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now The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

Celebrate the holiday season, local style! week of December 25 santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH


Gifts of the Holiday New Work from 27 Waxlander Gallery Artists

November 25, 2014 through January 1, 2015 THE ARTISTS Friday, November 28 5 pm - 7 pm and Friday, December 26 5 pm - 7 pm

EXHIBITION DATES RECEPTIONS FOR

Waxlander Gallery celebrating thirty years of excellence

622 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, NM 87501 waxlander.com • 505.984.2202 • 800.342.2202


KATHLEEN WALL

130 Lincoln Avenue, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-982-0055 truewestsf@aol.com


SHOPPING IN SANTA FE

From the time of the ancient Anazasi, the Santa Fe area has been a trading center. The Santa Fe Trail is synonymous with the romance of the old west, and from the time of New Mexico statehood in 1912, Santa Fe has been a multicultural art center and shoppers’ paradise.

Free iPhone and Android app The Best of Santa Fe

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2014

publisher’s note

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Christmastime in Santa Fe is unlike anything anywhere else. The Christmas Eve Farolito Walk on Canyon Road can put even the biggest grinch into the holiday mood. The romance of the night—with the farolitos, luminarias, holiday songs, and brisk air—creates a perfect atmosphere. Many residents and business owners invite revelers inside to warm themselves up and share some holiday cheer. By the time you’ve savored all the merriment, you’re ready to go home and curl up by a fire in anticipation of all the other festivities surrounding Christmas. You see, in Santa Fe, Christmas Day isn’t the end of the celebrating but rather the beginning. Starting on Friday, December 26, several galleries will host exhibition openings and other events, while live music venues will feature a wide array of performers. This activity continues all week and through New Year’s weekend. In the daytime, you can enjoy great outdoor activities. For some of us, the call of the wild has us on skis or snowshoes or lacing up hiking boots as we take advantage of the Santa Fe sunshine and enjoy the beautiful local mountains. It may be winter, but Santa Fe is alive and magical. We at Bella Media hope your holiday season is filled with peace, love, and lots of magic. DAVID ROBIN

Bruce Adams

Publisher

Find the best shops, restaurants, galleries, museums, parking locations, turn-by-turn directions, mobile deals, weather, news, and local-events with the free app from the iTunes App Store and from the Android Market. Look for the green sticker in the window of participating stores.

STEPHEN LANG

SantaFeDowntown.org

Santa Fe is a top US art center, with museums, shopping, Year-round outdoor activities, top flight restaurants, spas, and world famous cultural events. It’s not just your grandparents’ Santa Fe, it’s walkable, historic, charming, and exciting.A high desert destination of distinction and fun.

now

DEC 25 – DEC 31

Santa Feans are getting into the holiday spirit. For more fun, festive photos of goings-on around town, check out Seen Around on page 18.


buzz

Angel Fire is the only resort in New Mexico with night skiing.

courtesy of angel fire resort. inset: courtesy of taos ski valley.

snow time!

Skiers of all levels can take lessons at Taos Ski Valley’s ski school.

The snow’s starting to fly, which means it’s time to buckle your boots, hit the slopes, and take advantage of exciting new developments at two of New Mexico’s most popular ski resorts. In November 2013, hedge fund billionaire (and advanced skier) Louis Moore Bacon purchased Taos Ski Valley (skitaos.org) and immediately announced big changes. A new chairlift was installed on 12,450-foot Kachina Peak, now serving runs previously accessible only by foot and increasing the advanced terrain on the mountain by 50 percent. The newly thinned Wild West Glade opens another 75 acres of double black diamond hike-to tree runs, and new snowmaking equipment helped get the mountain ready for its Thanksgiving Day opening. Plans for the 2015 season include updating the ski rental and ski school areas as well as the construction of 40 new condominium units. Among the improvements this winter at Angel Fire Resort (angelfireresort.com) is a terrain park specifically designed for new skiers and snowboarders called the Railyard. Once newbies are comfortable on the Railyard’s gateway boxes, rails, and jumps, they can head to the Night Rider terrain park in its new location at the front of the mountain (where the best snow is). Night Rider, plus 50 acres of groomed runs, stays open and illuminated until 8 pm on weekends and peak holidays, offering extended hours of fun. Committed to “creating the most dedicated family-first winter destination,” according to marketing director Dan Swanson, Angel Fire has improved its ski school and day care offerings and is providing a variety of lessons, lodging options, and ticket deals.–Cristina Olds

a Santa Fe treasure travels to New York A one-of-a-kind bracelet purchased by Shiprock Santa Fe owner Jed Foutz is part of a new exhibit at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in New York City. The gold cuff, made by celebrated Navajo jeweler Raymond Yazzie in 1983, contains 681 semiprecious stones and is valued at $85,000. It’s one of almost 300 contemporary pieces featured in Glittering World: Navajo Jewelry of the Yazzie Family, which opened November 13 and runs through January 10, 2016. The exhibit showcases the talents of the Gallup, New Mexico–based Yazzie family and explores the important artistic and economic roles jewelry-making has played within the Navajo community. “I’ve traveled between the Navajo reservation and New York City my entire life,” says Foutz, who bought the bracelet from a private collector in January. “Having important Navajo jewelry shown at the Smithsonian in New York and lending a piece from my collection brings my worlds together.” —Emily Van Cleve

Shiprock Santa Fe owner Jed Foutz loaned this cuff bracelet by Raymond Yazzie to the Smithsonian for its exhibit Glittering World: Navajo Jewelry of the Yazzie Family at the National Museum of the American Indian in New York City.

December 25, 2014 NOW

courtesy of SHIPROCK SANTA FE

the

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Welcome to Santa Fe! As a creative, cultural hub, Santa Fe offers an abundance of the world’s best art, attractions, and entertainment opportunities. Santa Fean NOW is an excellent source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local or a tourist visiting for the first time or the 100th, NOW ’s complete listings of everything from gallery openings to live music events will help you make the most of the city. We look forward to seeing you around the City Different. Should you need any extra tips, please stop by our information centers at the Santa Fe Railyard or off the Plaza at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center.

now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR

amy hegarty whitney spivey

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

samantha schwirck

GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

whitney stewart

michelle odom, sybil watson

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Wishing you a wonderful time, Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor

b.y. cooper

ginny stewart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER MARKETING CONSULTANT

david wilkinson

andrea nagler

Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director WRITERS

ashley m. biggers, dorothy e. noe cristina olds, phil parker, emily van cleve A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC

HeatH ConCerts presents

COMING LIVE TO SANTA FE

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com

Copyright 2014. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Fean NOW Volume 1, Number 29, Week of December 25, 2014. Published by Bella Media, LLC, at 215 W San Francisco St, Ste 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2014 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

JAN 27 / Big HeAd Todd & THe MoNsTers / THe LeNsiC

FeB 10 / Todd sNider THe LeNsiC

FEBRUARY 18 / LUCINDA WILLIAMS / thE LENSIC MArCH 3 / THe roBerT CrAy BANd / THe LeNsiC MArCH 16 / MArTiN sexToN / THe LeNsiC For TiCkeTs ANd More CoNCerT iNForMATioN visiT HeATHCoNCerTs.org

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santafeanNOW.com

Mixologist Quinn Stephenson’s Winter Blush cocktail is a popular menu item at Geronimo this time of year. For more on this drink and other Geronimo offerings, see page 17. Photo by Douglas Merriam.


the

buzz

Color Force, Lionsgate

The Hunger Games leaves you hungry The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1, is an insult. It’s pure worthless product and a cynical slap in the face from selfish filmmakers assuming the worst about their audience. Shame on us that this heartless blob is a hit, because we’ve proven them right: It doesn’t have to be good, it just has to exist. We will pay to have our time wasted. Moviegoers are getting used to drawn-out cash grabs. Harry Potter had no problem distilling huge books into good standalone films until the money train neared its end, and then the last book (Deathly Hallows) was split in two. Similarly, the short novel The Hobbit was stretched into three long movies. The important difference here, however, is that the Harry Potter and Hobbit filmmakers are competent professionals. The movies only tell part of the story, but they’re definitely movies. THGMP1 is not a movie. It’s projected onto screens in theaters, but so are commercials. Movies tell a story. Movies have conflict and action. Movies have dialogue, and I truly

