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now

The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

,

Los Lobos at the Lensic

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

week of October 22


SANTA FE

From the time of the ancient Anasazi, the Santa Fe area has been a trading center. The Santa Fe Trail is synonymous with the romance of the Old West, and from the time of New Mexico statehood in 1912, Santa Fe has been a multicultural art center and shoppers’ paradise.

Free iPhone and Android app The Best of Santa Fe

|

2015

publisher’s note

|

In THE last few weeks, I’ve been commenting about the unusually diverse activities that take place here in Santa Fe. Clearly, this is not a one-trick-pony kind of town, as you will soon see just by reading this weekend’s highlighted activities in NOW magazine. Los Lobos are returning to Santa Fe, and you can read about that in this issue. Their Saturday night performance at the Lensic is sure to sell out, and it will be a terrific show. It’s encouraging see major acts like this coming to our community; we’re excited about the new effort to bring in this caliber of entertainment on a regular basis. For something completely different and lots of fun, consider heading to Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino for Comic Con—a three-day party that’s perfect for the whole family, with an emphasis on laughter. Comic Con has celebrity guests, authors, hundreds of vendors, local artists, film screenings, autograph opportunities, amazing awards, a cosplay contest, trick-or-treating, an actors’ retreat, and after-parties. Doesn’t this sound like fun! And finally, I’m happy to support one of my own: Stephen Lang. You may know that name, of course, as he’s NOW magazine’s featured photographer, taking photos all over town for us on a regular basis.  Tomorrow night, we will get a chance to see another side of Stephen’s work as he premieres his photographs of White Sands with an opening at David Rothermel Contemporary, at the corner of Marcy and Lincoln. Diversity reigns.

Bruce Adams

Publisher

Longworth Gallery owner Lisa Rodgers (middle) and husband Michael Taylor (left) with artist Michael Parkes. Below, Parkes signs books for fans.

Find the best shops, restaurants, galleries, museums, parking locations, turn-by-turn directions, mobile deals, weather, news, and local-events with the free app from the iTunes App Store and from the Android Market. Look for the green sticker in the window of participating stores.

STEPHEN LANG

SantaFeDowntown.org

Santa Fe is a top US art center, with museums, shopping, year-round outdoor activities, top-flight restaurants, spas, and world famous cultural events. It’s not just your grandparents’ Santa Fe—it’s walkable, historic, charming, and exciting: a high-desert destination of distinction and fun.

now

OCT 22 –OCT 28

DAVID ROBIN

SHOPPING IN


Connecting Community Through Concerts and Events

Presents

Los Lobos @The Lensic Santa Fe, NM

October 24th 2015 Doors Open 6:30pm

Boris McCutcheon

& the Salt Licks Purchase Now

www.TicketsSantaFe.org

HEATHCONCERTS.US


Welcome to Santa Fe!

now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

Santa Fe is rated one of the top ten destinations in the world for its abundance of high-quality art, shopping, attractions, outdoor adventures, food and entertainment. Santa Fean NOW is a great hands-on source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local resident, first time visitor, or a regular, NOW has the listings you need to navigate hundreds of weekly gallery openings, live music and more to make the most of your time here. For extra tips and insider insights, please stop by our Visitor Centers at the Downtown Santa Fe Plaza, Santa Fe Railyard, or just off the Plaza at the Community Convention Center. This October, ask about The Santa Fe Independent Film Festival, the Historic Canyon Road Paint Out, and be sure to check out the autumn harvest on a Tuesday or Saturday at our outstanding Santa Fe Famers Market in The Railyard.There are so many things going on to enhance your visit to Santa Fe—rated last month by Conde Nast as the second most popular small city destination in the country and top in the Southwest. Have a wonderful time in The City Different, Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor

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EDITOR

anne maclachlan

CALENDAR EDITOR

samantha schwirck

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Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

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summer 2015

arts+culture

dining • art • culture • history

lifestyle

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Santa Fean NOW Volume 2, Number 37, Week of October 22, 2015. Published by Bella Media, LLC, at Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2015 by Bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

On the cover: Los Lobos play the Lensic October 24. Photo courtesy of Heath Concerts.


Courtesy Heath Concerts

the

Los Lobos

buzz

Apparently Los Lobos just can’t stay away from New Mexico. The Grammy Award-winning rockers from East Los Angeles played at Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino back in August, and on October 24, they’ll take the stage at The Lensic Performing Arts Center. The band—David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano, and Steve Berlin— will likely play tunes from their newest album, Gates of Gold. Released on September 25, Gates of Gold is the quintet’s first album since 2010, and the dynamic 11-song collection features lyrics that touch on everything from the immigrant experience to impending mortality. Like previous records, the sound is mainstream American rock with a Mexican twist. “Unlike many bands that write, gather, and catalog material between studio releases, Los Lobos prefers to create their magic on the fly when they decide it’s time to record,” drummer Perez said in a statement. Singer/guitarist Cesar Rosas agrees. “When I listen to our catalog, doing things more spontaneously in the studio has led to some of our best work,” he says. With their best work being hits like “La Bamba,” “Don’t Worry Baby,” and “Bertha,” the band must be doing something right.—Whitney Spivey

Courtesy Nasario Garcia

HeathSUN Concert Series presents Los Lobos with openers Boris McCutcheon and the Salt Licks, October 24, 7 pm, $49–$59, The Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W San Francisco, ticketsantafe.org

Storyteller Nasario Garcia will spook visitors with ghostly folklore

Peter Italiano

L.A. rockers Los Lobos take the Lensic stage with Boris McCutcheon and the Salt Licks October 24

Shelli Kahl; jewelry ensemble; silver, gold, and topaz

Inaugural SW Festival of the Arts & Distillery Fest More than 125 artists (jewelers, potters, painters, and sculptors) from the U.S., Mexico, and Canada are exhibiting in this juried art show, happening over the last weekend in October at Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino. Sip and nibble while you view; the event includes the Distillery Fest, during which New Mexico food suppliers, brewers, and distillers will provide samples of their own creations. Tickets are available by the day or as a three-day pass.—Anne Maclachlan SW Festival of the Arts & Distillery Fest, $10–$15, October 30, noon–9 pm; October 31, 10 am–6 pm; November 1, 10 am–4 pm; Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino, 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, swfestivalofthearts.com

Halloween at the New Mexico History Museum The New Mexico History Museum hosts a family-friendly scavenger hunt through its permanent exhibit, Telling New Mexico, during a free Halloween program from 5 pm to 7 pm on October 30. “The idea behind this event is to make families, and particularly children, feel comfortable in the museum,” says marketing manager Kate Nelson. Upon entry, each visitor receives a free Halloween mask with an image of a historical character on it.. Spooky tales of ghosts, witches, and bogeymen come alive at 6 pm at the neighboring Palace of the Governors, when New Mexico author and folklorist Nasario García tells an hour’s worth of stories from his childhood.—Emily Van Cleve Halloween at the New Mexico History Museum, October 30, 5–7 pm, free, 113 Lincoln, nmhistorymuseum.org October 22, 2015 NOW 3


courtesy Ruxandra Simionescu-Marqu

the

buzz

Violinist Ruxandra SimionescuMarquardtis makes her Serenata debut in American Made

Serenata of Santa Fe: American Made

When she began selecting repertoire for the American Made concert on October 25, Serenata of Santa Fe’s artistic director and oboist Pamela Epple looked for music by 20th and 21st century American composers who have been inspired by our country’s open spaces. Opening the program is John Corigliano’s “Aria for Oboe and Strings,” which is one movement from the composer’s 1975 oboe concerto. “I love the piece because it sings,” Epple says. “It’s not unbearably hard, but it is virtuosic. Corigliano wanted this aria to be able to stand on its own and be performed without the rest of the movements from the oboe concerto.” The idea to perform Samuel Barber’s Sonata for Cello and Piano, Opus 6 (1932) came from Serenata of Santa Fe’s cellist Sally Guenther. Meanwhile, Epple wanted to include a work by John Harbison, and selected his 1981 piece Quintet for Strings and Piano.

