bonsai tree shapes, which are still maintained today. Much of the adobe structure, originally constructed in 1740, was preserved and restored over the years, and although some areas are not accessible during the tours (such as O’Keeffe’s library collection, which includes first editions that are protected from light exposure), the home is maintained as it was during O’Keeffe’s time there. Her kitchen shelves, for example, are lined with hand-labeled screw top jars filled with cooking herbs she gathered. Until she was 96 years old, O’Keeffe spent countless hours painting in her studio and appreciating the view from the expansive windows of her adjoining bedroom. As her eyesight failed in her 80s, she had a lightcolored rug installed in the studio to contrast with the dark fur of her pair of Chow dogs so she could see their shapes better. This must-see tour fills months in advance, but is well worth the wait— and the drive from Santa Fe.—Cristina Olds © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum

Nacha Mendez, Santa Fe’s beloved diva of Latin world music, performs from the Chavela Vargas songbook on July 25 in a benefit concert to support the Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project, a nonprofit organization that records and preserves 75,000 petroglyphs on Mesa Prieta. Costa Rican-born Vargas (1919–2012) was known for her gut-wrenching, passion-filled renditions of traditional rancheras from her adopted country of Mexico. The singer was also famously passionate in her personal life, mixing with notable contemporaries like Frida Kahlo and Lola Beltrán. Mendez grew up singing rancheras with her family in southern New Mexico and went on to study and perform classical music, flamenco guitar, and opera internationally. Among other accolades, she won Best Latin Production at the New Mexico Music Awards in 2013. On Saturday, expect Mendez to perform popular rancheras such as Volver, Volver and Paloma Blanca accompanied by musicians Carla Kountoupes, Chase Morrison, and Jesus Gachupin. Before the show, at 6 pm, participants can enjoy a silent auction soiree with beer and wine while bidding on art, jewelry, gift certificates, and more. —Cristina Olds

© Georgia O’Keeffe Museum

Homage to Chavela

Georgia O’Keeffe Home and Studio Tour, through November 25 by appointment only, $35–$45, Abiquiu, okeeffemuseum.org July 23, 2015 NOW 3


IAIA Writers Festival 2015

John Rangel & Barbara Bentree Ten years ago, jazz pianist John Rangel and his wife, vocalist Barbara Bentree, moved from Los Angeles to New Mexico. “We actually just came to visit a friend for the summer,” Rangel says. “We both fell in love with Santa Fe and decided not to leave.” On July 25, the duo performs at Pranzo Italian Grill—a venue with a “very good piano and a nice PA system,” according to Rangel. “Our audience can expect a high level of musical communication; both voice and piano are equally important to the conversation. There is deep reservoir of experience to draw from because of our many years together.” Although Rangel and Bentree have a set list—selections from the American Songbook—they will make adjustments based on audience response. “John is truly a world-class pianist,” says acclaimed Broadway pianist David Geist, who also plays at Pranzo. “The mediums of cabaret and jazz have always overlapped, and John’s musical finesse is a perfect blend of both these styles.”—Whitney Spivey John Rangel and Barbara Bentree, July 25, 6–9 pm, free, Pranzo Italian Grill,540 Montezuma, pranzosantafe.com 4

santafeanNOW.com

IAIA Writers Festival, July 25–August 1, times vary, free, 83 Avan Nu Po, iaia.org

IAIA

Vocalist Barbara Bentree and pianist John Rangel (below)

Back by popular demand, the Institute for American Indian Arts Writers Festival once again delivers a long list of notable contemporary Native American authors to the stage from July 25–August 1. Poets, screenwriters, and fiction and nonfiction authors will conduct readings in the institute’s 280-seat auditorium and teach workshops on campus as part of the 70-student Low Residency MFA in Creative Writing. “We have had great writers reading at the Institute for more than 25 years, but this festival takes it to a new level,” says Jon Davis, the creator, director, and organizer of the low residency program. “A year ago, we were forced to move the readings out of the small common room we traditionally used into the auditorium, and attendance has been steady, between 150–300 people each night.” Started in 2013 with the launch of the new MFA program, the Writers Festival has welcomed highly popular authors such as Sherman Alexie and Joy Harjo. This year, the program features more than 25 renowned national and local writers on the agenda, including Pam Houston, faculty member and author of the novel Contents May Have Shifted; nonfiction author John D’Agata; and poet, fiction, and nonfiction author Linda Hogan. New this year, Imperial Dreams, a film made from a screenplay by presenter Ismet Prcic, will be screened; and songwriter Peter Mimmelman will offer songwriting workshops. The Native women authors of the recently released poetry anthology, Effigies II, will also be celebrated during the festival.—Cristina Olds

Claire Vaye Watkins

Chip Livingston

Elissa Washuta

Linda Hogan

James Thomas Stevens

Sherman Alexie

Launched in 2013, the Institute for American Indian Arts Writers Festival has hosted some of the country’s most poplar authors during its summer and winter low-residency MFA programs in creative writing.


ZZ Wei: New Paintings

Opening Reception: Friday, July 24 at 225 Canyon Road, 5 - 7:30


this week July 23 thursday Arts Alive! Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

Learn to dye with cochineal. Free, 10 am–2 pm, 505-476-1250, internationalfolkart.org.

Shop Walk Santa Fe School of Cooking , 125 N Guadalupe Explore downtown Santa Fe’s food shops—sample olive oil, cupcakes, and more. $45, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Kyle Dickman Collected Works Bookstore, 202 Galisteo

See profile on page 27. Free, 6 pm, 505-988-4226, collectedworksbookstore.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Live piano music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Fiddlin’ Doc Gonzales Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Country, blues, and Hispanic music on the Plaza as part of the Santa Fe Bandstand series. Free, 7:30–9 pm, santafebandstand.org. 6

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Los Martinez Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Traditional Hispanic music on the Plaza as part of the Santa Fe Bandstand series. Free, 6:30–7:30 pm, santafebandstand.org.

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant, 58 S Federal Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Robert Muller Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma

Live piano music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

ALEKS GEZENTSVEY

July 23–July 30

July 28: Zongo Junction on the Plaza as part of the Santa Fe Bandstand Series

Santa Fe Fuego Fort Marcy, Murales and Washington Ave

Santa Fe’s Pecos League baseball team takes on the Trinidad Tigers. $6, 6 pm, santafefuego.com.

Sunset: After Hours in the Garden Santa Fe Botanical Garden, 715 Camino Lejo

A walk and musical performance by flamenco guitarist Joaquin Gallegos. $5–$10, 5:30–8:30 pm, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

A Trio of Trios New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace

Country, Spanish, and R&B. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

The Montrose Trio performs Turina’s Piano Trio No. 2 in B Minor, Beethoven’s Piano Trio in E-Flat Major, and Brahms’s Piano Trio No. 1 in B Major. $10–$72, 6 pm, 505-982-1890, santafechambermusic.com.

Sol Fire El Farol, 808 Canyon

Death of a Salesman Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Sierra La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Rock with pop, R&B, and Latin influences. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

The Saltanah Dancers Cleopatra Café, 3482 Zafarano

Belly dancing performance. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-820-7381, saltanahstudios.com.

