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now The City of Santa Fe Event Calendar

2015 Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out

this week’s

top nightlife

and entertainment

picks

santafeanNOW.com PRESENTED IN COOPERATION WITH ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL NORTH

week of October 15


now |

OCT 15 –OCT 21

2015

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

|

bruce Adams

Publisher

The 2015 ShowHouse gala and auction benefited Dollars4Schools. Bella Media publisher Bruce Adams and gallery owner Karen Malouf (center) celebrate with a D4S representative.

DAVID ROBIN

AS THE WEATHER ROLLS into a new season, we see returning events that have fairly recently become part of our community’s culture. One of these is the Canyon Road Paint & Sculpt Out and Parade. both the event and the name recognition have grown since well-known local artist Roseta Santiago and I came up with the idea eight years ago. We, along with the Canyon Road community, have been delighted by the way this annual weekend has grown to involve local children; by how warmly it’s been accepted by the gallery community; and by the fact that it has gained countrywide recognition as yet another unique Santa Fe event— to the point where national art magazines celebrate it. For Santa Feans, of course, the fact that it happens at a time when the leaves are in full changing color only adds to the magic. The Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out is one of those rare opportunities where we can witness the creative processes involved in art. It’s an opportunity to speak with the artists directly, finding out what they’re focusing on, what they’re feeling, and what is inspiring them. In a town like this, where creativity abounds, I’m always intrigued to hear about individual inspiration, which usually reveals a unique passion. I suggest that you make the event part of your weekend, if nothing more than to enjoy a lovely stroll on a fall day in an absolutely beautiful setting. I will warn you that the inspired artwork, the children’s faces and the magic of Santa Fe will cast a spell on you that you can savor for the season.

Designers Buffy Kline, left, and Pam Duncan, of Wiseman & Gale & Duncan, addded rustic glamour to the ShowHouse dining room.

D4S volunteers, along with ShowHouse cofounder Jennifer Ashton (second from left) and cofounder David Naylor (not shown) raised funding for dozens of classrooms at the 2015 gala.

STEPHEN LANG

Honorary Chair Wade Wilson


FRANK BALAAM • BARRY MCCUAN ANGUS • JOHN AXTON • JENNIFER DAVENPORT “Paint Out Preview Show”

Opening Reception • Friday, October 16, 2015 • 5 to 7pm

“Historic Canyon Road Paint Out”

Saturday, October 17, 2015 • 10am to 4pm

VENTANA FINE ART 400 Canyon Road

Santa Fe, NM 87501

505-983-8815

800-746-8815

www.ventanafineart.com


Welcome to Santa Fe!

Santa Fe is rated one of the top ten destinations in the world for its abundance of high-quality art, shopping, attractions, outdoor adventures, food and entertainment. Santa Fean NOW is a great hands-on source of information for all that’s happening around town. Whether you’re a local resident, first time visitor, or a regular, NOW has the listings you need to navigate hundreds of weekly gallery openings, live music and more to make the most of your time here. For extra tips and insider insights, please stop by our Visitor Centers at the Downtown Santa Fe Plaza, Santa Fe Railyard, or just off the Plaza at the Community Convention Center. This October, ask about The Santa Fe Independent Film Festival, the Historic Canyon Road Paint Out, and be sure to check out the autumn harvest on a Tuesday or Saturday at our outstanding Santa Fe Famers Market in The Railyard.There are so many things going on to enhance your visit to Santa Fe—rated last month by Conde Nast as the second most popular small city destination in the country and top in the Southwest. Have a wonderful time in The City Different, Javier M. Gonzales City of Santa Fe, Mayor

Randy Randall TOURISM Santa Fe, Director

now bruce adams

PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

EDITOR

anne maclachlan carolyn patten

ASSOCIATE EDITOR CALENDAR EDITOR

samantha schwirck

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT GRAPHIC DESIGNER ADDITIONAL DESIGN

b.y. cooper

dylan syverson

whitney stewart

sybil watson, allie salazar,

valerie herndon, jenny grass

OPERATIONS MANAGER

ginny stewart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER MARKETING CONSULTANT

david wilkinson

karim jundi

WRITERS

MASON JENNINGS

COMING LIVE TO SANTA FE WEDNESDAY / OCTOBER 21 / SKYLIGHT

amy gross, cristina olds phil parker whitney spivey, emily van cleve A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105 Santa Fe, NM 87505 Telephone 505-983-1444 Fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafeanNOW.com Copyright 2015. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Fean NOW Volume 2, Number 36, Week of October 15, 2015. Published by bella Media, LLC, at Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA, 505-983-1444 © Copyright 2015 by bella Media, LLC. All rights reserved.

FOR TICKETS CONTACT TICKETSSANTAFE.ORG / 505.988.1234

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Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out welcomes visitors to its annual event (see page15). Photo by Stephen Lang.


MARK WHITE FINE ART 414 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 87501

www.markwhitefineart.com | 505-982-2073 | Open 7 days a week


Based on a true story, Everest packs chills and an A-list cast.

buzz

killer mountain monster

new ski shuttle service

Everest is based on a true, tragic 1996 climbing expedition up the world’s highest mountain, when eight people died in an unexpected storm; but it’s extremely effective as an old-school horror flick. Think of the mountain as a monster, resting quietly, ominously, in Nepal. The climbers in the film (played by an A-list cast including Jake Gyllenhaal and Josh brolin) understand the endeavor they face, but perhaps lack the proper respect for it. They drink and dance in the nights before the deaths start, yucking it up like oblivious teens in a slasher flick. The climb begins in sunlight, with promise, the group excited. Eventually, they’re close to the top and dark clouds roll in fast, crackling with lightning, battering the climbers with stinging, icy snow. They begin to die, one at a time, in increasingly grisly ways. The top of Everest is almost 9,000 meters high—“the cruising altitude of a 747”—and humans aren’t meant to be there. Past a certain threshold, as the guide Rob Hall explains early in the film, “your bodies begin literally dying,” burning oxygen faster than breathing can replenish it. The effects are insidious. In these frigid temperatures, one of the climbers, whose oxygen-deprived brain convinces him he’s too hot, starts stripping off his jacket, slips, and plummets to certain death. He’s gone in an instant. A brave teacher, Doug Hansen, who just wants to prove to his students that anything’s possible, unhooks himself from safety cables and wobbles on useless legs along an ice ridge until he, too, falls. The mountain makes these men kill themselves, after it twists them into insanity. Even the ones who merely freeze to death are forced, first, to admit they’re done, and that they can’t move any farther. Not everyone died in the 1996 expedition, and we get some amazing gore effects as Everest takes the hands, feet, and face of the one survivor lucky enough to limp back to camp. While Everest is factually dubious and lacks exhilarating action, if you go for the scares instead of thrills or an education, you’ll walk away satisfied; but vowing never to attempt that crazy climb. —Phil Parker

The long, slow drive up to the ski basin is a trek of the past—at least for the next year—as residents and visitors now have the option to ride the new mountain trail bus service from the North Central Regional Transit District (NCRTD). Service began on September 26, just in time for the fall foliage season, from downtown Santa Fe to the ski basin. Round-trip service is offered twice a day on weekdays and three times a day on weekends. Once ski season commences, three round trips are scheduled each weekday and seven on Saturdays and Sundays. The route starts at the South Capitol Rail Runner Station and has more than a dozen stops before landing

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WORKING TITLE FILMS, RVK STUDIOS, WALDEN MEDIA

the


Don Edwards, cowboy balladeer at New Mexico History Museum 2012 that won the Carl Hertzog Award for Excellence in book Design from the University of Texas at El Paso’s Friends of the Library. “I’m going to sing some of Jack’s songs and tell his story, which is really fascinating,” says Edwards, who performed at the museum a few years ago. “These old-timers had great sayings. They told such funny stories.”—Emily Van Cleve Cowboy balladeer Don Edwards presents The Legend of Jack Thorp, October 18, 2 PM, $25, New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln, nmhistorymuseum.org

“Jack” Thorp (N. Howard Thorp, 1867-1940) collected cowboy songs and poems across the West for nearly 20 years, starting in the late 1800s.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTT O’MALLEY & ASSOCIATES