“Harbison carries a torch for American music,” says Epple. “I love his music and try to include a piece of his in every one of our seasons. The quintet was commissioned by the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival and dedicated to Georgia O’Keeffe. The acoustics in First Presbyterian Church are going to be wonderful for this piece.” Joining Epple and Guenther on stage are Serenata regulars David Felberg (violin), Debra Ayers (piano), and Shanti Randall (viola), as well as newcomers Frank Murry, a freelance bassist from Albuquerque, and Ruxandra Simionescu-Marquardt, a Romanianborn violinist teaching in the Albuquerque area. “Inviting new musicians to play with us helps keep the music alive and not so predictable,” Epple adds.—EVC Serenata of Santa Fe presents American Made, October 25, 3 pm, $15–$35, First Presbyterian Church, 208 Grant, brownpapertickets.com

the opposite of cynical: The Martian

4

santafeanNOW.com

Matt Damon stars in Ridley Scott’s The Martian

on Mars? In Prometheus, it takes guns and axes to survive; in The Martian, our heroes’ weapons are mathematics, physics, engineering, and even botany. Countries graciously coordinate, sharing technology. If it weren’t such a fine film, The Martian might have the feel of an exercise (“Okay, Ridley, let’s see if you can make sci-fi without your evil robots.”). Scott put his toys away; and the result is mature, fun, inspiring, and as scientific as science fiction gets.—Phil Parker

Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation, TSG Entertainment

The Martian is almost an atonement for Ridley Scott, a beautiful apology to scientists and the scientifically inclined. “Yes,” the director seems to say with his newest film, “I know killer androids and killer aliens are goofy. Here. Here is honest science fiction, without anyone’s skull getting crushed.” Scott has always been a technically proficient master of special effects, but those effects have often served silliness, even in movies rightly considered masterpieces. With his first two science fiction films, Blade Runner and Alien, Scott established himself as the father of killer androids and killer aliens (and killer androids who help killer aliens). Yet as prolific as he is, and as classic as those two films are, he dabbled in sci-fi only one other time before The Martian. I refer, of course, to the wonderful and absolutely bonkers 2012 Alien prequel Prometheus. The best science fiction often presents horrors that reflect important themes of human nature, and Scott’s androids have been particularly evil, his films particularly cynical. Blade Runner’s Roy Batty kills his creator for making him so frustratingly mortal. In Alien, corporate bosses sacrifice grunt employees for a monster they can turn into lucrative weapons. Prometheus declares that the universe is merciless and indifferent; that any search for meaning a terrible mistake. These dark themes are painted in shocking gore (Alien’s chest-busting scene remains a benchmark) and insidious motives. How fascinating, then, that The Martian has no villain. Its characters are highly intelligent and moral—people with the ideal mix of humor, humility, and confidence. The film’s conflict isn’t a fight, it’s a puzzle: How do you rescue a man who is stranded


J VanBuhler

this week

October 27: Greensky Bluegrass at the Skylight

October 22–November 4

October 22 thursday All Things Pumpkin Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

A demonstration-style class focusing on creative recipes featuring pumpkin. $85, 6 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Armed & Delicious: The Perfect Pantry Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Chef Lauren Slaff shares tips and tricks to create a fabulous dinner from a perfectly stocked pantry. Menu items include lemon-garlic pasta with kale and garbanzos and crispy polenta puttanesca. $85, 5:30–8:30 pm, 505-983-7554, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Cooking Inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Discover and explore some of Georgia O’Keeffe’s ideas about food and cooking via recipes featured in Margaret Wood’s book, A Painter’s Kitchen: Recipes from the Kitchen of Georgia O’Keeffe. $90, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Dinner with Daggett La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Enjoy a catered dinner at La Fonda on the Plaza and hear a spirited conversation with Daggett Harvey, a Fred Harvey descendant, and Stephen Fried, author of the bestselling book Appetite for America: Fred Harvey and the Business of Civilizing the Wild West— One Meal at a Time. $150, 6 pm, 505-992-2715 ext. 1, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Sip and Learn Wine Tasting Estrella del Norte Vineyard, 106 N Shining Sun Learn or improve your wine tasting techniques with a formal tasting that includes six Estrella del Norte wines. $10, 1–2 pm, 505-455-2826, estrelladelnortevineyard.com.

A Chorus in Miracles Unity Santa Fe, 1212 Unity Way

Spiritual pioneer James Twyman, best known for his bestseller The Moses Code, is holding the largest A Course in Miracles celebration in history by sharing his latest film, A Chorus in Miracles, in more than 350 churches nationwide. $7 (suggested donation), 7 pm, 505-989-4433, unitysantafe.org.

Oil, Gas, and the Methane Hot Spot in the San Juan Basin St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trl

Retired U.S. Geological Survey geologist Jim Fassett discusses the impact of the discovery of a large methane plume over the northern part of the San Juan Basin, which contains the largest coal-bed methane field in the world. $10, 1–3 pm, 505-982-9274, renesan.org.

Adult Classes: General Technique Entreflamenco: Santa Fe School of Flamenco 1730 Camino Carlos Rey A general technique adult flamenco class. $30, 5:30–6:30 pm, 505-209-1302, entreflamenco.com.

Community-Style Acupuncture

Southwest Acupuncture College 1622 Galisteo

Patients receive acupuncture treatments in the same room. $16, 5:30–9 pm, acupuncturecollege.edu.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco

Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Golden Thursdays Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Golden era and hip-hop music. $5, 10 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Jim Almand Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Rock music. Free, 8–11 pm 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

John Rangel Duets El Mesón, 213 Washington

Piano music. Free, 7–9 pm 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Latin Night Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With VDJ Dany. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Hosted by Michéle Leidig. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com. October 22, 2015 NOW 5


Paige Barton and Janice The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Live music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Swing Soleil: Gypsy Jazz Zia Diner, 326 S Guadalupe

Swing/jazz music. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm 505-988-7008, ziadiner.com.

The Hooligans La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Irish American music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Vicente Griego and Friends El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco jazz music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

The Foreigner Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Larry Shue’s comedy, which originally premiered in New York City in 1984, directed by Robert Nott. $15–$20, 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

The Tequila Plays The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 NM-14, Madrid

Joe West’s Theatre of Death presents a night of original drama inspired by the French Grand Guignol. $20, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Yemaya’s Belly Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

The story of a boy, Jesus, and his relation to his family, manhood, and the ocean. By Quiara Alegria

Hudes, directed by Alix Hudson. $10–$15, 7:30 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

October 23 friday Paint Moment Art Sanctuary, 621 Old Santa Fe Trl, Ste 16

A guided painting class. $45, 6–8 pm, 575-404-1801, santafeartclasses.com.

Santa Fe Comic Con Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trl

(See p. 15.) Second annual Santa Fe Comic Con features artists and authors from the sci-fi and entertainment worlds. $15–$20, 4–8 pm (October 23), 10 am–8 pm (October 24), 10 am–6 pm (October 25), santafecomiccon.com.

Chile Fest: Green and Red Las Cosas Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Celebrate both of New Mexico’s favorite crops during one cooking course focused on green and red chile. $90, 6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Restaurant Walk I Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

A restaurant walking tour with stops including Agoyo Lounge, Eloisa, La Boca/Taberna, and Il Piatto. $115, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Southwest Barbecue Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe Learn to make Southwestern barbecue dishes, with menu items such as ribs with chipotle barbecue sauce, frijoles churros, and green tamales with crema. $82, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Kent Lovelace Meyer East Gallery, 225 Canyon

Paintings and prints by Kent Lovelace. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-983-1657, meyereastgallery.com.

Stephen Lang David Rothermel Contemporary 142 Lincoln, Ste 102

(See page 21.) Photographs of White Sands by Stephen Lang. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 575-642-4981, drcontemporary.com. Courtesy boneorchardmusic.com

High Desert Harvest Manitou Galleries, 225 Canyon

Paintings by Jeff Cochran. Free, through November 6, 505-986-0440, manitougalleries.com.

October 23: Bone Orchard at the Cowgirl 6

santafeanNOW.com

The MoCNA Reader: A Book Club Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

Inspired by Chief Curator Candice Hopkins’ apocalyptic group exhibition An Evening of Redness in

the West (see Ongoing), MoCNA hosts a discussion of Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian. Part of the new tri-monthly book club The MoCNA Reader. Free with admission ($10), 12–1:30 pm, 505-983-1666, iaia.edu/museum.

SWAIA’s Moving Image Class X Winners 2015 Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

A film program featuring winners of SWAIA’s Indian Market Moving Image Classification X, one of the most recent classifications added to the juried market. Awards recognize the artist’s dedication and skill in working with new media and innovative art forms while retaining a commitment to traditional creation and technique. $10, through February 14, 2016, 505-983-1666, iaia.edu/museum.

Benzo with Scarlet Cortex Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Live hip-hop music. $5, 8 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Bone Orchard Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Folk music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma

Piano music. Free, 6-9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Dmitri Matheny Museum Hill Café, 710 Camino Lejo

Jazz artist Dmitri Matheny performs with the John Trentacosta Trio. $20–$25, 7 pm, 505-983-6820, santafemusiccollective.org.

Latin Fridays Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With DJ Dany in the Skylab. $10, 10 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Little Leroy and His Pack of Lies El Farol, 808 Canyon

Rock/blues/soul music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Nosotros The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Latin music. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Randall Rahn The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Live music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.


Courtesy SFUAD

S Festival

Friday, October 30, 12 pm - 9 pm Saturday, October 31, 10 am - 6 pm Sunday, November 1, 10 am - 4 pm $10 per person or $15 for a weekend pass

Arts

Jennifer Cavan©

of the

and Distillery Fest ©

Charles Carrillo

The SW Festival of the arts & Distillery Fest is an international juried art festival with artists from throughout North America. Distilleries, breweries, and New Mexico products will be sampled and sold as well.

swfestivalofthearts.com swfestivalofthearts@gmail.com (505) 821-8537

October 16–17, 23–24: Wild Talk at the Greer Garson Theatre Company

Sierra La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Country, Spanish, and R&B music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

TGIF Concerts: Linda Larkin and Julie Hawley First Presbyterian Church, 208 Grant

Every Friday night First Presbyterian Church opens its doors to the community of Santa Fe for a time of music and reflection. Free, 5:30–6 pm, 505-982-8544, fpcsantafe.org.