The Santa Fe Revue Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Americana featuring Joe West. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Ironweed Productions celebrates its 10th anniversary with Arthur Miller’s masterpiece. $10–$20, 7 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

Kirill Gerstein Recital New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace

The pianist performs Liszt’s Transcendental Études. $10–$26, 12 pm, 505-982-1890, santafechambermusic.com.

Serenade to Music Church of the Holy Faith, 311 E Palace


Suzanne Donazetti Evolving Intersections

Early Morning Mist 20 x 22 unf

woven copper painting

July 21 through August 3 ARTIST Friday, July 24 5 pm - 8 pm

EXHIBITION DATES RECEPTION FOR THE

Waxlander Gallery

celebrating thirty-one years of excellence

622 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, NM 87501 waxlander.com • 505.984.2202 • 800.342.2202


Secular and sacred English choral literature. $20–$55, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

July 24 friday Gold Rush Karen Melfi Collection, 225 Canyon

new mexico’s premiere professional ensemble of 24 singers from across the nation presents its 33rd summer season of the finest classical choral music.

A trunk show featuring local jeweler Denise Betesh. A Summer of Color event. Free, through July 26, 505-982-3032, karenmelficollection.com.

Traditional Spanish Market Preview Eldorado Hotel & Spa, 309 W San Francisco Collector’s hour (5–6 pm, $80) and public viewing (6–8 pm, $20) preceding Spanish Market, 505-982-2226, spanishcolonial.org.

THIS WEEK IN CONCERT JULY 23, 25, 29, 31 @ 8PM SERENADE TO MUSIC

SACRED + SECULAR ENGLISH CHORAL GEMS CHURCH OF THE HOLY FAITH, SANTA FE

JULY 24, 28, 30 @ 8PM VENETIAN SPLENDOR

INTIMATE MUSIC OF THE ITALIAN BAROQUE LORETTO CHAPEL, SANTA FE

Contemporary Southwest Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe Learn to cook local fare with a twist. $82, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

New Mexican Mole Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Chef Fernando Olea guides participants through the process of making mole. $85, 10 am–1 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Pickles and Seltzer GF Contemporary, 707 Canyon

Pat Block from Barrio Brinery samples his famous pickles at the gallery. Free, 5–7 pm, 505-983-3707, gfcontemporary.com.

Broken Boundaries Manitou Galleries, 225 Canyon

See profile on page 23. Free, reception 5–7:30 pm, 800-986-9833, manitougalleries.com.

Captured Beauty Pop Gallery, 125 Lincoln

Works by Daniel Martin Diaz, Chris Peters, Robb Rael, and Marie Sena. Free, reception 6–8 pm, 505-820-0788, popsantafe.com.

Diverse Communities Pippin Contemporary, 200 Canyon

See profile on page 25. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com.

purchase your tickets today. call our box office at {505} 988-2282 or order online at desertchorale.org

33RD ANNUAL

SUMMER FESTIVAL JULY 9 – AUGUST 9, 2015

Evolving Intersections Waxlander Gallery, 622 Canyon

See profile on page 21. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-984-2202, waxlandergallery.com.

Milt Kobayashi Meyer Gallery, 225 Canyon

Work by Milt Kobayashi. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-983-1434, meyergalleries.com.

Phyllis Kudder Sullivan and Cheryl Ann Thomas Santa Fe Clay, 545 Camino de la Familia Ceramic forms. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.


Release: A World Premiere Greenberg Fine Art, 205 Canyon

See preview on page 24. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-955-1500, greenbergfineart.com.

“release: a world premiere” group sculpture show

it’s time for a new show!

OPENING RECEPTION: July 24, 5:00-7:00pm

Sketches of Charcoal and Fire Catenary Art Gallery, 616 1/2 Canyon

“UNDER THE SURFACE: SHOW DATES: REFLECTIONS” July 24–August 6

Photographs by Rumi Vesselinova examine the Southwest landscape under the conditions of drought and related natural disasters. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-2700, catenaryartgallery.com.

The Art of Ruin Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado 198 State Rd 592

Opening Reception March 20th, from 5-7pm

Work by Robert Stivers. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-577-5911, bealsandco.com.

Show Dates: March 20 through April 2

Visual Symphony Art Gone Wild Gallery, 203-B Canyon

Work by Laura Wilson. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-820-1004, agwg.net.

paige bradley

LAURIN MCCRACKEN “Breath” “The Original Old 46 Time” 18 x 13" x 24 Watercolor x 24”

Bronze

Lynn Cline Collected Works Bookstore, 202 Galisteo

The author discusses her new book, The Maverick Cookbook. Free, 6 pm, 505-988-4226, collectedworksbookstore.com.

Inversions Workshop Santa Fe Community Yoga Center 826 Camino de Monte Rey

Viktoria Shushan turns your world upside down. $15–$20, 1–3 pm, 505-820-9363, santafecommunityyoga.org.

Doug Montgomery & Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Live piano music. Free, 6–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Flamenco El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 7–9:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Mark’s Midnight Carnival Show Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe Indie rock. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm,

GREENBERG

Greenberg Fine Art 205 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.955.1500 greenbergfineart.com/NOW 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Mito & Wes Cava Santa Fe Lounge, 309 W San Francisco Guitar duo. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-988-4455, eldoradohotel.com.

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant, 58 S Federal Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Paige Barton Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Country and folk music. Free, 8:30 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Robert Muller Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma Live piano music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

DENISE BETESH

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-9821200, ronaldroybal.com.

Savor La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco July 24: Gold Rush at Karen Melfi Collection

fine art

Cuban street music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

TGIF Concert First Presbyterian Church, 208 Grant

Robert Marcus and Edwin Light perform. Free, 5:30–6 pm, 505-982-8544, fpcsantafe.org.

The Alchemy Party Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Juicebox Ray. $7, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

The Gruve El Farol, 808 Canyon

Funk and soul music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

The John Kurzweg Band El Paseo Bar & Grill, 208 Galisteo

Rock music. $5, 9 pm, 505-992-2848.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón, 213 Washington

Swinging jazz piano trio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Free Yoga Santa Fe Railyard Park 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Bring your own mat for an outdoor yoga practice. Free, 12:15–1:15 pm, freelanceadrienne.com.

Santa Fe Fuego Fort Marcy, Murales and Washington Ave

Santa Fe’s Pecos League baseball team takes on the Trinidad Tigers. $6, 6 pm, santafefuego.com. July 23, 2015 NOW 9


sfshakespeare.com.

The Wizard of Oz James A. Little Theatre, 1060 Cerrillos

COUNT BASIE ORCHESTRA

Presented by Pandemonium Productions. $6–$10, 7 pm, 505-982-3327, pandemoniumprod.org.