Jennifer Lawrence and Liam Hemsworth star in The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part I.

don’t know if the words spoken in THGMP1 count as dialogue. There’s a scene where Katniss Everdeen is trying to get evil President Snow on a videophone line, and she keeps saying “Are you there?” for about a minute. A screenwriter should see this minute as a chance to insert an interesting line or two from the story’s hero to its chief malevolent force. But no. “Are you there? Are you there?” Nothing’s there. The Hunger Games had potential. It’s the stuff of good science fiction: a saga of rich oppressing poor, of children forced to fight and kill and die. This latest installment pretends to be about revolution, but random scenes of fighting feel completely detached from Katniss and her puppet masters who are filming propaganda pieces because . . . why? The truth’s not strong enough? It makes no sense. THGMP1 will endure as a waste. Of time. Of money. Of Jennifer Lawrence and, most sadly, of the late Philip Seymour Hoffman. He deserves better, but do we? This movie is a hit, earning $122 million its first weekend. We are zombies.—Phil Parker December 25, 2014 NOW

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locally crafted Christmas ornaments

Richard Gabriel Jr. 6

santafeanNOW.com

If you’re looking for handcrafted, locally made holiday decorations, two acclaimed artists you should keep an eye out for are Richard Gabriel Jr. and Jil Gurulé. Gabriel creates traditional New Mexican tinworks, such as nichos, picture frames, and candleholders, as well as a variety of ornaments. His stars, crosses, and retablos featuring patron saints and original hand-drawn illustrations are available at The Shop: A Christmas Store (theshopchristmas.com), just off Santa Fe’s Plaza. Jil Gurulé makes clay sculptures depicting Santa Claus, nativity scenes, and Native American imagery, as well as a variety of smaller ornaments, many of which are handpainted. Gurulé has sold her one-of-a-kind red earthenware ornaments—tiny replicas of carolers, saints, and churches —exclusively at The Shop since 1984.—Cristina Olds

STEPHEN LANG

The Shop: A Christmas Store sells ornaments by acclaimed local artists like Richard Gabriel Jr. and Jil Gurulé. The tin items seen in these photos are by Gabriel and the clay works are by Gurulé.


George Ancona

this week

December 31: Celebrate New Year’s Eve with American JeM at La Tienda Performance Space. For details, see page 11.

December 25–December 31

December 25 thursday Celebrate Christmas Day The Old House at Eldorado Hotel & Spa 309 W San Francisco

A scrumptious meal that ends with your choice of pumpkin-spiced crème brûlée or warm sticky toffee pudding. $75, 1–8 pm, 505-995-4530, eldoradohotel.com

Chef Lane Warner’s Christmas Buffet La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Eveything from sweet and spicy deviled eggs to roasted leg of lamb to bourbon pecan pie. $18–$49, 11 am–3 pm, 505-995-2334, lafondasantafe.com.

Christmas Dinner La Casa Sena, 125 E Palace, Ste 20

Chef Patrick Gharrity offers a special prix fixe menu. $70, 4–8:30 pm, 505-988-9232, lacasasena.com.

GLOW Santa Fe Botanical Garden at Museum Hill 715 Camino Lejo

Light displays, hot cocoa, and entertainment. $5–$8 (kids free), 5–8 pm, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Little Leroy & His Pack of Lies

Evangelo’s, 200 W San Francisco

Rock music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-9014.

Sierra La Fonda on the Plaza, La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

December 26 friday

Friday Night Art Walk Canyon Road Arts District, Canyon Road

Galleries up and down Canyon Road stay open late every fourth Friday of the month. Free, 5–7 pm, visitcanyonroad.com.

Last Friday Art Walk Railyard Arts District Santa Fe Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Ten galleries and SITE Santa Fe host receptions and stay open late on the last Friday of each month. Free, 5–7 pm, 505-982-3373, railyardsantafe.com.

Celebrating the Chiles of New and Old Mexico Las Cosas Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Learn to incorporate chiles in tortilla soup, queso fundido, classic chicken mole, arroz verde, and more.

6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Red Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on class focusing on the red chile. $75, 3:30 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Holiday Cheer Winterowd Fine Art, 701 Canyon

Gallery artists show new work in this group exhibition, held in honor of the holiday season. Free, reception 12–4 pm, 505-992-8878, fineartsantafe.com.

Unnamed Weavers of the Trading Post Era Shiprock Santa Fe, 53 Old Santa Fe Trl

Navajo rugs from the turn of the 20th century through the 1950s. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-982-8478, shiprocksantafe.com.

GLOW Santa Fe Botanical Garden at Museum Hill 715 Camino Lejo

Dazzling light displays, hot cocoa, and entertainment. $5–$8 (kids free), 5–8 pm, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Chris Blacker Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Live music from pianist and songwriter Chris Blacker. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com. December 25, 2014 NOW

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emmi whitehorse, Charting the Walk-About V

Connie Long & Fast Patsy The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Country/rockabilly/blues. Free, 7 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

Controlled Burn Tiny’s Restaurant, 1005 St. Francis Rock and blues. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Danny the Harp The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid Guitar, harmonica, and vocals. Free, 5–7 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

DK & The Affordables Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Roots rock plus jump and swing blues. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Eryn Bent Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Indie/folk music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-989-3278, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Happy Hours with Brent Berry Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Live music. Free, 5–7:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto, 211 Old Santa Fe Trl Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Nic Peña Junction, 530 S Guadelupe

Live music. Free, 10 pm–1 am, 505-988-7222, junctionsantafe.com

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Savor La Fonda on the Plaza, La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Latin music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

The Alchemy Party Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Poetics. Free, 9 pm–12 am, skylightsantafe.com.

The Gruve El Farol, 808 Canyon

R&B/pop music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 8

santafeanNOW.com

Create a menu that includes Bloody Marys, poached eggs, buttermilk waffles, and more. 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard, 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Fresh produce and handmade goods from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Holiday Exhibition Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art, 702 ½ Canyon

David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma

Live music by acclaimed pianist David Geist. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Las Cosas Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Recent work from 19 gallery artists. Free, reception 2–5 pm, 505-992-0711, chiaroscurosantafe.com. December 27: Holiday Exhibition at Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art

505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

The Shiners Club The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Jazz music. Free, 4:30–7:30 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Swing Soleil Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta Live music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-989-3278, secondstreetbrewery.com.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón, 213 Washington

Jazz piano trio with special guest. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

GLOW Santa Fe Botanical Garden at Museum Hill 715 Camino Lejo

Dazzling light displays, hot cocoa, and entertainment. $5–$8 (kids free), 5–8 pm, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

JoyceGroup Santa Fe Santa Fe Public Library, 145 Washington Pick Room, Second Floor

Lovers of James Joyce’s work discuss Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. Led by Adam Harvey, creator of the one-man show Don’t Panic: It’s Only Finnegans Wake. Enthusiasts with all levels of knowledge are welcome. Free, 10 am–12:30 pm, joycegeek.com.

Alchemy 2.0 Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Music from DJs. Free, 8 pm, skylightsantafe.com.

TGIF Concerts First Presbyterian Church, 208 Grant

A time of music and reflection. Free, 5:30–6 pm, 505-982-8544, fpcsantafe.org.

December 27 saturday El Museo Winter Market El Museo Cultural, 555 Camino de la Familia

An indoor market featuring art, textiles, jewelry, books, and more. Free, 8 am–5 pm, 505-992-0591, elmuseocultural.org.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Plaza, at the water tower 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Painting, pottery, jewelry, photography, and more by local artists. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-310-1555, santafeartistsmarket.com.

Burritos Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on burrito-making class. $98, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Fabulous New Year’s Brunch

Asher Barreras Quartet El Mesón, 213 Washington

Latin and classic jazz music. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Bill Hearne Trio Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Country music. Free, 2–5 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Chris Blacker Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Live music from pianist and songwriter Chris Blacker. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

E. Christina Herr & Wild Frontier Second Street Brewery at Second Street 1814 Second St Live music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-989-3030, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Edmund Gorman and Friends Duel Brewing, 1228 Parkway Dr Country/rock music. Free, 7–10 pm,


505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dancers and musicians perform. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Tiho Dimitrov El Farol, 808 Canyon

Rock and blues music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Trash Disco Blue Rooster, 101 W Marcy

Hawaiian Slack-Key Guitar Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen 1512 Pacheco

With resident DJ Oona. $5, 9 pm, 505-206-2318, blueroosterbar.com.

