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RAILYARD

DISTRICT MAGAZINE

VISIONARY SPACE

2013

PRESENTED BY

magazine

RailyardArtsDistrict.net


“SITE Santa Fe, the Southwest’s premier contemporary art venue…” —The New York Times

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS State of Mind: New California Art Circa 1970 Linda Mary Montano: Always Creative Mungo Thomson: Time, People, Money, Crickets

Enrique Martínez Celaya: The Pearl July 13 – Oct 13, 2013

Photo: Kate Russell

Feb 23 – May 19, 2013 Public Opening, Friday, Feb 22, 5–7 pm


2013 exhibitions

ERIC ZAMMITT PHILIP BALDWIN AND MONICA GUGGISBERG JUNE WAYNE JUDY CHICAGO TOM MARTINELLI CAROL BROWN GOLDBERG PHILLIS IDEAL RICHARD ANUSZKIEWICZ BEVERLY FISHMAN PAUL REED STEVEN ALEXANDER TED LARSEN SILVIA LEVENSON PETER DEMOS JULIAN STANCZAK LEON BERKOWITZ TAMARiND institute LITHOGRapHS

DavidrichardGALLERY.com 544 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | p (505) 983-9555 | f (505) 983-1284 info@DavidRichardGallery.com


2 Publisher’s Note, the Railyard district’s history 4 James Kelly Contemporary Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 6 Zane Bennett Contemporary Art 8 TAI Gallery, David Richard Gallery 11 LewAllen Galleries 13 William Siegal Gallery PUBLISHER

bruce adams

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER  EDITOR

lisa alvarado

ASSOCIATE EDITOR WRITERS

b.y. cooper

samantha schwirck

amy hegarty, samantha schwirck

GRAPHIC DESIGN

sybil watson

GRAPHIC DESIGN CONTRIBUTOR

michelle odom

SALES REPRESENTATIVES

anne mulvaney, david wilkinson, yvonne johnston

OPERATIONS MANAGER

ginny stewart-jaramillo

The Railyard Arts District has now come into its own, as this special supplement to the Santa Fean illustrates. Five years ago, the only galleries in the area were SITE Santa Fe and James Kelly Contemporary—nothing like today’s burgeoning collection of art spaces.  The organization’s name reflects the evolution of the area—once called the Guadalupe district. The neighborhood is now known as the Railyard district, and it’s home to some of Santa Fe’s finest contemporary galleries, who relocated and established new spaces in the heart of this historic area. With this growth, a whole new neighborhood for art enthusiasts is born. The contemporary and stunning architecture of these galleries boasts tall ceilings and large, open spaces. They are the perfect venues for the contemporary art found here. You may think you’re in SoHo, not Santa Fe, but the charming train whistle will be a good reminder you are, in fact, in the City Different. All the venues are within easy walking distance of each other and just a short enjoyable walk from downtown or Canyon Road. In addition, quality restaurants abound in the area, allowing you to spend all day immersing yourself in an unforgettable cultural experience. Whether you take the train, bus, bike ride or walk the Rail Trail, or drive Guadalupe Street, the Railyard district offers one of the most accessible and unique areas in Santa Fe. For art lovers, your exploration of the Santa Fe art scene is not complete without a visit to this transformed neighborhood, and the galleries of The Railyard Arts District.

BRUCE ADAMS

Publisher

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC 215 W San Francisco Street, Suite 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444; fax 505-983-1555, info@santafean.com

RailyardArtsDistrict.net

On the cover, clockwise from top: Beverly Fishman at David Richard Gallery; Oli Sihvonen at James Kelly Contemporary; Ed Moses at Charlotte Jackson Fine Art; Karen Gunderson at William Siegal Gallery; Robert Motherwell at Zane Bennett Contemporary Art; and Emily Mason at LewAllen Galleries. Center: Shono Tokuzo at TAI Gallery.