Venetian Splendor Loretto Chapel, 207 Old Santa Fe Trl

Eight singers perform excerpts from Monteverdi’s Sestina and Songs of Love and War, double choir music by Andrea and Giovanni Gabrielli, and music written by women for women. $20–$55, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

What The What GiG Performance Space, 1808 Second

A concert by a group that fuses diverse elements of funk, jazz, and world music. $20, 7:30 pm, gigsantafe.com.

July 24: Dogen Seminar at Upaya Zen Center

Cantigas d’Amigo First Presbyterian Church, 208 Grant

A Spanish and Celtic “tapestry of song,” sponsored by the Spanish Colonial Arts Society. $10–$20, 7:30–9 pm, dreapressley.com.

Chicago Arts Orchestra Eldorado Hotel & Spa, 309 W San Francisco

A concert and lecture with the Chicago Arts Orchestra. $30, 10:30 am–12:30 pm, 505-982-2226, spanishcolonial.org.

Daughter of the Regiment Santa Fe Opera, 301 Opera

Donizetti’s romantic comedy is sung in French but has words in English. $38–$214, 8:30 pm, 505-9865900, santafeopera.org.

Death of a Salesman Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Ironweed Productions celebrates its 10th anniversary with Arthur Miller’s masterpiece. $10–$20, 7 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

Grease Armory for the Arts, 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Santa Fe Performing Arts Teen Ensemble presents the 1978 musical romance. $8, 7 pm, 505-984-1370, sfperformingarts.org.

The Legendary Count Basie Orchestra The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Directed by Scotty Barnhart with vocalist Carmen Bradford; part of the New Mexico Jazz Festival. $20–$50, 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

The Tempest Monte del Sol Charter School 4157 Walking Rain

The Santa Fe Shakespeare Society’s Summer Shakespeare returns for the fifth year. $10–$20 (donation), 6–8 pm, 505-490-6271, 10

santafeanNOW.com

July 25 saturday Contemporary Hispanic Market Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

July 24: Carmen Bradford with the Legendary Count Basie Orchestra at The Lensic

Fresh produce and handmade goods from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Spanish Market Class Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

A demonstration class with Chef James Campbell Caruso of La Boca and Taberna to benefit the Spanish Colonial Arts Society. $90, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

See profile on page 14. Free, 8 am–5 pm, 505-3315162, contemporaryhispanicmarketinc.com.

Frank Gonzales Drury Plaza Hotel, 828 Paseo de Peralta

Fashion Art Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian 704 Camino Lejo

Nicholas Herrera Evoke Contemporary, 550 S Guadalupe

Botanical paintings. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-577-5911, bealsandco.com.

The Case Trading Posts hosts a talk and sales show with artist Jamie Okuma (Luiseño/ShoshoneBannock). Free, 10:30 am–1 pm, 505-982-4636, wheelwright.org.

In celebration of Spanish Market, the artist showcases his mastery as a premier Santero. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-995-9902, evokecontermporary.com.

Gallery One-Year Anniversary Eye on the Mountain Gallery, 614 Agua Fria

Earthen Architecture New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln

A garden party with live music. Free, 5–9 pm, 928-308-0319, eyeonthemountaingallery.com.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Plaza, 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and more by local artists. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-310-1555, santafeartistsmarket.com.

Spanish Market Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl See profile on page 15. Free, 8 am–5 pm, 505-982-2226, spanishcolonial.org.

Bringing Food Home Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

A film about Santa Fe’s urban agriculture. $7–$10, 8:15 pm, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Journey to Italy Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

A screening of Roberto Rossellini’s 1954 drama/romance. $7-$10, 11 am, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta

A multicultural perspective of how communities preserve adobe structures. Free, 1–3 pm, 505-476-5100, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Summer Garden Seasonal Maintenance Santa Fe Botanical Garden, 725 Camino Lejo Lead by Michael Clark, one of the cofounders of the Santa Fe Botanical Garden. Registration required. $15, 1–3 pm, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

The Writers Festival Institute of American Indian Arts, 83 Avan Nu Po See profile on page 4. Free, 6 pm, 505-424-2331, iaia.edu.

Andy Kingston Trio El Mesón, 213 Washington

Jazz trio with special guest Horace Young. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Bill Hearne Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Americana and country music. Free, 1–4 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water


Live piano music. Free, 8–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

SANTA FE

Live piano music. Free, 6:30–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Flamenco El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 7–9:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant, 113 Washington Live guitar music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

JULY 22 – AUGUST 9, 2015 FREE ADMISSION

Joe King Carrasco y Los Side FX Santa Fe Railyard Plaza 1607 Paseo de Peralta

FO R EV E RYO N E

FOOD, MUSIC & BEER GARDEN

The King of Tex-Mex rock-and-roll and his band. Free, 7 pm, 505-232-9868, ampconcerts.org.

ON SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS EACH WEEK TOP EQUESTRIAN ATHLETES COMPETE WEDNESDAYS-SUNDAYS WWW.HIPICOSANTAFE.COM

John Rangel & Barbara Bentree Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma See profile on page 4. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

New Piano Lounge Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant, 58 S Federal Music by Tucker Binkley. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Savor La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Cuban street music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Death of a Salesman Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Ironweed Productions celebrates its 10th anniversary with Arthur Miller’s masterpiece. $10–$20, 7 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

Goldberg Variations on Strings New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace

Bach’s Goldberg Variations, transcribed by violinist Dmitry Sitkovetsky for string trio. Part of the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. $10–$45, 5 pm, 505-982-1890, santafechambermusic.com.

www.sharonmcelvain.com

Grease Armory for the Arts, 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Santa Fe Performing Arts Teen Ensemble presents the 1978 musical romance. $8, 7 pm, 505-984-1370, sfperformingarts.org.

Here Comes the Storyteller! Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian 704 Camino Lejo

Joe Hayes presents stirring tales of the great Southwest. Free, 7 pm, 505-982-4636, wheelwright.org.

Homage to Chavela Scottish Rite Temple, 463 Paseo de Peralta See profile on page 3. $25, 7:30 pm, 505-852-1351, mesaprietapetroglyphs.org.

La Finta Giardiniera Santa Fe Opera, 301 Opera

Mozart’s opera, conducted by Harry Bicket. $40–$300, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

Midsummer Concert Southside Southside Library, 6599 Jaguar

The Santa Fe Concert Band celebrates the end of the Summer Reading Program. Free, 4–5 pm, 505-4714865, santafeconcertband.org.

DANIEL QUAT

NEA Jazz Master Kenny Barron The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Presented by the New Mexico Jazz Festival. $20–$50, 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org. July 25–26: Spanish Market on the Plaza

Serenade to Music Church of the Holy Faith, 311 E Palace

The Santa Fe Desert Chorale presents secular and sacred pieces of English choral literature. $20–$55, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

The Tempest Monte del Sol Charter School, 4157 Walking Rain The Santa Fe Shakespeare Society’s Summer Shakespeare returns for the fifth year. $10–$20 (donation), 6–8 pm, 505-490-6271, sfshakespeare.com.