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant, 113 Washington

Live music. $10, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Slack-key guitar music by John Serkin. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-795-7383, sweetwatersf.com.

Live guitar music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

Julie Trujillo and David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma

Vanilla Pop The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Endings + Beginnings The Lodge at Santa Fe, 750 N St. Francis

Live music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Pop and jazz a capella works performed by the eight-member ensemble VOASIS. $35–$100, 4 pm and 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

Little Leroy & His Pack of Lies Tiny’s Restaurant, 1005 St. Francis

Holiday Family Cabaret Wise Fool New Mexico, 2778 Agua Fria, Ste D

Rock music. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae Inn and Spa at Loretto, 211 Old Santa Fe Trl Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 8–11 pm, 800-727-5531, innatloretto.com.

MVIII Unplugged Second Street Brewery at the Railyard 1607 Paseo de Peralta Jazz music. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-989-3278, secondstreetbrewery.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Savor La Fonda on the Plaza, La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Latin music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Sean Healen Band Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Americana/rock music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

The Dandelion Liberation Front The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid Bluegrass music. Free, 3–6 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

The Ninjahs The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Live music. Free, 4:30–7:30 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

The Shiners Club The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Jazz music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

A family-friendly cabaret with circus and puppetry acts. $15 (discounts for kids), 2 pm, 4 pm, 6 pm, and 7:30 pm, 505-992-2588, wisefoolnewmexico.org.

The Dream Train Armory for the Arts, 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Life Drawing Series Duel Brewing, 1228 Parkway Dr

Draw from a live model while enjoying beer and waffles. $22, 11 am–1 pm, 505-474-5301, duelbrewing.com.

Railyard Artisan Market Santa Fe Railyard Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta

Local artisans and demonstrations. Free, 10 am–4 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Contemporary Southwest Light Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on class focused on contemporary, health-conscious Southwestern fare. $80, 11 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Broomdust Gospel Quartet Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Live music. Free, 12–3 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Daniel Murphy Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Folk/rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

A “theater adventure” by Clan Tynker Family Circus that includes spectacular sights and circus acts. $10–$12 (kids 3 and younger free), 2 pm and 7 pm, 505-660-5347, clantynker.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

December 28 sunday

Flamenco Dinner Show El Farol, 808 Canyon

Embodydance Santa Fe Railyard Performing Arts Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Nacha Mendez and Co. El Farol, 808 Canyon

Ecstatic dance event. $12, 3–5 pm, embodydancesantafe.org.

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Flamenco dancers and musicians perform during dinner. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Latin world music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Sunday Funday Blue Rooster, 101 W Marcy

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.

A brunch bar and drink specials. $5–$10, all day, 505-206-2318, blueroosterbar.com.

Endings + Beginnings The Lodge at Santa Fe, 750 N St. Francis

Pop and jazz a capella works performed by the eight-member ensemble VOASIS. $35–$75, 4 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

Music for the Royal Fireworks St. Francis Auditorium New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace

The Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra performs music by baroque composers. Featuring violinist Càrmelo de los Santos. $20–$65, 3 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Silent Night Loretto Chapel, 207 Old Santa Fe Trl

A Christmas concert by the sacred music ensemble Schola Cantorum featuring Gregorian chants, December 25, 2014 NOW

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Renaissance polyphony, and a cappella arrangements of familiar carols. $15–$20, 6:30 pm, 505-474-2815, schola-sf.org.

505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Bittersweet Highway Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

The Dream Train Armory for the Arts, 1050 Old Pecos Trl

December 29 monday Native American I Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe Lois Ellen Frank, a James Beard Award–winning author and PhD in culinary culture, presents a demonstration class focusing on Native American food and culture. $85, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

2015: Guidance for the New Year Santa Fe Center for Spiritual Living 505 Camino de los Marquez

Throwing of the bones ceremony, led by JoAnne Dodgson, offering guidance with relationships, health, work, life transitions, and more. $20, 2–4 pm, 505-216-8148, pathwaysforhealing.net.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda on the Plaza, La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Chris Blacker Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Live music from pianist and songwriter Chris Blacker. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Hillary Smith and Company El Farol, 808 Canyon

Jazzy blues, gospel-inflected R & B, and soul. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Robert Mirabal Show El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Santa Fe Swing Old Fellows Lodge, 1125 Cerrillos

A dance lesson followed by a group dance. $8 (lesson and dance), $3 (dance only), 7 pm (lesson), 8 pm (dance), santafeswing.com. 10

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Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol, 808 Canyon

Courtesy of Santa Fe Desert Chorale

A “theater adventure” by Clan Tynker Family Circus that includes spectacular sights and circus acts. $10–$12 (kids 3 and younger free), 2 pm, 505-660-5347, clantynker.com.

Progressive folk music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Live blues music. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Chris Blacker Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Live music from pianist and songwriter Chris Blacker. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com. December 27–31: Endings + Beginnings

Endings + Beginnings The Lodge at Santa Fe, 750 N St. Francis

Pop and jazz a capella works performed by the eight-member ensemble VOASIS. $40–$100, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

Music for the Royal Fireworks St. Francis Auditorium New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace

The Santa Fe Pro Musica Orchestra performs a concert of music by baroque composers. Featuring violinist Càrmelo de los Santos. $20–$65, 6 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

December 30 tuesday Cooking Inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe Discover and explore some of Georgia O’Keeffe’s ideas about food and cooking. $85, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Sabor Santa Fe Las Cosas Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

A cooking class that utilizes ingredients associated with New Mexico. 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Metta Refuge Council Upaya Zen Center, 1404 Cerro Gordo

An opportunity for people who are struggling with loss in a variety of forms to share life experiences in a setting of compassion and confidentiality. Free, 9:45 am–12:05 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Argentine Tango Milonga El Mesón, 213 Washington

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Bill Hearne Trio La Fonda on the Plaza, La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm,

Dana Smith Upper Crust Pizza, 329 Old Santa Fe Trl Country-tinged folk music. Free, 6–9 pm, 505-982-0000, uppercrustpizza.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Popular piano music by Juilliard-trained pianist. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

Les Gens Bruyants Evangelo’s, 200 W San Francisco Live Cajun music and free jambalaya. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9014.

Open Mic Tiny’s Restaurant, 1005 St. Francis

Hosted by Randy Mulkey. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Robert Mirabal Show El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

SF Business Mixer The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

A mixer with a happy-hour buffet. Free, 4:30–6:30 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Timbo Jam The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

Jam session. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com.

Turn Up on Tuesdays Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Party tunes. Free, 8 pm, skylightsantafe.com.

Endings + Beginnings The Lodge at Santa Fe, 750 N St. Francis

Pop and jazz a capella works performed by the eight-member ensemble VOASIS. $40–$100, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

December 31 wednesday Happy New Year’s Eve Andiamo!, 322 Garfield


Tiny’s Restaurant, 1005 St. Francis

Country/R&B music. Free, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9817, tinyssantafe.com.

Courtesy of Broomdust Caravan

New Year’s Eve Party Junction, 530 S Guadelupe

Ring in 2015 with a DJ-fueled party. Free, 10 pm–1 am, 505-988-7222, junctionsantafe.com

New Year’s Eve Party The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 Hwy 14, Madrid

A special dinner menu, live music, and dancing. Free, 7 pm–1 am, 505-473-0743, themineshafttavern.com. December 31: Broomdust Caravan at Cowgirl BBQ

Pleasure Pilots La Fonda on the Plaza, La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco

The neighborhood trattoria offers a special three-course menu. $56, from 5 pm, 505-995-9595, andiamosantafe.com

Blues music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Say Farewell to 2014 The Old House at Eldorado Hotel & Spa 309 W San Francisco

Speakeasy Ball with The Shiners Club The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

End the year with a meal to remember. $85, 505-995-4530, eldoradohotel.com

Tamales Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Hands-on cooking class centered on tamales. $98, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Wine Down Wednesday Inn and Spa at Loretto, 211 Old Santa Fe Trl

Tasting flights featuring four different wines, plus a mini tableside wine-101 session with Mark Johnson, Santa Fe’s leading sommelier. $12, 5:30–7:30 pm, 800–727-5531, innatloretto.com.