history in the making Over the last two decades, Santa Fe has emerged as a major player on the international contemporary art scene. Southwestern landscapes, turquoise jewelry, and Native American wares are still important draws for visitors and collectors, but the City Different is also a center of cutting edge art—from large-scale installations to minimalist sculptures. The heart and soul of this ongoing evolution is the newly reborn Railyard district. The arrival of the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway in the late 19th century ushered in social and economic changes to Santa Fe, transforming the city into a hub of culture and commerce, with the Railyard as its inception point. It’s not surprising that the area’s present-day incarnation is also ground zero for the town’s contemporary art scene. After years of underuse following the rise of interstate and air travel, the warehouse-filled Railyard was given a new lease on life in 1987. City officials decided that the area needed and deserved revitalization, and the seeds for redevelopment were planted. A master plan was approved in 2002, following years of debate on details and designs, and groundbreaking began two years later. In 2008, the brand-new Railyard was officially unveiled at a much-attended grand-opening ceremony. The success and vitality that the Railyard enjoys today is due in large part to the artists, art lovers, and art experts who championed the area in its infancy. A key player in making the Railyard the epicenter of Santa Fe’s growing contemporary art scene is SITE Santa Fe. A world-class exhibition space, non--profit SITE Santa Fe opened its doors in 1995. SITE made a name for itself by hosting extraordinary biennials on par with such exhibitions as the Whitney Biennial and the Venice Biennale, showcasing contemporary artwork on display and on sale in the City Different. The presence of SITE Santa Fe inspired gallerists to bring their own endeavors just south of downtown. Soon the Railyard’s once-empty, high-ceilinged structures were brimming with modern-day marvels and art enthusiasts from around the city, around the country, and around the world.

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railyardartsdistrict.net

DAVID ROBIN

contents


Contemporary Painting, Sculpture & Glass Art of International Stature

LewAllenGalleries Railyard: 1613 Paseo de Peralta (505) 988.3250 LewAllenGalleries Downtown: 125 West Palace Avenue (505) 988.8997 Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado: (505) 946.5778 Scottsdale: 7036 East Main Street Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 970.3600 info@lewallengalleries.com www.lewallengalleries.com


tracking art galleries are breaking ground in Santa Fe

T James Kelly Contemporary's museum-like space exhibits paintings, drawings, sculptures, videos, and works on paper by European and American artists, including many New Mexico locals. Here, a view of Robert Kelly's installation Back and Forth (2012).

Jeremy Thomas's installation Smart Orange at Charlotte Jackson Fine Art (2012). Below: Aldo Chaparro's installation I've Lost Control Again at James Kelly Contemporary (2012).

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wo years after the launch of SITE Santa Fe, James Kelly, attracted to the industrial aesthetic of the Railyard, opened his eponymous gallery directly across the street. James Kelly Contemporary (550 S Guadalupe, jameskelly.com) settled into the HansenSears Building, where it remained the only gallery at that location until 2006. At the time of its opening, James Kelly was also the sole gallery for the entire Railyard complex. Following an extensive renovation of the building, a handful of other like-minded galleries soon moved in, making for a particularly buzzy corner of town. James Kelly’s museum-like space features paintings, drawings, sculptures, videos, works on paper, and more by post-war European and American artists. The gallery also showcases a stable of talented New Mexican artists. From minimalist graphite cubes and colorful geometric abstractions, to stainless-steel sculptures and narrative-driven photographs, James Kelly’s diverse collections and half-dozen annual exhibitions explore form, illusion, and the act of art-making, among other themes. Moving from just off the Plaza, after 21 years, Charlotte Jackson Fine Art (554 S Guadalupe, charlottejackson.com) relocated to the Railyard district in 2010, and is now one of the residents of the HansenSears Building. Internationally renowned for its focus on monochrome painters, the gallery also specializes in sculpture and paintings by early California minimalists. Also of interest are works inspired by the late 20th-century light-and-space movement; as well as hard-edge and geometric abstractions. The sophisticated space typically hosts 12 monthly exhibitions and owner Charlotte Grey Jackson frequently travels on behalf of the gallery and its artists, drawing a global set of art collectors and enthusiasts to the Railyard.