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows. July 23, 2015 NOW 11


The Wizard of Oz James A. Little Theatre, 1060 Cerrillos

Santa Fe Fuego Fort Marcy, Murales and Washington Ave

Presented by Pandemonium Productions. $6–$10, 2 pm, 505-982-3327, pandemoniumprod.org.

Santa Fe’s Pecos League baseball team takes on the Trinidad Tigers. $6, 6 pm, santafefuego.com.

You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown Armory for the Arts, 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Chamber Music Concert New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln

Santa Fe Performing Arts Teen Ensemble presents a show based on the Peanuts comic strip. $8, 2 pm, 505-984-1370, sfperformingarts.org.

A musical portrait of Cold Mountain presented in conjunction with the museum’s exhibit Fading Memories: Echoes of the Civil War. $15–$20, 4–5 pm, 505-986-5900, nmhistorymuseum.org.

July 26 sunday

Death of a Salesman Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

See profile on page 14. Free, 8 am–5 pm, 505-3315162, contemporaryhispanicmarketinc.com.

Spanish Market Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Here Comes the Storyteller! Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian 704 Camino Lejo

Journey to Italy Center for Contemporary Art, 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Juan Siddi Flamenco Santa Fe The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Joe Hayes presents stirring tales of the great Southwest. Free, 7 pm, 505-982-4636, wheelwright.org.

See profile on page 15. Free, 8 am–5 pm, 505-982-2226, spanishcolonial.org.

Roberto Rossellini’s 1954 drama/romance. $7–$10, 11 am, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Evolving Intentions in Public Art Center for Contemporary Art, 1050 Old Pecos Trl A book signing and celebration of the release of the Axle Contemporary Press publication. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-670-5854, axleart.com.

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet presents 14 dancers and musicians delivering a theatrical experience. $25–$72, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Piano and Clarinet Quintets New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace

SANTA FE OPERA

Ironweed Productions celebrates its 10th anniversary with Arthur Miller’s masterpiece. $10–$20, 2 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

Contemporary Hispanic Market Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

July 25, 29: Joel Prieto stars as Count Belfiore in La Finta Giardiniera at the Santa Fe Opera

Haydn’s String Quartet in D Minor, Franck’s Piano Quintet in F Minor, and Brahms’s Clarinet Quintet. $10–$78, 6 pm, 505-982-1890, santafechambermusic.com.

The Tempest Monte del Sol Charter School 4157 Walking Rain

The Writers Festival Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po See profile on page 4. Free, 6 pm, 505-424-2331, iaia.edu.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Live piano music. Free, 6:30–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Flamenco El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 7–9:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Leeann Atherton Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Power folk. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Omar Villanueva La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Tone and The Major Dudes Evangelo’s, 200 W San Francisco Blues, rock, and R&B. $5, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-9014. 12

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SANTA FE OPERA

Classical guitar music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Covering Santa Fe in a unique way. aBqJournal.com/subscribe


The Santa Fe Shakespeare Society’s Summer Shakespeare returns for the fifth year. $10–$20 (donation), 6–8 pm, 505-490-6271, sfshakespeare.com.

The Wizard of Oz James A. Little Theatre, 1060 Cerrillos

Presented by Pandemonium Productions. $6–$10, 2 pm, 505-982-3327, pandemoniumprod.org.

You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown Armory for the Arts, 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Santa Fe Performing Arts Teen Ensemble presents a show based on the Peanuts comic strip. $8, 2 pm, 505-984-1370, sfperformingarts.org.

July 27 monday Global Warming and Human Health Eldorado Hotel & Spa, 309 W San Francisco

Dr. Robert E. Davis, University of Virginia, summarizes the current scientific understanding of human health implications of climate change. Free, 5:30–6:30 pm, chapman.agu.org.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Flamenco El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 7–9:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Hosted by Michéle Leidig. Free, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

A COLLABORATIVE PROJECT OF THE OUTPOST PERFORMANCE SPACE

Santa Fe Fuego Fort Marcy, Murales and Washington Ave

July 28

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

JULY 10– AUGUST 6, 2015

Blues music. $5, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

The Writers Festival Institute of American Indian Arts, 83 Avan Nu Po

tuesday

THE LENSIC PERFORMING ARTS CENTER & THE SANTA FE JAZZ FOUNDATION

INFO:

LENI STERN A F R I C A N Q U A RT E T RENÉ MARIE J O H N T R E N TA C O S TA & FRIENDS

AT T H E L E N S I C

The Legendary Count Basie Orchestra JULY 2 4, 7: 30 P M

NEA Jazz Master Kenny Barron Trio with Stefon Harris JULY 2 5 , 7: 30 P M

Esperanza Spalding

TI C K E TS : TicketsSantaFe.org | 505-988-1234 NewMexicoJazzFestival.org | O U TP O S T: 505-268-0044

See profile on page 4. Free, 6 pm, 505-424-2331, iaia.edu.

Argentine Tango Milonga El Meson, 213 Washington

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Live piano music. Free, 8–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol , 808 Canyon

Live piano music. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

COURTESY KENNYBARRON.COM

L AVAY S M I T H & H E R RED HOT SKILLET LICKERS

PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH AMP CONCERTS

The Writers Festival Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Live piano music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Polyphony Marimba

T H E K L E Z M AT I C S

AUGUST 6, 7: 30 P M

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

July 25: Jazz Master Kenny Barron at The Lensic

VINICIUS CANTUARIA

ALBUQUERQUE | SANTA FE

Hillary Smith and Co. El Farol, 808 Canyon

An informal reading of Yemaya’s Belly. Free, 5 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

See profile on page 4. Free, 6 pm, 505-424-2331, iaia.edu.

NEW MEXICO JAZZ FESTIVAL

Live piano music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Santa Fe’s Pecos League baseball team takes on the Trinidad Tigers. $6, 6 pm, santafefuego.com.

Sangria Sunday Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

TENTH ANNUAL

Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Marimba on the Plaza; part of the Santa Fe Bandstand series. Free, 6–7 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Zachary Pohl Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

The blues side of folk, the folk side of country. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Zongo Junction Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Afro-beat music on the Plaza as part of the Santa Fe Bandstand series. Free, 7:15–8:45 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Santa Fe Fuego Fort Marcy, Murales and Washington Ave

Santa Fe’s Pecos League baseball team takes on the Trinidad Tigers. $6, 6 pm, santafefuego.com.

Track Night Santa Fe High School, 2100 Yucca

An organized track workout for runners of all speeds. Free, 5:50 PM (slow runners), 6 pm (fast runners), santafestriders.org.

Beethoven Quartets New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace

Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 2 in G Major and String Quartet No. 8 in E Minor. $10–$78, 12 pm, 505982-1890, santafechambermusic.com. July 23, 2015 NOW 13


Kirill Gerstein Recital New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace The pianist performs Liszt’s Transcendental Études. $10–$26, 12 pm, 505-982-1890, santafechambermusic.com.