Broomdust Caravan New Year’s Eve Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Live music. Free, 8 pm–12 am, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Celebrate New Year’s Eve La Tienda Performance Space 7 Caliente, Eldorado

Three-course dinner, champagne, and music and dancing with American JeM. $60, 7 pm–12 am, 505-670-8604, americanjem.com.

J. Q. Whitcomb Quartet El Mesón, 213 Washington

Classic and contemporary jazz quartet with J. Q. Whitcomb on trumpet. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

New Year’s Eve The Lodge at Santa Fe, 744 Calle Mejia

Celebrate with a buffet, cocktails, and live entertainment. $25–$30, 6:30 pm, 505-992-5800, lodgeatsantafe.com.

New Year’s Eve Gala Vanessie Santa Fe, 427 W Water

Four-course dinner, champagne toast, and live music with Chris Blacker and Doug Montgomery. $150, 6 pm–1 am, 505-984-1193, vanessiesantafe.com.

New Year’s Eve with Dusk

Live music. $25 per person, $35 per couple, 9 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Tone & Company New Year’s Eve Bash El Farol, 808 Canyon Rock music. $25, 9 pm–1 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Endings + Beginnings The Lodge at Santa Fe, 750 N St. Francis

Pop and jazz a capella works performed by the eight-member ensemble VOASIS. $50–$100, 8 pm, 505-988-2282, desertchorale.org.

New Year’s Eve Concerts The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

The Performance Santa Fe Orchestra, conducted by Joseph Illick, performs Beethoven’s Symphony No. 1; Bruch’s Violin Concerto featuring Vadim Gluzman; and works by Handel and Lehár featuring soprano Ava Pine. $10–$25, 2 pm and 5 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Ongoing The Art in Wax Gallery 901, 901 Canyon

A national juried encaustic small works exhibition featuring wax art. Free, through December 30, 505-780-8390, gallery901.org.

Gems and Jewels Worrell Gallery 103 Washington

through December 31, 505-819-1103, marilynangelwynn.com.

My Favorite Things Santa Fe Art Collector 217 Galisteo

Oil paintings by Mikki Senkarik. Free, through December 31, 505-988-5545, santafeartcollector.com.

Reflect the World through the Mirror of Metaphor The Longworth Gallery, 530 Canyon

Works by Russian-born artist Vladimir Kush. Free, through December 31, 505-989-4210, thelongworthgallery.com.

Annual Small Works Holiday Group Show Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art, 702 Canyon

Twenty-five new small works by 11 contemporary artists. Free, through December 31, 505-986-1156, giacobbefritz.com.

Gifts of the Holiday Waxlander Gallery, 622 Canyon

Artists Phyllis Kapp, Marshall Noice, Andree Hudson, Matthew Higginbotham, Dominique Boisjoli, and first-time participant Javier López Barbosa contribute works to Waxlander’s popular annual group exhibition. Free, through January 1, 505-984-2202, waxlander.com.

Holy Adobes: The Churches of New Mexico William R. Talbot Fine Art, Antique Maps & Prints 129 W San Francisco, Second Floor

Historic and contemporary artworks depicting churches of New Mexico. Free, through January 16, 505-982-1559, williamtalbot.com.

Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw Golden Dawn Gallery, 201 Galisteo

Paintings by acclaimed Native American artists (and family members) Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Margarete Bagshaw. Free, ongoing, 505-988-2024, goldendawngallery.com.

LEVEL/LAND Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Works by Courtney M. Leonard (Shinnecock Nation) that question our relationship to cultural landscape and sustainable continuity. Free, through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Rattlebone Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

First annual small-works holiday exhibit. Free, through December 31, 505-989-4900, worrellgallery.com.

An exhibition of paintings and related works by Spokane artist Ric Gendron. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Ghost Dance: Spirits & Angels American Indian Photography & Art Studio 1036 Canyon

Saligaaw (it is loud-voiced) Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

A photography show that gives the illusion of haunting encounters at historical locations. Free,

Alaskan artist Da-ka-xeen Mehner celebrates the lasting and profound relationship between the Tlingit December 25, 2014 NOW 11


language and song. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

well as his contribution to modern art. $6–$12 (kids free), 10 am–5 pm, through January 18, 505-9461000, okeeffemuseum.org.

The Desert Never Left “The City” Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Spotlight on Gustave Baumann New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace

Mario Martinez’s artwork pays reverence to nature through the influences derived from his deeply rooted Yaqui cultural background and commitment to Western modernism. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through December 31, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Brasil & Arte Popular Museum of International Folk Art, Cotsen Gallery, 706 Camino Lejo

More than 350 pieces from the museum’s rich Brazilian collection are on display, from graphic woodblock prints to toys and religious art. Covers the culture of Brazil’s original indigenous inhabitants, Portuguese colonists, and enslaved Africans brought to Brazil by Europeans. $6–$9, through January 4, 2015, 505-476-1200, internationalfolkart.org.

Harvesting Traditions Pablita Velarde Museum of Indian Women in the Arts, 213 Cathedral

A solo exhibition of work by Kathleen Wall. $10 (discounts for seniors, students, and military), $5 for New Mexico residents, through January 4, 2015, 505-988-8900, pvmiwa.org.

Native American Portraits: Points of Inquiry Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo

Works by Gustave Baumann (1881–1971), who’s widely known for his woodblock prints depicting Southwestern landscapes and traditions. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through February 1, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Toys and Games: A New Mexico Childhood New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln

A celebration of childhood on the western frontier, this exhibition includes a selection of late-19thcentury metal toys from the New Mexico History Museum’s collection. Items include a German windup bear, a French bicycle rider, terra cotta dolls, and a china doll that once belonged to legendary curator and conservator E. Boyd. $6–$9, through February 1, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Wooden Menagerie: Made in New Mexico Museum of International Folk Art, Hispanic Heritage Wing, 706 Camino Lejo

This exhibition celebrates the rich Hispano folk tradition of animal wood carving in New Mexico. $6–$9, through February 15, 505-476-1200, internationalfolkart.org.

New Mexico Art Tells New Mexico History New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace

showcase New Mexico’s history and cultural traditions from pre-Conquest to the present day. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through February 22, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Alcove Shows 1917–1927 New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace

Works by 24 artists in the museum’s permanent collection. $6–$9, 10 am–5 pm, through February 23, 505-476-5072, nmartmuseum.org.

Georgia O’Keeffe: Ghost Ranch Views Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, 217 Johnson

See profile on page 26. $6–$12 (kids free), 10 am–5 pm, through March 22, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

City Tours

Walking tours of Santa Fe with various companies, including Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), and New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.

Paintings, prints, sculptures, and photographs that

More than 50 images from the Palace of the Governors’ photo archives—along with contemporary images by Native photographers—that document the changing perceptions of Native peoples over a span of almost 100 years. $6–$9, through January 5, 505-467-1200, indianartsandculture.org.

Spiral Lands, Chapter 2, 2008 Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

A slide and sound installation by Andrea Geyer in collaboration with SITE Santa Fe as part of SITElines: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas. $10 (discounts for students, members, and New Mexico residents), through January 11, 888-922-IAIA, iaia.edu.

Unsettled Landscapes SITE Santa Fe, 1606 Paseo de Peralta

A selection of works by 45 artists and artist collaboratives from 16 countries are on display in the inaugural edition of SITElines, SITE Santa Fe’s new biennial exhibition series, which focuses on contemporary art from the Americas. $5–$10, through January 11, 505-989-1199, sitesantafe.org.

