Page 1

now The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

santafeanNOW.com

PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

week of July 10


The Only 3 Generation, Full-time, Female, Painting Dynasty

Recorded in History Margarete Bagshaw

“Clown Magic” 20”X16”

Pablita Velarde (1918 - 2006)

“The Colors of My People” 20”X16”

Helen Hardin (1943 - 1984)

201 Galisteo St. Santa Fe, NM 505-988-2024 www.goldendawngallery.com


ART SANTA FE FAIR C O S TA R I C A | J A PA N | T U R K E Y | U N I T E D S TAT E S

JULY 10 - JULY 13 | SANTA FE CONVENTION CENTER TEL 5 0 5 . 9 8 8 . 8 8 8 3 | W W W. A R T S A N TA F E . C O M OPENING NIGHT GALA THURSDAY, JULY 10, 5-8 PM | CALL FOR INFO FRIDAY, JULY 11 | SATURDAY, JULY 12 | SUNDAY, JULY 13 | 11- 6 PM | $10 AT THE DOOR

ALL TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE LENSIC BOX OFFICE 505.988.1234 1ST ROW: Edgar Medina, Texas; Andy Warhol, Art Collection Nakano, Japan; Allison Barnes, Alibi Fine Art, Illinois; Brian Goodman, California; Martha Braun, Arizona; August Muth, Hulse/Warman Gallery, New Mexico; David Gordon, New Mexico; 2ND ROW: Gioconda Rojas, Costa Rica; Jim Gautier, New Mexico; Marcio Decker, Nevada; Anne Truitt, Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, New Mexico; Ana Tzarev, Ana Tzarev Gallery, New York; 3RD ROW: Pascal, GF Contemporary, New Mexico; Greg Miller, Kidder Smith Gallery, Massachusetts; Jeff Laird, New Mexico; Vida Tayari, Tayari Art Gallery, Texas; Jim Martin, Contemporary Artifact, California; Doris K. Hembrough, Wisconsin; 4TH ROW: Michael Carson, Bonner David Galleries, Arizona; EGUCHI Ayane, Zane Bennett Contemporary Art, New Mexico; Anthony Abbate, Abbate Fine Art, New Mexico; Shuji Fujii, Tomomitsu Nakamura, Japan; Hasan Pehlevan, Merkur Art Gallery, Turkey; Nancy Macko, California; 5TH ROW: Arthur Pinajian, Stephanie’s Art Gallery, INC., California; Emily Montoya, Meow Wolf Art Collective, New Mexico; Toko Shinoda, The Tolman Collection of Tokyo, Japan; Eva Ginguimia, Rainforest Baskets, Oregon; Mac Read, New Mexico; Nara Yoshitomo, Gallery Edel, Japan; 6TH Row: Sam Still, rör contemporary, Florida; Martin Spei, New Mexico; John Vokoun, New Mexico; Melanie Yazzie, New Mexico Museum of Art, New Mexico; Kurt Merkel, New Mexico

ART Santa Fe Presents keynote speaker, JAMES MEYER James Meyer is Associate Curator of Modern Art at the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. lecturing on “Children of the Sixties,” from his book: Return to the Sixties: On the Meaning of the Sixties in Art and Culture.

Saturday, July 12, 6:30 PM | St. Francis Auditorium, NM Museum of Art | $10 BRING THIS AD to the Art Santa Fe ticket booth and receive 2 tickets for the price of 1 (individual ticket: $10). — Valid Friday, Saturday, Sunday, July 11-13, 11-6 PM, Santa Fe Convention Center, 201 West Marcy Street —


museum of indian arts and culture presents

now 5 The Buzz The Santa Fe Greek Festival and the Santa Fe Desert Chorale

wednesday, JuLY 16th, 12:00–2:00 pm

let’s take a look Curators from the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and the Laboratory of Anthropology will be in the lobby of MIAC to look at your treasures and attempt to identify and interpret artifacts and historic objects. Free and open to the public. Federal and state regulations prohibit the curators from appraising any artifact.

NEXT UP Saturday, JuLY 19th, 1:00–3:00 pm

Turquoise buying seminar Before you buy your next piece of turquoise, learn what to look for. Garrick Beck from Natural Stones, Santa Fe, will conduct the seminar.

sunday, JuLY 20th, 2:00–4:00 pm

Turquoise Perspectives and MeaningS Dan Simplicio, a descendant of the famed Zuni jewelry artist of the same name and a noted scholar, will speak about Zuni traditions for using turquoise. This lecture is free with museum admission.

WEDNESday, JuLY 23th, 1:00–4:00 pm

southwest pottery artist demonstration Native artists from different Southwest tribes, will discuss and demonstrate different techniques, clays and styles of pottery. Pamela Quintana, from Cochiti Pueblo, was taught, as a child, the historic art and her family’s tradition of making storytellers by her parents Pablo and Margaret Quintana. Pamela hand forms and fires in a kiln. She uses micaceous clay “so that it glitters”. All are free with paid admission, 16 and under always free. New Mexico residents with ID always free on Sundays.

Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on Museum Hill 710 Camino Lejo (off Old Santa Fe Trail) 505-476-1250 indianartsandculture.org

7 This Week A comprehensive calendar of goings-on around town 14 Features ART Santa Fe, painter Margaretta Caesar, the 11th annual International Folk Art Market, and folk pop musician Anthony Leon 18 Seen Around Photos from fun local events

|

JULY 10 – JULY 16

2014

20 Art Winterowd Fine Art’s 10th anniversary, artist David Solomon, and gallery show openings 25 Eating + Drinking Santa Fe Bite’s legendary Green Chile Cheeseburger 27 Style Scalp acupuncture and beautiful Santa Fe–area homes for sale 28 Last Look Vocalist Stephanie Hatfield at the Santa Fe Bandstand

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

|

ART REIGNS BIG this weekend as the Santa Fe Art Trifecta— ART Santa Fe, the International Folk Art Market, and SITE Santa Fe’s SITElines—gets underway. ART Santa Fe (July 10–July 13) returns for a 14th year with bigger, even better events and, of course, stunning art from Santa Fe and beyond. By gathering this large display of excellent fine art all in one place, ART Santa Fe gives us locals access to art we’ve never seen before. I never miss it.  The International Folk Art Market (July 10–July 13) always attracts a huge crowd to Museum Hill, where the event is held. The variety of objects from around the world will keep your head spinning, but in my mind the international music alone is worth checking out.  Next week, SITE Santa Fe’s reimagined biennial, SITElines 2014: Unsettled Landscapes (July 17–July 19), further stirs our contemporary art juices. And if you’re not festivaled out, there’s a Greek festival this weekend as well. Art and music continue to abound in Santa Fe. Be sure to catch great gallery openings all over town Friday night and concerts at the bandstand on the Plaza this weekend. I especially recommend Nosotros and their Latin beats. Salsa, anyone?

Bruce Adams

Publisher

DAVID ROBIN

2014 SUMMER PROGRAMS


Welcome to Santa Fe! As a creative, cultural hub, Santa Fe offers an abundance of the world’s best art, attractions, and entertainment opportunities. Santa Fean NOW is the premier source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local or a tourist visiting for the first time or the 100th, NOW’s complete listings of everything from gallery openings to live music events will help you make the most of the city. We look forward to seeing you around the City Different. Should you need any extra tips, please stop by our information centers at the Santa Fe Railyard or off the Plaza at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. Wishing you a wonderful time, Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor

now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

b.y. cooper

amy hegarty samantha schwirck amy gross

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

whitney stewart

michelle odom, sybil watson

OPERATIONS MANAGER

ginny stewart-jaramillo

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER MARKETING CONSULTANT

Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

david wilkinson

andrea nagler

WRITERS

cristina olds, anna sochocky dianne stromberg, emily van cleve

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com

Join St. John’s College for our 9th Annual Season Wednesday, July 16 SuperSax New Mexico All concerts are free, family friendly, and hosted on the beautiful campus of St. John’s College. Music begins promptly at 6 p.m. and continues until 8 p.m. For complete information on this year’s artists and general information about Music on the Hill and St. John’s College, please visit www.sjc.edu.