The colorful tale of late-19th-century/early 20th-century New Mexico cowboy Jack Thorp comes to life on October 18 at the New Mexico History Museum when Texas cowboy balladeer Don Edwards presents The Legend of Jack Thorp. born in 1867, Thorp collected several dozen cowboy songs (and wrote a few of his own) from 1889 to 1890 during a 1,500-mile horseback journey through Texas and New Mexico. These tunes were published in 1908 in the New Mexico town of Estancia, in a volume titled Songs of the Cowboys. Few original copies are in existence, but Edwards owns one of them. “The great-great-grandniece of Jack Thorp gave it to me years ago,” says Edwards. “A second version of the book was put together in 1921. It has 100 songs in it. That version has songs from other sources as well as ones he collected and wrote himself. I’ll be going back and forth between the two versions during my performance.” The New Mexico History Museum is the perfect venue for the show. It owns the Estancia press that published the 1908 book, and crafted its own version in

COURTESY OF NCRTD

at the top of the mountain. In the fall, riders pay $5 to go up, and then get a free ride down. During ski season, fares are $5 each way, although passengers destined for the ski basin receive a token worth $5 at Ski Santa Fe. The new bus service is also a good way to visit Ten Thousand Waves, at $5 to go up, with a free return trip. “This service has been talked about for years,” says NCRTD public information officer Jim Nagle. “It’s taken $95,000 of public and private money to fund operations for our trial period, which is from September 26 through the end of August. We hope everything will be successful and continue.” buses are not equipped with restroom facilities but do have racks for skis and snowboards. bicycles are not permitted. For details and a schedule, visit the Ski Santa Fe bus service website at ridethebluebus.com. —Emily Van Cleve

The North Central Regional Transit District began service on its new RTD Mountain Trail Route on Saturday, September 26.

October 15, 2015 NOW 5


COURTESY TIFFANYCHRISTOPHER.COM

this week

Tiffany Christopher performs at both The Palace and Cowgirl Santa Fe this week.

October 15–October 21

October 15 thursday Santa Fe Independent Film Festival Various Locations

Cutting-edge programming; the latest independent films and directors; Native cinema; New Mexico films; student films; and discussions with top directors, writers, and artists. Ticket prices vary, through October 18, 505-349-1414, santafeindependentfilmfestival.com.

Mole & More Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Publishing and Demystifying the Role of Agents Unitarian Universalist Congregation 107 W Barcelona Elizabeth Trupin-Pulli, co-director of JET Literary Associates, Inc., discusses the business of publishing and demystifying the role of agents, followed by a Q+A. $15–$20, 6:30–8 pm, nmbook.org.

William Powers: New Slow City Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo

William Powers, author of the “green living” bestseller 12x12, reads from his new book, New Slow City. Free, 6–7:30 pm, 505-988-4226, cwbookstore.com.

Learn how to make dishes with mole, a sauce that originated in the Mexican states of Puebla and Oaxaca. $82, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Adult Flamenco Classes: General Technique Entreflamenco: Santa Fe School of Flamenco 1730 Camino Carlos Rey

Harry O. Morris Jean Cocteau Cinema Gallery, 418 Montezuma

The Six Perfections Weekend Retreat Upaya Zen Center, 1404 Cerro Gordo

Multi-media work by Harry O. Morris. Free, reception 5 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Joseph Pulitzer and the Dawning of the Modern Mass Media St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trl

Author, columnist, and radio show host James McGrath Morris discusses how Joseph Pulitzer transformed American journalism into a medium of mass consumption and made the newspaper an essential feature of urban life. $10, 1–3 pm, 505-982-9274, renesan.org. 6

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A general technique flamenco class for adults. $30, 5:30–6:30 pm, 505-209-1302, entreflamenco.com.

Roshi Zoketsu Norman Fischer of the Everyday Zen Foundation, with Sokaku Kathy Fischer, presents teachings on giving, ethical conduct, forbearance, energy, meditation, and wisdom during this weekend meditation retreat. $360–$400, through October 17, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

After Hours in the Garden

Santa Fe Botanical Garden, 715 Camino Lejo Pack a picnic and visit the garden after hours. $5–$10, 5 pm, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Branden James

Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco

Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Buffalo Nickel

La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Connie Long The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Blues music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Golden Thursdays Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Golden era and hip-hop music. $5, 10 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Latin Night Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With VDJ Dany. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Limelight Karaoke The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Hosted by Michéle Leidig. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

MIX Santa Fe Various locations

A monthly event showcasing talent and local resources, providing an avenue for personal contact and networking. Free, 6 pm, 505-471-9103, mixsantafe.com.


October 16 friday 14th Annual Eldorado Arts and Crafts Fall Show St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trl Forty-five Eldorado artists bring their works to Santa Fe for a weekend art, craft, and gift exhibition. Free, 3–7 pm (October 16), 9 am–5 pm (October 17) eldoart.org.

JASON S. ORDAZ

Art in the Rave Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po

IAIA presents the pop-up show Art in the Rave, October 16.

Rio El Mesón, 213 Washington

Acoustic Brazilian jazz, bossa, samba, and Tropicana music. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Trio Bijou Zia Diner, 326 S Guadalupe

Jazz music. Free, 6:30–8:30 pm, 505-988-7008, ziadiner.com.

Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal

Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Vicente Griego and Friends El Farol, 808 Canyon

Flamenco jazz music. Free, 8:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

The Foreigner Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Beer and Cheese Pairing Cheesemongers of Santa Fe, 130 E Marcy

Matthew Zehnder of Susan’s Fine Wine & Spirits visits Cheesemongers to share his expertise on cheese and beer flavors, offering six pairings to taste. $45, 7:30–9 pm, 505-795-7878, cheesemongersofsantafe.com.

Museum Club presents a pop-up art show with original works for sale by IAIA students. A one-night-only event featuring music, food, glow sticks, and art. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-424-2300, iaia.edu.

Bill Gallen: Paintings from the American West Sage Creek Gallery, 421 Canyon

Historic Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out Various Locations on Canyon Road

Black Magic Charlotte Jackson Fine Art, 544 S Guadalupe

(See page 15.) An annual event that brings artists from around the country to Santa Fe on the third weekend of October each year. On Friday, visitors have opportunities to mingle with artists at receptions and gallery openings; and on Saturday, more than 100 artists working en plein air provide onlookers with the incredible experience of being involved in the creative process. Free, Art Walk Friday, October 16, 5 pm, Paint Out & Sculpt Out Saturday, October 17, 10 am–4 pm, 505-795-5703, visitcanyonroad.com.

Joseph Birdsong Charles Azbell Gallery, 203A Canyon

Jewelry trunk show. Free, through October 17, 505-988-1875, charlesazbellgallery.com.

Webster Artechnology Eye on the Mountain Gallery, 614 Agua Fria

The closing exhibition for Aaron Webster Leonard Jones’s show of metal art designs in jewelry, sculptures, and more. Free, 5–9 pm, 928-308-0319, eyeonthemountaingallery.com.

Celebrating the Chiles of New and Old Mexico Las Cosas Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

A hands-on exploration of the fabulous chiles of Mexico and New Mexico. $90, 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Rellenos Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Larry Shue’s comedy, which originally premiered in New York City in 1984, directed by Robert Nott. $15–$20, 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

Learn how to make four different types of chiles rellenos: New Mexican tempura rellenos, ancho chile rellenos, cream cheese stuffed jalapenos en escabeche, and chiles en nogada. $98, 9 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Yemaya’s Belly Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

Restaurant Walk III Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

The story of a boy, Jesus, and his relation to his family, manhood, and the ocean. By Quiara Alegria Hudes, directed by Alix Hudson. $10–$15, 7:30 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

The Southwest Association for Indian Art (SWAIA) presents an authentic Native American dinner prepared by top chefs. Limited seating. SWAIA members $100, non-members $150, 6:30 pm, 505-983-5220, ext. 232, mybarra@swaia.org.

Work by Bill Gallen. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-988-3444, sagecreekgallery.com.

Work by Max Cole and Constance DeJong. Free, reception 5–7 pm, gallery talk 2:30–3:30 pm, 505-989-8688, charlottejackson.com.

Harvest Greenberg Fine Art, 205 Canyon

(See page 21.) Group exhibition of paintings, coinciding with the Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out (see page 15). Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-955-1500, greenbergfineart.com.

New Mexico Wild: Typewriter Tales of a Santa Fe Bohemian Matthews Gallery, 669 Canyon

(See page 28.) Robert Wolf returns to Santa Fe with his typewriter and original notes that inspired parts of his new memoir, In Search of America. The author signs copies of his book during the show’s reception. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-992-2882, thematthewsgallery.com.

NO LAND Wheelhouse Art, 418 Montezuma

Art collective Strangers presents a provocative new show examining the situation and future of young artists in the deeply established Santa Fe scene. Free, reception 5–9 pm, 541-844-6683, strangersartcollective@gmail.com.