Drawing a Composition Line Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, 217 Johnson

An exhibition of artwork by Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias (1904–1957), who’s best known for his caricatures of famous figures that appeared in magazines in the 1920s and ’30s. This exhibit reveals Covarrubias’s influential role in a global network of modernists, which included Georgia O’Keeffe, as 12

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holiday fare at the Santa Fe Farmers Market

Gabriella Marks

Throughout the month of December, the vendors at the popular Santa Fe Farmers Market in the Railyard are selling special holiday items alongside the usual local produce and handcrafted goods. Lavender sachets, molded beeswax candles, ornaments, candies, and more make for great locally sourced gifts, and they’ll remain on sale even after Christmas has passed. For more information, visit santafefarmersmarket.com.—Cristina Olds

December 25, 2014 NOW 13


COURTESY OF Ski santa fe

ski and snowboard rentals

by Cri sti na Old s

four local shops with gear to meet your every need Renting ski and snowboard gear has distinct advantages over buying, especially for novices in either sport, experienced skiers who want to try out new (or different) high-end equipment, and travelers who don’t want to lug cumbersome baggage. Rental gear is tuned regularly and maintained professionally, allowing for optimum performance, and a handful of local shops offer rental packages (skis, boots, and poles, or a snowboard and boots) that will make your trip up the mountain that much simpler. Plus, you can consult with on-staff experts about the equipment and about nearby trails and snow conditions. Skis up! Alpine Sports For more than 50 years, Alpine Sports has offered rentals and support services, such as ski tuning and boot fitting. In addition to alpine skis, you can rent snowshoes and cross-country items, with discounted rates for groups of 15 or more. If you’re interested in a new pair of skis, take the demo-package rentals for a test run before buying. 121 Sandoval, 505-983-5155, alpinesports-santafe.com Cottam’s Ski Shop This family-owned business is headquartered at Taos Ski Valley, but for more than 15 years it’s operated a satellite location on Hyde Park Road, halfway between downtown Santa Fe and Ski Santa Fe. Cottam’s rents three kinds of skis—basic, performance, and demo—and the shop is the only local option for renting ski blades (twin-tip skis about half the length of regular skis, for an experience that combines aspects of skiing, snowboarding, and skating). Make online rental reservations and save 10 percent off all regular prices. 740 Hyde Park Rd, 505-982-0495, cottamsskishops.com 14

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Ski Santa Fe Thanks to its multipurpose La Casa Lodge, Ski Santa Fe offers the convenience of renting and storing your gear on-site. Operating under its current ownership since 1984, the lodge underwent a major renovation and expansion in 2012, which gave its rental shop room to stock 1,000 sets of skis and 600 snowboards. Rent from here, and you can score a package deal that includes great rates on lessons and lift tickets. 1477 New Mexico 475, 505-982-4429, skisantafe.com Ski Tech Ski Tech is the only area shop that offers “ski butler” service. Chip Storm and Lynsey PompeiStorm, who’ve owned and operated the 34-yearold business since 2004, deliver snowboards, skis, boots, poles, helmets, jackets, and snow pants to their clients’ residences or hotel rooms. “We bring different boot options, and I can make adjustments to bindings on-site,” Storm says. “Our clients never have to set a foot inside a ski shop.” 905 S St. Francis, 505-983-5512, skitechsantafe.com Above: The recently remodeled rental shop at Ski Santa Fe

winter fun at Ski Santa Fe Once you’ve got your ski and snowboard equipment sorted out, head to Ski Santa Fe for some memorable winter fun. Below are several ways you can take advantage of the adventure-filled spot, located just 16 miles from downtown Santa Fe. For more information, visit skisantafe.com.

Events

Beats on the Basin January 10 & 24; February 7 & 21; March 7 & 21; 12–3 pm Mid-mountain Totemoff’s Bar and Grill offers live music for its diners every other Saturday. Tessa Horan Ascension Race March 21, 5 pm In this endurance event, held in honor of a former ski patroller who died at age 24, skiers and snowboarders hike up the mountain and descend via a modified giant slalom course Costumes are encouraged. Gladfelter Memorial Bump Contest March 28, 10 am–3 pm Skiers and snowboarders of all ages compete for prizes in a timed mogul race held on the Slalom Slope.

Contest

Post photos of your Ski Santa Fe experience on Instagram with the hashtag #skibueno for a chance to win a 2015–16 season pass and entry into weekly drawings.


Sipapu and Pajarito ski areas team up Two of New Mexico’s smaller-scale ski areas recently joined forces. For the first time, Sipapu Ski and Summer Resort’s management company (along with Los Alamos County) is operating the Pajarito Mountain Ski Area, located five miles west of Los Alamos and less than an hour’s drive from Santa Fe. One of the big plans for Pajarito—which has six lifts, 40 trails, and a peak elevation of 10,440 feet—is to crank up the snowmaking so the resort can be open daily rather than just Friday through Sunday, as it has been in the past. This plan draws on Sipapu’s reputation (built during the last 11 seasons and largely driven by its snowmaking capabilities) as the first New Mexico resort to open for the winter and the last to close in the spring. “Our vision is simple: to offer a consistent ski and snowboard season and make it affordable for everyone,” says James Coleman, Sipapu’s comanaging partner. In this spirit, Sipapu and Pajarito, which have fun-filled events, ski lessons, equipment rentals, dining options, and more, are offering a new Power Pass that allows for unlimited skiing at both resorts and free tickets at 20 other U.S. ski areas. For more information, visit skipajarito.com or sipapunm.com.—CO

JEFF HYLOK

Here and inset: Pajarito Mountain Ski Area

December 25, 2014 NOW 15


eating+ drinking

wine tasting at Susan’s

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Cheese aficionados, rejoice! There’s a new queso grande in town, and he really knows his stuff. John Isaac Gutierrez, of the just-opened Cheesemongers of Santa Fe, recently moved here from the Bay Area and brought with him a wealth of knowledge and a love of all things fromage. His spankin’ new cheese and gourmet goodies shop ups the ante for specialty food stores in our foodie-frenzied town; Gutierrez notes that more than 80 percent of his inventory has never been available in New Mexico until now. Customers can enjoy everything from the requisite ParmigianoReggiano and Cheddar cheeses to the huge selection of exotics, which includes treats such as seasonal Vacherin Mont d’Or from Switzerland enrobed in spruce bark. A selection of locally baked breads, crackers, pickles, vinegars, chutneys, mustards, mostardas, and cured meats (there’s jamón serrano on the leg) as well as an antipasto bar round out the offerings in the sunny showroom. Classes, tastings, gift baskets, and top-notch customer service will make Cheesemongers of Santa Fe a one-stop shop for all the gourmands on your gift list as well as for the kind of party planning that will take your cheese board to another luscious level, any way you slice it. —John Vollertsen Cheesemongers of Santa Fe, 130 E Marcy, cheesemongersofsantafe.com On December 16, visitors came in from the cold for a tasting at Susan’s Fine Wine and Spirits, led by Raphael Krueger (near left) of Santa Fe–based Fiasco Fine Wine. Susan’s boasts an extensive collection of more than 1,200 varieties of wine. With an equally impressive assortment of beers and spirits, it’s no wonder guests linger in the shop’s new bar area.—Cristina Olds Susan’s Fine Wine and Spirits, 1005 S St. Francis, #105, 505-984-1582, sfwineandspirits.com

GABRIELLA MAKS

douglas merriam

big cheese


Geronimo

douglas merriam

Known for his creative New Mexican and international cooking style, Geronimo’s executive chef and co-owner, Eric DiStefano, favors organic ingredients, like the lamb in his slowbraised lamb shank entrée (pictured here), which is particularly popular this time of year. DiStefano sears the hearty shank after rubbing it with a blend of peppercorn, cumin, thyme, star anise, cayenne, clove, and ginger and then braises it in a tomato paste and red wine sauce. “Because of all the bones [in the cut of meat], the au jus [portion] has a lot of gelatin in it, so no flour is added,” DiStefano notes. In lieu of a traditional rice-based risotto to accompany the lamb, DiStefano uses organic farro, an ancient Italian wheat grain. “Farro is like barley, with the chewy consistency of brown rice,” the chef says. “It’s really healthy and has a low gluten content.” Gremolata, made with mint, lemon zest, parsley, and carroway seeds, is a classic finish to the dish. “This is a hearty [meal] that sticks to the ribs,” DiStefano says. “It’s got a lot of nice meat on it. It’s a sublime dish.” Another popular item this time of year is the Winter’s Blush cocktail (see inset). Quinn Stephenson, master mixologist for Geronimo, Coyote Café, and The Den (all establishments he partially owns), says he created this drink for Geronimo’s seasonal cocktail list because of its “winter flavors, and because it’s really pretty.” Stephenson first pours a bit of blood orange puree into a champagne flute and then adds organic apricot juice, Gruet sparkling wine, and a simple syrup made from a reduction of sugar and a traditional Chinese five-spice blend. “As you sip the cocktail, you get the effervescence of the champagne with some acidity, then the spices and sweetness come across, and finally the fruit finishes it with the tart blood orange,” Stephenson says. “The layers of complexity hit different parts of the palate as it’s sipped.”—Cristina Olds Geronimo, 724 Canyon, geronimorestaurant.com

eating+ drinking

December 25, 2014 NOW 17


Seen Around photographs by Stephen Lang

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Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.


on the eastside entertainer’s delight

1130 PIEDRA RONDO. A gated and paved driveway leads into a large motor court with native plants, pines, and aspens. Encompassing the court is a three bedroom, three bath main house, separate guest house and three-car garage. Features include five fireplaces, coved vigas, high ceilings, French doors, a large portal and Jemez Mountain views. This is THE perfect home for entertaining! MLS #201401651 $1,790,000

expect more.

tel: 505.989.774 1 •

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A Full Service Real Estate Brokerage

AID + Comfort

LISA LAW, MICHELLE ODOM

Southwest CARE Center’s 26th annual gala fundraising event

December 25, 2014 NOW 19


Opening Night photographs by Stephen Lang

As one of the largest art markets in the country, Santa Fe is always hosting openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was recently out and about at a number of opening-night receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we hung out with.