PRESENTING SPONSOR

October 24 saturday

Sounds of Santa Fe: Frogville The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Architecture Studio Tour Various locations

The Alchemy Party Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Juicebox Ray. $7, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón, 213 Washington

The Tequila Plays The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 NM-14, Madrid

Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Gemma Kavanagh Christ Lutheran Church, 1701 Arroyo Chamiso

Southwest Arts presents soprano Gemma Kavanagh alongside trumpeter Mick Hesse and pianist C. Scott Hagler. $20, children $5, 7–8:30 pm, 970-903-8854, southwestarts.org.

The Foreigner Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Larry Shue’s comedy, which originally premiered in New York City in 1984, directed by Robert Nott.

GOLD SPONSOR

$15–$20, 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

The Lensic Performing Arts Center and Frogville Records present the third event in a series celebrating the local music scene, featuring headliner Anthony Leon & The Chain, as well as St. Range, Felecia Ford, and Mariachi Sonidos del Monte. $15, 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Swinging jazz piano trio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Festival location: 20 BuFFaLO ThuNDER TRaIL SaNTa FE, NM 87506

Joe West’s Theatre of Death presents a night of original drama inspired by the French Grand Guignol. $20, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Wild Talk Greer Garson Theatre, 1600 St. Michael’s

Wild Talk, written by Jane Martin and directed by Jon Jory, is a sequel to Martin’s Talking With and brings ten women to points of extreme comic and dramatic crisis in a whirlwind of unusual situations. $5–$15, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Yemaya’s Belly Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

The story of a boy, Jesus, and his relation to his family, manhood, and the ocean. By Quiara Alegria Hudes, directed by Alix Hudson. $10–$15, 7:30 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

An inside look at how design firms work as six Santa Fe architecture outfits open their doors to the public for tours: ARCHAEO Architects, Suby Bowden + Associates, Hoopes + Associates Architects, Atkin Olshin Schade Architects, and Architectural Alliance. Free, 10 am–5 pm, 505-428-9056, architecturesantafe.org.

Artdoors Adventures: Picacho Peak Nature Conservancy Trail Park Lot Canyon Rd and Cerro Gordo

Eggman & Walrus presents a program that pairs hiking with mindfulness, breathing, and meditation practices; color and form exercises; and site-specific art-making with pastels and found objects. $60, 9 am–1 pm, 801-910-7150, thegreatartdoors.com.

Paint Moment Art Sanctuary, 621 Old Santa Fe Trl, Ste 16

A guided painting class. $45, 6–8 pm, 575-404-1801, santafeartclasses.com.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Plaza, at the Park Ramada 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Juried fine art and craft show for Northern New Mexico artists, featuring paintings, photography, pottery, jewelry, and more. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-414-8544, santafeartistsmarket.com. October 22, 2015 NOW 7


Brewery Tour Santa Fe Brewing Company, 35 Fire Pl

See where local brews such as Happy Camper IPA and Santa Fe Pale Ale are made. Free, noon, 505-424-3333, santafebrewing.com.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal

Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Vanilla Pop The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Chris Ishee Quartet El Mesón, 213 Washington

Live music. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

A cooking course focused on Santa Fe’s unique cuisine, which melds the region’s cultural traditions with a contemporary style of Southwestern fare. Menu items include grilled salmon fillet with poblanolime jam and fresh green onion-corn tamales. $82, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

C.S. Rockshow El Farol, 808 Canyon

Bird Walk Leonora Curtin Wetland Preserve 27283 I-25 West Frontage Rd, La Cienega

How To Make Bread Las Cosas Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Piano music. Free, 6-9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Contemporary Southwest I Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Tackle the challenge of making bread at high altitudes. $90, 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Red Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Explore chile’s unique history and learn how to handle the vegetable in the kitchen. $78, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta Fresh produce and handmade goods from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

JoyceGroup Santa Fe Santa Fe Public Library, 145 Washington

Lovers of Irish writer James Joyce’s work meet every Saturday to discuss Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. Led by Adam Harvey, creator of the one-man show Don’t Panic: It’s Only Finnegans Wake. Enthusiasts with all levels of knowledge are welcome. Free, 10 am–12:30 pm, joycegeek.com.

Adult Classes: General Technique Entreflamenco: Santa Fe School of Flamenco 1730 Camino Carlos Rey

A general technique adult flamenco class. $30, 11 am–12:15 pm, 505-209-1302, entreflamenco.com.

Adult Classes: Introduction to Flamenco Entreflamenco: Santa Fe School of Flamenco 1730 Camino Carlos Rey An introductory adult flamenco class. $30, 10–11 am, 505-209-1302, entreflamenco.com.

Alex Maryol Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Rock music. Free, 1–4 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com. 8

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Jazz piano music. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Rock and roll. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma

Flamenco El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant, 113 Washington Live guitar music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

KGB Trio El Mesón, 213 Washington

Kirk Kadish (baby grand piano), alongside John Gagan (bass) and John Bartlit (drums). Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Paul Cataldo The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Spend a morning in the unique wetland habitat and learn about the diversity of birds from Rocky Tucker, volunteer bird guide. Free, 8–9:30 am, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Cottonwood Celebration Leonora Curtin Wetland Preserve 27283 I-25 West Frontage Rd, La Cienega

Celebrate the cottonwood trees at the preserve with art and science activities for all ages. Free, 9–11 am, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Jill Hennessy Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

AMP Concerts presents a concert with rock musician Jill Hennessy, perhaps best known for her acting roles in Law & Order and Crossing Jordan. $17–$20, 7 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Los Lobos The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Americana music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

(See page 5.) HeathSUN Concert Series presents Grammy winning East L.A. band Los Lobos, comprising David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano, and Steve Berlin. $49–$59, 7 pm 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

The Foreigner Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Showcase Karaoke Tiny’s Restaurant, 1005 St. Francis

Hosted by Nanci & Cyndy. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-1100, tinyssantafe.com.

Sierra La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Country, Spanish, and R&B music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

So Sophisticated Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Dance party with DJ 12 Tribe. $7, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

The John Kurzweg Band Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Rock music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Tucker Binkley

Larry Shue’s comedy, which originally premiered in New York City in 1984, directed by Robert Nott. $15–$20, 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

The Tequila Plays The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 NM-14, Madrid

Joe West’s Theatre of Death presents a night of original drama inspired by the French Grand Guignol. $20, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Wild Talk Greer Garson Theatre, 1600 St. Michael’s

Wild Talk, written by Jane Martin and directed by Jon Jory, is a sequel to Martin’s Talking With and brings ten women to points of extreme comic and dramatic crisis in a whirlwind of unusual situations. $5–$15, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Yemaya’s Belly Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

The story of a boy, Jesus, and his relation to his family, manhood, and the ocean. By Quiara Alegria Hudes, directed by Alix Hudson. $10–$15, 7:30 pm,


Joining her for a discussion are Harvey family members and Stephen Fried, author of Appetite for America. Free with admission ($6–$9), 2 pm, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Matthew Andrae La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Brazilian/flamenco/classical music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Nacha Mendez and Friends El Farol, 808 Canyon

Courtesy Red Mountain Press

Latin world music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Paul Cataldo Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Americana music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com. October 25: Book launch for Jeffrey Thomson’s fragile at Teatro Paraguas

505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

October 25 sunday Cowgirl Brunch Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

With music by the Broomdust Caravan. Free, 2–3 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Book Launch Teatro Paraguas, 3504 Calle Marie

Red Mountain Press launches LIFTED TO THE WIND: Poems 1974-2015 by Susan Gardner and fragile by Jeffrey Thomson. Free, 6 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

Fred Nathan: A Sneak Preview of Think New Mexico’s New Policy Initiative Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo

Journey Santa Fe presents “A Sneak Preview of Think New Mexico’s New Policy Initiative: How a Little Known 1977 Law Continues to Have a Big Impact on New Mexicans,” with Fred Nathan, executive director of Think New Mexico; and host and moderator Bill Dupuy, the former news director for KSFR radio station. Free, 11 am, 505-988-4226, cwbookstore.com.

Harvey Girls Revisited New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln

Katrina Parks, director of the 2013 documentary Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound, shows her newest interviews with former New Mexico Harvey Girls.

Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Tone and The Major Dudes Evangelo’s, 200 W San Francisco

Tone and The Major Dudes perform every Sunday. $5, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-9014.

The Foreigner Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Larry Shue’s comedy, which originally premiered in New York City in 1984, directed by Robert Nott. $15–$20, 2 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

The Tequila Plays The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 NM-14, Madrid

by John Corigliano, Samuel Barber, and more. 3 pm, $15–$35, brownpapertickets.com.