Paint Out Participants Ventana Fine Art, 400 Canyon

Work by Doug Dawson, Barry McCuan, Angus, Frank Balaam, and John Axton, in conjunction with the Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out (see page 15). Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-983-8815, ventanafineart.com.

Passages Pippin Contemporary, 200 Canyon

(See page 22.) Work by Tony Griffith. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-795-7476, pippincontemporary.com.

A restaurant walking tour with stops including Agave Lounge, Dinner for Two, The Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi, and L’Olivier. $115, 2 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Pretty, Peculiar

Annual Native Food & Wine Event Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Santa Fe Six Art Exchange Gallery, 60 E San Francisco

Turner Carroll Gallery, 725 Canyon Work by Jenny Honnert Abell. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-986-9800, turnercarroll.com.

October 15, 2015 NOW 7


A Novel. Free, 6–7:30 pm, 505-988-4226, cwbookstore.com.

The Landscape: Classical to Modern Karan Ruhlen Gallery, 225 Canyon

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco

Omar Ganzo Misfits, 821 Canyon

David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill, 540 Montezuma

Re-Invention City of Mud, 1114A Hickox

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco

Work by Martha Mans, Kurt Meer, Stephen Pentak, and Pauline Ziegen. Free, reception 5–7 pm, 505-820-0807, karanruhlen.com.

Paintings by Omar Ganzo. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-717-7028, misfitsoncanyonroad@gmail.com.

New work from Jamie Chase, Paul Shapiro, Sasha Pyle, and others in City of Mud’s inaugural show. Free, reception 5–8 pm, 505-954-1705, cityofmud.com.

Block Printing without a Press: Use Your Feet! Teresa Neptune Studio/Gallery, 728 Canyon

Printmaker Linda Hunsaker shows how to create paper prints by standing on inked woodblocks instead of using a press. Free, coinciding with the Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out (see page 15), 2 pm–6 pm, 505-470-1468, teresaneptune.com.

Educate Your Ear: Thoroughly Modern New Mexico Museum of Art (St. Francis Auditorium), 107 W Palace

Santa Fe Community Orchestra music director Oliver Prezant and museum curator Kate Ware present a fun, informative talk on the jazzy, syncopated music and art of American Modernism, featuring selected images from the museum’s current exhibit followed by excerpts from the music of Copland, Still, and Gershwin. Free, 7 pm, 505-4879, sfco.org.

Miriam Sagan: Black Rainbow Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo

Miriam Sagan discusses her work Black Rainbow:

Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 8–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Piano music. Free, 6-9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

Classical, standards, Broadway, and originals by pianist/vocalist Doug Montgomery. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

EmiArte Flamenco Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Live Flamenco show. $13–$20, 8–10 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Half Broke Horses The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Honky tonk/Americana music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Film Fest Party The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

A party coinciding with the Santa Fe Independent Film Festival. Free, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

J.J. and The Hooligans El Farol, 808 Canyon

Blues, rock, and Americana music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Jay Boy Adams and Zenobia Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

With DJ Dany in the Skylab. $10, 10 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Pleasure Pilots La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

R&B music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

TGIF Concerts with Fred Frahm First Presbyterian Church, 208 Grant

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The Legend of Jack Thorp is presented by cowboy balladeer Don Edwards at the New Mexico History Museum

music and reflection. Free, 5:30-6 pm, 505-982-8544, fpcsantafe.org.

The Alchemy Party Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Juicebox Ray. $7, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

The Three Faces of Jazz El Mesón, 213 Washington

Swinging jazz piano trio. Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Rory Block James A. Little Theater, 1060 Cerrillos

A concert with blueswoman Rory Block, who has dedicated her life to preserving and innovating the Delta blues tradition. $29–$59, 7:30 pm, 800-838-3006, southwestrootsmusic.org.

The Foreigner Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Larry Shue’s comedy, which originally premiered in

Americana music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Latin Fridays Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Jay Sturdevant, Togian Islands, photgraphic print on aluminum, 30 x 20", at the Annual Eldorado Arts and Crafts Fair

COURTESY SCOTT O’MALLEY & ASSOCIATES

An exhibition of work by six artists who live and work in Santa Fe. Free, reception 4–6 pm, 505-603-4485, aegallery.com.

Every Friday night First Presbyterian Church opens its doors to the community of Santa Fe for a time of

Send us your event information! To have your event listed in the calendar section of NOW, please either email your information and any related photos to calendar@santafean.com or self-post your event at santafeanNOW.com. All material must be emailed or self-posted two weeks prior to NOW’s Thursday publication date. All submissions are welcome, but events will be included in NOW as space allows.


New York City in 1984, directed by Robert Nott. $15–$20, 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

The Tequila Plays The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 NM-14, Madrid

Joe West’s Theatre of Death presents a night of original drama inspired by the French Grand Guignol performance style. $20, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Yemaya’s Belly Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie

giant chalk art-making. $70, 8:30 am–1 pm, 801-910-7150, thegreatartdoors.com.

Family Program: Travel Boxes Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Research Center, 135 Grant

Decorate your own box to hold your treasures, as Georgia O’Keeffe would do upon returning from her many trips. Free, 9:30–11:30 am, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

Outdoor Fine Art Show First National Bank on the Plaza Parking Lot 107 W San Francisco

The story of a boy, Jesus, and his relation to his family, manhood, and the ocean. By Quiara Alegria Hudes, directed by Alix Hudson. $10–$15, 7:30 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

Members of the Santa Fe Society of Artists exhibit and sell their work. Free, 9 am–5:30 pm, santafesocietyofartists.com.

October 17

A guided painting class. $45, 6–8 pm, 575-404-1801, santafeartclasses.com.

saturday

Historic Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out Various Locations on Canyon Road

(See page 15.) An annual event that brings artists from around the country to Santa Fe on the third weekend of October each year. On Friday, visitors have opportunities to mingle with artists at receptions and gallery openings; and on Saturday, more than 100 artists working en plein air provide onlookers with the incredible experience of being involved in the creative process. Free, Art Walk Friday, October 16, 5 pm, Paint Out & Sculpt Out Saturday, October 17, 10 am–4 pm, 505-795-5703, visitcanyonroad.com.

28th Annual Galisteo Studio Tour Various Locations, Galisteo

More than 30 artists open their private studios to the public. Free, 10 am–5 pm, through October 18, galisteostudiotour.com.

Artdoors Adventures: The Boulders Adventure The Boulders (meet at Harry’s Roadhouse, 96B Old Las Vegas Hwy)

Eggman & Walrus presents a program that pairs hiking with mindfulness, breathing, and meditation practices; color and form creative exercises; and personal petroglyph/

Paint Moment Art Sanctuary 621 Old Santa Fe Trl, Ste 16

Paint Out Participants Acosta Strong, 640 Canyon

Painting demonsrations by Jack Dunn and Jim Jennings, in conjunction with the Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out (see page 15). Free, reception Saturday, 11am–4 pm, 505-982-2795, johnbstrong.com.

Paint Out Participants Mark White Fine Art, 414 Canyon

Work by Karen Kling, Bill Suys, and Carol Kerly, in conjunction with the Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out (see page 15). Free, 10 am–4 pm, 505-982-2073 markwhitefineart.com.

Paint Out Participants Waxlander Gallery, 622 Canyon

Participating Saturday, Oct. 17 and Sunday, Oct. 18, in conjunction with the Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out (see page 15). Free, reception Saturday, noon–3 pm, 505-984-2202, waxlander.com.

Santa Fe Artists Market Railyard Plaza at the Park Ramada, 1611 Paseo de Peralta

Juried fine art and craft show for Northern New Mexico artists, featuring paintings, photography, pottery, jewelry, and more. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-414-8544, santafeartistsmarket.com.

5th Annual Oktoberfiesta


Santa Fe Brewing, 35 Fire Pl

A fundraiser event with live music, food trucks, contests, prizes, and more, to benefit The Prompt Institute, Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families, and Santa Fe Animal Shelter & Humane Society. $10 per day, 12 pm (October 17 and 18), 505-424-3333, santafebrewing.com.

Brewery Tour Santa Fe Brewing Company 35 Fire Pl

See where local brews such as Happy Camper IPA and Santa Fe Pale Ale are made. Free, noon, 505-424-3333, santafebrewing.com.