St. John’s College | 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca | Santa Fe, New Mexico | 87505 | 505-984-6000 | www.sjc.edu

4

santafeanNOW.com

Copyright 2014. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Fean NOW Volume 1, Number 9, Week of July 10, 2014. Published by Bella Media, LLC at 215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2014 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

On the cover: Anthony Leon and The Chain hit Sol Santa Fe. Details on page 17. Photo by Gabriella Marks.


Greeking out

the

buzz

VIOLET SANTIKOS

The Santa Fe Greek Festival celebrates Greek culture as expressed through its food, music, and folk dancing. This year’s event, the 17th annual, is a fundraiser for St. Elias the Prophet Greek Orthodox Church and features delicious cuisine, lively music, raffles, and special performances by the New Mexico–based Greek band The Aegean Sounds, the Palamakia Dancers, and Mosaic Dance Company. On the lengthy menu are traditional Greek foods both savory and sweet. Beef and lamb gyros, baked Greek calzone, spanakopita (spinach pie), moussaka (beef and eggplant casserole), and the layered pasta dish pastitsio are some of the delicious main dishes, and of course there will be plenty of Greek confections on hand to satisfy the most demanding sweet tooth.

KERRY TRAMONTANAS

Honey and nuts are used liberally in the layered pastry known as baklava (above) and many traditional Greek cookies (left).

“We will definitely have our delicious Greek pastries available including baklava, kourambiedes, which are powered sugar cookies, melomakarona (honey cookies with walnuts), koulourakia (Easter twist cookies), and loukoumades, which are fluffy fried balls of dough coated with a light honey sauce and a sprinkle of cinnamon,” says the event’s advertising chair, Violet Santikos. New to the festival in 2014 is a silent auction, during which you can bid on a variety of donated items and gift certificates. Greek gifts and foods will be available for purchase at the Greek Agora market. —Emily Van Cleve Greek folk dancing at the Santa Fe Greek Festival

Seventeenth annual Santa Fe Greek Festival at the Eldorado Hotel & Spa, July 12 & 13, 11 AM–9 PM, santafegreekfestival.com. $3 adults, free for kids 12 and younger. July 10, 2014

NOW

5


Santa Fe Desert Chorale

The Santa Fe Symphony and St. Martin’s Chamber Choir of Denver join the Santa Fe Desert Chorale on August 7 and 9 for a performance of Mozart’s Requiem, the composer’s final work, along with Mozart arias and choral pieces. Grammy Award– winning mezzo-soprano Susan Graham, who was born in Roswell, New Mexico, is the special guest star. Voasis, the Santa Fe Desert Chorale’s sister group that’s composed of eight a cappella singers, presents pop, jazz, and contemporary vocal tunes during its Soaking up the Summer concert at Warehouse 21 in mid-August.—EVC July 10–August 17, venues throughout Santa Fe and Albuquerque, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

BLUE ROSE PHOTOGRAPHY

Santa Fe Desert Chorale Music Director Joshua Habermann enjoys a broad range of vocal music and has made a point of programming many different kinds of pieces for his a cappella group’s 33rd summer festival season. Opening July 10 at St. Francis Cathedral is The New World: Music of the Americas concert series featuring folk music, traditional spirituals, and new works by composers from throughout the Americas. “This is a concert I’m very excited about,” says Habermann, who’s in his sixth season with the ensemble. “Building on the American program we did last year, which was very popular, we’re expanding that focus to include music not only from the United States but also Latin America and Cuba. There will also be a couple of pieces in which the choir will imitate the sound of a percussion-based salsa band using only their voices.” Presented at the Loretto Chapel beginning July 17 is Spanish Mystics, a collection of works from the Renaissance and beyond, including arrangements of pieces by contemporary Spanish composer Javier Busto. Guitarist and lutenist Richard Savino and percussionist Angela Gabriel provide accompaniment. A Romantic Evening with Brahms is a program of works for chorus and piano, featuring pianist Debra Ayers, which will take place at First Presbyterian Church. The concert includes a selection of both a cappella and accompanied songs, such as Intermezzo Op. 119, Nos. 1 and 3 for solo piano.

the buzz

Opening July 10, The New World: Music of the Americas concert series features folk music, traditional spirituals, and new works by composers from throughout the Americas. 6

santafeanNOW.com


this week July 10–July 16

XREZ PRODUCTIONS

A photogrammetry 3-D modeling video of Ai Weiwei and Bert Benally’s Pull of the Moon performance (shown here) opens July 16 at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts.

July 10 thursday ART Santa Fe Santa Fe Convention Center 201 W Marcy

An upscale mix of excellent contemporary galleries from all over the globe, cutting-edge art installations, and emerging artists and dealers. See profile on page 14. Vernissage opening gala tonight ($100, 5–8 PM); fair open July 11–13 ($10 per day, 11 am–6 pm), 505-988-8883, artsantafe.com.

Fun Summer Tacos Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Demonstration class with Chef Rocky Durham. $50, 5:30–7:30 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Susanna Trilling Oaxacan Cuisine Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 S Guadalupe

Susanna Trilling, founder and director of Seasons of My Heart Cooking School (Oaxaca, Mexico), teaches a demonstration-style class on authentic Mexican cooking. $85, 10 am, 505-983-4688, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

The Krishna Das Kirtan Wallah Concert Tour

Greer Garson Theatre 1600 St. Michaels

The Center For Inner Truth and Transitions Radio Magazine present The Krishna Das Kirtan Wallah Concert Tour. $36.50 (reserved seating), 7 pm, 505-983-1234, ticketssantafe.org or krishnadas.com.

StorySwap: Revolutionary Freedom & Free-Wheelin’ Revolution Hillside Market 86 Old Las Vegas Hwy

Practiced and beginner storytellers are invited to bring a story to share with a supportive group of listeners. The event starts with featured tellers and leads into an open-mic storytelling session with a seven-minute limit. Free, 6–7:30 pm, 505-982-9944, santafehillsidemarket.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Great American Songbook works, plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 6:30–9 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Broadway/Cabaret Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

Broadway favorites from pianist David Geist. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

C. S. Rockshow La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Live music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com.

CW Ayon Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Blues music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Guitarras Con Sabor El Farol 808 Canyon

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Karaoke. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Summer Flamenco Series El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–8 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

The Boxcar Bandits Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe July 10, 2014

NOW

7


Live music. Free, 8–10:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

TapestryFive on the Trail The New Mexico State Land Office 310 Old Santa Fe Trl

The Saltanah Dancers Cleopatra Café (Southside location) 3482 Zafarano

Five established artists, Pat Dozier, Heather Gallegos-Rex, Nancy Lane, LaDonna Mayer, and Janice Thomson Peters, exhibit their contemporary hand-woven tapestries. Free, reception 4–6 pm, 505-827-5762, tapestryfive.com.

Belly-dancing performance. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-820-7381.

Wild for Color Waxlander Art Gallery & Sculpture Garden 622 Canyon

Santa Fe Desert Chorale Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi 131 Cathedral

Waxlander shows Andrée Hudson’s brushy, expressionistic pieces and unveils a clay pre-casting of Hudson’s first bronze. See preview on page 21. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-984-2202, waxlander.com.

The New World: Music of the Americas concert series, opening tonight and continuing through August 2, will transport audiences throughout the United States and southward through Central and South America. See preview on page 6. $17–$60, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

July 11 friday Art Spectacular! Winterowd Fine Art 701 Canyon

A celebration of Winterowd Fine Art’s 10th anniversary. See preview on page 20. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-992-8878, fineartsantafe.com.

Red Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 S Guadalupe

A class focusing on red chile. $75, 9 am, 505-983-4688, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Bio-Morphed Turner Carroll Gallery 725 Canyon

Artists Shawn Smith, Rey Ray, and Josh Garber share perspectives on the natural world. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-986-9800, turnercarroll.com.

Blooms La Mesa of Santa Fe 225 Canyon

New forged-steel sculpture by Christopher Thomson, with live music by the artist and Scott McKinley. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-984-1688, christopherthomsonironworks.com.