Painted Checkerboard Mantle - Huari Culture 850 AD, cotton and natural dyes, 50 x 131 inches

CONTEMPORARY

540 S GUADALUPE STREET SANTA FE, NM 87501 505.820.3300 WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM INFO@WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM

ANCIENT

W I L L I A M S I E G A L G A L L E RY


Monden Kogyoku, Thunderhead, madake and rattan, 18 x 17 x 18", at TAI Gallery

In 2005, Sandy Zane and Ned Bennett opened Zane Bennett Contemporary Art (435 S Guadalupe, zanebennettgallery.com) in a small, historic adobe on Canyon Road. They quickly realized that they needed a much bigger and much different kind of space in order to accommodate the art they wanted to represent—art that often includes largescale works. The following year they bought a building in the Railyard district. In 2008, after an extensive renovation that preserved the structure’s historic exterior and completely gutted its interior, the new, two-story, almost 10,000-square-foot location was up and running. With two floors, multiple lofted galleries, and glass catwalks and stairs, the ultra-chic, ultra-modern space is tailor-made to showcase the paintings, sculpture, photography, and prints of Zane Bennett’s artists, who range from well-established and blue-chip to mid-career, local, and emerging.

An upstairs glass catwalk at Zane Bennett Contemporary Art showcases the work of Olivier Mosset. The gallery also displays paintings, sculpture, photography, and prints by well-established artists, as well as local and emerging talents.

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435 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505 982-8111 www.zanebennettgallery.com


DONALD WOODMAN

With an emphasis on abstract post-war art that came out of the east and west coasts, David Richard explores the evolution of contemporary art as seen in important movements from the 1950s through the 1980s. Exhibits explore such genres as color field, pop, op, abstract expressionism, minimalism, feminist art, and light and space.

TAI Gallery (1601 Paseo de Peralta, taigallery.com) relocated from a small, casita-like space just off Canyon to the Hansen-Sears Building in 2006. Originally opened in 1978 by Robert Coffland and the late Mary Hunt Kahlenberg— international experts in bamboo arts and historic textiles, respectively. With an all-Japanese roster of artists, the gallery is renowned for its collection of contemporary bamboo sculptures and Japanese photography; as well as contemporary and antique bamboo baskets. In support of the gallery’s more than 30 bamboo artists, and of the use of bamboo as a medium, Coffland leads a group of up to12 people on an excursion to Japan every fall. The group meets with TAI’s artists, learning more about their intricate work and craft. Previously TAI’s owner, Coffland has re-imagined a new role for himself, leading tours and acting as an information point person for visitors. Discourse is key at David Richard Gallery (554 S Guadalupe, davidrichardgallery.com), which opened its doors in

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railyardartsdistrict.net

Top left: Judy Chicago, Grand Toby Head with Copper Eye, copper gilding on cast glass and bronze, 28 x 16 x 13", at David Richard Gallery. Above: Honda Syoryu, Innocent Glitter, madake and rattan, 22 x 19 x 23", at TAI Gallery.


STUART ARENDS JACK BALAS TIM BAVINGTON TONY BERLANT ERIKA BLUMENFELD ENRIQUE MARTINEZ CELAYA ALDO CHAPARRO THOMAS JOSHUA COOPER SHARON CORE HELMUT DORNER JAMES DRAKE ROBERT DRUMMOND DEBORA HUNTER BILL JACOBSON TOM JOYCE ROBERT KELLY SHERRIE LEVINE JANELLE LYNCH MATT MAGEE ROY MCMAKIN WES MILLS PARD MORRISON JILL MOSER BRUCE NAUMAN NIC NICOSIA SAM REVELES JOHNNIE ROSS SUSAN ROTHENBERG VICTORIA SAMBUNARIS PETER SARKISIAN ARLENE SHECHET ESTATE OF OLI SIHVONEN JOHN SONSINI ROBERT STIVERS DAVID TAYLOR EMI WINTER SUSAN YORK