October 26 monday Tacos Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A taco cooking class with ingredients such as potato, poblano chile and spinach, and hot and smoky shrimp. $98, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Adult Flamenco Classes Entreflamenco: Santa Fe School of Flamenco 1730 Camino Carlos Rey

Adult flamenco classes. $30, general technique class 5:30–6:30 pm, introductory class 6:30–7:30 pm, 505-209-1302, entreflamenco.com.

Bill Hearne La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Hosted by Michéle Leidig. Free, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Sean Healen El Farol, 808 Canyon

Americana/rock and roll music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Joe West’s Theatre of Death presents a night of original drama inspired by the French Grand Guignol. $20, 3 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

October 27 tuesday

Wild Talk Greer Garson Theatre, 1600 St. Michael’s

Mural Project Encaustic Institute, 632 Agua Fria

Wild Talk, written by Jane Martin and directed by Jon Jory, is a sequel to Martin’s Talking With and brings ten women to points of extreme comic and dramatic crisis in a whirlwind of unusual situations. $5–$15, 2 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Yemaya’s Belly Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

The story of a boy, Jesus, and his relation to his family, manhood, and the ocean. By Quiara Alegria Hudes, directed by Alix Hudson. $10–$15, 2 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

American Made First Presbyterian Church, 208 Grant

(See page 4.) Serenata of Santa Fe performs works

Students from De Vargas Middle School and volunteers from Encaustic Art Institute transfer and paint a mural during this ARTsmart event. Free, 9 am–2 pm, 505-992-2787, artsmartnm.org.

Hot & Spicy Curries Las Cosas Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Explore the exotic flavor and heat that fires curries from India and Thailand. $90, 6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

George R.R. Martin Book Signing October 22, 2015 NOW 9


Jean Cocteau Cinema, 418 Montezuma

George R.R. Martin signs copies of his Game of Thrones prequel A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms. $10–$30, 7:30 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Coffee Hour & Book Club Santa Fe Botanical Garden, 725 Camino Lejo

Explore the Terence S. Tarr Botanical Library during a coffee and book club event. 10 am, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Juilliard in Santa Fe New Mexico School for the Arts 275 E Alameda

A special presentation for prospective students and families in the Santa Fe area with a program about applying and auditioning for Juilliard, followed by a Q+A session. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-310-4194, nmschoolforthearts.org.

The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo

Rinker Buck presents The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey, which tells the story of he and his brother’s travel along the Oregon Trail, as well as the trail’s history and significance. Free, 6 pm, 505-988-4226, cwbookstore.com.

Metta Refuge Council Upaya Zen Center, 1404 Cerro Gordo

A weekly council group for those who wish to explore and share their experiences with aging, sickness, and death. Free, 10:15 am–12:45 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

susana millman

Poetry of Embodiment Zoetic Nourishing Life, 230 St. Francis

In a playful weave of poetry reading and writing, awareness exercises, mindfulness, yoga, and practical wisdom, this program—designed for individuals facing effects of traumatic stress, chronic pain, illness, disability, or other life challenges— explores how to use both joy and suffering to live more fully. 2–3:30 pm, 505-983-2649, lisaannmoore.com.

Argentine Tango Milonga El Mesón, 213 Washington

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Bill Hearne La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Bluegrass Jam Zia Diner, 326 S Guadalupe

A weekly bluegrass jam. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-988-7008, ziadiner.com.

Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol, 808 Canyon

Blues, rock, and R&B. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

John Rangel Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco

Jazz piano music. Free, 6:30–9:30 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Lounge Sessions Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Guttermouth. $2, 8–11 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Open Mic Night The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Hosted by Benito. Free, 9:30 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

wednesday National Food Day Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Rd

A celebration of food at the Dance Circle on the IAIA campus, in conjunction with Food Day, developed by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). The event includes prizes, raffles, a community lunch, and art show. Free, 10 am–4 pm, 505-424-2300, iaia.edu.

Lisa Dale Norton: Writing Memoirs Unitarian Universalist Congregation 107 W Barcelona

Lisa Dale Norton, author of Shimmering Images: A Handy Little Guide to Writing Memoir  and  Hawk Flies Above: Journey to the Heart of the Sandhills, discusses the craft of memoir writing. $15–$20, 6:30–8 pm, nmbook.org.

LOO’K Closer: Art Talk at Lunchtime Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, 217 Johnson

A member of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum’s curatorial department leads an insightful 15-minute discussion of a work of art currently on exhibit. Free with admission ($8–$12), 12:30–1 pm, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe 434 W San Francisco

Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Buffalo Nickel La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

The Troy Browne Trio Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

A new twist on a classic sound. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Greensky Bluegrass Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

AMP Concerts presents a bluegrass concert. $17–$20, 7:30 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Mark Morris Dance Group The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

October 27: Rinker Buck at Collected Works Bookstore 10

October 28

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(See page 16.) Performance Santa Fe presents 16 of Mark Morris Dance Company’s celebrated performers in a program featuring Pacific (Lou Harrison’s Trio for Violin, Cello, & Piano), The (Johann Sebastian Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F Major), and Festival Dance (Johann Nepomuk Hummel’s Piano Trio No. 5 in E Major, Op. 83). $27– $100, 7:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.


Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Chuscales El Mesón, 213 Washington

Classic and modern flamenco guitar. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Flash Forward Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Live music with DJ Poetics. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Living Room Blues El Farol, 808 Canyon

With Stanlie Kee & The Step In. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Russell Pyle Santa Fe Spirits, 7505 Mallard Way, Unit I

A solo performance by Russell Pyle of The Porter Draw. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-467-8892, santafespirits.com.

The Ian McFeron Duo Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Americana/roots. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Wednesday Night Karaoke Boxcar, 530 S Guadalupe

Hosted by Michéle Leidig. Free, 10 pm–1 am, 505-988-7222, railyardsantafe.com.

Wingtips & Windsors Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Music, style, and dance of the 1920s, featuring a dance lesson and live music. $5, 7 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

World Tavern Poker League Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

A poker tournament from World Tavern Poker, the largest poker league in the United States. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

October 29

thursday

Nosferatu Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

A screening of Nosferatu, with live music by Invincible Czars. $10–$12, 7 pm, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

David Corcoran: The New York Times Book of Science Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo

David Corcoran, now retired long-time editor of the The New York Times Science Times section, discusses The New York Times Book of Science: More than 150 Years of Groundbreaking Scientific Coverage. Free, 6 pm, 505-988-4226, cwbookstore.com.

The History of Water Rights in New Mexico St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trl

Steven Rudnick, retired director of environmental studies at University of Massachusetts-Boston, discusses the legal entanglements among Texas, Arizona, Mexico, and New Mexico along the Pecos, Rio Grande, and Colorado Rivers, and their impact on New Mexico’s ability to supply water to its residents. $10, 1–3 pm, 505-982-9274, renesan.org.

Adult Classes: General Technique Entreflamenco: Santa Fe School of Flamenco 1730 Camino Carlos Rey

A general technique adult flamenco class. $30, 5:30–6:30 pm, 505-209-1302, entreflamenco.com.

Community-Style Acupuncture Southwest Acupuncture College 1622 Galisteo

Patients receive acupuncture treatments in the same room. $16, 5:30–9 pm, acupuncturecollege.edu.

Alto Street Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco Cello and vocal duo in residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Duo Rasminko The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace Gypsy jazz music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Golden Thursdays Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Golden era and hip-hop music. $5, 10 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Latin Night Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With VDJ Dany. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Hosted by Michéle Leidig. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Trio Bijou Zia Diner, 326 S Guadalupe

Jazz music. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-988-7008, ziadiner.com.

Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Vicente Griego and Friends El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco jazz music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

October 30 friday SW Festival of the Arts & Distillery Fest Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trl

(See page 5.) A juried fine art festival featuring artists from around the United States, Canada, and Mexico along with select distilleries, breweries, and New Mexico products. $10–$15, 12–9 pm (Friday, October 30 and Saturday, October 31), 10 am–4 pm (Sunday, November 1), 505-821-8537, swfestivalofthearts.com.

Tricks, Treats, Witches, and Ghosts New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln

(See page 5.) Wear your costume and visit the museum’s Telling New Mexico exhibit on a scavenger hunt for costumed people portraying historic personalities to win a treat: a historically themed Halloween mask. At  6 pm, author and folklorist Nasario Garcia tells tales of witches, ghosts, and bogeymen inside the spooky Palace of the Governors. Free, 5–7 pm, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Gerard Vachez Gallery Grand Opening Gerard Vachez Gallery, 418 Montezuma

An exhibit of paintings and 3D graphic art by Gerard Vachez. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-577-8339, gerardvachez.com.

Three New Mexico Artists Santa Fe Clay, 545 Camino de la Familia

(See page 21.) Work by HP Bloomer IV, Eddie Dominguez, and Michelle Goodman. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-984-1122, santafeclay.com.