Javier Lopez Barbosa and jd Hansen Mark White Fine Art 414 Canyon

Javier Lopez Barbosa works in a mixed-media technique loosely based on glazing. Sculptor jd Hansen’s highly textured figurative bronzes are influenced by music. See preview on page 22. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-982-2073, markwhitefineart.com.

Milt Kobayashi: A One Man Exhibition Meyer Gallery 225 Canyon

Award-winning figurative painter Milt Kobayashi’s 8

santafeanNOW.com

The 2014 Summer Art Show Red Dot Gallery 826 Canyon July 11: Art Spectacular! at Winterowd Fine Art

work boasts strong compositions combined with sophisticated palettes. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505983-5170, meyergalleries.com.

New Watercolors Marigold Arts 424 Canyon

Paintings by Robert Highsmith. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-4142, marigoldarts.com.

Rio Grande Gorge Series Bill Hester Fine Art 621 Canyon

Works by Margaretta Caesar. See profile on page 15. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-660-5966, billhesterfineart.com.

Rumi on Canvas The Longworth Gallery 530 Canyon

Paintings by Rahileh Rokhsari. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-989-4210, thelongworthgallery.com.

Sailing to Byzantium New Concept Gallery 610 Canyon

New Concept Gallery presents 2-D and 3-D work by painter, photographer, and sculptor Roger Arvid Anderson. See preview on page 21. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-795-7570, newconceptgallery.com.

Seasons of Beauty Sage Creek Gallery 421 Canyon

Fifteen new oil paintings from Bryce Cameron Liston celebrate the human form. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-3444, sagecreekgallery.com.

Shape Shifter Patina Gallery 131 W Palace

The second exhibition in Patina’s Drawn to the Wall series, featuring new works by abstract painter David Solomon. See profile on page 24. Free, reception 5–7:30 pm, 505-986-3432, patina-gallery.com.

Group exhibition by student artists. Free, reception 4:30–7 pm, 505-820-7338, red-dot-gallery.com.

The Barn as a Portrait Canyon Road Contemporary 403 Canyon

Works by Kathy Beekman. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-983-0433, canyoncontemporary.com.

The Krishna Das Kirtan Wallah Concert Tour Greer Garson Theatre 1600 St. Michaels

The Center For Inner Truth and Transitions Radio Magazine present The Krishna Das Kirtan Wallah Concert Tour. $36.50 (reserved seating), 7 pm, 505-983-1234, ticketssantafe.org or krishnadas.com.

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Great American Songbook works, plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 6:30–9 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Boris McCutcheon Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Indie rock music. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Broadway/Cabaret Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

Broadway favorites from pianist David Geist. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Cathy Faber La Fiesta Lounge at La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Piano/vocals. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.


Jay Boy Adams & Zenobia with Mister Sister Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

106 N Shining Sun

Santa Fe School of Cooking hosts a Southwesternthemed cooking class on Estrella Del Norte’s garden patio. Instructors demonstrate using a wood-fired oven and grill while wine experts discuss New Mexico’s wine history and production. $120, 10 am–12 pm, 505-455-2826, estrelladelnortevineyard.com.

Live music. Free, 8–10:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

JJ and the Hooligans El Farol 808 Canyon

Rock and roll music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

James Meyer: Children of the Sixties New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Pachanga The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St Francis

July 11: S. Carey performs at Sol Santa Fe.

Salsa, cumbia, bachata, and merengue music and dancing. $5, 9:30 pm–1:30 am, 505-992-5800, lodgeatsantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

S. Carey Sol Santa Fe Stage & Grill 37 Fire Place

S. Carey, best known for his work beside Bon Iver (drummer and supporting vocalist), performs music from his solo career. $12, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón 213 Washington

Jazz piano trio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet presents a program of mixed works including Square None choreographed by Norbert De la Cruz III, Return to a Strange Land by Jirí Kylián, and The Heart(s)pace, by Nicolo Fonte. $25–$72, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Carmen Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

A performance of Bizet’s Carmen. From $84, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

New Mexico Jazz Festival Various locations

The Lensic Performing Arts Center, Outpost Performance Space, and Santa Fe Jazz Foundation present the ninth annual New Mexico Jazz Festival, which features concerts and events at indoor and outdoor venues in Santa Fe and Albuquerque. Through July 27, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

July 12 saturday International Folk Art Market Museum Hill

More than 150 select folk artists from more than 50 countries sell their handmade products on Museum Hill. See profile on page 16. $10–$20, through July 13, 9 am–5 pm, 505-992-7600, folkartmarket.org.

Rocky Horror Picture Show Santa Fe Railyard Park Guadalupe and Paseo de Peralta

Outdoor movie screening. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-5483, heathconcerts.org.

Contemporary Southwest Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 S Guadalupe

A class focusing on Southwestern foods. $82, 10 am, 505-983-4688, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Italian Summer Soups & Salads Las Cosas Kitchen Shoppe & Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Join Christine Hickman for an Italian menu inspired by her annual trek to Italy where she runs a cooking school in Perugia. 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Santa Fe Greek Festival Eldorado Hotel and Spa 309 W San Francisco

Experience Greek culture in Santa Fe with food, music, and dancing. See profile on page 5. $3 (kids free), 11 am–9 pm, 505-983-4945, steliasnm.org/greek-festival.

Summer Cooking Class Estrella Del Norte Vineyard

James Meyer—associate curator of modern art at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and professor of art history at Johns Hopkins University—presents a lecture titled Children of the Sixties in conjunction with ART Santa Fe. $10, 6:30 pm, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Zazenkai Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo

Day-long silent meditation retreat. $35 (includes meals), 6 am, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Broadway/Cabaret Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

Music by Kari Simmons and Todd Lowry. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Cathy Faber La Fiesta Lounge at La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Piano/vocals. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar with John Serkin Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen 1512 Pacheco

Slack key guitar music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com.

JAKA Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Five-piece dance band. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Jazz (Off the Plaza) Swiss Bistro & Bakery 401 S Guadalupe

Live music on the patio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-988-1111, swissbakerysantafe.com.

John Carey El Farol 808 Canyon

Blues/Americana. $5, 9 pm–12 am, July 10, 2014

NOW

9


SHAREN BRADFORD

Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe July 11 & July 12: Aspen Santa Fe Ballet performs at the Lensic.

Americana music. Free, 12–3 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Piano/vocals. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Nacha Mendez El Farol 808 Canyon

Latin world music. Free, 7 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Reed Turner Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Americana folk music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Summer Flamenco Series El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–8 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com. 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Poncho Sanchez Santa Fe Sol Stage & Grill 37 Fire Place

505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet presents a program of mixed works, including Square None choreographed by Norbert De la Cruz III, Return to a Strange Land by Jirí Kylián, and The Heart(s)pace by Nicolo Fonte. $25–$72, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

A performance by Poncho Sanchez, presented by Heath Concerts. Sanchez’s music has been called a mix of jazz and soul with Latin American and South American influences. $28, 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Fidelio Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta

July 13 sunday

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Santa Fe Revue Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Psychedelic rock. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com

Stacey Joy Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Live music. Free, 2–5 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Summer Flamenco Series El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–8 pm, 10

santafeanNOW.com

A performance of Beethoven’s Fidelio. From $84, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

Santa Fe Greek Festival Eldorado Hotel and Spa 309 W San Francisco

The Tom Rheam Trio Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

July 14 monday Tacos Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 S Guadalupe

Hands-on taco-making class. $98, 10 am, 505-983-4688, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ 319 S Guadalupe

Experience Greek culture in Santa Fe with food, music, and dancing. See profile on page 5. $3 (kids free), 11 am–9 pm, 505-983-4945, steliasnm.org/greek-festival/.

Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Bonnie Prince Billie Santa Fe Railyard Park Guadalupe and Paseo de Peralta

Piano/vocals. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Boris & The Salt Licks—John Prine Tribute Brunch

Custom crafted cocktails, beer, wine, and late night nosh. Local singer-songwriter Alex Maryol performs

Outdoor concert. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-5483, heathconcerts.org.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Santa Fe Bandstand After Party Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trl


after his Bandstand performance. Free, 8:30–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

July 12 and July 16: Santa Fe Opera performs Beethoven’s Fidelio, illustrated here with a sketch by costume designer Camille Assaf.