Venetian Splendor Loretto Chapel, 207 Old Santa Fe Trl

Eight singers perform Venetian Splendor with excerpts from Monteverdi’s Sestina and Songs of Love and War, double choir music by Andrea and Giovanni Gabrielli, and music written by women for women. $20–$55, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

July 29 wednesday Trunk Show & Reception Made:SantaFe, 508 Camino de la Familia

The debut of the Yvonne O’Gara Collection of Santa Fe-inspired home accessories made from vintage kimonos and saris, along with her line of scarves and wraps. Free, 5–7 pm, made-art.com.

Restaurant Walk I Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Eat your way around town with stops at Restaurant Martin, Luminaria Restaurant and Patio, TerraCotta Wine Bistro, and Georgia. $115, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Classic country on the Plaza as part of the Santa Fe Bandstand series. Free, 6–7 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Live piano music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Sim Balkey Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Carter Sampson Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Sim Balkey performs as part of the Santa Fe Bandstand series. Free, 7:15–8:45 pm, santafebandstand.org.

Americana and folk. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Jim Almand El Mesón, 213 Washington

Blues, soul, rock, folk, Americana, harp, and vocals. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Little Leroy & His Pack of Lies El Farol , 808 Canyon

Rock and roll. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Secular and sacred English choral literature. $20–$55, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

Country rockers Anthony Leon & The Chain opens for Lucero. $20, 7 pm, ampconcerts.org.

Moon Dogs La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Re-Coil Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Mozart’s opera, conducted by Harry Bicket. $40–$300, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

Serenade to Music Church of the Holy Faith 311 E Palace

Lucero Sol Santa Fe, 37 Fire Pl

R&B music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

La Finta Giardiniera Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.

Contemporary fresh takes on traditional arts Hispanic Market by Cri stina Olds

Artists such as Angie Casias (top) and Julian Romero will discuss and sell their work at CHM. 14

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NOW IN ITS 29th year, the Contemporary Hispanic Market (CHM) once again presents the non-traditional side of many age-old art forms. For a sneak peek and to honor the many award winners, check out the free preview event on July 24 from 5:30–8 pm at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. Through a jury of their peers, 134 artists were chosen to show this year. Their work spans a variety of genres, from mixed media to fused glass to recycled art. More traditional categories are also represented, such as acrylic, pastel, jewelry, and furniture; with jury approval, one artist may show different media. Julian Romero, public relations spokesperson for the Market, shows in the wood, sculpture, and printmaking categories. He said visitors to both the traditional Spanish Market and the CHM tell him that they prefer the range of styles and the variety of categories from the contemporary artists. “The traditional artists are more limited,” Romero says, “and of course some

[subjects] cross from traditional to contemporary, like Our Lady of Guadalupe—she’s forever!” Art collectors and aficionados have the opportunity to ask questions directly of the people creating the pieces they’re buying. The artists take home 100 percent of the proceeds from their sales during the Market. This year’s chosen poster artwork is by Albuquerque woodblock printmaker Alfred Ancheta. Signed copies of the posters, along with other branded merchandise for sale, and a silent auction fundraiser will be available at the Market booth during the two-day event. Every few years, the Market artists’ work is reevaluated to ensure ongoing quality, and each year several new artists join the lineup. “We have some artists showing who have been in the Contemporary Hispanic Market the entire 29 years,” says Romero, “like [CHM past president and oil painter] Judy Ortiz, who was one of the original founders.” Contemporary Hispanic Market, July 25–26, 8 am–5 pm, free, Lincoln Ave, contemporaryhispanicmarketinc.com


Spanish Market

by Cri stina Olds

KAREN SCHULD

Celebrating Spanish arts in the Plaza NOTHING REPRESENTS SANTA FE’S HISTORY, art, and culture quite like the summer arts markets. Started in 1926 with a few artists vending their handmade crafts under a portal at the New Mexico Museum of Art, the Spanish Market continues as a vital part of the Santa Fe arts scene, with 230 artists participating this year. On July 25 and 26, an anticipated 70,000 visitors will pack the booth-lined Santa Fe Plaza to sample from colcha embroidery, furniture, leatherwork, tinwork, weavings, carvings, fine art, and much more. The two-day event also includes traditional cuisine and live entertainment. “Bombarded as we are with all the other things that happen in Santa Fe in the 21st century, let’s not forget that it was these cultures, and these markets (along with the outstanding northern New Mexican natural environment) that started the phenomenon that is Santa Fe!” says David Setford, Executive Director of Spanish Colonial Arts Society, which sponsors the Spanish Market. “And we continue to be unique in that we are the only Market where more than 98 percent of the economic impact—more than $26 million in 2012—stays right here in New Mexico.” The Spanish Colonial Arts Society, founded in 1925 by writer Mary Austin with writer and artist Frank Applegate, preserves and perpetuates Hispano artistic traditions in New Mexico that have existed since Spain colonized the region in 1589. The Society manages the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, sponsors summer and winter Spanish Markets, and offers a range of educational outreach programs. During the week leading up to the Market, a series of events called “¡Viva la Cultura!” celebrates the Spanish culture and includes performances by Entreflamenco, Spanish films, and a concert by the Chicago Arts Orchestra. “A lot of the artistic highlights [of the week of Spanish Market] are secrets, so even I don’t know about them as of yet,” says Setford. “What I can say is that the procession with the new archbishop, the Most Reverend John Wester, is much anticipated, and of course the elegant new venue for the Market Preview (July 24 at the Eldorado Hotel) is a big change.” He also notes silversmith Lawrence Baca will be recognized as this year’s Masters Lifetime Achievement Award Winner. A very important aspect of the Market is the collection of young artists aged 7 to 17 years, who have been mentored by adult artists in their chosen art form. “If our grandchildren are all going to Spanish Market in 50 years, it’s because the traditions are handed down in this way, and the young artists see that there is in fact a good life to be made out of being an artist,” Setford adds. Spanish Market, July 25–26, 8 am–5 pm, free, Santa Fe Plaza, spanishcolonial.org

Meet the artists and enjoy an afternoon downtown during Spanish Market

July 23, 2015 NOW 15


eating+ drinking

Homemade scones (regular and gluten free) with lemon curd and clotted cream are made fresh in-house daily.

With more than 175 tea varieties from all over the world, no one leaves The Teahouse thirsty (or hungry for that matter—the Canyon Road eatery also serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner). In addition to the ginger green tea macha latte pictured here, the menu includes white, herbal, Ayurvedic/healing, chai, Chinese, and Japanese teas, just to name a few. The super popular antioxidant macha tea can be prepared several ways: like an Americano with 10 ounces of water, like an espresso with 2–3 ounces of water, as a latte with steamed milk, or flavored with cane sugar, ginger, or white chocolate. And don’t forget about cold tea. “We offer an iced tea of the day, both black and herbal,” says owner Rich Freedman. “We’ll prepare any teas iced-to-order.”—Cristina Olds 821 Canyon, teahousesantafe.com

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DOUGLAS MERRIAM

The Teahouse


Galisteo Bistro

eating+ drinking

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

Two Le Cordon Bleu chefs, Tomas Allen Keller and Brian Muller, prepare Galisteo Bistro’s beef, game, and seafood entrees in fresh and innovative ways. The yellowtail fillet pictured here, for example, is marinated and grilled in a house-specialty mirin and miso reduction; that is, a sweet Japanese rice wine and fermented soybean paste. “It also has vegetable stock and some brown sugar and maple syrup,” Muller says. “It adds a little sweetness to the salty miso to balance it out.” Served with its crispy skin on, the fillet is garnished with charred kale caramelized with butter, salt, and garlic on the side. “The yellowtail is a white fish that’s flaky and mild, very delicious,” Muller says. Called “hamachi” (the Japanese name for Pacific yellowtail) on the menu, this rich and buttery fish is similar to tuna and is a favorite in sushi bars. —Cristina Olds Galisteo Bistro, 227 Galisteo, galisteobistro.com

July 23, 2015 NOW

17


Seen Around photographs by Stephen Lang

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Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of who we encountered.