Contemporary Southwest IV Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

Explore Santa Fe’s unique cuisine that melds rich cultural traditions with new ideas to create a contemporary style of Southwestern fare. Menu items include lamb avocado with chipotle sauce, caramelized corn garnish, and herb-roasted vegetables. $82, 10 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Green Chile Workshop Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Explore chile’s unique history and learn how to handle the vegetable in the kitchen. $78, 2 pm and 2:30 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Local Harvest Boot Camp (Workshop) Santa Fe Culinary Academy 112 W San Francisco

Tour the Santa Fe Farmers’ Market with Chef Rocky

Durham to meet local farmers and learn how to select the best produce. Then, head back to the SFCA to utilize the ingredients during a hands-on workshop. $95, 9 am–3 pm, 505-983-7554, santafeculinaryacademy.com.

Chango Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Mark Connell of Fables Las Cosas Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

Connie Long CD Release Party The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

A sneak peek into the menu of Mark Connell’s next restaurant, Fables, due to open this fall. $95, 10 am–1 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

CD release party for Connie Long. $5, 10 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Santa Fe Farmers Market Santa Fe Railyard Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta

David Geist Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma

Fresh produce and handmade goods from local vendors. Free, 8 am–1 pm, 505-983-4098, santafefarmersmarket.com.

The Met: Live in HD: Otello (Verdi) The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Jesus Bas Anasazi Restaurant 113 Washington

Kirk Kadish (baby grand piano), alongside John Gagan (bass) and John Bartlit (drums). Free, 7:30–10:30 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Lovers of Irish writer James Joyce’s work meet every Saturday to discuss Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. Led by Adam Harvey, creator of the one-man show Don’t Panic: It’s Only Finnegans Wake. Enthusiasts with all levels of knowledge are welcome. Free, 10 am–12:30 pm, joycegeek.com.

A flamenco class for adults. $30, introductory class 10–11 am, general technique class 11 am–12:15 pm, 505-209-1302, entreflamenco.com.

Boom Roots El Farol, 808 Canyon

Reggae music. $5, 9 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

SUSANA MILLMAN

Flamenco dinner show. $25, 6:30–9 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

JoyceGroup Santa Fe Santa Fe Public Library, 145 Washington

Adult Flamenco Classes Entreflamenco: Santa Fe School of Flamenco 1730 Camino Carlos Rey

Branden James Vanessie Santa Fe 434 W San Francisco

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Flamenco El Farol, 808 Canyon

Live guitar music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-988-3030, rosewoodhotels.com.

Collected Works Bookstore and Builders Without Borders present The Art of Natural Building, presentations and signings from ten authors in the field of construction. Free, 3–6 pm, 505-988-4226, cwbookstore.com.

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Piano music. Free, 6-9 pm, 505-984-2645, pranzosantafe.com.

The Lensic presents a live broadcast of Verdi’s masterful Shakespeare adaptation Otello. Aleksandrs Antonenko plays the titular Moor of Venice in his Met debut, with Sonya Yoncheva as Desdemona and Željko Lucic as Iago. $22–$28, 11 am, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

The Art of Natural Building Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo

Andy Weir signs The Martian at the Jean Cocteau Cinema

Covers from the ’70s to the ’90s, plus a few originals. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 6:30–10:30 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

KGB Trio El Mesón, 213 Washington

Pleasure Pilots La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco

R&B music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Ronald Roybal Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta

Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-982-1200, ronaldroybal.com.

Showcase Karaoke Tiny’s Restaurant, 1005 St. Francis

Hosted by Nanci & Cyndy. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-1100, tinyssantafe.com.

So Sophisticated Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

Dance party with DJ 12 Tribe. $7, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

The Lab Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

A party hosted by Meow Wolf. $7, 9 pm–12 am, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

The Santa Fe Chiles Dixie Jazz Band Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe Live jazz with a twist. Free, 1–4 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Tiffany Christopher

The Palace Restaurant and Saloon, 142 W Palace One-woman rock, pop, and blues show. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.


Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal

Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

“Harvest ” October 16–29 Opening Reception: October 16, 5–7pm In conjunction with Canyon Road’s Historic Paint-Out, October 17

Historical Garden to Garden Walk

Santa Fe Botanical Garden, 715 Camino Lejo A guided walking tour from the Santa Fe Botanical Garden to the Santa Fe Plaza. $15–$20, 1–4:30 pm, 505-471-9103, santafebotanicalgarden.org.

Fall Concert New Mexico Museum of Art (St. Francis Auditorium), 107 W Palace

Visit the museum’s latest exhibit, An American Modernism, then hear the music of Copland and Still; Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue with pianist Ron Grinage; Nielsen’s wild and crazy Clarinet Concerto featuring Melinda Russial; and a side-by-side performance by the Aspen Magnet School Band. Free, 2:30 pm, 505-466-4879, sfco.org.

The Foreigner Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Michael DeVore “The Tipped Kettle” 24 x 30” Oil on linen

Larry Shue’s comedy, which originally premiered in New York City in 1984, directed by Robert Nott. $15–$20, 7:30 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

The Tequila Plays The Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 NM-14, Madrid

Joe West’s Theatre of Death presents a night of original drama inspired by the French Grand Guignol performance style. $20, 8 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Yemaya’s Belly Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

The story of a boy, Jesus, and his relation to his family, manhood, and the ocean. By Quiara Alegria Hudes, directed by Alix Hudson. $10–$15, 7:30 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

October 18

sunday

Outdoor Fine Art Show First National Bank on the Plaza Parking Lot, 107 W San Francisco

Members of the Santa Fe Society of Artists exhibit and sell their work. Free, 9 am–5:30 pm, santafesocietyofartists.com.

Cowgirl Brunch Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

With music by Broomdust Caravan. Free, 2–3 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com. October 15, 2015 NOW 11


Joe West in The Tequila Plays at The Mine Shaft Tavern

$15–$20, 2 pm, 505-988-4262, santafeplayhouse.org.

The Tequila Plays The Mine Shaft Tavern, 2846 NM-14, Madrid

Joe West’s Theatre of Death presents a night of original drama inspired by the French Grand Guignol performance style. $20, 3 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Yemaya’s Belly Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

The story of a boy, Jesus, and his relation to his family, manhood, and the ocean. By Quiara Alegria Hudes, directed by Alix Hudson. $10–$15, 2 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

October 19

COURTESY JOEWESTMUSIC.COM

monday

The Met: Live in HD: Otello (Verdi) Encore The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco Tacos Santa Fe School of Cooking 125 N Guadalupe

A taco cooking class with ingredients such as potato, poblano chile, spinach, and hot and smoky shrimp. $98, 2 pm and 2:30 pm, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

C.J. Hunt: The Perfect Human Diet Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo

A screening of the documentary The Perfect Human Diet, followed by a discussion and book signing with the filmmaker, C.J. Hunt. Free, 3–4:30 pm, 505-9884226, cwbookstore.com.

Courtney White: 2% Solutions for the Planet Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo

Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco

Classical, standards, Broadway, and originals by pianist/vocalist Doug Montgomery. Free, 6:30– 10:30 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Nacha Mendez and Friends El Farol, 808 Canyon

Latin world music. Free, 7–10 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

A book signing and interview with Andy Weir, author of The Martian, followed by a screening of the film. $10 (free with book purchase), 7 pm, 505-466-5528, jeancocteaucinema.com.

Tiffany Christopher

We the People Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

Guitar music. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe One-woman rock, pop, and blues show. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Tucker Binkley Osteria d’Assisi Restaurant & Bar, 58 S Federal

Piano music. Free, 7–11 pm, 505-986-5858, osteriadassisi.com.

Getting There From Here Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie

Tone and The Major Dudes perform every Sunday. $5, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-982-9014.

The Legend of Jack Thorp New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln

(See page 5.) Cowboy balladeer Don Edwards hosts a musical adventure with old-time ballads and cowboy songs that tell the tale of Jack Thorp, who was the first person to collect and publish cowboys’ campfire songs in New Mexico. $25, 2 pm, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

Doug Montgomery 12

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Andy Weir Book Signing Jean Cocteau Cinema, 418 Montezuma

Omar Villanueva La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

A talk and book signing with local author Courtney White, former executive director of Quivira Coalition. Free, 11:30 am–2 pm, 505-988-4226, cwbookstore.com.

A poetry reading with Lauren Camp, Allyse McCanna, Jeanette Mish, and Juan Morales. Free, 5 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

The Lensic presents a live broadcast of Verdi’s masterful Shakespeare adaptation Otello. Aleksandrs Antonenko plays the titular Moor of Venice in his Met debut, with Sonya Yoncheva as Desdemona and Željko Lucic as Iago. $22, 6 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

Tone and The Major Dudes Evangelo’s, 200 W San Francisco

Mozart & Schubert The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

The Santa Fe Symphony’s concertmaster David Felberg and principal violist Kim Fredenburgh are featured soloists in this fall tribute to two Viennese masters, led by Guest Conductor Philip Mann. $25–$80, 4 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

The Foreigner Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas

Larry Shue’s comedy, which originally premiered in New York City in 1984, directed by Robert Nott.