Truth & Beauty Janine Contemporary, 328 S Guadalupe

Sculptures by Don Kennell. Free, reception 5–7 pm, through November 30, 505-989-9330, janinecontemporary.com.

Two Landscapes: England & Peru photo-eye Gallery, 541 S Guadalupe

Photographs by Edward Ranney. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-5152, photoeye.com.

Boomroots The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

October 22, 2015 NOW 11


The Lensic presents a live broadcast of Wagner’s Tannhäuser, conducted by James Levine in the first Met revival since 2004. $22–$28, 10 am, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

October 31: Stone Soup at the Santa Fe Botanical Garden

The Shining The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

The Lensic presents a Halloween screening of The Shining, starring Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall, as part of the Big Screen Classics series. $5, 7 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Brewery Tour Santa Fe Brewing Company, 35 Fire Pl Courtesy Axle Contemporary

See where local brews such as Happy Camper IPA and Santa Fe Pale Ale are made. Free, noon, 505-424-3333, santafebrewing.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta Live music. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma

Piano music. Free, 6-9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Don and Pete The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Live music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Grand Opening: Día de los Muertos Crow Bar, 207 E San Francisco

Local business owner Rick Cassidy brings a new face to historic Burro Alley with the grand opening of the Crow Bar, with artwork by printmaker José Guadalupe Posada. Free, 6 pm, bealsandco.com.

Latin Fridays Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With DJ Dany in the Skylab. $10, 10 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

John Kurzweg El Farol, 808 Canyon

Rock music. $5, 9 pm –12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

TGIF Concerts: David Solem First Presbyterian Church, 208 Grant

Every Friday night First Presbyterian Church opens its doors to the community of Santa Fe for a time of music and reflection. Free, 5:30–6 pm, 505-982-8544, fpcsantafe.org. 12

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The Alchemy Party Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Juicebox Ray. $7, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

The Jason Spooner Band Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Live music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón, 213 Washington

Swinging jazz piano trio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Fresh produce and handmade goods from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

Stone Soup Santa Fe Botanical Garden, 715 Camino Lejo A community soup-making fundraiser to support Axle Contemporary’s nonprofit Axle Projects, Inc. Free, 3–5 pm, 505-670-5854, axleart.com.

JoyceGroup Santa Fe Santa Fe Public Library, 145 Washington

Lovers of Irish writer James Joyce’s work meet every Saturday to discuss Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. Led by Adam Harvey, creator of the oneman show Don’t Panic: It’s Only Finnegans Wake. Enthusiasts with all levels of knowledge are welcome. Free, 10 am–12:30 pm, joycegeek.com.

The Dark Desert Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

The Tequila Plays The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 NM-14, Madrid

An evening of storytelling hosted by Nickel Stories, with proceeds benefitting CCA and Op-Cit Books. $5–$7, 5–7:30 pm, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

October 31 saturday

Adult Flamenco Classes Entreflamenco: Santa Fe School of Flamenco 1730 Camino Carlos Rey

Joe West’s Theatre of Death presents a night of original drama inspired by the French Grand Guignol. $20, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Plaza, at the Park Ramada 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Juried fine art and craft show for Northern New Mexico artists, featuring paintings, photography, pottery, jewelry, and more. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-414-8544, santafeartistsmarket.com.

The Met: Live in HD: Tannhäuser (Wagner) The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

An adult flamenco class. $30, introductory class 10 am–11 am, general technique class 11 am–12:15 pm, 505-209-1302, entreflamenco.com.

American JeM’s Spook-tacular Night of Dinner and Dancing The Performance Space, 7 Caliente, Eldorado

American JeM performs during a Halloween event that includes a three-course dinner, music, dancing, and a costume contest with prizes. $55, 7 pm, 505-465-9214, theperformancespace.com.

Branden James


Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco Cello and vocal duo in residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma

Piano music. Free, 6-9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Flamenco El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Halloween with Felix and Los Gatos Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe Live music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Halloween Party The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Music by DJ Five7Five. $10, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Showcase Karaoke Tiny’s Restaurant, 1005 St. Francis

Hosted by Nanci & Cyndy. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-1100, tinyssantafe.com.

So Sophisticated Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Halloween party with DJ 12 Tribe. $7, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

The Gruve

El Farol, 808 Canyon Funk and soul music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

The Tequila Plays The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 NM-14, Madrid

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant, 113 Washington

Joe West’s Theatre of Death presents a night of original drama inspired by the French Grand Guignol. $20, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

KGB Trio El Mesón, 213 Washington

November 1 sunday

Live guitar music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

Kirk Kadish (baby grand piano), alongside John Gagan (bass) and John Bartlit (drums). Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar.

November 2

monday

Adult Flamenco Classes Entreflamenco: Santa Fe School of Flamenco 1730 Camino Carlos Rey

Adult flamenco classes. $30, general technique class 5:30–6:30 pm, introductory class 6:30–7:30 pm, 505-209-1302, entreflamenco.com.

Cowgirl Karaoke Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Hosted by Michéle Leidig. Free, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

November 3 tuesday ArtFusion Event Scottish Rite Temple, 463 Paseo de Peralta

Artists, muralists, and faux finishers of all levels can expand their knowledge and portfolio with classes, live demonstrations, and exhibitors. Various prices/ times, through November 6, artfusionevent.com.

Nacha Mendez and Friends El Farol, 808 Canyon

Metta Refuge Council Upaya Zen Center, 1404 Cerro Gordo

Cello and vocal duo in residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Tone and The Major Dudes Evangelo’s, 200 W San Francisco

Tone and The Major Dudes perform every Sunday. $5, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-9014.

El Día de los Muertos Celebration Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

Teatro Paraguas, Santa Fe Danceworks, and La Cocina de Balam host the second annual Day of the Dead event, featuring traditional and special dances, poetry in Spanish, live music, a procession and an altar honoring the ancestors. $7–$10, 1–9 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

Courtesy imago theatre/the lensic

Joe West’s Theatre of Death presents a night of original drama inspired by the French Grand Guignol. $20, 3 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco

Latin world music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Imago Theatre: ZooZoo The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

November 1: Imago Theatre’s ZooZoo at the Lensic

The Tequila Plays The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 NM-14, Madrid

Portland’s award-winning musical theater company combines mime, dance, acrobatics, and original music in a production to delight the young and the young at heart. $15–$40, 6 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

A weekly council group for those who wish to explore and share their experiences with aging, sickness, and death. Free, 10:15 am–12:45 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

Poetry of Embodiment Zoetic Nourishing Life, 230 St. Francis

In a playful weave of poetry reading and writing, awareness exercises, mindfulness, yoga, and practical wisdom, this program—designed for individuals facing effects of traumatic stress, chronic pain, illness, disability, or other life challenges— explores how to use both joy and suffering to live more fully. 2–3:30 pm, 505-983-2649, lisaannmoore.com.

Argentine Tango Milonga El Mesón, 213 Washington

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Bluegrass Jam Zia Diner, 326 S Guadalupe

A weekly bluegrass jam. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-988-7008, ziadiner.com.

Canyon Road Blues Jam

October 22, 2015 NOW 13


El Farol, 808 Canyon

Blues, rock, and R&B. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

November 4

wednesday Wednesday Night Karaoke Boxcar, 530 S Guadalupe

Hosted by Michéle Leidig. Free, 10 pm–1 am, 505-988-7222, railyardsantafe.com.

Wingtips & Windsors Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Music, style, and dance of the 1920s, featuring a dance lesson and live music. $5, 7 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Ongoing Irina Zaytceva Solo Exhibition Tansey Contemporary, 652 Canyon

Porcelain works by ceramicist Irina Zaytceva. Free, through October 23, 505-995-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.

Aftermath: Reactions to Cataclysm and Evolution freeform art space, 1619 C de Baca Ln

Work by Kelly Eckel. Free, through October 24, 505-692-9249, freeformartspace.com.

Origami in the Garden Turquoise Trail Sculpture Garden 3453 State Hwy 14 N, Cerrillos

More than 20 monumental sculptures by Kevin Box, often with his wife, Jennifer, and fellow origami masters. $10 (kids 12 and younger free), through October 24, 505-471-4688, origamiinthegarden.com.

Ineffable Nüart Gallery, 670 Canyon

Work by painter Erin Cone. Free, through October 25, 505-988-3888, nuartgallery.com.

Plein Air Painters of New Mexico Santa Fe Art Collector, 217 Galisteo

An annual, three-week juried exhibition and sale of work by artists from the Plein Art Painters of New Mexico. Free, through October 25, 505-988-5545, santafeartcollector.com.

Different Strokes Gallery 901, 708 Canyon

Work by Deborah Gold and Bobbie Goodrich. Free, through October 27, 505-780-8390, gallery901.org.

Harvest Greenberg Fine Art, 205 Canyon

(See page 21.) Group exhibition of paintings. Free, through October 29, 505-955-1500, greenbergfineart.com.