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art

openings | reviews | artists

Third-generation Taoseño Tom Noble’s remembered vision of the world in which he grew up is on view in New Views, Old Villages, a solo exhibition featuring more than two-dozen new paintings, including 10 miniatures. Although the artist’s subject matter has altered little over the years, his paintings continue to be cherished for their depiction of the region’s cultural roots, which reach deeply into a timeless, rural way of life. As his work reveals, it was a life intimately connected with land, family, and religion.—Gussie Fauntleroy Tom Noble: New Views, Old Villages Ventana Fine Art, 400 Canyon, ventanafineart.com Through December 31

Tom Noble, Taos Moon, watercolor on acid-free rag paper, 18 x 18" December 25, 2014 NOW 21


by Ash le y M. Big ge rs

season’s greetings

holiday cards by Gustave Baumann and friends are on view at the New Mexico Histor y Museum

Today homemade Christmas cards seem like a relic of a bygone era. And yet, while the holiday cards in a current exhibition at the New Mexico History Museum are indeed historical, they also provide fresh insight into one of Santa Fe’s best-known 20th-century artists, Gustave Baumann (1881–1971), and a number of his contemporaries. Gustave Baumann and Friends: Artist Cards from Holidays Past showcases 100 cards, some of which Baumann, a noted printmaker, created himself, and some of which were sent to him by the likes of Will Shuster, B. J. O. Nordfeldt, and Ernest Blumenschein. In this homey medium, the artists, unbeholden to any demands and expectations of collectors or gallery owners, expressed themselves freely, commenting on Christmas, their families (in a rather non-idealized way), and contemporary affairs. The cards span from 1919 to 1970, touching upon the Great Depression, World War II, and the launch of Sputnik. In one of

Left: A linoleum-cut Christmas card by Harold West, 1940. Below: An undated (ca. 1950s) color woodcut by Theodore Van Soelen.

Above: A woodcut Christmas card printed on Chinese paper by Gustave Baumann, 1924. Right: A 1936 holiday card by Will Shuster made via photo-engraving from an original drawing. A 1950s holiday card by Cyrus Leroy Baldridge made via offset lithography from an ink drawing. 22

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ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM COLLECTION

art

PROFILE


ongoing Anthony Ryder, JunGirl, oil on linen, 8 x 8"

Left: The inside of a 1934/35 two-color woodcut Christmas card by Gustave Baumann.

them, the printmaker Chuzo Tamotsu observes that “The little ones are enjoying life peacefully. What’s wrong with the grown ups?” “This is not high art, but there are some beautifully rendered pieces,” says Tom Leech, director of the Palace Press, which collaborated on the exhibit with guest curator and antiquarian book dealer Jean Moss. Baumann’s cards reflect motifs expressed in his larger works, including the New Mexico landscape and Native deer dancers, but in his family Christmas cards, his sense of play was unleashed. “He had a very eccentric, quirky sense of humor, as we can see from his puppets, but you can’t see that as much in ‘the work,’” Leech says. In Baumann’s nimble hands, diapers became visual puns about snow upon the birth of his daughter. He even made himself the butt of jokes, signing one New Year’s card Gustave “Later than Usual” Baumann. The artists may have had a friendly competition for the best creations, with Don Herold writing “Please give Gustave Baumann a Merry Christmas” in one custom print featuring a man praying and lettering. Cards culled from the 400 in Baumann’s estate have also been compiled into a companion coffee-table book from the Museum of New Mexico Press. Leech set aside 75 copies to create a limited-edition Palace Press version. The Baumann aficionado used the artist’s original blocks as well as paper found in his studio to re-create several prints. In a few cases, Leech improvised, cutting new blocks and rigging canvas into his press to create prints faithful to the originals. Throughout the process, he always asked himself “What would Gus do?” From this exhibit, it’s clear that neither Baumann nor his friends would have held anything back in the holiday greetings to those who knew them best. Gustave Baumann and Friends: Artist Cards from Holidays Past, through March 29, 2015, New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln, nmhistorymuseum.org

art

PREVIEWS

Ryder Studio Exhibit Lacuna Galleries, 124 W Palace lacunagalleries.com Through January 31 Anthony and Celeste Ryder, who teach classical painting and drawing from life, based on the methods of contemporary master painter Ted Seth Jacobs, are displaying their work and that of 12 students at the new Lacuna Galleries, located in the historic Felipe B. Delgado home. “Tony’s students are one of his greatest assets, extolling his extraordinary abilities not just as an internationally recognized portrait painter but also as a teacher,” says gallery owner Olaf Moon. “Their enthusiasm for his methods and style make for an infectious and creative atelier.” More than 50 works are featured in the show, many of which are suspended by satin cords from the gallery’s high ceilings.—Whitney Spivey

Arlene LaDell Hayes: The Many Voices of Arlene LaDell Hayes, Joe Wade Fine Art, 102 E Water, joewadefineart.com Through December 28 The many facets of artist Arlene LaDell Hayes’s work are evident in her solo show at Joe Wade Fine Art. “Arlene is always doing something new, which is what is so exciting about her,” says gallery owner Judy Wade. Hayes’s acrylic, oil, and mixed-media paintings with stylized figures of people and animals are on display along with her 3-D abstract plaster pieces.—Emily Van Cleve

Stephen Buxton, The Realm of Myth, paper on panel, 28 x 22"

Arlene LaDell Hayes, We Are Taking Them With Us, encaustic and oil on board, 18 x 18"

Holiday Group Show David Rothermel Contemporary 142 Lincoln, Ste 102 drcontemporary.com Through December 30 This group show features new abstract works by local artists Stephen Buxton (collage), Stan Berning (watercolor and gouache), and Abid Husain (oil); optical realist works by Philadelphia-based artist Paul Kane; and abstracts and classic landscapes from the archives of gallery owner David Rothermel. —Cristina Olds December 25, 2014 NOW 23


ongoing

Holiday Show 2014, Selby Fleetwood Gallery 600 Canyon, selbyfleetwoodgallery.com Through January 1 Selby Fleetwood’s group show features works that center on winter imagery—from the crispness of winter light to piñon wood burning in a fireplace. In addition to works by the gallery’s permanent artists like Sandra Pratt and Joan Barber, the show includes pieces by Santa Fe abstract painter Dick Evans and California-based painter Melissa Chandon.—EVC

Sandra Pratt, Pink Sky, oil on canvas, 16 x 18"

Gifts of the Holiday, Waxlander Art Gallery 622 Canyon, waxlander.com, through January 1 Artists Phyllis Kapp, Marshall Noice, Andree Hudson, Matthew Higginbotham, Dominique Boisjoli, Sharon Markwardt, and first-time participant Javier López Barbosa contribute works to Waxlander Art Gallery’s popular annual group exhibition. “The holiday show is a favorite with Waxlander’s collectors,” says gallery director Bonnie French. “We receive more new art—a cornucopia of wonderful colorful work—from more artists for this show than any other show of the year.”—EVC Ben Steele, Abstract Motel, oil on canvas, 10 x 8"