A Bernie Sanders fundraiser/poetry reading featuring Debbi Brody and Philip Woods. 6:30 pm, 505-424-1601, teatroparaguas.org.

Colonization, Patronization, Collaboration Santa Fe Art Institute, 1600 St. Michael’s

A discussion focusing on the complex terrain of immigration/emigration, as part of the Conversations @ SFAI series. Free, 7 pm, 505-424-5050, sfai.org.

Sandra Cisneros: A House of My Own Collected Works Bookstore & Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo Sandra Cisneros reads from her new book, A House of My Own: Stories from My Life. Free, 6 pm, 505-988-4226, cwbookstore.com.

Adult Flamenco Classes Entreflamenco: Santa Fe School of Flamenco, 1730 Camino Carlos Rey

A flamenco class for adults. $30, general technique class 5:30–6:30 pm, introductory class 6:30–7:30 pm, 505-209-1302, entreflamenco.com.

Branden James


explore and share their experiences with aging, sickness, and death. Free, 10:15 am–12:45 pm, 505-986-8518, upaya.org.

PAINTINGS FROM THE AMERICAN WEST

BOB GODWIN

Poetry of Embodiment Zoetic Nourishing Life, 230 St. Francis

One person show of new works by

In a playful weave of poetry reading and writing, awareness exercises, mindfulness, yoga, and practical wisdom, this program—designed for individuals facing effects of traumatic stress, chronic pain, illness, disability, or other life challenges—explores how to use both joy and suffering to live more fully. 2–3:30 pm, 505-983-2649, lisaannmoore.com.

Bill Gallen Opening Reception:

September New Mexico, oil, 16 x 16"

Lauren Camp, Getting There from Here at Teatro Paraguas

Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco

Cello and vocal duo-in-residence. As seen on America’s Got Talent. Free, 8–10 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

J.J. and The Hooligans El Farol, 808 Canyon

Blues, rock, and Americana music. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Santa Fe Great Big Jazz Band Tiny’s Restaurant, 1005 St. Francis

Sixteen-piece ‘40s style big band music. Free, 7–9 pm, 505-983-1100, tinyssantafe.com.

October 20

tuesday

Autumn Soups & Stews Las Cosas Cooking School 181 Paseo de Peralta

A cooking class focused on soups and stews for cooler weather. Menu items include spiced butternut squash soup and escarole–white bean soup. $90, 6–9 pm, 505-988-3394, lascosascooking.com.

Southwest Party Fare Santa Fe School of Cooking, 125 N Guadalupe

Southwest party fare such as gazpacho; crab and corn fritters; and goat cheese and mushroom relleno with red chile sauce. $80, 9 am, 505-983-4511, santafeschoolofcooking.com.

Metta Refuge Council Upaya Zen Center, 1404 Cerro Gordo

A weekly council group for those who wish to

Argentine Tango Milonga El Mesón, 213 Washington

Tango dancing. $5, 7:30–11 pm, 505-983-6756, elmeson-santafe.com.

Friday October 16 5–7 pm

SAGE CREEK GALLERY

421 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 505.988.3444 sagecreeksf@aol.com sagecreekgallery.com

Bill Hearne La Fonda on the Plaza, 100 E San Francisco

Country music. Free, 7:30–11 pm, 505-995-2363, lafondasantafe.com.

Bluegrass Jam Zia Diner, 326 S Guadalupe

A weekly bluegrass jam. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-988-7008, ziadiner.com.

Canyon Road Blues Jam El Farol, 808 Canyon

Blues, rock, and R&B. Free, 8:30 pm–12 am, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

Doug Montgomery Vanessie Santa Fe, 434 W San Francisco

Classical, standards, Broadway, and originals by pianist/vocalist Doug Montgomery. Free, 6–8 pm, 505-982-9966, vanessiesantafe.com.

Irene Adams Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Classic rock, folk, and country-inspired guitar and acoustic originals. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Lounge Sessions Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

With DJs Dynamite Sol and Guttermouth. $2, 8–11 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Open Mic Night The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Hosted by Benito. Free, 9:30 pm–12 am, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Has the City of the Monkey God Been Revealed? The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco

Best-selling author and journalist Douglas Preston presents a benefit lecture for the School for Advanced Research, focusing on an expedition to Honduras and coinciding with Preston’s feature article in the October 2015 issue of National Geographic. A reception follows at La Fonda on the Plaza ($60, 7:45 pm). $10–$25, 6:30 pm, 505-988-1234, ticketssantafe.org.

October 21

wednesday Research Center Conversation: Museums and Communities Georgia O’Keeffe Museum Education Annex October 15, 2015 NOW 13


Panelists discuss questions that explore the benefits of museums and communities working together. $5, 6–8 pm, 505-946-1000, okeeffemuseum.org.

santafeartcollector.com.

Different Strokes Gallery 901, 708 Canyon

Work by Deborah Gold and Bobbie Goodrich. Free, through October 27, 505-780-8390, gallery901.org.

Anthony Leon The Palace Restaurant and Saloon 142 W Palace

Journey to the Soul’s Reflection Winterowd Fine Art, 710 Canyon

Flash Forward Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

National Juried Encaustic/Wax Exhibition The Encaustic Art Institute 632 Agua Fria

Country/rock music. Free, 8:30–10:30 pm, 505-428-0690, palacesantafe.com.

Live music with DJ Poetics. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Living Room Blues El Farol, 808 Canyon

With Stanlie Kee & The Step In. Free, 8:30–11:30 pm, 505-983-9912, elfarolsf.com.

The Shiner’s Club Jazz Band Santa Fe Spirits, 7505 Mallard Way, Unit I Jazz music. Free, 5–8 pm, 505-467-8892, santafespirits.com.

Wingtips & Windsors Skylight,139 W San Francisco

Music, style, and dance of the 1920s, featuring a dance lesson and live music. $5, 7 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Zachary Caruso Cowgirl BBQ, 319 S Guadalupe

Rock music. Free, 8–11 pm, 505-982-2565, cowgirlsantafe.com.

Mason Jennings Skylight, 139 W San Francisco

(See page 16.) AMP Concerts presents singer/songwriter Mason Jennings, who combines jazz and rock-and-roll music. $20–$27, 7:30 pm, 505-982-0775, skylightsantafe.com.

Ongoing BC Nowlin: New Works and Solo Show Manitou Galleries 123 W Palace and 225 Canyon New work by BC Nowlin in a solo show. Free, through October 16, 505-986-0440, 505-986-9833, manitougalleries.com.

Irina Zaytceva Solo Exhibition Tansey Contemporary, 652 Canyon

Porcelain works by ceramicist Irina Zaytceva. Free, through October 23, 505-995-8513, tanseycontemporary.com.

Plein Air Painters of New Mexico Santa Fe Art Collector, 217 Galisteo

An annual, three-week juried exhibition and sale of work by artists from the Plein Air Painters of New Mexico. Free, through October 25, 505-988-5545, 14

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Work by abstract painter Brian Coffin. Free, through October 31, 505-992-8878, fineartsantafe.com.

An exhibition of work by 57 nation-wide artists working with encaustic/wax, juried by Bruce Helander, editor in chief of The Art Economist magazine. Free, through October 31, 505-989-3283, eainm.com.

Unearthing the Mirror Manitou Galleries 123 W Palace and 225 Canyon

Work by Harry Greene, Fran Larsen, and Liz Wolf. Free, through October 31, 505-986-0440, 505-986-9833, manitougalleries.com.

Fine Native American Art from a Private Collection Adobe Gallery, 221 Canyon

New selection of paintings from the Betty and Marvin Rubin Collection. Free, through November 10, 505-955-0550, adobegallery.com

New Mexico Landscapes and Native Peoples The Santa Fe Gallery, 223 E Palace Photographs and new archival pigment prints by Robert Dawson. Free, ongoing, 505-983-6429, thesantafeartgallery.com.

Painting the Divine: Images of Mary in the New World New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln

A 1960s ecclesiastical wave of urban renewal inspired mission churches throughout the Americas to undergo renovations and, all too often, cast off centuries-old art work. $6–$9, through March 3, 2016, 505-476-5200, nmhistorymuseum.org.