Passages Pippin Contemporary, 200 Canyon 14

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(See page 21.) Work by Tony Griffith. Free, through October 27, 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com.

NO LAND Wheelhouse Art, 418 Montezuma

Art collective STRANGERS presents a provocative new show examining the situation and future of young artists in the deeply established Santa Fe scene. Free, through October 28, 541-844-6683, strangersartcollective@gmail.com.

Bill Gallen Sage Creek Gallery, 421 Canyon

Work by Bill Gallen. Free, through October 30, 505-988-3444, sagecreekgallery.com.

Paintings of the Electric Night PHILSPACE, 1410 Second St

A new body of work by Larry Bob Phillips. Free, through October 30, 505-983-7945, philspacesantafe.com.

Good Things Come in Small Packages Lacuna Galleries, 124 W Palace

Works by photographer Julie Houck, mixed media artist Sandra Duran Wilson, and sculptor Cheryl Anne Lorance. Free, through October 31, 505-467-8424, lacunagalleries.com.

Karan Ruhlen Gallery, 225 Canyon

Work by Martha Mans, Kurt Meer, Stephen Pentak, and Pauline Ziegen. Free, through October 31, 505-820-0807, karanruhlen.com.

Unearthing the Mirror Manitou Galleries 123 W Palace and 225 Canyon

Work by Harry Greene, Fran Larsen, and Liz Wolf. Free, through October 31, 505-986-0440, 505-986-9833, manitougalleries.com.

Wine, Chile & Clifford Bailey! POP Gallery, 125 Lincoln, Ste 111

Work by Clifford Nolan Bailey. Free, through October 31, 505-820-0788, popsantafe.com.

Cecilia Kirby Binkley New Concept Gallery, 610 Canyon

Impressionist landscapes by Cecilia Kirby Binkley. Free, through November 2, 505-795-7570, newconceptgallery.com.

Pretty, Peculiar Turner Carroll Gallery, 725 Canyon

Work by Jenny Honnert Abell. Free, through November 3, 505-986-9800, turnercarroll.com.

Interaction Vivo Contemporary, 725 Canyon

Fine Native American Art from a Private Collection Adobe Gallery, 221 Canyon

Journey to the Soul’s Reflection Winterowd Fine Art, 710 Canyon

Harry O. Morris Jean Cocteau Cinema Gallery, 418 Montezuma

An exhibit of the mutual interplay among 14 artists and their media. Free, through October 31, 505-982-1320, vivocontemporary.com.

Work by abstract painter Brian Coffin. Free, through October 31, 505-992-8878, fineartsantafe.com.

My Spirit Animal Santa Fe Collective, 1114 Hickox, Ste G

A group show exploring the belief in an animal spirit that guides, protects, and serves as beacon for the attainment of desired strengths and characteristics. Free, through October 31, santafecollective.com.

National Juried Encaustic/Wax Exhibition The Encaustic Art Institute, 632 Agua Fria

(See page 21.) An exhibition of work by 57 nationwide artists working with encaustic/wax, juried by Bruce Helander, editor in chief of The Art Economist magazine. Free, through October 31, 505-989-3283, eainm.com.

New Mexico Wild: Typewriter Tales of a Santa Fe Bohemian Matthews Gallery, 669 Canyon

Robert Wolf returns to Santa Fe with his typewriter and original notes that inspired parts of his new memoir, In Search of America. Free, through October 31, 505-992-2882, thematthewsgallery.com.

Santa Fe Six Art Exchange Gallery, 60 E San Francisco

An exhibition of work by six artists who live and work in Santa Fe. Free, through October 31, 505-603-4485, aegallery.com.

The Landscape: Classical to Modern

New selection of paintings from the Betty and Marvin Rubin Collection. Free, through November 10, 505-955-0550, adobegallery.com

Multimedia work by Harry O. Morris. Free, through November 11, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Black Magic Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, 544 S Guadalupe Work by Max Cole and Constance DeJong. Free, through November 16, 505-989-8688, charlottejackson.com.

100 Portraits Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

Axle Contemporary and CCA present a series of portraits by artist Hye Coh. $5, through December 6, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Gravity’s Delta Peters Projects 1011 Paseo de Peralta

New works on paper and sculpture by Eric Garduño. Free, through December 21, 505-954-5800, petersprojects.com.

The Land Mark Show Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trl

An exhibition featuring works from 28 artists located in the western United States. $5, through December 27, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org.

Trans-Species Repast Center for Contemporary Arts


1050 Old Pecos Trl

Catherine Harris’s interactive installation explores a non-hierarchal relationship to landscape. $5, through December 27, 505-982-1338, ccasantafe.org. Comic Con attendees show off their cosplay superpowers

Art, Wind and Fire Los Alamos Nature Center 2600 Canyon, Los Alamos

A joint event of Catenary Art Gallery and Pajarito Environmental Center, featuring work by Rumi Vesselinova. Free, through October 28, 505-982-2700, catenaryartgallery.com.

A group exhibition of work that reimagines the idea of the apocalypse. $10, through December 31, 505-983-1666, iaia.edu/museum.

Pottery of the U.S. South Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo

Traditional stoneware from North Carolina and northern Georgia. $6–9, through January 3, 2016, 505-476-1250, internationalfolkart.org.

From New York to New Mexico Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, 217 Johnson

A modernist exhibition featuring more than 60 works by O’Keeffe, Max Weber, Stuart Davis, and others. $12–$18, through January 10, 2016, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln Nearly 225 photographs and 40 cameras show how a light-tight box pierced by a hole can reveal alternate versions of reality. $6-$9, through January 10, 2016, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

City Tours

Discover Santa Fe via Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505-983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), or the New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.

STEPHEN LANG

An Evening of Redness in the West Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral

by Ja s on Str ykow s ki

a little pop for Santa Fe’s culture second annual Santa Fe Comic Con FORGET SAN DIEGO OR NEW YORK. New Mexican fans of pop culture need only drive up Highway 84 to find their inner geek. The second annual Santa Fe Comic Con runs from October 23-25 at the Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino Convention Center and features a number of famous faces and names behind famous characters. Scheduled to attend this year are actors Bai Ling (The Crow), Tony Todd (Candyman), and Noah Hathaway (Battlestar Galactica), among many others. Also on hand will be athletes Bill Goldberg (professional wrestler) and Frank Mir (UFC). Len Wein (creator of the Marvel Comics character Wolverine) and Brian Pulido (creator of Lady Death) will represent the comic book world. Promoter Jim Burleson also says that surprises are inevitable. True Blood’s Jim Parrack, for instance, recently signed on to attend. This year’s convention may swell to some 10,000 guests, but attendees can expect an intimate experience with their favorite stars. Celebrity-driven panels run throughout the day, starting an hour after doors open. Topics to be discussed include acting, wrestling, and breaking into the comics and entertainment scenes. Younger fans might choose to participate in the cos[tumes] play contest, watch the scheduled anime, or shop for souvenirs from 200 vendors. Once the kids go to bed, adults can party with live bands or take part in a charity poker tournament. Look for Swami Rob, playing on Saturday night, and superhero burlesque over the weekend as well. Tickets for one, two or three days (ranging in price from $15 for a day pass up to $250 for a VIP Platinum three-day pass) are available online at santafecomiccon.com or in person at Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino. Santa Fe Comic Con, October 23–25,$15-$250, Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino, 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, santafecomiccon.com October 22, 2015 NOW 15


by Emily Va n Cle ve

Mark Morris Dance Group 35 years of eclectic, electric choreography

“Nuances are an important part of his work,” says Lynch. “All of the dancers have worked hard to learn his particular style. There’s a humbleness to his work. It can look easy. The challenge lies in communicating the details.” Morris founded the Mark Morris Dance Group in 1980 and has created close to 150 works for his company. He’s also been involved in other projects through the years. From 1988 to 1991 he was the director of dance at the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels, the national opera house of Belgium. In 1990 he founded the White Oak Dance Project with Russianborn ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov. Morris has taught at the University of Washington, Princeton University, and Tanglewood Music Center and received 11 honorary doctorates to date. He was named a fellow of the MacArthur Foundation in 1991. Music usually provides the seeds for Morris’s movements. “He listens to music and collects certain images in his mind,” says Lynch. This intense dedication to music is reflected in performances that always feature live musicians collaborating with dancers. “We (the musicians and dancers) take cues off each other,” Lynch adds. “Each performance becomes a very alive experience.” Mark Morris Dance Group, October 27, 7:30 pm, $74, Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W San Francisco, tickets.ticketssantafe.org

Mark Morris Dance Group performs Dido and Aeneas at Tanglewood.