Summer Flamenco Series El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–8 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Tiho Dimitrov El Farol 808 Canyon

Girls Night Out El Farol 808 Canyon

Traditional New Mexican Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 S Guadalupe

Motown dinner show. $25, 6:30–7:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Learn how to make traditional New Mexican food. $80, 10 am, 505-983-4688, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol 808 Canyon

Live music. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Piano/vocals. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Summer Flamenco Series El Farol 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–8 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Tango Milonga El Mesón 213 Washington

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

July 16 wednesday Wednesday Night Slide Lecture Series Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia

Julia Galloway presents a slide lecture on her work, which is concurrently open to the public. Free, 7–8:30 pm, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

Live music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Great American Songbook works, plus pop from the 1960s and ’70s. Free, 6:30–9 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

July 15 tuesday

Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com.

Bill Hearne Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Dr

Bob Finnie Vanessie Santa Fe 427 W Water

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Professor Seth Lloyd discusses the practicality of time travel in this installment of the Santa Fe Institute Public Lecture Series. Free, 7:30 pm, 505-476-6429, santafe.edu.

TIME Project Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

International artist Ai Weiwei partnered with Navajo artist Bert Benally to create a site-specific art installation on the Navajo reservation called Pull of the Moon. An opening reception for a viewing of a photogrammetry 3-D modeling video of the Pull of the Moon performance is tonight at MoCNA (5–7 PM) and includes a live sound performance with Robert Henke and Bert Benally. The video will be on view through October 16 at MoCNA, and, beginning July 18, as a fulldome immersive experience on Museum Hill (presented by New Mexico Arts). Also premiering tonight at MoCNA: Bert and Weiwei: TIME 2014, a documentary on the project directed by Daniel Hyde and Blackhorse Lowe, July 16–July 31 and August 21–October 16. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

New Mexican Lunch on the Patio Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Demonstration class on the third-floor patio, featuring New Mexican foods. $75, 11 am–1 pm, 505-983-7445, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

PAGES James Kelly Contemporary 550 S Guadalupe

Solo exhibition of new drawings by James Drake. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-989-1601, jameskelly.com.

Is Time Travel Possible? Testing the “Grandfather Paradox” James A. Little Theater 1060 Cerrillos

If a time traveler killed his grandfather in the past, wouldn’t that prevent his own existence? MIT

Half Broke Horses La Fonda Hotel’s La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

Live music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-982-5511, lafondasantafe.com.

John Kurzweg El Farol 808 Canyon

Live music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Karaoke Night Junction 530 S Guadalupe

Karaoke. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-988-7222, junctionsantafe.com.

Music on the Hill St. John’s College 1160 Camino de Cruz Blanca

One of six free jazz concerts on the college’s athletic field, featuring SuperSax New Mexico. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-6199, sjc.edu.

Fidelio Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Dr

A performance of Beethoven’s Fidelio. From $84, 8:30 pm, 505-986-5900, santafeopera.org.

Ongoing Dawn to Dusk Nedra Matteucci Galleries 1075 Paseo de Peralta

Landscapes by Chris Morel. Free, through July 12, 505-982-4631, matteucci.com.

Down the Rabbit Hole Eggman & Walrus 130 W Palace

July 10, 2014

NOW

11


Installation with Sandra Butler, Jeff Madeen, and Joan Levine Russell, with special guests. Free, through July 12, 505-660-0048, eggmanwalrus.com.

Pottery of the Western Pueblos: Acoma, Laguna, and Zuni Adobe Gallery 221 Canyon

A selection of traditional pottery pieces. Free, through July 12, 505-955-0550, adobegallery.com.

Good to Be Home Joe Wade Fine Art 102 E Water

Paintings by John Oteri. Free, through July 13, 505-988-2727, joewadefineart.com.

Luís Gonzalez Palma Owings Gallery 120 E Marcy

New work by contemporary Latin American photographer Luís Gonzalez Palma. Free, through July 14, 505-983-4215, owingsgallery.com.

Insight Out David Rothermel Contemporary 142 Lincoln, Ste 102

A new body of work by David Rothermel. See preview on page 23. Free, through July 15, 575-642-4981, drcontemporary.com.

Power Objects Tansey Contemporary 652 Canyon

Handblown glass sculptures by Noel Hart. Free, through July 15, 505-995-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.

Movement and Grace Ventana Fine Art 400 Canyon

Paintings by Jean Richardson and sculpture by Rebecca Tobey. Free, through July 16, 800-746-8815, ventanafineart.com.

An Artistic Legacy Rediscovered Matthews Gallery 669 Canyon

Works by American modernist sculptor Hannah Holiday Stewart. Free, through July 18, 505-992-2882, matthewsgallery.com.

Byways: Paintings by Damien Stamer Complications: Works in Glass by Matthew Szösz Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 435 S Guadalupe

Landscapes by Damien Stamer and glassworks by Matthew Szösz. Free, through July 18, 505-982-8111, zanebennettgallery.com.

Elements Art Quilt Exhibit with Poetry La Tienda Exhibit Space in Eldorado 7 Caliente

An exhibit of contemporary mixed-media fiber art. Free, through July 18. Closing reception July 18 from 4–7 pm with poetry reading 6–7 pm, 505-428-0024, theexhibitspace.com.

Hopper Meditations 12

santafeanNOW.com

photo-eye Gallery 541 S Guadalupe

Photo-eye Gallery hosts a grand opening event with an exhibition of works by photographer Richard Tuschman, who is inspired by the painter Edward Hopper. Free, through July 19, 505-988-5150, photoeye.com.

Year of the Horse Blue Rain Gallery 130 Lincoln, Ste C

Work by painter Rimi Yang and glass blower Shelley Muzylowski Allen. Free, through July 19, 505-954-9902, blueraingallery.com.

Ben Steele’s Art Circus Show Giacobbe-Friz Fine Art 702 Canyon

Paintings by Ben Steele. Free, through July 20, 505-986-1156, giacobbefritz.com.

Being True to My Creative Self Pippin Contemporary 200 Canyon

Paintings and Works on Paper Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 554 S Guadalupe

Works by Anne Truitt. See preview on page 23. Free, through July 27, 505-989-9898, charlottejackson.com.

Into the Moonlight Bindle Stick Studio 616 ½ B Canyon

A new series of narrative works by Jeffrey Schweitzer. Free, through July 30, 917-679-8080, jeffreyschweitzer.com.

Magic Square Chalk Farm Gallery 729 Canyon

Paintings by Lukáš Kándl. Free, through July 30, 505-983-7125, chalkfarmgallery.com.

Storyteller Bill Hester Fine Art 621 Canyon

New works by Aleta Pippin. Free, through July 22, 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com.

Bronze sculptures by Bill Unger. See preview on page 22. Free, through July 31, 505-660-5966, billhesterfineart.com.

ruah William Siegel Gallery 540 S Guadalupe

Finished with Fire Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia

Mixed-media work by Judy Tuwaletstiwa. Free, through July 22, 505-820-3300, williamsiegal.com.

The Persistence of Religion Tansey Contemporary 652 Canyon

A group exhibition focused on work that exemplifies the persistent influence of religion or myth on human cultures both ancient and modern. Free, through July 22, 505-995-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.

Heads Up David Richard Gallery 544 S Guadalupe

Sculptures by Judy Chicago. Free, through July 26, 505-983-9555, davidrichardgallery.com.

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date.

14

All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.

Work by Bonnie Lynch and Mary Roehm. Free, through August 2, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

James Surls Wade Wilson Art 217 W Water

Sculptures by James Surls. See preview on page 23. Free, through August 2, 505-660-4393, wadewilsonart.com.

Australian Contemporary Indigenous Art III Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art 702 1/2 Canyon Abstract paintings by contemporary Australian indigenous artists. Free, through August 3, 505-992-0711, chiaroscurosantafe.com.

Martin Cary Horowitz Yares Art Projects 123 Grant

Sculptures by Martin Cary Horowitz. Free, through August 11, yaresartprojects.com.

Forms in Balance Gerald Peters Gallery 1011 Paseo de Peralta

Sculptures by Will Clift. Free, through August 16, 505-954-5700, gpgallery.com.