JAMES KELLY CONTEMPORARY 550 SOUTH GUADALUPE STREET IN THE RAILYARD 505.989.1601 / JAMESKELLY.COM


K A J I WA R A AYA 2010, 12 x 12 x 11.5 inches

TA I G A L L E R Y 1601 B Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

Across from SITE Santa Fe

505.984.1387 • www.taigallery.com


2012, two years after its downtown incarnation, David Richard Contemporary, was launched. With an emphasis on abstract post-war art that came out of the east and west coasts, David Richard, owned by directors Dave Eichholtz and Richard Barger, explores the evolution of contemporary art as seen in important movements from the 1950s through the 1980s. Exhibits explore such genres such as color field, pop, op, abstract expressionism, minimalism, feminist art, and light and space. The majority of the gallery’s artists are established and mid-career, although a handful of emerging artists are represented as well. Events like panel discussions and lectures complement David Richard’s prolific and thoughtfully curated exhibitions, which typically number between 16 and 20 a year. For over 35 years, LewAllen Galleries’ (1613 Paseo de Peralta, lewallencontemporary. com) commitment is to represent a broad range of contemporary painting, sculpture, and glass art by leading national and international artists. Its Santa Fe Railyard incarnation opened in 2009, at 1613 Paseo de Peralta. Continuing the tradition of its signature well-curated collections, with a range of aesthetic styles, materials, and periods, LewAllen exhibits painting and sculpture by established artists alongside younger emerging artists with significant promise. The imposing

Fujinuma Noburu, Single Flower Vases, madake and lacquer, various sizes, at TAI Gallery.

The interior of LewAllen Galleries 14,000-square-foot Railyard location, here featuring the work of Ronnie Landfield.

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With two floors, multiple lofted galleries, and glass catwalks and stairs, the ultra-chic, ultra-modern Zane Bennett Contemporary Art is tailor-made for showcasing paintings, sculptures, and prints.

Clockwise from top: James Havard, Pomo Flag/Hopi Corn, mixed media on board, 40 x 95", at Zane Bennett Contemporary Art; Tom Waldron, Harrow, steel, 16 x 21 x 8", at William Siegal Gallery; Francois Morellet, 20 Positive and Negative Random Lines, acrylic on canvas on wood, 39 x 39", at Zane Bennett Contemporary Art.

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14,000-square-foot gallery is a design of the New Mexican architectural firm, Devendra Contractor. Two spacious main-floor gallery halls, featuring 23-foot ceilings and innovative flex walls, allow creative displays for major exhibitions. A third, more intimate gallery is dedicated to LewAllen’s Modern department. A landscaped outdoor sculpture plaza offering large pieces welcomes visitors, and a dedicated sculpture terrace on the mezzanine level houses smaller-scale sculpture. In addition to its Railyard exhibition space, LewAllen continues to operate its landmark downtown location at 125 W Palace. Visitors exploring the area can also visit its satellite locations at Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado Santa Fe in Tesuque, as well as its newest venue in Scottsdale, Arizona. In its new, 5,000-square-foot award-winning Railyard location, William Siegal Gallery (540 S Guadalupe, williamsiegal.com) features museumquality ancient textiles, objects, and artifacts from pre-Columbian, African, Chinese, and Indonesian cultures dating from 700 BC through the 19th Century. Of special interest to collectors and visitors is the world’s largest collection of Andean textiles. William Siegel also showcases cutting-edge contemporary paintings, sculpture, and photography by leading local and nationally known artists, such as Peter Ogilvie and Judy Tuwaletstiwa. rad

Left: Paul Castillo, the second part (the network), welded fencing nails and enamel, 52 x 50 x 15", at William Siegal Gallery. Below: LewAllen Galleries at the Railyard has two main-floor gallery halls with 23-foot ceilings and flex walls, as well as a more intimate gallery and an outdoor sculpture plaza.

Below, from left to right: Polly Barton, Woven Night, Japanese silver thread on cotton with soy and indigo, 10 x 10", at William Siegal Gallery; An exhibition featuring the work of Charles Arnoldi, at Charlotte Jackson Fine Art (2010).

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CHARLOTTE JACKSON FINE ART Railyard Arts District | 554 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.989.8688

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Railyard Arts District Magazine 2013 Digital Edition