Nightlife

photographs by Pamela Macias

International Folk Art Market photographs by Lisa Law

the whole world comes together on Museum Hill


Opening Night As one of the largest art markets in the country, Santa Fe is always hosting openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was recently out and about at a number of opening-night receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we hung out with.

photographs by Stephen Lang

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art

openings | reviews | artists

Suzanne Donazetti moved from Maryland to southern New Mexico last year and has been experimenting with different colors that reflect the landscape around her Carrizozo home. “The Valley of Fires is on the edge of town, and I often go there at different times of the day for inspiration,” she says. “I mix my colors with inks, liquid acrylics, and interference powders and have been influenced by the clear light and long views.” Donazetti’s recent work—paintings and weavings on metal—will be shown at Waxlander from July

21–August 3. “It’s the first time in a nearly 30-year career making art that I have felt like part of a family who are dedicated to representing and selling my work to perfection,” she says of the gallery. “I love being represented by Waxlander because they are so good to me.”—Whitney Spivey

Suzanne Donazetti, Midsummer Evening, woven copper painting, 32 x 36"

Evolving Intersections, July 21–August 3, reception July 24, 5–8 pm, free, Waxlander Gallery, 622 Canyon, waxlander.com July 23, 2015 NOW 21


art

STUDIO

Arthur Lopez

the contemporary wood sculptor reinterprets traditional icons Saint Christopher’s Beach Cruiser is a commissioned work in progress. A micro gauge tool is used to carve fine details.

The hand-carved and painted wood saints, crosses, and altars by Santa Fean Arthur Lopez are irreverent interpretations of traditional themes with a contemporary twist. A carved milk carton with a missing child announcement is titled El Niño Perdido, and a statue of a hippie version of Our Lady of Guadalupe (currently on display at the Museum of International Folk Art) is called Mary Jane Magdalena. For his 16th year showing santos, bultos, and retablos at Spanish Market, Lopez will enter a carving of Jesus and a lowrider truck (below). Last year he won second place in the painted bultos category. He’s exhibited internationally, and recently received a 2015 Mayor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts. Lopez is represented locally at Manitou Galleries.—Cristina Olds artlopezart.com

Lopez carves details into the statues after shaping them but before sanding, gessoing, painting, sealing, and waxing.

Maria-Posa

Cruzin’ the Sangres with the Lowered 22

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STEPHEN LANG

Lopez’s living room displays his own and other artists’ work.


art

by Emily Va n Cle ve

PROFILE

Broken Boundaries

COURTESY OF MANITOU GALLERIES

Ne w Mex ica n la nds cape s by Z. Z. We i Z. Z. WEI LOVES THE LOOK AND FEEL of rural America and expresses his impressions of twisty country roads, farmsteads and old classic pickup trucks through imaginative and colorful paintings. “It’s not just about seeing the landscape, but also about feeling the sunlight, smelling the air, even interacting with people and understanding their daily life,” he says, as translated by his wife, Hsuan Lin. Fifteen paintings, including several inspired by New Mexico’s landscape with its traditional adobe structures, are featured in Wei’s solo show, Broken Boundaries, at Manitou Galleries’ Canyon Road location, beginning July 24. Wei made his first visit to Santa Fe 25 years ago and has been drawn to the City Different on many occasions. Since becoming familiar with the heart and spirit of a place is essential to his work, he has to spend considerable time in each location. “Z. Z. Wei is well known for his evocative landscapes of rural America and the American Southwest,” says Manitou Galleries’ marketing director Matthew Mullins. “Wei’s paintings powerfully represent the sense of stillness and solitude that one experiences while traveling through these vast landscapes. His paintings capture a sense of flux and slowly-passing time that can be seen through a creeping shadow, a crumbling adobe wall and a forgotten highway that rolls toward the horizon.”     Born in Beijing in 1957, Wei started painting during the years of the Cultural Revolution. He graduated from The Central Institute of Arts and Design (now The Academy of Arts and Design of Tsinghua University) in 1984. By the age of 30, he had two exhibitions at the China National Museum of Fine Arts. Wei experienced rural America for the first time when he was invited by the Washington State Centennial Commission in 1989 to participate in the Pacific Rim Cultural Connection Project and to be a resident artist at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle. He was enthralled by the beauty around him and decided to settle in the Seattle area. “With nature, mankind and their interaction and relationship, there are so many stories to tell and so many different ways of telling them,” he says. “What’s most fascinating about painting for me are the endless possibilities.” Painting is much more than a career for Wei. It’s a way of life. “I don’t intentionally change what I do, but as I grow older and see and experience more, I believe changes occur,” he adds. “Some might be obvious, like subject matter; some might be subtle and subconscious.” Broken Boundaries, July 24–August 7, reception July 24, 5–7:30 pm, free, Manitou Galleries, 225 Canyon, manitougalleries.com

Z. Z. Wei, Hidden, oil on canvas, 48 x 36"

Z. Z. Wei, Crisp Autumn, oil on canvas, 48 x 48" July 23, 2015 NOW 23


Cheryl Ann Thomas, Vessel 104, porcelain, 12 x 16 x 15"

Phyllis Kudder Sullivan and Cheryl Ann Thomas Santa Fe Clay, 545 Camino de la Familia santafeclay.com, July 24–September 5 Reception July 24, 5–7 pm So delicately woven are the ceramic forms made by Phyllis Kudder Sullivan and Cheryl Ann Thomas that they’re sometimes mistaken for textiles. Using a coiling technique that gives the appearance of netting, Sullivan creates vessels and sculptural forms. Thomas’s pieces start out as thin coiled vessels and then collapse on themselves when fired, representing the experience of creation and loss.—EVC

ongoing

Jason Chakravarty and Sean Hennessey: Kiss My Glass, The WilliamandJoseph Gallery, 727 Canyon thewilliamandjosephgallery.com Through July 31 “These two artists have created bodies of work that make us laugh, make us think, and ask us to see glass in a new light,” says gallery owner Mary Bonney about the works of Jason Chakravarty and Sean Hennessey, both of whom employ mixed media. Chakravarty likes to use neon, while Hennessey incorporates materials such as concrete, wood, and steel.—EVC

Sean Hennessey, Electricity, mixed media on cast glass, 18 x 24"