In the Mood ViVO Contemporary 725 Canyon

Local musicians and artists. Free, through September 2, 505-982-1320, vivocontemporary.com.

Once Upon a Time In America Monroe Gallery of Photography 112 Don Gaspar


of Japan explores cultural, historic, and artistic perspectives of kite making and kite flying. Kite-making workshops and kite flying on the plaza at Museum Hill. $6–$9, through July 27, 505-982-4636, internationalfolkart.org.

MIKE HEARNE

Brandywine Workshop Collection Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Works by Steve Schapiro. Free, through September 21, 505-992-0810, monroegallery.com.

American Cowgirl McLarry Fine Art 225 Canyon

Works by Donna Howell-Sickles. Free, ongoing, 505-988-1161, mclarryfineart.com.

Voice of the West Wiford Gallery 403 Canyon

Oil works by Barry Thomas. Free, ongoing, 505-982-2403, wifordgallery.com.

D. Arthur Wilson Art Gone Wild Galleries 130-D Lincoln

Works by wildlife expressionist artist D. Arthur Wilson. Free, ongoing, 505-820-1004, artgonewildgalleries.com.

High Desert Meditations Meyer East Gallery 225 Canyon

New paintings by David Jonason. Free, ongoing, 505-983-1657, meyereastgallery.com.

Western Regionalism Manitou Galleries 225 Canyon

A show featuring the works of Kim Wiggins and William Haskell. Free, ongoing, 505-986-9833, manitougalleries.com.

Southwestern Allure: The Art of the Santa Fe Art Colony New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

The best of groundbreaking artwork from Santa Fe’s formative artistic years of approximately 1915 to 1940. $6–$9 (kids free), through July 27, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Tako Kichi: Kite Crazy in Japan Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

A collection of works by indigenous artists, donated by The Brandywine Workshop (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), opens to the public. $10 (kids free), through July 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Ongoing: Santa Fe Bandstand concert series

An exhibition of traditional kites from various regions

Shan Goshorn: We Hold These Truths Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Shan Goshorn’s exhibit of contemporary paper baskets, inspired by traditional Cherokee baskets, opens in the museum’s North Gallery. $10 (kids free), through July 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams: The Hawaii Pictures Georgia O’Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson

The first exhibition to feature artwork created in Hawaii by American modernists and friends Georgia O’Keeffe and Ansel Adams. $6–$12 (kids free), through September 14, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

Intimate and International: The Art of Nicolai Fechin Taos Art Museum and Fechin House 227 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos

An exhibit of 25 paintings and 30 drawings by Nicolai Fechin—known for emotive, vivid, and idiosyncratic art—will be exhibited at the late artist’s Taos home and studio. $8, through September 21, 575-758-2960, taosartmuseum.org.

Local Color: Judy Chicago in New Mexico New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace

An exhibition of Judy Chicago’s large-scale projects and smaller-scale personal artworks opens to the public in honor of the artist’s 75th birthday. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through October 12, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln

A collection of nearly 225 photographs and 40 cameras that show how a light-tight box with a tiny hole can help capture amazing photos. $6–$9, through March 2015, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Painting the Divine: Images of Mary in the New World New Mexico History Museum

113 Lincoln

An ecclesiastical wave of urban renewal in the 1960s inspired mission churches throughout the Americas to undergo renovations and, all too often, cast off centuries-old artwork. $6–$9, through March 29, 2015, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture presents its extensive collection of Southwestern turquoise jewelry and educates on the geology, mining, and history of the stone. $6–$9, through May 2016, 505-467-1200, indianartsandculture.org.

Mabel Dodge Luhan & Company: American Moderns and the West The Harwood Museum of Art, 238 Ledoux, Taos Mabel Dodge Luhan (1879–1962) was a Taos icon and a political, social, and cultural visionary who collected modern works relevant to painting, photography, drama, psychology, radical politics, and social reform. $8–$10, through September 2016, 575-758-9826, harwoodmuseum.org.

City Tours

Walking tours of Santa Fe with various companies including Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505-983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), and New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce from local vendors. Free, Saturdays 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

EntreFlamenco The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis

Maria Benitez Cabaret world-class Spanish dance ignites an intimate theater setting in a series of performances by flamenco stars Antonio Granjero and Estefania Ramirez. $25–$45, 8 pm nightly (except Tuesdays), through August 31, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Santa Fe Bandstand Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trl

Annual summer-long music festival on the Plaza in downtown Santa Fe. A full range of diverse music is presented nightly, from Americana and indie to country, jazz, world, New Mexico classics, and more. Free, through August 28, 505-986-6054, santafebandstand.org.

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com. July 10, 2014

NOW

13


ART Santa Fe galleries and artists from around the world converge in Santa Fe July 10–July 13 by Em i ly Va n C le ve

EVENT ORGANIZERS CALL IT “an allencompassing experience.” Indeed, the four-day affair known as ART Santa Fe, which showcases paintings, sculptures, photography, lectures, and cutting-edge art installations from around the world, brings together the most important aspects of modern and contemporary art at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. Thirty-five fine art galleries and individual artists are participating this year, says ART Santa Fe Director Charlotte Jackson, and there are several new events and art forms to look forward to. “In past years, we haven’t had much photography, but this year there’s quite a bit of it in the show,” Jackson notes. “It’s exciting.”

ART Santa Fe showcases paintings, sculptures, photography, lectures, and cutting-edge art installations from around the world. Participating in the 14th annual event are local galleries such as GF Contemporary, Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, Zane Bennett Contemporary Art, and Abbate Fine Art. Bonner David Galleries of Scottsdale, Chicago’s Alibi Fine Art, and Ana Tzarev Gallery from New York City are also among the exhibitors, as are Merkur Gallery from Istanbul, Turkey, and Gallery Edel from Osaka, Japan. Meow Wolf, a Santa Fe art collective that’s produced 11 large-scale installations since its inception in 2008, has been invited to create a special installation for the fair. “We told [Meow Wolf] they can do whatever they want,” Jackson says. “Everything I’ve seen that they’ve done has been interesting, so I’m thrilled they’ll be part of ART Santa Fe this year. Their installation will fit inside a large booth. It’s going to be a surprise for me and for everyone else to see.” The Vernissage, ART Santa Fe’s opening night gala, is July 10. New this year is the VIP lounge, a quiet place with couches and chairs where radio interviews can take place and guests and artists can sit down to chat with each other. Keynote speaker James Meyer, associate curator of modern art at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., presents Children of the Sixties on Saturday, July 12, at 6:30 pm , in St. Francis Auditorium. Meyers’s talk is based on his book Return to the Sixties: On the Meaning of the Sixties in Art and Culture.

Hisahiro Fukasawa, Tranquility No. 22, acrylic and pencil on wood, 60 x 40"

Geodecadent I, a 2010 large-scale art installation by Meow Wolf of Santa Fe 14

santafeanNOW.com

Vernissage: July 10 ($100, 5–8 pm); fair: July 11–July 13 ($10 per day, $125 VIP pass, 11 am–6 pm), Santa Fe Community Convention Center, artsantafe.com.