EARTHBALANCE PHOTOGRAPHY

123 Grant

Student Musician Gallery Performances & SFPS Music Students’ Canyon Road Parade SFPS K-12 MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAMS JOIN WITH CANYON ROAD MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION AND SANTA FEAN MAGAZINE

October 17 saturday Parade 12:00 PM

Dedicated to Pat Burns, Recently Passed and Beloved SFPS Music Educator THE ONLY ALL-SFPS MUSIC PARADE IN TOWN

Santa Fe High Guitarists, El Camino Real 3rd Grade Wildcat Choir, Aspen Community Magnet School Elementary Choir, Santa Fe Youth Symphony Mariachi Estrella, Kearny Elementary Choir, Ortiz Middle School Choir, Acequia Madre Elementary Choir, Gonzales, Aspen, and Capshaw Orchestras, El Camino Real Wildcat Band PARADE GUESTS

Dr. Joel Boyd, Superintendent of Santa Fe Public Schools Santa Fe Mayor Javier M. Gonzales Cabinet Secretary Veronica Gonzales, NM Department of Cultural Affairs

Gallery Performances 1-2 PM DORADO ELEMENTARY CHOIR

Caffe Greco/Jacqueline’s Place, 233 Canyon Rd EL SWEENEY ELEMENTARY COUGAR CHOIR

Ventana Fine Art, 400 Canyon Rd

ACEQUIA MADRE ELEMENTARY BAND

Canyon Road Contemporary Art, 403 Canyon Rd ASPEN COMMUNITY SCHOOL ELEMENTARY CHOIR

Sage Creek Gallery, 421 Canyon Rd

City Tours

Discover Santa Fe via Historic Walks of Santa Fe (historicwalksofsantafe.com), Get Acquainted Walking Tour (505-983-7774), A Well-Born Guide (swguides.com), or the New Mexico Museum of Art (nmartmuseum.org).

GONZALES COMMUNITY SCHOOL ORCHESTRA

Bill Hester Fine Art, 621 Canyon Rd ATC MARIMBA AND STRING BANDS

William and Joseph Gallery, 727 Canyon Rd

Gallery Performances 2-3 PM SANTA FE HIGH SCHOOL GUITARISTS

Canyon Road Contemporary Art, 403 Canyon Rd

For more events happening around town, visit the Santa Fean’s online calendar at SantaFean.com.

SANTA FE YOUTH SYMPHONY ELEMENTARY STRINGS

Sage Creek Gallery, 421 Canyon Rd CAPITAL HIGH JAGUAR PRIDE BAND

Bill Hester Fine Art, 621 Canyon Rd ATC MARIMBA AND STRING BANDS

William and Joseph Gallery, 727 Canyon Rd DETAILED SCHEDULE POSTED AT WWW.SFPS.INFO


by Emi ly Va n C le ve

Eighth Annual Historic Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out the scent of paint and autumn leaves is in the air

ARTISTS FROM JUST SEVEN Canyon Road galleries were part of the first Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out in 2008. This year’s extravaganza—one of the nation’s largest annual artist demonstrations—features at least 60 galleries, and includes live demonstrations by

more than 200 painters, sculptors, jewelers, glass blowers, fiber artists, weavers, carvers, and potters. “Last year we added sculptors to the roster of painters,” explains bonnie French, president of the Canyon Road Merchants Association, which sponsors the event. “This year there are artists working in everything from metal and fiber to clay and glass. We also have invited Santa Fe artists without Canyon Road representation to paint with us. Canyon Road gallery artists will work outside near their galleries, and other Santa Fe artists can set up and work wherever they want along Canyon Road.” The fun begins on the evening of Friday, October 16, when boutiques, shops, restaurants, and galleries located along Canyon Road stay open late. The galleries will host exhibitions, interactive art experiences, and receptions where the public can meet and mingle with the artists. On Saturday morning, artists will hit the street, claiming their favorite spots and setting up with easels, tables, clay, blowtorches, and models. Entertainment begins at noon when a marching band parades down Canyon Road, and in the early afternoon student musicians from local schools will perform at a variety of locations. Expect to see belly dancers, riders on horseback, activities for kids, and live music throughout the stretch of this historic road. Hungry? There are plenty of culinary treats to enjoy at galleries and restaurants along the way. Eighth Annual Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out, October 16, from 5 PM and October 17, from 10 AM, free, Canyon Road, visitcanyonroad.com

COURTESY OF THE CANYON ROAD MERCHANT ASSOCIATION

The Paint Out & Sculpt Out is always a lively social scene, with locals, visitors, and artists swapping stories and making new friends.

October 15, 2015 NOW 15


Mason Jennings

the Minneapolis-based musician performs at Skylight

so I’ll be playing some new songs as well as songs from previous albums.” Jennings has recorded 11 albums since 1998, including his most recent Always Been (November 2013), which is touted on his website as the “most radiant and refined effort of his career.” Recorded after Jennings spent a winter writing songs in his Minnesota cabin, Always Been features “Wilderness,” a song about “facing things we’d rather not in hopes of moving forward,” Jennings told Rolling Stone magazine. “It is not an easy task, alone out there in our inner wilderness, trying to find our way home.” If “Wilderness” is best described as honest and unassuming, Jennings’s forthcoming album (likely out this winter) sounds like it might be quite the opposite. “It’s very electric and bombastic,” Jennings says. “I’m very excited about it.” In a recent Instagram post, Jennings hinted at some details. “One of my sons excitedly told me [that the album] has the quality of someone pull-starting a chainsaw. Couldn’t refute that description. Chainsaw of the heart maybe.” Does that mean I should bring earplugs or tissues to the show? Mason Jennings, October 21, 7:30 PM, $20–$30, Skylight, 139 W San Francisco, masonjennings.com IMAGE COURTESY OF AB PRESS

THE FIRST TIME I HEARD singer/songwriter/multiinstrumentalist Mason Jennings was on a friend’s mix CD back in 2009. With lyrics like songbird’s singing in an old dead tree; the way you drive honey scares the hell out of me, a hundred miles an hour on a brand new road, look at me again, you’ll make my heart explode, “Fighter Girl” was a tribute to independent women, a nod to perseverance during hard times, and a catchy song that quite frankly reminded me of myself (I would later discover that such relatable lyrics are the soul of Jennings’s music— people find themselves in his poetic words and lose themselves in his catchy melodies). I was hooked. I acquired several of Jennings’s albums and bought tickets to see him live when he came through my then-hometown of Columbia, Missouri. but Jennings—a Midwesterner himself—hasn’t been so easy to see in concert since I’ve been in Santa Fe, which is why his October 21 show at Skylight is kind of a big deal. Turns out, it’s kind of a big deal for Jennings, too. “I really like Sante Fe, but I haven’t been there for probably seven years,” he says. “I love the light and the air.” The stop is one of a couple dozen stops on Jennings’s current tour. “It will be a solo intimate show,” he says. “I just finished a new record

by Wh itne y Sp ive y

Singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Mason Jennings brings his solo musical performance to Skylight on October 21.

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eating+ drinking

Bartender Simona Zirguleviciute

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

Osteria d’Assisi Ristorante Italiano Italian Spritz Called the most popular aperitif in Italy according to Aperol’s site, the wildly popular Italian Spritz is not only refreshing and hip to drink, it’s lovely to look at. The Italian Spritz seen here at Osteria d’Assisi Ristorante Italiano is a simple mix of Prosecco wine, Aperol bitter liqueur, and a spritz of soda water poured over ice cubes. Garnished with a twist of orange rind, the sparkly reddish orange beverage is regaining the popularity it had in Italy in the 1950s, thanks to a 2013 marketing campaign by the Campari Group, who owns Aperol. Invented in 1919 in Padova, Italy, Aperol boasts a proprietary recipe with flavors of oranges, rhubarb, and gentian root. Appropriate for drinking any time of day in Italy, the Italian Spritz is a lovely way to whet your appetite for any fine dining experience at Osteria d’Assisi.—Cristina Olds Osteria D’Assisi Ristorante Italiano, 58 South Federal, osteriadassisi.com October 15, 2015 NOW 17


Seen Around

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Every week, Santa Fean NOW hits the street to take in the latest concerts, art shows, film premieres, and more. Here’s just a sampling of what we got to see.

photographs by Stephen Lang


photographs by Lisa Law

Nightlife

by Pamela Macias

October 15, 2015 NOW 19


Opening Night As one of the largest art markets in the country, Santa Fe is always hosting openings at galleries and museums around town. Santa Fean NOW was recently out and about at a number of opening-night receptions, and here’s just a sampling of the fun people we hung out with.