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HILARY SCOTT

NEW YORK CHOREOGRAPHER Mark Morris is in great demand as a ballet choreographer, but he’s also firmly entrenched in modern dance. His piece Pacific, which the San Francisco Ballet asked him to create in 1995, is one of three dances presented by his company, the Mark Morris Dance Group, at the Lensic PerformingArts Center on October 27. Another work, Festival Dance, was created in 2011 for six couples. THE, also on the Santa Fe program, premiered this year at Tanglewood Music Center and is a fully modern piece, says Laurel Lynch, one of 18 dancers in the company. “Mark’s signature approach is to have everybody dancing together most of the time, but a few years ago he became interested in the traditional man/woman partnering,” says Lynch. “Festival Dance has a classical formality to the shape and architecture of the dancers but it’s also somewhat folk-like in that the dancers form circles and lines.” Unlike some of his contemporaries, who are interested in showcasing their dancers’ virtuosity, Morris focuses his attention on communicating complex ideas that are open to a variety of interpretations. He’s particularly interested in human relationships and yet tends to avoid a story line.


Plaza Cafe Southside The hip little sister restaurant to the original Plaza Café is nowhere near the Plaza, but Plaza Café Southside is a great place to enjoy a homemade dessert or a full meal after a movie at the Regal Cinemas on Cerrillos. With creative dishes like the crispy avocado taco pictured here, the diner is reaching out to all of us who have special diets and offering delicious gluten-free, vegetarian, and vegan options. These tacos hit all of those dietary designations, as they’re made with avocado slices coated with protein-packed quinoa, sesame, and poppy seeds; and they’re garnished with romaine lettuce, roasted corn, red bell pepper, chopped green chile, and pickled onions. Rounding out the meal with a side of pinto beans and Spanish rice, the avocado tacos please the palate with a variety of spicy and mild ingredients that simultaneously run the gamut of textures and nutrients.—Cristina Olds

eating drinking +

douglas merriam

Plaza Café Southside, 3466 Zafarano, plazacafesouthside.com

October 22, 2015 NOW 17


Seen Around

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Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.

photographs by Stephen Lang


photographs by Lisa Law

Nightlife

by Pamela Macias

October 22, 2015 NOW 19


Opening Night As one of the largest art markets in the country, Santa Fe is always hosting openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was recently out and about at a number of opening-night receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we hung out with.

photographs by Stephen Lang

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art

openings | reviews | artists

Stephen Lang, White Sands, photographic print, 12 x 24"

Photographer Stephen Lang wasn’t prepared for the blinding whiteness of White Sands National Monument in southern New Mexico when he spent two days there in 2012. “I’ve seen massive amounts of snow in the East Coast, but this was something different,” says Lang. “I couldn’t read the numbers in my camera.” Despite the visual challenges, Lang persevered in his goal to photograph these unusual sand dunes, which are made of gypsum crystals. He has selected a group of photos, originally taken in color and converted to black and white, to display at David Rothermel Contemporary from October 23 through November 6. Lang, primarily a freelance photographer, moved to Santa Fe more than two years ago and was mesmerized by the dunes’ graceful curves, gentle slopes, and subtle shapes and tones. “I live and die by my eye,” he says. “It is what propels me into whatever world I choose to shoot in.”— Emily Van Cleve Photographs of White Sands National Monument by Stephen Lang October 23–November 6, reception Oct. 23, 5–8 PM David Rothermel Contemporary, 142 Lincoln #102, drcontemporary.com October 22, 2015 NOW 21


art

STUDIO

Shidoni Foundry

losing your wax, finding your bronze

Pouring bronze to create beautiful sculptures since 1971, Shidoni Foundry is a full-service stop for bronze casting. The Shidoni team of long-term staff—who are mostly artists themselves—can do any part of the process of the lost wax method of bronze art casting, from mold making to casting to pouring. “We do everything from small to large pieces; we’re not just for artists but also hobbyists,” says Alex Donnatelli, assistant foundry manager. Bronze is the primary metal poured at Shidoni, but depending on the weight of the piece requested, they will re-purpose the preheat furnace to be used with other materials. The artists are encouraged to help with the many steps in the process (see shidonifoundry. com for a comprehensive guide), but for safety, the Shidoni team does the actual pouring of the molten metal. Visit Saturday afternoons to see this process firsthand and stroll the surrounding eight acres of sculpture gardens.—Cristina Olds Shidoni Foundry, 1508 Bishops Lodge, Tesuque, shidonifoundry.com

Using a ladle, Shidoni pour captain and artist Josh Ybarra pours excess metal from a pour into ingots, molds that will be used at a later date. The pour team wears kevlar suits for this hot job.

Investment shells are poured with metal that is melted in a large furnace.

Shells are moved with a hoist out of the dropping cage. The cage is moved to a sand bed where shells will be poured with bronze heated to 2,000 degrees.

This is the back of a sculpture by artist Bruce LaFountain that’s been encased in wax and is covered by a ceramic shell. Once bronze is poured in the shell and cooled, the shell cracks off, leaving the bronze sculpture.

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STEPHEN LANG

Shells in a dropping cage are removed from the preheat furnace, where they are heated to 1,300 degrees before the pour.


art

PROFILE

Alvaro Cardona-Hine, Dream City VI, acrylic on canvas, 21 x 28"

Alvaro Cardona-Hine truth in Truchas

by Eve Tolpa

ALVARO CARDONA-HINE got serious about painting 50 years ago. “When I was 40 years old, I decided I needed color in my life,” he says of the transition. “I never had a teacher. I had a lot of friends who were painters, and I watched them.” He’s always worked in series, exploring themes that range from Buddhist sutras to Egyptian myths; his latest is called Dream Cities. Those pieces, he says, “begin with groups of color” and are “happier” than what he’s created in the past, representing “a breakthrough in terms of form.” Originally from Costa Rica, Cardona-Hine relocated with his family to Los Angeles at age 14, when his father accepted a post as a consul. (“There were no freeways,” he recalls. “L.A. was a garden; it was gorgeous.”) His work was featured in galleries in both California and Minnesota before he and his wife, fellow artist Barbara McCauley, came to Truchas in 1987 to open CardonaHine Gallery, where they still show their paintings and prints. “Most artists are a little too proud to peddle their own work,” says Cardona-Hine, who continued to exhibit work nationwide after the move, but has found the ideal model of an artist-owned space, with its inherent capacity for aesthetic freedom. Equally ideal is Truchas. “[It’s] a happy little village,” he says. “There are a lot of galleries here.” Cardona-Hine’s talent transcends the visual; he is also a composer and author who has published more than 30 volumes

Alvaro Cardona-Hine, Dream City XIX, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 42"

of poetry and prose. His current passion project is translating from Spanish to English a book by his brother, who was “a very well-known poet in Latin America,” based on the latter’s conversations with Diego Rivera. Called El monstruo en su laberinto (The Monster in His Labyrinth), it is, says Cardona-Hine, “a very important book in terms of Rivera’s ideas.” Dream Cities, October 25–November 8, Cardona-Hine Gallery, 82 Country Road 75, Truchas, cardonahinegallery.com October 22, 2015 NOW 23


art

PROFILE

Donna Schillinger

fluent in multimedia Tony Abeyta mixes philosophies, textures, senses—and hats

Navajo contemporary artist Tony Abeyta wears many hats. Literally. And the kind of artist he is on any given day depends on which hat he is wearing. If it’s a baseball cap, he may be splashing paint around on a large-scale black-and-white abstract. If he’s wearing a cowboy hat, it’s because he must again bear witness to the marriage of the Taos sky and earth, a sight permanently impressed in his imagination. Yet another hat finds him in a parking lot, negotiating a score of turquoise to get his jewelry-making fix. Abeyta’s primary focus has been brightly colored textural paintings of New Mexican landscapes. He began to experiment on this foundation with grainy materials like sand, which evolved into sculpture and jewelry making. The three-dimensional work in turn influenced his painting, and vice versa. “It’s about translating 3-D, color, and texture into one another,” says Abeyta. His newest work is a confluence of these elements, with the addition of sound. “I am animating abstract drawings and color paintings,” explains Abeyta,“ . . . multimedia video mapping and projections on immersive domes, on buildings, and then on large dishes.” The artist is considering rolling out this multimedia exhibit on the Very Large Array astronomical radio observatories near Magdalena at a to-be-determined date. Abeyta’s brightly colored textural paintings of New Mexican landscapes are reminiscent of the Taos modernists of the 1940s. In his Santa Fe studio (he also keeps one in Berkeley, California): a 46 x 90" oil of the Grand Canyon.

Calling Abeyta’s work “mixed media” is an understatement. He uses traditional as well as multimedia approaches, and is considering a large-scale projection exhibit at the Very Large Array observatiories.

Abeyta working on a black-and-white drawing entitled Deer Gathering.