Hilario Gutierrez: What Can’t Be Spoken Tansey Contemporary, 652 Canyon tanseycontemporary.com Through August 8 Abstract painter Hilario Gutierrez, a native of Arizona, created 10 new works for this show, which spotlights the artist’s belief in the importance of viewer interpretation as well as his love for the Southwest landscape. Gutierrez typically creates what’s been referred to as “a prism of conjoined colors” and interjects variations in hue, patterns, textures, and more, encouraging a viewer’s engagement and interpretation.—EVC Hilario Gutierrez, A Delicate Moment, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48" 24

santafeanNOW.com

BELLA GASPICH

PREVIEWS

Paige Bradley, Expansion, bronze, lifesize

Release Paige Bradley’s sculptures reveal power of emotions In sculptor Paige Bradley’s eyes, the human figure is the perfect vehicle for communicating the human condition. Bradley doesn’t sugarcoat her forms. “Paige is about the nitty-gritty; presenting things as they are,” says Bella Gaspich, art director of Greenberg Fine Art. “Her sculptures feel real when you experience them in person, as if they could stretch right out and become real people.” Release: A World Premiere is Bradley’s show at Greenberg Fine Art, with an opening reception Friday, July 24, 5–7 pm, closing August 6. The centerpiece of the exhibit is the new life-size version of her sculpture Release, which shows a woman with outstretched arms, her eyes looking toward the sky. Release is one of nearly a dozen works from Bradley’s four series entitled fragments; dancers; goddess; and metamorphosis, which will be featured during the show. Another important work is Expansion, a bronze illuminated with LED lights that Gaspich calls “the hottest sculpture in Santa Fe.” –Emily Van Cleve Release: A World Premiere, July 24–August 6, reception July 24, 5–7 pm, free, Greenberg Fine Art, 205 Canyon, greenbergfineart.com Release in progress

COURTESY OF PAIGE BRADLEY

art


art

PROFILE

Guilloume Perez-Zapata, We Can Grow, oil, 12 x 48"

by Emily Va n Cle ve

Diverse Communities

DAVE NUFER

C olom bi a n a rti s t Guilloume shows at Pip p i n Con te mpora r y BOLISMO IS A TERM THAT PAINTER and sculptor Guilloume PerezZapata invented to describe his artistic style. It refers to playing with circles— and within them textures and shadings—as the basis of work that expresses relationships and a vast range of human feelings through simplistic forms. “Through this style, I am able to convey the love I feel for my family and friends,” says the artist, who goes only by his first name. “These simple forms, faceless yet full of expression, demonstrate the relationships all of us have with those around us.” Although Guilloume’s creative process is intuitive, there’s usually a story behind each work. He starts by sketching an idea in ink. With pen in hand, he might start thinking about an experience with family or friends, or simply allow his subconscious to direct his movements. Although he believes his visual images communicate his ideas, he’s comfortable conversing with viewers about the thoughts behind each piece. “I explore the depths of complex yet simple relationships; those of lovers, parents, friends, acquaintances, the interactions we have on a daily basis,” he says. “I am blessed to experience the richness of these personal relationships in my life and to impart their importance through my art.” Born the 19th of 20 children in Colombia’s second largest city, Medellín, Guilloume attended art school in his hometown and learned to work with charcoal, pencil, ink, watercolor, pastel, and oils. After meeting his wife, Gladys, in 1984, he decided to move to the U.S. to join most of his family. The couple spent a few years in Los Angeles before settling in Sandia Park outside Albuquerque, New Mexico, where his 4,000 square foot studio is also located. Pippin Contemporary displays 25 of Guilloume’s latest paintings, bronze relief wall pieces and bronze sculptures in his solo show Diverse Communities, which runs through July 31. Some of the pieces focus on relationships between two individuals, while others portray large group celebrations. “Guilloume’s fluid bronze sculptures and minimalist oil paintings are passionate expressions of relationships in the artist’s life, from brief

Guilloume Perez-Zapata, At the Same Level, oil, 12 x 18"

interactions with strangers to personal moments with loved ones,” says the gallery’s marketing director Kelly Skeen. “We love to see people connect with his work in the gallery through his personal narratives that go along with each piece. These stories add an intimacy to the work, and in turn create a special connection with the collector.” Diverse Communities, July 17–31, reception July 24, 5–7 pm, free, Pippin Contemporary, 200 Canyon, pippincontemporary.com July 23, 2015 NOW 25


Victoria Adams

“Watching the birds inspired me to make these bird nest baskets,” Adams says. “I had to train myself to become wild instead of forming the materials into more human forms like most baskets.”

For the past 35 years, Victoria Adams has lived off the land, so to speak. In her Adams Family Garden business, she sold produce and eggs alongside her husband; the couple also crafted willow furniture. Currently, Adams weaves baskets, which she sells in her Mother Earth Art booth at the Santa Fe Farmers Market. The bird nest baskets pictured here are primarily woven from red willow, but Adams also gathers pine needles, rosemary, and lavender for her stitched “Good Thoughts” baskets, in which she includes little sayings. The self-taught weaver credits Mother Nature as her inspiration and greatest teacher. “I make it a point to give lots of gratitude for all the gifts [Mother Nature] shares with me,” Adams says. “I try to listen to what She tells me.”—Cristina Olds 505-984-2102

MARSHALL ELIAS

wild weaving inspired by Mother Nature

[on the market]

entertain in grand style

Adams and her husband planted a red willow grove—where the artist harvests materials for her baskets— 25 years ago on their property in the foothills east of Santa Fe. 26

santafeanNOW.com

Designed and built by Kim Dressell, this spacious Las Campanas home has a large living room as well as a comfortable family room. Slate flooring is found throughout the home, with carpet in the bedrooms. The bright, open kitchen with granite counters and stainless steel appliances has all the modern conveniences a chef could ask for, including an adjacent butler’s pantry. Just below the main level of the home is an ample wine cellar. Enjoy gourmet meals in the dining room or under one of the home’s five portals. The front courtyard has views that gaze west upon the Jemez Mountains. Manicured lawns with native plants and colorful flowers enhance the beauty of this 1.9-acre property. List price: $1.35 million Contact: Tim Galvin, 505-795-5990, Sotheby’s International Realty, sothebyshomes.com


equestrian paradise An elegant and ideal equestrian property, this 20-acre estate with sweeping mountain views features a 7,397–square–foot home with antique architectural elements such as old Mexican and Spanish Pueblo doors, along with reclaimed timbers and beams. Gallery-style lighting can showcase an extensive art collection. There is no need to have a gym membership in town; this home has its very own, with a wall-mounted drinking fountain. Enjoy the hot tub or a therapeutic sweat in the personal sauna located in the owner’s suite. Evening stargazing takes on new meaning in the property’s 15-foot dome observatory that’s fully powered and wired for automated control from the main house. The equestrian facilities include a custom 60 x 36 Morton Barn with a tack room and wash stalls. List price: $2.175 million Contact: Amber Haskell, 505-470-0923, Santa Fe Properties, santafeproperties.com