photographs by Stephen Lang

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art

openings | reviews | artists

Lange Marshall’s impressionistic autumn still-life paintings, inspired by the abundance of seasonal fruits and vegetables and their rich shapes and color combinations, are included in the featured works in this seven-person group show. “I look forward to fall harvest because of the abundance of colorful objects to paint,” says Marshall. “The shapes and color combinations of fruit and vegetables are endless.” Additional artists include Laurin McCracken, Timothy Horn, Joseph breza, Caroline Carpio, bernard Franz, and Michael DeVore. Also fascinated with seasonal color changes, DeVore says, “I find this time of year particularly complements my use of reds, yellows, oranges, and browns. Oil color pigments come from the earth, so there’s a natural relationship between nature and art, which I love to explore.” His newest pieces will be on display during the group show.—Carolyn Patten Harvest: A Group Show, Greenberg Fine Art, 205 Canyon through October 29, greenbergfineart.com, reception October 16, 5–7 PM

Lange Marshall, Arrangement with White Pumpkins, oil on linen, 26 x 34"

October 15, 2015 NOW 21


art

PROFILE

art matters

galle r ie s celeb rat e t h e wh at a nd w hy of a r t

by Anne Maclachla n Established in the fall of 2013, the educational series Art Matters goes beyond the appreciation of art in general and its importance to Santa Fe’s tourism, economic, and aesthetic existence. The next seasonal program, sponsored by the Santa Fe Gallery Association and operating under the leadership of David Eichholtz of David Richard Gallery, will take place in more than two dozen galleries around the City Different from October 16 to October 25. The galleries will host events that delve into the historical and cultural matters of art, with lectures and discussions that allow unique interaction among gallery owners, visitors, and the artists themselves. Art Matters series, October 16–25, see individual galleries for participants and lectures, artmatterssantafe.org

Tony Griffith, In Medias Res, acrylic/resin/panel, 48 x 36"

Tony Griffith: Passages Pippin Contemporary 200 Canyon pippincontemporary.com October 14–27 Reception October 16, 5–7 pm This fall, mixed-media artist Tony Griffith is exhibiting his vibrant, soulful abstracts at Pippin Contemporary, one of the participating galleries in October’s Art Matters series. An enthusiastic outdoorsman, Griffith is known for expressing diverse arid and aquatic surroundings in the hope that the viewer will join him in sensing the peaceful brilliance of nature. In Passages, Griffith presents a set of quirky optical challenges that encourage both reflection and the spiritual awareness that not all boundaries are set by exterior elements.—AM

Re-Op: The Responsive Eye Fifty Years After, David Richard Gallery 544 South Guadalupe, davidrichardgallery.com, October 2–November 21 Spearheading the Art Matters lineup, David Richard Gallery reexamines William C . Seitz’s optical art movement from the mid-1960s and its metamorphosis over the last 50 years. Newer artists experimenting with industrial textures like the reflective aluminum sign material in Jack Slentz’s Blue Tube, the digital projection blend in Matthew Kluber’s No Place Like Utopia, and the wildly colorful cast acrylic in Float for Gilberto Perez by Christian Haub create a new perspective, so to speak, on the op-art experience. The show includes pieces created within the past 30 years by several artists from the original Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) Op-Art exhibit. —AM 22

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Participating Galleries Adobe Gallery Casweck Galleries Chiaroscuro Contemporary Art David Richard Gallery David Rothermel Contemporary Ellsworth Gallery Evoke Contemporary GF Contemporary Gaugy Gallery Giacobbe-Fritz Fine Art Allan Houser Gallery Charlotte Jackson Fine Art Heidi Loewen Porcelain Gallery LewAllen Galleries at the Railyard Matthews Gallery New Concept Gallery Pippin Contemporary SITE Santa Fe Sorrel Sky Gallery TAI Modern Tansey Contemporary Turner Carroll Gallery Wade Wilson Art Winterowd Fine Art

Christian Haub, Float for Gilberto Perez, cast acrylic sheet, 24 x 24 x 2.5"


body language Ma r t i n Sp e i puts se r iou s mu s cle into h i s a r c he ty pa l s c u l p t u r e s

Blue Rain Gallery, 130 Lincoln, blueraingallery.com

STEPHEN LANG

by Amy Gro s s MARTIN SPEI ISN’T ONE to wax sentimental about his hometown of Detroit, but the fact that he hails from “a town that makes things” is certainly not lost on the sculptor, whose own hands create figures in bronze, steel, cast iron, and a host of nontraditional media. And he has to credit the Detroit Institute of Arts with kickstarting, at an early age, his lifelong fascination with art; a Diego Rivera mural at the museum blew his mind, though perhaps not as much as the realization, some 30 years later, that his own figures have much in common with Rivera’s WPA-era characters. “Rivera’s characters had those thick arms and fingers and hands, and there was something solid about them,” says Spei, whose own figures tend to be broadshouldered and heavy-set, suited (but barefoot), and bald—“like the 1970s big-time wrestlers. These are guys who could pick something up, and throw each other around.” Hunched determinedly forward, each figure appears to have a purpose. Some smile blithely or grin; others frown or seem to be lost in thought. “Most of my pieces are about doing tasks—the tasks we do in life,” Spei says. Hence the suits. “Suits are kind of like the modern apron; if you’re wearing a suit, you’re going to a job, a funeral, or a wedding.” As for the lack of hair and shoes, “Hair is a fashion statement,” he explains. “My characters need to be bald so you’re not distracted by the hair. And shoes bring in a certain socioeconomic reality that I don’t want to make a part of the piece. Should they be wingtips, loafers, tennis shoes?” Spei taught himself the classical way of modeling clay, making a mold, and casting. but his process can go in any direction. “I work in a lot of different materials, and I’m excited by different materials—resins, rubber, aluminum, bronze, steel, cast iron,” he says. “I get an idea, and then I find a material that suits it.” He’s currently experimenting with casting figures in resin and using a material called Aerblock (a green building material) for his bases. Spei, whose work is represented by blue Rain Gallery, creates in his southside Santa Fe studio where, with caffeinated assistance from a classic 1979 La Pavoni espresso machine, he is able to indulge his artistic whims: “I have the luxury of going back and forth between different pieces and different realities.”

art

PROFILE

“Body language and body types—these are my words. This is how I put together these short stories,” says Spei. October 15, 2015 NOW 23


art

STUDIO

Jane Filer

Jane Filer says her home studio holds easels and art supplies for anyone who wishes to stop by and create something.

transcending time, space, and imagination Viewing the work of Jane Filer is more than simply taking a trip into a fabulous land; it’s a metaphysical, philosophical, and cultural journey. Filer is passionate about the nonlinear and the unseen; about string theory, simultaneous multidimensional existence, and quantum physics; and all of these are revealed in her work. “Imagination is a major ingredient,” she says, noting that the ancient cultures valued an education in the arts as much as they respected the sciences. Each of her paintings starts out as an abstract, full of color, pattern, composition, and texture. From there, “I look into it, just like you look into a cloud and see something there.” Filer then discovers what she terms “algebraic equations.... where something else could happen; and I just follow the equation.” When she creates a piece, she first constructs, then deconstructs it, “which fragments reality, taking pieces of what happened before, adding what now transpires … .” Reflecting aspects of Australian Aboriginal space and time concepts—acquired during two years of Filer’s childhood in West Australia—her paintings draw the viewer into simultaneously existing, fantastical realms and new perspectives.—Anne Maclachlan “It’s finished when I love every square inch. It’s finished when it makes sense. Not in a literal way; not in a narrative way; but in a poetic way.”—Jane Filer

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art

PREVIEWS

Sasha Pyle, Malagueña, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 24"

Wherever she is painting, Filer prefers to work outdoors.