Rio Grande Gorge Series

Curtain Call, oil on canvas, 48 x 60"

one of the area’s most distinctive features takes center stage in new paintings by Margaretta Caesar b y Em ily V an C le ve

PAINTER MARGARETTA CAESAR frequently drives from her home outside Denver to Santa Fe, often stopping in Taos to spend the night. One of her favorite places to visit in the area is the Rio Grande Gorge. The 50-mile-long geological feature that begins near the Colorado state line and ends southeast of Taos is the sole subject of Caesar’s new show, Rio Grande Gorge Series, at Bill Hester Fine Art on Canyon Road. “Earlier this year I showed Bill two paintings I had done of the Rio Grande Gorge a few years ago and he loved them,” says Caesar, who frequently paints landscapes, animals, and still lifes in bright colors. “He asked me to paint a series of them, much like Monet’s Haystacks series, for my summer show.” Using three different perspectives of

Daytime Drama, oil on canvas, 48 x 60"

the Rio Grande Gorge, Caesar created more than a dozen vibrant oil paintings that show the site at various times of the day under different lighting conditions. Some of the paintings are as large as four feet by five feet, while others are smaller. Each one, however, focuses on a specific mood created by light as it illuminates the land. “I loved the challenge of it,” Caesar says. “I looked at it almost as a homework assignment. It made me really study each painting, think about color, and find the right mood. Every painting has its own character. The focal point of all of them is the drama of the gorge.” Because drama is what the paintings are all about, Caesar decided to give them titles that relate to theater. One is called Intermezzo, another Stage Lighting. Also in the show are Debut and, naturally, Applause. Margaretta Caesar, Rio Grande Gorge Series, July 11–July 31, reception July 11, 5–7 PM, Bill Hester Fine Art, 621 Canyon, billhesterfineart.com July 10, 2014

NOW

15


MARKET EVENTS: A QUICK LOOK The colorful entrance to the International Folk Art Market on the plaza at Museum Hill

International Folk Art Market 150 master artists come from around the world to show their work at the beloved annual event

Thursday, July 10: Artists’ procession at the Railyard (7:30 pm), followed by live music by Las Alegres Ambulancias (8:15 pm) Friday, July 11: Market Opening Party (6:30–9 pm) SOLD OUT Saturday, July 12: Early Bird Market (7:30–9 am) SOLD OUT Saturday, July 12: Saturday Market (9 am–5 pm). Includes Andean flute music, traditional dance from Chile and Indonesian, Nigerian talking drum demonstration, puppet shows from Myanmar, a screening of The Silkies of Madagascar, and more. Sunday, July 13: Sunday Market/Family Day (9 am–5 pm). Includes the Children’s Passport Project, string instrument performance from Madagascar, Nepalese dance, art demonstrations, and book signings.

Arguably one of the most popular and accessible art events in Santa Fe, the International Folk Art Market, now in its 11th year, returns to the plaza on Museum Hill July 11–July 13. The flagship program of the International Folk Art Alliance—and the largest exhibition and sale of folk art by artists in the world—the market brings 150 master artists from 60 countries to Santa Fe, allowing attendees to not only meet the artists in person but to purchase their work in a way that directly benefits them and their communities. The three-day event includes international food, music, dancing, performances, and film presentations each day. To kick things off, on 16

santafeanNOW.com

Thursday, July 10, the artists will make a colorful procession into Railyard Park at 7:30 pm, followed by music by Las Alegres Ambulancias at 8:15 pm. The Market Opening Party, which is sold out, is on Friday night. At press time, tickets were still available for the Saturday and Sunday Markets (9 am–5 pm), although the Saturday Early Bird Market is sold out. The market has hosted more than 700 artists from 87 countries in the last decade. Importantly, the artists take home 90 percent of their own sales, enabling them to educate and feed their families and to build schools, among other things. “With the money I made from the

market I was able to build a house, buy more silk cocoons, pay my children’s school fees, and save money. That’s never happened,” says “Menja” in the David Evans Media documentary film The Silkies of Madagascar, which will be shown Saturday and Sunday at the market. In Madagascar, a weaver might earn $400 annually; in three days at the market, the co-op sold $36,000 of Menja’s work. Between 2004 and 2012, artist earnings exceeded $18.7 million dollars and improved more than one million lives in the artists’ communities. Because of the International Folk Art Market, Santa Fe has been designated a UNESCO City of Folk Art. For more information, visit folkartalliance.org.

BOB SMITH

by Dia nn e St r ombe r g


Anthony Leon the accidental Santa Fean lights up the local music scene by Cri sti na Old s

ANTHONY LEON FOUND HIMSELF stuck in the “land of entrapment” 16 years ago and, like so many before him, wound up staying. “I was 23 and cruising to California to get famous and ran out of money,” Leon says. “I had a friend who had a friend who lived in Santa Fe, and I’ve been here ever since.” And that’s good news for fans of Leon’s rough-around-the-edges folk-pop sound. Naming Uncle Tupelo, Steve Earle, and Social Distortion as possible influences, Leon then quickly dismisses them. “We’re not like those cats; it’s hard to say we sound like anybody in particular. We do songwriter stuff, but kind of punk—we jump around and get crazy.” Leon performs frequently in Santa Fe and Albuquerque, playing either solo/acoustic; with his band, The Chain; or with his girlfriend, Paige Barton of Hot Honey. This month, he and three bandmates—Daniel Jaramillo, Benito Rose Plaza, and David Badstubner—are hitting the road for Colorado, doing “kind of a brewery tour,” where they’ll mostly be camping after their 14 shows in 17 days. Leon’s latest album—still in the works—touches on the themes of travel, homecoming, and maturity. “My three CDs tell an unfolding story with me as the main character,” he says. “The first and second CDs have a lot of sex, drugs, rock and roll, guns, and the West in them, and the third is more meaningful, more about growing up and getting on with life.” When asked by a friend to write a song for the Santa Fe Humane Society and Animal Shelter to help raise awareness of black-colored animals in shelters (the most often overlooked and also the most likely to be euthanized), Leon penned a growly,

GABRIELLA MARKS

Anthony Leon plays around Santa Fe regularly—sometimes with his band The Chain and occasionally on his own.

Anthony Leon

“My three CDs tell an unfolding story with me as the main character,” says Anthony Leon.

swaggering anthem called “Black Dog, Black Cat”—and he isn’t even a dog- or cat-person, he admits. “Santa Fe has been good to me,” Leon says, noting that he plays for international audiences regularly here, since the city draws diverse visitors and residents. But he’s looking to expand his fan base and says that he’s taking that necessary next step in his journey. “For any musician, you got to leave the nest at some point in time.” Anthony Leon and The Chain will be at Sol Santa Fe on July 20 with Supersuckers. For more information, visit anthonyleonandthechain.com.

July 10, 2014

NOW

17


Seen Around photographs by Adrian Wills

KEN ESTRADA

Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.

18

santafeanNOW.com


las campanas

16 W. Avenida Sebastian. 13-foot ceilings, stone and carpeted floors, and beamed ceilings in the Los Santeros subdivision in Las Campanas. 2 bedroom, 2 bath main house plus guest casita & garage. $547,500 MLS #201401025

expect more.

tel: 505.989.774 1 •

www.dresf.com

A Full Service Real Estate Brokerage

Covering Santa Fe in a unique way. aBqJournal.com/subscribe July 10, 2014

NOW

19


art

openings | reviews | artists

20

santafeanNOW.com

On Friday, July 11, it’ll be a gallery event of a slightly different kind, as all 18 of Winterowd Fine Art’s artists will be present to mingle with art enthusiasts at a special reception for Art Spectacular!, an exhibition celebrating the gallery’s 10th anniversary. “It’s been amazing to discover new artists and further their careers,” says gallery owner Karla Winterowd. “It’s also been wonderful to witness the delight of collectors and to know we’re making a significant contribution to their lives. We’re proud to be here at the forefront of modern and contemporary art in Santa Fe.” Art Spectacular!, through July 31, reception July 11, 5–7 pm, Winterowd Fine Art, 701 Canyon, fineartsantafe.com Charlie Burk, Urban Escape, oil on panel, 72 x 48"


opening art receptions

Roger Arvid Anderson: Sailing to Byzantium New Concept Gallery, 610 Canyon newconceptgallery.com July 11–July 28 Reception July 11, 5–7 pm New Concept Gallery presents 2-D and 3-D work by painter, photographer, and sculptor Roger Arvid Anderson. On view are archival rag paper pigment prints created in an elongated vertical format and inspired by Navajo blankets, Oriental carpets, and Peruvian textiles, as well as a selection of bronzes, dubbed Trail Markers, conceived in the tradition of cairns, man-made rock monuments that serve as landmarks and ceremonial structures.—Eve Tolpa

Judy Chicago, The Return of the Butterfly, from A Retrospective in a Box, 2012. Lithograph. Collection of the New Mexico Museum of Art, museum purchase, 2013.