Javier López Barbosa, Creation of Unity, mixed media, 60 x 48"

Shyatesa White Dove, Achuwah, Acoma clay with handground mineral paint, 10 x 14"

Annual Small Works Holiday Group Show, Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art, 702 Canyon giacobbefritz.com, through December 27 Twenty-five new small works by 11 contemporary artists are on view in Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art’s annual holiday group show. “[This show] is a wonderful opportunity to view the gallery’s extremely eclectic collection of artists in a small format,” says gallery director Palin Wiltshire. Included in the show are Britt Freda, who paints wild animals with kaleidoscopic patches of shapes and color; Siri Hollander, known for her equine sculptures; and Ben Steele, who paints witty, irreverent takes on classic works from art history.—Noelle Stern 24

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Opening the Envelope Robert Nichols Gallery 419 Canyon, robertnicholsgallery.com Through January 4 This show spotlights works by Shyatesa White Dove, who studied at the Institute of American Indian Arts and learned the traditions of Acoma Pueblo pottery from her grandmother. Rather than using typical complex geometric designs in her pottery, White Dove draws inspiration from nature. The show also includes works by Diego Romero, Alan Lasiloo, and Glen Nipshank.—EVC


style

Ojo Caliente shop your way to a fre e s oa k Rex Ray, Untitled #4308, mixed media, collage, and resin on panel, 16 x 16"

Red, Turner Carroll Gallery, 725 Canyon turnercarrollgallery.com, through January 16 Turner Carroll Gallery asked guests to wear red to the December opening reception of its latest show, in which each of the participating artists incorporates the color into their works. The various pieces on display—by David Linn, Hung Liu, Greg Murr, Kate Petley, Rex Ray, Shawn Smith, and Ann Weiner—reveal the powerful and multifaceted symbolism of the color, whether it’s suggesting good fortune, lust, passion, or politics.—EVC

Anatoly Kostovsky The Russian Art Gallery, 216 Galisteo russianart.us.com, through January 31 Eighty-six-year-old Russian artist Anatoly Kostovsky focuses on the natural beauty and scenes of everyday life in Siberia and has a particular passion for painting classical Russian architecture. “I love to paint in the old part of the city with its charming, old wooden houses,” he says. “Even after over 100 years, they still serve the people who live in them.”—EVC

JULIEN MCROBERTS

Anatoly Kostovsky, Windows, oil on canvas, 36 x 44"

The best shopping between Santa Fe and Taos may well be at Ojo Caliente’s El Mercado gift shop. Tucked 50 miles north of the City Different along Route 285, El Mercado offers jewelry, clothing, and body care items, many of which are part of the spa’s signature Ojo Collection. Now through December 31, as part of a Shop and Soak special, you can earn a complimentary day pass to the spa’s hot springs (an $18 value) for every $100 spent in El Mercado or online at ojospa.com/store.php. The passes are valid through February 28. In addition to the robes, shirts, hats, and bags of the Ojo Collection, El Mercado sells eco-friendly attire by Colombian designer Paola Buendía and her husband, Mark Donovan. The couple’s Wooden Ships collection features cold-weather knitwear that can be dressed up with Shaesby Scott fine jewelry, which is also available at El Mercado. Handcrafted in Austin, Texas, the jewelry line’s sterling silver earrings, necklaces, and bracelets are inspired by nature and history. Even though it’s roughly an hour’s drive to El Mercado from Santa Fe, Shaesby’s Michaele Smith says the effort is well worth the reward. “I think [Ojo Caliente’s] awesome gift shop is just an added bonus to probably one of the most perfect and peaceful places I’ve ever been to.”

by Whitne y Spive y

hot deals

In addition to its Shop and Soak special (see left), Ojo Caliente is offering a number of winter blues–busting deals this season. Ski, Soak, and Stay Present a lift ticket or season pass from any ski resort in New Mexico and receive 20 percent off entry to the springs or any lodging unit. Winter Girls’ Getaway ($599) Two nights of lodging for two in a suite, two spa therapies and/or massages per person, yoga classes, and access to the mineral pools.

Winter Couples’ Romance Retreat ($619) Two nights of lodging for two in a suite, a bottle of wine or sparkling cider with Ojo glasses and chocolate truffles, two spa therapies and/or massages per person, yoga classes, and access to the mineral pools. For all specials, access to the mineral pools includes entry to the year-round Mud Area and a separate private pool with a kiva fireplace. For more seasonal promotions, visit ojospa.com. Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort & Spa, 50 Los Baños Dr., 505-583-2233, ojospa.com December 25, 2014 NOW 25


December Special!

art

PROFILE

Ghost Ranch Views iconic, contemplative paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe by Ash le y M. Big ge rs

Wine & Spirits Bar Now Open! Come enjoy a glass, flight or a single taste. Bar purchases earn an additional 5% store discount during that visit. Wed–Sat: 4–7PM Come browse our extensive selection of sparkling wines and Champaigns and get 10% off your selection. PRESENT THIS AD by 12/31/2014. *Applies to 750ml and larger. Not to be combined with other offers.

Located on the corner of St. Francis & Cerrillos

(505) 984-1582 www.sfwineandspirits.com

Special Holiday Hours: Mon-Sat: 10AM–8PM, Sunday: Noon–6PM through December, Wednesday, Dec 24: 10AM–6PM, Wednesday, Dec 31: 10AM–6PM, Closed Christmas and New Year’s Days

The paintings featured in Georgia O’Keeffe: Ghost Ranch Views are quintessential O’Keeffe: flowers floating before hillsides, bones suspended in the sky, and Cerro Pedernal—always Cerro Pedernal. Works such as these, composed between 1934 and 1984 from O’Keeffe’s outpost at Ghost Ranch, became the artist’s most iconic contributions to American modernism, and they’re currently on view at Santa Fe’s Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. Ghost Ranch Views is the third in the museum’s recent series of exhibitions that focus on where O’Keeffe lived and worked. (The previous two shows highlighted Abiquiú and Lake George.) “There’s a really intimate relationship that comes with daily observation, and that’s what’s at the heart of these exhibitions,” says curator Carolyn Kastner. As O’Keeffe often acknowledged in her writings, she painted what was around her. Lucky, then, that her U-shaped Ghost Ranch house perfectly framed Cerro Georgia O’Keeffe, Ram’s Head, Blue Morning Glory Pedernal from the (1938), oil on canvas, 20 x 30”, Georgia O’Keeffe patio and offered Museum, Gift of The Burnett Foundation. panoramas of red © Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. cliffs and dry arroyos on the alternate side. Of course, O’Keeffe never replicated her view precisely. “She’d foresee it as a composition, as a series of lines, and how those lines formed a composition on the canvas,” Kastner says. “Something that’s overlooked in her paintings is how conceptual she is. What will make a good painting is so much more of an interesting question to her [than replication].” Although O’Keeffe enthusiasts may already be familiar with works such as Ram’s Head, Blue Morning Glory (1938) or Red Hills and White Flower (1937), Kastner says this exhibition invites viewers “to understand what happens when an artist works in a series and contemplates certain visual landscapes over an extended period.” Indeed, this particular landscape was so powerful for O’Keeffe that she continued to visit Ghost Ranch even after her failing eyesight made it impossible for her to see the hills that had loomed so large in her work and career. Georgia O’Keeffe: Ghost Ranch Views, through March 22, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, 217 Johnson, okeeffemuseum.org


Dr. Maxine McBrinn

by Dor ot h y E . Noe

On April 13, Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning launched at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC). Running through May 2, 2016, the show is the culmination of hours of research and assembly by Dr. Maxine McBrinn, the museum’s curator of archaeology, who says she “knew nothing” about our state gem when she began her job in 2012 after working at museums in Denver and Chicago. Exploring unfamiliar subjects is just one aspect of McBrinn’s job. Here, she talks about her other responsibilities as a curator at the state’s premier repository of Native art and material culture. Generally speaking, what does a curator do? A curator selects, acquires, and cares for objects and creates an exhibit’s storyline. Because everything found on federal land comes to [MIAC], I also have to research objects to know what can be repatriated to tribes, to fulfill our legal and ethical requirements. It helps to be visually oriented, to be able to recognize beautiful objects, and to have intellectual curiosity. What is your educational and professional background? I have undergraduate and master’s degrees in physics and worked at AT&T Bell Labs before earning a master’s and PhD from the University of Colorado in Boulder in archaeology. As a child I always loved museums and reading about ancient cultures. This work is a natural extension of that interest.

kitty leaken

Items from MIAC’s exhibit Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning

European-style villa

curator of archaeology at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

How is an exhibit topic chosen? Some museum collections cry out to be in an exhibit, such as Casas Grandes pottery. Other ideas are inherited or proposed to the exhibit committee. I suggested

Just a half-mile from the Plaza and a block from Canyon Road, this 5,147-square-foot renovated home showcases Spanish style at its finest. Designed for comfortable living with four bedrooms and 5.5 baths, the home was also redone with entertaining in mind. Beer and spirits enthusiasts can kick back in the bar-lined billiard room, while wine connoisseurs will appreciate the brick-walled wine cellar and adjacent tasting room. Both are located on the lower level and accessed from within the residence or via an outdoor stone staircase. Outside, a large patio surrounds the house and features a fountain, gas barbecue, and hot tub among the lush landscaping and mature evergreen trees.