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Stephen Lang

The Owings Gallery, 120 E Marcy, owingsgallery.com


Three New Mexico Artists, Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia santafeclay.com October 30–December 5 Reception October 30 5–7 pm Santa Fe Clay’s new exhibit of works by Eddie Dominguez, Michelle Goodman, and Studio Manager HP Bloomer IV focuses on the artistic interpretations of everyday sights and objects. Bloomer’s teapots, for example, blend his childhood exposure Michelle Goodman, Pink Coily, wire and to art and architecture ceramic, 12 x 7.5 x 5" with complex patterns in soothing earth tones. Goodman’s offbeat wire creations are everything from softly organic to tightly structured, as she draws on objects as varied as fish traps and kitchen utensils. Dominguez’s work has a clearly New Mexico slant; his attention to landscapes and lighting is reflected in the colors he uses in his ceramics. This exhibit opens at Santa Fe Clay on October 30 and runs until December 5.—AM

art style

PREVIEWS Tony Griffith: Passages Pippin Contemporary 200 Canyon pippincontemporary.com October 14–27 Reception October 16, 5–7 pm This fall, mixed-media artist Tony Griffith is exhibiting his vibrant, soulful abstracts at Pippin Contemporary, one of the participating galleries in October’s Art Matters series. An enthusiastic outdoorsman, Griffith is known for expressing diverse arid and aquatic surroundings in the hope that the viewer will join him in sensing the peaceful brilliance of nature. In Passages, Griffith presents a set of quirky optical challenges that encourage both reflection and the spiritual awareness that not all boundaries are set by exterior elements.—Anne Maclachlan

Tony Griffith, In Medias Res, acrylic/resin/panel, 48 x 36"

Lange Marshall, Wholes and Halves, oil on linen, 14 x 18" Linda Wein, Simple Pleasure, encaustic, 6 x 8"

Harvest: A Group Show, Greenberg Fine Art, 205 Canyon greenbergfineart.com, through October 29 Reception October 16, 5–7 pm Lange Marshall’s impressionistic autumn still-life paintings, inspired by the abundance of seasonal fruits and vegetables and their rich shapes and color combinations, are included in the featured works in this seven-person group show. “I look forward to fall harvest because of the abundance of colorful objects to paint,” says Marshall. “The shapes and color combinations of fruit and vegetables are endless.” Additional artists include Laurin McCracken, Timothy Horn, Joseph Breza, Caroline Carpio, Bernard Franz, and Michael DeVore. Also fascinated with seasonal color changes, DeVore says, “I find this time of year particularly complements my use of reds, yellows, oranges, and browns. Oil color pigments come from the earth, so there’s a natural relationship between nature and art, which I love to explore.” His newest pieces will be on display during the group show.—Carolyn Patten

Encaustic Art Institute’s Best of Show award goes to Linda Wein National Juried Encaustic/Wax Exhibition, Encaustic Art Institute 632 Agua Fria, eainm.com, through October 31 Wednesday–Sunday, 1–5 pm The Encaustic Art Institute recently awarded its national Best of Show prize in the miniatures category to EAI member artist Linda Wein for her 6 x 8" Simple Pleasure. The work was selected from a pool of 57 juried pieces submitted by artists from across the country; the prize carries a cash award of $500. Based in Missouri, Wein teaches art in the public school system. Her work is nationally represented in public and private collections, as well as in numerous juried shows. The National Juried Encaustic/ Wax Exhibition will continue through the end of October at the Encaustic Art Institute at 632 Agua Fria.—AM

October 22, 2015 NOW 25


style

here and NOW La Puerta Originals helps NOW display in style

IF YOU BUILD IT, they will come. And indeed they have. Readers of Santa Fean NOW are regularly emptying our new display case at the entrance of Whole Foods Market on Cerrillos Road—and we’re refilling it with fresh copies just as quickly as they’re flying off the shelves. NOW turned to Santa Fe woodworkers La Puerta Originals, who designed and built the multishelf unit that displays not only current and back issue copies of NOW, but other area publications as well. The kiosk, like most of La Puerta’s pieces, is made entirely of reclaimed wood, including Douglas fir from a warehouse building in Northern California and sawtooth detail carvings from Afghanistan. “It’s little touches like that that make the pieces we do highly unique,” says Scott Coleman, La Puerta’s founder and creative director. “Everything today is made out of plywood and pressboard and veneers. When you see something that’s made out of real wood, it usually exceeds your expectations.”—Amy Gross

La Puerta Originals, lapuertaoriginals.com

The display case was a “community effort” utilizing the skills of about a half-dozen people, says Scott Coleman. From a computergenerated design), all of the pieces were milled and assembled, followed by a finish prep and a finish process. The display case, assembled and ready for finishing (shown here) and at right, stained, painted, and clad in chalkboard slates, ready for magazines.

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STEPHEN LANG

La Puerta Originals employees cut parts and assemble the case. Below: A CNC machine allows for precise carving of lettering.

The kiosk, like most of La Puerta’s pieces, is made entirely of reclaimed wood.


Eating Around October 15, 8 pm Tuna and lobster claw parfait on Indian fry bread $19; chorizo stuffed quail with fried plantains $15; grilled salmon with local heirloom tomatoes and burrata, topped with piñon pesto sauce $32.

B.Y. COOPER

Daniel Nadelbach

Julia at La Posada

330 East Palace Ave, laposadadesantafe.com

[on the market]

Send Santa Fean NOW pictures of your meal (with the info we’ve included here) and we might run them in the magazine! Email: info@santafean.com

4 Camino Sabio The views go on for miles and miles at this double adobe, four-residence compound on more than 11 acres in the Tesuque area. The spacious main house, with two bedrooms and two bathrooms, has ample wall space to accommodate a large collection of artwork. The property’s 1,800-squarefoot guesthouse has two one-bedroom residences, each with its own bath, kitchen and living room, separated by a laundry room that serves both residences. A smaller casita can be used as a guesthouse or an office. Outdoor portales and patios surrounding the homes provide stunning views of the Jemez and Sangre de Cristo mountains. Gardens are immaculately maintained, lush and extensive. A three-car garage offers plenty of storage space.

Santa Fashion Photographer Mark Steven Shepherd proves Santa Fe style is a real thing with his candid shots of locals around town.

Jane Van Amberg sports a striking ensemble at the Railyard.

List Price: $1.835 million Contact: Neil Lyon, 505-660-8600, Sotheby’s International Realty, santafesir.com

October 22, 2015 NOW 27


Angel Wynn, Holy Ghost 2, Photographic Print

style

www.angelwynn.com

Spooky Santa Fe

jason strykowski

a guide to gh oul is h g at he r ing s

Peter Sinclaire shows a tour group through La Posada’s Staab House.

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santafeanNOW.com

America’s oldest capital city would seem a likely home for the restless undead—and it is. To spot some of these spirits, ghost hunters will need to bring their sixth sense and, perhaps, a guide. Santa Fe local Peter Sinclaire, owner and operator of The Original Santa Fe Ghost Tour, has guided believers and skeptics through Santa Fe in search of the undead for over two decades. In that time, he has gathered and told over two dozen ghost tales, most of which center on a five-block radius of the plaza. “Hundreds of people have told their stories,” said Sinclaire. “A lot of people, when they lose a close loved one, have an experience after the death.” Presences are often seen or felt at the Hotel St. Francis, La Fonda on the Plaza, and La Posada. At the St. Francis, the ghost of a young boy is often heard giggling in the basement, while La Fonda is home to several apparitions. A wailing bride is said to roam the corridors. A failed gambler mourns his own suicide in the hotel’s atrium and wanders the ground floor, perhaps reenacting the last fateful moments of his life. La Posada’s ghost, Julia Staab, may be Santa Fe’s most famous post-living resident. The lady herself died in 1896, only to appear in ghostly form beginning in the 1970s. She is said to be seen in La Posada’s Staab House.

“The Staab House, built in 1882 by local merchant Abraham Staab, my great-great-grandfather, and haunted—allegedly—by his wife Julia, is a beloved institution in Santa Fe and a destination for those who love luxury, lore and local history,” said author Hannah Nordhaus. Her book American Ghost: The True Story of a Family’s Haunted Past, unravels some of the mysteries behind the many ghost sightings in La Posada’s lobby. According to Sinclaire and some staff members at La Posada, a number of mysterious events have followed Julia Staab’s return. Women have reported a presence in the bathroom near the lobby; the toilets overflow without cause; a ghost child calls guest rooms and laughs; and footprints appear on wet tile. The hotel is home to so much supernatural activity that some maids refuse to clean rooms alone. Others have left their employment to escape the otherworldly atmosphere. Those brave enough can venture to La Posada’s Julia Restaurant, where Mrs. Staab herself may join diners for a few spirits. Others can visit the supernatural with Sinclaire, who hosts weekly walks that begin at Hotel St. Francis.– Jason Strykowski The Original Santa Fe Ghost Tour, theoriginalsantafeghosttour.weebly.com, 505-983-7774.


| L A ST LOO K |

Beirut

GABRIELLA MARKS

The musical group Beirut, led by Santa Fe hometown boy Zach Condon, took a break from their international tour and treated audiences at the Santa Fe Bandstand to a free “homecoming concert” recently, in celebration of the release of their new album No No No. Using multicultural and multinational influences in their music, the group has an immense Santa Fe following, and the enthusiastic crowd was delighted to welcome them home.—AM

October 22, 2015 NOW 29


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