Roger Arvid Anderson, Byzantium, archival rag paper pigment print, 13 x 19"

O N E XH I B IT TH RO U G H OC TO B E R 12 Andrée Hudson, Family of Five, acrylic on canvas, 32 x 50"

Andrée Hudson: Wild for Color Waxlander Art Gallery & Sculpture Garden 622 Canyon waxlander.com Through July 21, reception July 11, 5–8 pm Whether her brushy, expressionistic pieces capture human figures, wildlife, or landscapes, Andrée Hudson employs a bold color palette to build her forms, keeping their internal structures foremost in mind. Along with Hudson’s paintings, Waxlander also unveils a clay pre-casting of the artist’s first bronze—a new direction for Hudson, though not an unexpected one. “I always think about things in 3-D anyway,” she says.—ET

Large-scale projects and small-scale personal works in an impressive array of media by artist, author and educator Judy Chicago. This exhibition focuses on works produced in the last three decades while the artist has been living and working in New Mexico.

107 W. PALACE AVE | ON THE PLAZA IN SANTA FE | 505.476.5072

nmartmuseum.org

July 10, 2014

NOW

21


opening art receptions

Bryce Cameron Liston: Seasons of Beauty Sage Creek Gallery 421 Canyon, sagecreekgallery.com July 11–July 30, reception July 11, 5–7 pm Lacking formal art training, Bryce Cameron Liston learned about painting from, interestingly, a master sculptor. Perhaps it was Edward J. Fraughton’s appreciation of the human form that passed to his oil-painter pupil; Liston’s delicate, almost touchable portraits of people, children, and nudes have a rich, three-dimensional quality. “When I paint, I search for timelessness,” says Liston. “My focus is mostly mood, to impart more atmosphere in the painting. These pieces are softer, more muted.” Liston’s solo show at Sage Creek Gallery includes more than 15 new pieces, including Descending Sun, which features one of his three daughters.—Amy Gross

Javier Lopez Barbosa, Joy & Circumstance, oil and mixed media on canvas, 27 x 20"

Javier Lopez Barbosa and jd Hansen Mark White Fine Art, 414 Canyon, markwhitefineart.com Through August 25, reception July 11, 5–8 pm Self-taught artist Javier Lopez Barbosa works in a mixedmedia technique loosely based on glazing, an oil painting technique that creates a layer of opacity over color. His abstract pieces occasionally feature landscape elements. California-based sculptor jd Hansen’s highly textured figurative bronzes are influenced by music and, she says, aim to “capture the bare essence of a human experiencing the moment she is in at that time.”—ET

Bryce Cameron Liston, Luna, oil on canvas, 16 x 12"

ongoing

Ben Steele: Ben Steele’s Art Circus Show Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art, 702 Canyon giacobbefritz.com Through July 20 Ben Steele uses the language of visual puns to create what can be described as meta-mashup paintings. His process of employing silkscreen and other application techniques results in pieces that are—in the tradition of Warhol, one of his influences—reproducible. In the past Steele has reinterpreted classic works of art; here he turns his eye to the circus and all its components: performers, animals, spectators, and concessions.—ET Ben Steele, Gourd-geous, oil on canvas, 30 x 25"

Kim Wiggins and William Haskell: Western Regionalism Manitou Galleries 123 W Palace, manitougalleries.com Through July 18 Painters Kim Wiggins and William Haskell, renowned for their dramatic and evocative Western landscape paintings, join forces for their latest show. William Haskell, Santa Ana Light (detail), acrylic, 36 x 24" 22

santafeanNOW.com

David Unger: Storyteller Bill Hester Fine Art, 621 Canyon billhesterfineart.com Through July 31 The dynamic, fluid figures David Unger sculpts transcend the seemingly static medium of clay cast in bronze. “I’ve always liked using my hands,” Unger says. “You can feel the energy of what you’re doing. When working with a tool, I don’t feel like I’m imparting what I’m feeling in my body into the piece.” Unger hits his stride portraying two figures interacting, where a head tilt conveys emotion and narrative. The Tucson-based artist exhibits at galleries in Arizona and Maine in addition to Santa Fe’s Bill Hester Fine Art. —Ashley M. Biggers


James Surls Wade Wilson Art 217 W Water, wadewilsonart.com Through August 2 In recent years James Surls has hosted an annual open-studio weekend in Aspen, drawing collectors, curators, and critics nationwide. For 2014, he brings the event to Santa Fe, giving an artist talk and leading both a tour of his public sculptures (in conjunction with Creative Santa Fe) and a discussion panel. A portion of proceeds from exhibition sales benefit select local arts organizations.—ET

ongoing

James Surls, Rough God 4, steel, 67 x 85 x 60"

Anne Truitt, Quick, acrylic on canvas, 22 x 42"

Anne Truitt: Paintings and Works on Paper Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, 544 S Guadalupe, charlottejackson.com Through July 27 This show features rarely seen works from the 1960s through the 1980s by Anne Truitt (1921–2004), who’s known mostly for her wooden sculptures. Born in Baltimore, Maryland, Truitt studied psychology at Bryn Mawr College and treated shell-shocked soldiers in a Boston hospital before she enrolled in Washington, D.C.’s Institute of Contemporary Art in 1948. Her paintings are striking for their deliberate colors and forms, and for the layers of emotions and experiences they evoke or bring to the surface. “Once it had occurred to me that I could use color metaphorically for content,” Truitt said, “I realized that I could go ahead with new freedom.” David Rothermel, Gypsum, acrylic on panel, 48 x 54" David Unger, Tango, bronze, 21 x 14 x 24"

David Rothermel: Insight Out Daivd Rothermel Contemporary 142 Lincoln, Ste 102, drcontemporary.com Through July 15 Part of an ongoing series of work diving deep into mixed theories of abstraction, modernist design, and color-field experimentation, David Rothermel’s new show explores formal painting with deliberate tonality. The pleasing color values dance with contrast, while spatial structures adhere to a trained formalist practice. Careful interplay between layered and diminished brushstrokes within structuralist rigidity leads to compositions that perpetually attract the viewer’s gaze and, Rothermel says playfully, “achieve the breath of abstract art. In and out . . . insight and out.”—B.Y. Cooper July 10, 2014

NOW

23


artist

PROFILE

Shape Shifter David Solomon’s new abstract paintings explore the mutable roles of shapes by Emi ly Van Cle ve

24

santafeanNOW.com

SHAPES IN SANTA FE–BASED ARTIST David Solomon’s abstract paintings shift, change, and often repeat throughout his work. His new show at Patina Gallery, Shape Shifter (the second in Patina’s Drawn to the Wall series), is therefore aptly named. “Shapes change roles,” Solomon says. “I’m inspired by quantum physics, where particles can act in different ways and operate in multiple spaces at one time.” Several shapes that have appeared in Solomon’s work over the years are also present in his most recent paintings, such as a seed shape. Sometimes the seed pod transfers information from one point or shape in the painting to another; at other times it holds information inside itself or even functions as an eye. Another recurring shape, a blackand-white pyramid/triangle, will also appear spontaneously. “Because I work intuitively, I never know what will happen, what shapes I will paint,” Solomon says. The artist paints on aluminum (which imparts luminosity to the finished The Schmoopy Painting, oil work) using specially mixed pigments, and on aluminum panel, 60 x 48" he creates texture by embedding powdered pigments into the paint. “Shapes evolve out of other shapes,” he adds. “Shapes change roles. I’m inspired by “My iconic shapes quantum physics, where particles can act in have evolved over time.” different ways and operate in multiple spaces Normally, Solomon works at one time,” says David Solomon. in medium- and small-size formats, but for this show he stepped outside his comfort zone, expanding to a few 4 x 5-foot paintings. “I’ve had to overcome the urge to paint smaller,” he says. “Part of it has had to do with feeling Wenger-74 Binary Nucleus Comet, oil on aluminum almost miserly about the paint. In my process, panel, 48 x 36" I’m constantly adding and taking away paint. It’s been interesting to use more.” David Solomon, Shape Shifter, July 11–August 24, reception July 11, 5–7:30 pm, Patina Gallery, 131 W Palace, patina-gallery.com


one big bite

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

It’s 10 ounces of beefy, cheesy, green chile-y goodness on a toasted brioche bun—and the most popular item on Santa Fe Bite’s menu, according to owners John and Bonnie Eckre. The Green Chile Cheeseburger is made from natural, locally grown beef (a 90/10 combination of whole boneless chuck and sirloin); the fat, juicy patty slow-cooks to perfection on a cast-iron griddle in no fewer than 13 minutes. Standard toppings include a mild Swiss-American cheese blend and a medium-kick Hatch green chile, but you can dress yours with goodies like grilled onions or guacamole. A daintier 6-ounce version is now on the menu, but the Big Bite (aka Shannon’s Favorite, named after an Eldorado firefighter), remains the popular choice for those whose appetites can only be satisfied by consuming one full, glorious pound of beef.—Amy Gross Santa Fe Bite, santafebite.com

eating+ drinking

July 10, 2014

NOW

25


SHOPPING

[on the market]