Re+Invention, City of Mud 1114A Hickox, cityofmud.com, reception October 16, 5–8 pm, through December 15 Featuring over a half-dozen artists, including Jamie Chase, Sandy brown, brett Chomer, Paul Shapiro, and Gina Telcocci, Re+Invention will be the first exhibition hosted by City of Mud, a new collaborative art space west of the Railyard. “Our fall show is . . . just a touch dark and decadent, and showcases abstraction in both two and three dimensions,” says featured artist and Curator Sasha Pyle. “The show is called Re+Invention because we reinvented the building, ourselves, and how art can be displayed.” The space aims to create a unique atmosphere: alongside art created with various traditional media, it will showcase vintage found objects from industrial curiosities to home décor. The name “City of Mud” can be read to suggest the impermanent nature of created works and their creators, or to note Santa Fe’s “kinship with other parts of the world that are blessed with indigenous architecture and design, where buildings are created out of the earth.“—Dylan Syverson

CHRIS CORRIE

Richard Tashjian Drifting Clouds Over Mountains oil on panel 22 x 28"

Santa Fe Six, Art Exchange Gallery 60 E San Francisco, Ste 10, aegallery.com, through October 31 Trinon Crouch, Jim Griffith, Mike Mahon, Laurence Seredowych, Jeff Tabor, and Richard Tashjian are the half-dozen artists sharing top billing at the recurring downtown exhibition Santa Fe Six. The shows, featuring a mostly unchanging crew of exhibitors, have cropped up sporadically at Art Exchange for nearly a decade. In this edition, all are painters except Griffith, who has made a forty-plus-year career in Santa Fe crafting vivid, often comical sculptures from wood and mixed media. The five others represent distinct approaches to painting, from the vast color swaths of Crouch and Tabor, to Seredowych’s careful still lifes, to Tashjian’s and Mahon’s detailheavy yet stylized landscapes.—DS October 15, 2015 NOW 25


art

Block Printing without a Press: Use Your Feet! Teresa Neptune Studio/Gallery, 728 Canyon October 16, 2–6 pm The art of woodcut has evolved severally within multiple cultures across the globe, and established methods for transferring images to paper range from pounding with a hammer, to rubbing with leather pads, to using a mechanical press. Printmaker Linda Hunsaker will demonstrate a tool-free traditional technique, attributed to ancient India, in which the artist inks the (in this contemporary case, linoleum) block before placing it face down on paper and standing on it, using his or her own feet and body weight to create the print. The demonstration will close out Hunsaker’s and photographer Teresa Neptune’s “A Closer Look” exhibition, featuring depictions of shared travel memories in starkly disparate media; and also coincides with the 8th Annual Historic Canyon Road Paint & Sculpt Out.—DS

PREVIEWS

Linda Hunsaker, Sheep, linocut print, 4 x 4"

Dog’n Around by Stephen Lang Santa Fe’s favorite pets, seen around town

Santa Fashion Photographer Mark Steven Shepherd proves Santa Fe style is a real thing with his candid shots of locals around town.

Joanie Sparkman, wearing a fabulous new hat from O'Farrell Hat Company.

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JONATHAN TERCERO

style [on the market]

The northeast part of town is the setting for this elegant, remodeled adobe home with an attached guesthouse. Handcarved doors, antique vigas, coved ceilings and nichos add an old world feeling to this gracious residence. The master suite has an abundance of storage space in its eight closets (which include one walk-in and one for jewelry). Ample space in the entry area and gallery hall accommodates a large collection of artwork. The spacious gourmet kitchen is equipped with top-of-the-line appliances and stained concrete counters. Two portales, including a large one at the back of the house off the kitchen, and beautifully landscaped grounds are designed for relaxed outdoor living. The property is located on a private dead-end street in Sierra Del Norte.

StudioNia Santa Fe

he a l ing t hr o u g h m o v e m e nt

THE NIA TECHNIQUE, which originated with Debbie and Carlos Rosas in California more than two decades ago, is what’s known these days as fusion fitness or mind-body fitness, a dance/movement program that blends elements of tai chi, yoga, tae kwon do, modern, and ethnic dance to create a highenergy, whole-body workout allowing for a lot of personal expression. StudioNia has a varied schedule of classes, instructor training events, and workshops, including Nia, 5Rhythms and JourneyDance, a monthly, guided (rather than taught) free expression dance workout done without mirrors to encourage participants to become more centered and self-aware. Co-owner Kelle Rae Oien was the first certified Nia teacher in brazil and has been operating StudioNia in Santa Fe since Mark Frossard and Kelle 2009. She’s also a certified yoga teacher and a Rolf Movement Rae Oien are co-owners practitioner, and says she has dedicated her life “to self-masof StudioNia. tery, through the discovery of healing through movement. My purpose is to inspire my students to live wildly satisfying lives.” Co-owner Mark Frossard is a visual artist who discovered Nia when he was commissioned to paint a mural for the studio. “Somewhere in early adulthood,” Mark says, he had lost the playfulness in his dance, stopped listening to his body and gained more than 50 pounds. He began taking Nia classes, became certified as an instructor, lost the weight and regained the joy. He says Nia helped him “become a physically and mentally healthier person.”—Carolyn Patten

Nia blends dance and other forms of movement for a full body workout.

List price: $1.8 million Contact: Mark Banham, 505-577-5273, Barker Realty, santaferealestatemarket.com StudioNia on San Mateo has been offering classes, workshops, and instructor training since 2009.

DANIEL QUAT

151 Barranca Road

October 15, 2015 NOW 27


Robert Wolf: In Search of America

Robert Wolf spent his formative youth bouncing around New Mexico, both as a student at St. John’s College and as a student of life on the bohemian streets of Santa Fe in the mid-1960s. A writer, publisher, and radio producer now based in Iowa, Wolf recently published his first memoir. He is currently working on a sequel to In Search of America, and will sign books on October 16 at Matthews Gallery as part of the Fall of Modernism exhibition series. NOW: Your first visit to New Mexico was in Duran in 1963—why did you stop there? Robert Wolf: I had gotten a ride in Indiana from an aggressive young guy who kept a pistol in his glove compartment and claimed to be a journalist. He was headed for Las Vegas, Nevada, and I was headed for San Francisco. . . .The first town we hit was Duran, a village of adobe and wood houses that looked like it was out of the 1880s. . . . Who are some of the notable characters you mention in the book? Harold “Hal” West (1902-1962), who had a big influence on me, was a Western artist who lived on Canyon Road. Almost across the street from Hal’s studio was James “Jim” Stovall Morris’s home and studio. Tommy Macaione is in the book, too—a terrific character and prolific painter. Eli Levin was— and still is—a friend. So is Jerry West, Hal’s son. The Matthews Gallery is hoping to have paintings by all of them for the show. How is this memoir different from your other writings? Many sections of In Search of America were based on drafts written shortly after the events occurred. The prose is stylistically different from anything I’ve written before. It’s a lot sparser. I wanted something that would invite the reader’s imagination.

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What was it about Santa Fe during the 1960s that affected you so intensely? I grew up in a very affluent Connecticut town during the fifties and early sixties, a time of great conformity. . . . I despised that kind of life. I wanted adventure, not security. Santa Fe, with all of its artists and eccentrics, plus its Indians and Hispanics, was a wonderful gift that came three years after Duran. A young person—especially someone who hoped to become a writer—couldn’t have asked for a better place to experience the range of humanity. How does your memoir fit into the Fall of Modernism series? The final version of In Search of America was deeply influenced by the pioneer modernist American writers Gertrude Stein, Sherwood Anderson, and Ernest Hemingway. Do you still paint? I spend about half my time painting, mostly Midwest and New Mexico landscapes. I sell through several Midwest galleries and I’ll have two oil pastels at the show.—Cristina Olds New Mexico Wild: Typewriter Tales of a Santa Fe Bohemian, book signing with author Robert Wolf, 5–7 pm, October 16, Matthews Gallery, 669 Canyon, thematthewsgallery.com

In Search of America by Robert Wolf, 222 pages, Ruskin Press, $15

MATTHEW PUTNEY

style


GABRIELLA MARKS

| L A S T LO O K |

Chango at Santa Fe Bandstand Often called Santa Fe’s hardest-working band, the dance-rock group Chango can be found somewhere in town most weekends: playing at local bars; or at the Railyard and Santa Fe Bandstand; at weddings; and for all manner of private parties and celebrations. The Santa Fe natives—Scott Morrissey on lead vocals and rhythm guitar, Micah Chappel on drums and percussion, James “Hammy” Griego on bass and background vocals, and rapper Greg Lopez with background vocals and lead guitar—are known for high-energy performances that mix top musicianship with humor and an irresistibly danceable sound.—Carolyn Patten October 15, 2015 NOW 29


Historic Canyon Road Paint Out & Sculpt Out Saturday, October 17, 2015

We invite you to watch Waxlander Gallery artists painting and sculpting in front of the gallery

9:30 am - 5:30 pm

Waxlander Gallery

celebrating thirty-one years of excellence

622 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, NM 87501 waxlander.com • 505.984.2202 • 800.342.2202

Santa Fean NOW October 15 2015 Digital Edition  
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