On the Burning Edge auth or K y l e D ic k man discus s e s his ne w bo o k at Col l e c te d W o r k s

style

Dickman, a former hotshot, spent five seasons fighting wildfires in California.

by Wh it ne y Spi ve y DAN WINTERS

[on the market]

Kyle Dickman’s National Magazine award-nominated cover story in the November 2013 issue of Outside magazine is now a book. On the Burning Edge: A Fateful Fire and the Men Who Fought It is the true and tragic account of the 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots who died in Arizona’s 2013 Yarnell Hill Fire. “The story was very personal for me because I used to be a hotshot,” says Dickman, who lives in Santa Fe. “The story also had a strong narrative that had lots of natural segues into the bigger picture of firefighting.” Dickman details Granite Mountain’s 2013 season—some of it spent just 60 miles from Santa Fe at the Thompson Ridge Fire—including the crew’s final hours at Yarnell Hill. “The point of the book is to say look, here’s this individual awful tragedy, but in the greater context of fire history, this is one of many,” Dickman says. “Why do young men and women keep dying fighting fires? I wanted to contextualize the tragedy and talk about hopefully how we can prevent this in the future.” Dickman will be at Collected Works on July 23 to talk about On the Burning Edge. But first, he took a moment to speak with Santa Fean Now about the book and wildfires in the Southwest.

JAMES BLACK

Was living in Santa Fe a factor when writing the book? For much of the past decade, the Southwest has been the center for wildland fires in the U.S. We’ve seen some of the biggest fires in the history of wildland firefighting just outside of Santa Fe—Las Conchas, Pacheco, Tres Lagunas, all of those big burns. Wildfires are impossible to ignore when you’re in Santa Fe. What was the role of New Mexico’s Thompson Ridge fire in Granite Mountain’s 2013 season? Most hotshot crews tend to have a fire like that, where all the men coalesce and they figure out the kinks and how to work together as a unit. I think Thompson Ridge, where they were working to save historic buildings [in the Valles Caldera], was really the fire that did it for the crew. Before they went into that fire, they had very little experience on big active blazes, but when they left, they really felt like a unit. They went through quite a bit of turmoil in a little bit of time. What can Santa Feans do to protect their homes from wildfires? For homeowners, especially those who live up on the flanks of Atalaya or up the ski basin road or anywhere in the wildland-urban interface, people need to be proactive about preparing for fires, and that means creating defensible space—using chainsaws and chippers to thin the brush out from around their houses so. There’s a lot of evidence to suggest that preparing homes for fires rather than reacting to fires is actually a more successful tactic for keeping homes standing through fires. Kyle Dickman: On the Burning Edge book reading and signing, July 23, 6 pm, free, Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse, 202 Galisteo, collectedworksbookstore.com

July 23, 2015 NOW 27


Eating Around

style

Chocolate + Cashmere

Paper Dosa

w ha t ’ s n ot to l ove ab out th is downtown sho p ?

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

CRISTINA OLDS

July 9, 6:30 pm During World War II, 109 East Lamb Keema dosa, $13 Haleigh Palmer asked artist and Palace Avenue in Santa Fe was the designer Kristin Bortles to help administrative hub for the Manhatdecorate the store. “She had some 551 W Cordova, tan Project and a gateway of sorts to outrageous ideas,” Palmer says, paper-dosa.com Los Alamos. Seventy years later, the such as the cashmere wall rug seen here behind Palmer. project’s director, Robert Oppenheimer, still has a presence in the Send Santa Fean NOW pictures of your meal (with the info we’ve included here) and we might run them in the magazine! Spanish hacienda–style building. Email info@santafean.com. “As an homage, and with the approval of the city attorney in Los Alamos, we’ve created a chocolate sculpture of Mr. Oppenheimer,” says Haleigh Palmer, owner of Chocolate + Cashmere, a candy and accessories shop that recently opened in the historic location and, accordingly, sees many tour groups and history buffs pass through its doors. The sweet replicas of the scientist (they’re $600 for a two-foot-tall statue or $105 for a bust) are only a small part of what Chocolate + Cashmere has to offer. “Coming into our store is a sexy, sensual, and cultural experience,” Palmer says of her four-room shop, which offers an expansive collection of made-in-Santa Fe Golightly Cashmere, along with gourmet treats from the likes of Albuquerque-based Joliesse and Santa Fe chef Joseph Wrede of the acclaimed culinary pub Joseph’s. “We offer something for everyone,” Palmer notes. “You can spend $2 or $200, and we’re certain you’ll experience something magical, if just for a moment—or for a lifetime. We’re excited about the opportunity to present a culture of quality.” This philosophy is perhaps most apparent in the colorful rows of cashmere that adorn walls, tables, and shelves throughout the store. “Actual cashmere—the stuff we import from Scotland—is Grade A,” Palmer says of her inventory. “It’s taken solely from just one-sixth of the goat’s belly. In fact, it takes the annual molting of four cashmere goats to make one sweater.” That cashmere is then hand-loomed on vintage knitting machines Master chocolatier Grace Lapsys created a custom line right here in Santa Fe. of truffles exclusively for Chocolate + Cashmere that Although Chocolate + uses organic butters and creams as well as Cashmere’s flagship store still a few single-origin cacao sources. operates at 130 Bent Street in Taos, Palmer is excited about the “bigger pond” offered by Santa Fe. “Being downtown Clothes by Dries Van Noten, available at feels amazing,” she says. Santa Fe Dry Goods. “So many people from all Jacket, $1,285; blouse, over the world come to $610; scarf, $895; us. It feels cultured necklace, $1,200 Photographer Mark Steven and expansive.” Shepherd proves Santa Fe style is a real thing with –Whitney Spivey

Santa Fashion

Chocolate + Cashmere, 109 E Palace, chocolatecashmere.com 28

his candid shots of locals around town. Santa Fe Dry Goods, 53 Old Santa Fe Trail, 505-992-8083, santafedrygoods.com


| L A S T LO O K |

GABRIELLA MARKS

World Party at Skylight

On June 23, folk musician Gabriel Kelley opened for the band World Party at Skylight. Led by Welshman Karl Wallinger, the band played powerful, alternative rock from its five-CD collection, Arkeology. The audience “loved the show,” according to Skylight marketing manager Kate Kennedy. “Santa Fe was lucky to have this tour stop, and Skylight felt honored to be the venue.”—Elizabeth Sanchez July 23, 2015 NOW 29


ZACHARIAH RIEKE July 17 – September 12

Wedge, 2015, mixed media on canvas, 69.5” x 55.5”

Opening Reception: Friday, July 24, 5–7

pm

2 1 7 W. W a t e r S t r e e t , S a n t a F e , N M 8 7 5 0 1 w a d e w i l s o n a r t . c o m | w a d e w i l s o n s e c o n d a r y. c o m Tu e s d a y - S a t u r d a y 1 1 a m - 5 p m | 505.660.4393

Santa Fean NOW July 23 2015 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW July 23 2015 Digital Edition

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