IN SANTA FE

From the time of the ancient Anazasi, the Santa Fe area has been a trading center. The Santa Fe Trail is synonymous with the romance of the old west, and from the time of New Mexico statehood in 1912, Santa Fe has been a multicultural art center and shoppers’ paradise. Santa Fe is a top US art center, with museums, shopping, Year-round outdoor activities, top flight restaurants, spas, and world famous cultural events. It’s not just your grandparents’ Santa Fe, it’s walkable, historic, charming, and exciting. A high desert destination of distinction and fun.

SantaFeDowntown.org Free iPhone and Android app The Best of Santa Fe

Find the best shops, restaurants, galleries, museums, parking locations, turn-by-turn directions, mobile deals, weather, news, and local-events with the free app from the iTunes App Store and from the Android Market. Look for the green sticker in the window of participating stores.

green inside and out Off Cerro Gordo Road, within minutes of downtown Santa Fe, this 3,000-square-foot, three-bedroom, two-and-a-half bathroom home was completely remodeled in 2005 utilizing green materials. Natural plaster walls and reclaimed oak wood flooring warm the residence. Special features include a gourmet kitchen with a pantry, a wine cellar, an infrared sauna in the secondary bathroom, a hot tub outside the master bedroom, three custom fireplaces, antique doors, an expansive deck, and a whole-house water filtration system. The lush, one-acre property is landscaped with fruit trees, gardens, and a pond. Stone paths lead to a conservation easement with hiking trails. List price: $1.575 million Sotheby’s International Realty, Emily Garcia, 505-699-6644, emilygarcia.com

DANIEL NADELBACH

Alpine Sports Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery Bahti Indian Arts Barbara Rosen Antique Jewelry Casa Nova Charlotte Jewelry Collected Works Bookstore Cowboys and Indians Santa Fe Cutlery of Santa Fe David Richard Gallery Design Warehouse Designs by Rocki Gorman Doodlet’s Dressman’s Gifts Evoke Contemporary Fairchild & Co Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Golden Dawn Gallery Goler Fine Imported Shoes Gusterman Silversmith Inn on the Alameda Jett Gallery John Rippel U.S.A. Keshi La Fonda Hotel Law Office of Robert Andreotti Lensic Performing Arts Center LewAllen Galleries Lorreen Emporium Lucchese Boot Co Lucille’s Malouf on the Plaza Manitou Gallery Monroe Gallery Museum of Contemporary Native Arts Native Jackets Norma Sharon O’Farrell Hat Company Ojo Optique Origins Plaza Cafe POP Gallery Sante Fe Pueblo Bonito Inn Santa Fe Culinary Academy Santa Fe Dry Goods Santa Fe Espresso Co. Santa Fe Goldworks Santa Fe Indian Trading Co Santa Fe School of Cooking Santa Fe Weaving Gallery Santa Fean Magazine Sock Magic Spirit of the Earth The Golden Eye The Petersom-Cody Gallery The Rainbow Man Things Finer Things Finer Home Tom Taylor Uli’s


style

scalp acupuncture patients with certain neurological concerns are turning to this innovative treatment by Anna Sochocky

BRIAN BLOUNT

in the heart of history Built in the early 1900s, this home is an elegant, 2,632-square-foot adobe on a quiet dead-end lane close to Canyon Road. One of only five houses on the street, it has a secret passage to Arroyo Tenorio. The two-bedroom, twobath home has a library/art studio, four kiva fireplaces, a formal dining room, and an adobe garage, as well as a comfortable guesthouse that’s well-appointed with a kitchenette and full bath. The compact but beautifully landscaped property is graced with magnificent gardens featuring more than 100 plants, flowers, and trees, including a 90-year-old willow tree and a peach tree that in a good year produces 300 peaches. A comprehensive irrigation system helps keep the gardens thriving. List price: $1.364 million Keller Williams, Brian Blount, 505-670-5002, 609millerstreet.com

ANNA SOCHOCKY

[on the market]

PEOPLE WITH ALLERGIES, chronic pain, or the desire to quit smoking often find solace in acupuncture, but what if the brain has been damaged by illness or an accident? Scalp acupuncture combines traditional Chinese techniques with Western knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology, and neurology. Rather than solely relying on Chinese meridian pathways in the body, however, scalp acupuncture connects 17 reflex areas of the cerebral cortex to the head’s surface. Needles inserted near the affected area of the brain are rotated 200 times every 10 minutes, with treatments lasting for at least half an hour. “The brain is elastic, but it needs stimulation,” says Jason Hao, DOM, a graduate of the renowned Heilongjiang Jason Hao, DOM, with University of Chinese patient JJ Dalton Medicine in China. “Eighty to 90 percent of patients see immediate improvement,” he adds. Scalp acupuncture matches the motor, sensory, and cognitive regions of the brain with insertion points in the head, and some patients with neurological conditions are saying that they’re seeing various degrees of improvement with the treatment. The modality has also made a difference in the lives of amputees suffering from phantom pain. In 2006, Hao was invited to the Walter Reed Army Medical Center to treat war veterans and says he achieved permanent results in 84 percent of his cases. Hao operates practices in Santa Fe and Albuquerque, but patients from around the country seek him out for treatment. JJ Dalton, a Los Angeles film producer who has cerebral palsy, says he saw changes in his balance, ability to walk, and use of his right hand after two treatments. “I walk without a limp now,” he says. “My walking is straight and flawless.” National Healthcare Center, 505-986-0542 (Santa Fe), 505-822-9878 (Albuquerque), scalpacupuncture.info. July 10, 2014

NOW

27


| L A S T LO O K |

Stephanie Hatfield has said that she loves feeling the connection with her audience when performing, and her July 1 show at the Santa Fe Bandstand certainly demonstrated that bond. Busting out with an operatic aria for an opener, Hatfield inspired comments like “Wow, goose bumps!” and “Gave me chills!” from her fans. As Hatfield played her eclectic mix of country, rock, and jazz as part of the free summer concert series on the Plaza, tourists and locals alike were sucked into the vortex of her powerful vocals. The classically trained singer/songwriter teaches voice lessons locally and performs regularly on Santa Fe stages with her band, Hot Mess.—Cristina Olds 28

santafeanNOW.com

GABRIELLA MARKS

Stephanie Hatfield


Seasons ds and Gardens of Beauty work by Santa Fe artist

exhibition of new work by Santa Fe artist

YN YATES

BRYCE g Reception CAMERON gust 1st, 5-7pm LISTON th

hrough August 14

Opening Reception Friday, July 11th, 5–7pm

show onlineShow at: to run through July 30th

kgallery.com

See the show online at:

sagecreekgallery.com

y • 14"H x 18"W • Acrylic

Bryce Cameron Liston, Halo, oil on canvas, 18 x 24"

SAGE u CREEK u GALLERY 421 Canyon Road u Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 505.988.3444 u sagecreeksf@aol.com


Jane Filer, Hotel California, acrylic on canvas, 58.5" x 51" David Unger Beloved, bronze billhester@billhesterfineart.com

BillHesterFineArt.com (505) 660-5966

621 C anyon R oad 830 C anyon R oad

Profile for Bella Media Group

Santa Fean NOW July 10 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW July 10 2014 Digital Edition

Santa Fean NOW July 10 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW July 10 2014 Digital Edition

Profile for santafean