Dr. Maxine McBrinn

an exhibit on footwear because I’d done research on sandals. How do you curate an exhibit? First I examine the physical constraints and needs of the [exhibition] space. Then I research the topic. I walk through the collection many times (there are more than 75,000 pieces in the MIAC collection and 8–10 million objects in the archaeological collection) to refine what I’m looking for, keeping in mind that the exhibit must appeal to a wide variety of people. I also have to think about what can be borrowed from other collections to fill in any gaps. Lastly, I design the narrative, the story I want to tell.

List price: $1.595 million Contact: Darlene Streit, Sotheby’s International Realty, 505-920-8001, santafeproperties.com

What are you working on now? I’m working on an exhibit that will compare the aerial photographs of ruins taken by Charles Lindberg in 1929 for commercial airline routes over New Mexico with photos taken today by [aerial photographer] Adriel Heisey from his ultralight plane. The differences are striking. Do you do any archeological work? I’m not doing fieldwork, but I’m involved in academic projects. I’m coediting a volume on the Great Basin and southwestern archaeology and co-authoring a chapter on the Archaic period, which is my specialty. What are the rewards of curating an exhibit? I get to learn a whole lot. Curating is an exercise in creativity, and it’s nice when people tell you they’ve enjoyed an exhibit.

LOU NOVICK

Q &A

[on the market]

What are the challenges of a curator? Mice in the fall. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, Tuesday–Sunday, 10 am–5 pm, $6 (NM residents), $9 (nonresidents), 710 Camino Lejo, indianartsandculture.org

December 25, 2014 NOW 27


style

Downtown Day Spa promot i ng e n v i ronm e n t a l wel l n e s s

by Whitne y Spive y

Like so many before her, Christina Sisley moved to New Mexico for its healing properties. “I came out to Santa Fe to go to massage school, and I fell in love with the blue skies,” she says. “And, according to my astrocartography, my Venus and Neptune go right through Santa Fe, so I had to live here.” But even with the astrological affirmation, times were tough. In 1994, the East Coast transplant found herself just out of bankruptcy court with only $27 to her name. “So I picked up my best friend, my emery board,” Sisley says, adding that she talked her way into a month’s free rent in a commercial space behind the Eldorado hotel and started offering buy-two-get-one-free manicure specials. And so Enchantment Body—now Downtown Day Spa—was born. The getaway, which focuses on traditional, holistic, and Navajo treatments, is currently tucked along the northern edge of the Railyard District in an 18th-century adobe hacienda. “This area is my favorite part of downtown—being a block west of the Guadalupe shrine and near the Rail Runner, art galleries, and small businesses,” Sisley says. “The neighborhood is really up and coming.” If location is 50 percent of Downtown Day Spa’s success, the other half can be chalked up to Sisley’s commitment to highly personalized environmental wellness. “There are so many people who are environmentally sensitive,” she says. “When you walk through the door [of my spa], you’re not going to get hit with any strange smells.” This means no traditional nail products. “We only do natural manicures,” Sisley says, noting that her services strengthen nails and relieve stress. Likewise, the essential oils used in all treatments are “organic, well-crafted, and regional.” Brands 28

santafeanNOW.com

such as NYR and Marsha Mason’s Resting in the River are preferred here and will be available for purchase in the soon-to-be expanded retail therapy room. “Christina always tries to use only the very best products,” says Mason, the acclaimed actress, who was among Sisley’s first clients. “I went in for a manicure,” she remembers, “and she was so lovely; we just became friends over the years.” One of Sisley’s favorite treatments is the popular 75-minute NavajoInspired Hot Stone Massage, which alternates heated basalt rocks with cool marble stones and includes smudging with locally gathered sage. “It really does make your mind stop chattering,” she says. Sounds like the perfect remedy for holiday stress. Downtown Day Spa, 624 Agua Fria, 505-986-0113, downtowndayspa.com

taste of the town

nor t h ern new m e x i c o ’ s fines t d inin g e x perien c es

Plaza Café

54 Lincoln Ave, 505-982-1664 santafeplazacafe.com The famous Plaza Café, on the historic Santa Fe Plaza, has been serving locals and visitors alike for over 110 years! We are Santa Fe’s oldest restaurant and serve authentic New Mexican cuisines and flavors that span the globe for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. We are the home of fine food and the friendliest folks in town! Open daily from 7am to 9 pm, we hope you come visit us for a bite to eat!

La Plazuela at La Fonda on the Plaza™

100 E San Francisco St, 505-995-2334 lafondasantafe.com La Plazuela, located in the heart of historic La Fonda on the Plaza, is a feast for the senses. Skylights flood the restaurant with natural light, a soothing fountain sits below a dramatic, wrought-iron chandelier and hand-painted windows encircle the room. At La Plazuela, old favorites have been reinvented with tantalizing New World twists, and our classic Northern New Mexico specialties are not to be missed. Our wine list is award-winning. Come make memories with us!

The Beestro

101 W Marcy St, 505-629-8786 thebeestro.com Dinner: French crêpes, wine, hard ciders, and beer served Wed–Sun, 5–9 pm or later, in our warm, inviting, second-level dining room. Enjoy a delectable selection of savory and sweet crêpes alongside French onion soup, bountiful entrée salads, prime rib French dip, and more. Reservations suggested! Lunch: Mon–Fri, 9 am–4 pm, serving scratch-made daily panini, salads, soups, breakfast burritos, and Iconik coffee and espresso ready for take-out or dine-in. Daily menu available at thebeestro.com.

315 Restaurant & Bistro

315 Old Santa Fe Trail, 505-986-9190 315santafe.com Located in the historic Barrio de Analco, 315 is celebrating its 20th year and is in the tradition of French bistros under the leadership of Louis Moskow. Serving French classics and utilizing locally sourced products, 315 offers an award-winning wine list and a full bar as well as nightly specials, a bar menu, and a seasonally changing regular menu. Dinner nightly from 5 to 9 pm weeknights and until 9:30 pm on Fridays and Saturdays.


| L A ST LOO K |

The Earful at Skylight

stephen lang

On November 20, West Coast funk masters The Earful brought their full eightperson band to Skylight in downtown Santa Fe for booty-shaking fun. Nominated for best jazz group at the 2013 San Diego Music Awards, The Earful’s talent-heavy members include founder Brian Teel and musicians from The Mars Volta (progressive rock) and The B-Side Players (Latin jazz). Although the Skylight gathering was intimate, the energy onstage was intense. Super danceable numbers highlighted the group’s various instruments, which include organ, clavinet, synthesizer, saxophone, trumpet, drums, bass, and guitar. The Earful’s press material is spot on when it notes: “When the band hits the stage, fans can leave their troubles aside, feel the spirit, and shake their rumps until they sweat, and then sweat some more.”—Cristina Olds

December 25, 2014 NOW 29


Jane Filer

The Blue Earth acrylic on canvas 60" x 50"

621 C anyon R oad 830 C anyon R oad billhester@billhesterfineart.com BillHesterFineArt.com (505) 660-5966

Sean Wimberly

Red Roof Autumn acrylic on canvas 30" x 40"

Santa Fean NOW December 25 2014 Digital Edition  

Santa Fean NOW December 25 2014 Digital Edition

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