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canyon road magazine

Your Guide to

Art Events Boutiques Restaurants

Welcome to the

Heart of Santa Fe Presented by the Santa Fean

visitcanyonroad.com


JANE SAUER Innovative work by internationally recognized artists in a variety of media

652 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 87501 505 - 995 - 8513

j s a u e r g a l l e r y. c o m info@jsauergallery.com

GALLERY


JacquelineÕ S Place A one-stop shopping experience from head to toe Jacqueline’s Place, a treasure trove on Canyon Road, features women’s and girls fashions, jewelry, belts, handbags, shoes, and accessories for the ultra-stylish. Whether you’re looking for a low-key yet elegant look, an innovative jeweled eye-catcher, or a casual-chic ensemble, Jacqueline’s Place, which prides itself on carrying fashions made in the United States, will wardrobe you in no time. In addition to our clothing, we offer one of the finest selections of museum-quality Native American jewelry in the Southwest. We also showcase local jewelry designers who work in sterling silver, brass, crystal, and natural gemstones.

233 Canyon Road Suite 4 505-820-6542 Open daily 10 – 6

Jewel Mark, Santa Fe'S FaMily Jeweler The only authorized Cartier dealer in New Mexico Master Goldsmith and Graduate Gemologist on Staff jewelmark@qwestoffice.net Fine Jewelry the Mark oF DiStinction eStabliSheD 1987

Jewel

mark

OPEN EVERY DAY 10-6 • 505.820.6304

233 Canyon Road • www.jewel-mark.com


Phyllis Kapp

“Oh, How We Dream With the Stars” 29 x 38 unfr Watercolor

Waxlander Gallery Celebrating Twenty-eight Years of Excellence 622 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, NM 87501 waxlander.com • 505.984.2202


WENDY HIGGINS

DAVID BOT TINI

The Joy of Illusion, 16 x 12, Oil on Canvas

November Light, 60 x 40, Acrylic on Canvas

JOSEPH BREZ A

L ANGE MARSHALL

Pink Light, 24 x 36, Oil on Canvas

Orange Shawl, 16 x 26, Oil on Canvas

GREENBERG FINE

ART

F E AT U R I N G T H E F I N E S T I N R E P R E S E N TAT I O N A L A RT 205 CANYON ROAD S A N TA F E , N M 8 7 5 0 1

PHONE 505.955.1500 • EMAIL info@greenbergfineart.com

w w w. g r e e n b e r g f i n e a r t . c o m


TAMAR KANDER, “I Missed You So Much” 40" x 40" Mixed Media

JEAN RICHARDSON, “Untitled”

16" x 16"

Acrylic

DOUG DAWSON, “City Traffic”

JOHN AXTON, “Spinnaker Sky”

19" x 20"

Oil

22" x 24"

Oil

VENTANA FINE ART 400 Canyon Road

Santa Fe, NM 87501

505-983-8815

800-746-8815

www.ventanafineart.com


canyon road magazine

PUBLISHER

bruce adams

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

New Work

anne mulvaney

b.y. cooper

CREATIVE DIRECTOR EDITORS

Peter Burega

dianna delling, amy hegarty, samantha schwirck

GRAPHIC DESIGNER FOOD+DINING EDITOR

sybil watson john vollertsen

GRAPHIC DESIGN CONTRIBUTER OPERSATIONS MANAGER

michelle odom

ginny stewart-jaramillo

SALES REPRESENTATIVES

robbie o’neill, david wilkinson HOME+DESIGN DIRECTOR

emilie mcintyre

WRITERS

gussie fauntleroy, devon jackson, kate mcgraw PHOTOGRAPHERS

chris corrie, charles mann gabriella marks, will mcpherson julien mcroberts, daniel nadelbach efraín m. padró

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

215 W San Francisco Street, Suite 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501

Chasing Jake No.12, 2012, oil on wood panel, 60 × 48 inches

Telephone 505-983-1444; fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafean.com

Hunter Kirkland Contemporary 200 – B Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 phone 505.984.2111 fax 505.984.8111 www.hunterkirklandcontemporary.com

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how to get around Canyon Road

Free Santa Fe Pick-Up to Canyon Road

The free Santa Fe Pick-Up shuttle runs every 15 minutes. Catch it at stops marked “Pick It Up Here”—there are four on Canyon Road (shown below) and one nearby at Alameda and Paseo de Peralta. The shuttle will drop passengers off anywhere along the route (safety permitting).

Route

The Santa Fe Pick-Up route starts and ends at the Santa Fe Depot in the Railyard and runs counterclockwise around downtown, with stops at: The Capitol/PERA Building Canyon Road Alameda and Paseo de Peralta The Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi The Main Library City Hall/The Santa Fe Community Convention Center Santa Fe Plaza/Museums The Eldorado and Hilton Hotels

Shuttle Hours

Monday–Friday, 6:30 am–6:30 pm Saturday, 7:30 am–4:30 pm CHRIS CORRIE

For a map and more information,

visit santafenm.gov

To Plaza ce Ave.

East Pala

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RESTROOMS

225 Canyon

Santa Fe PUBLIC PARKING

PARKING

River

ad Canyon Ro dre

ia Ma Acequ

SF PICK-UP Gormley

SF PICK-UP E. Palace

Ca Mo min nte o de So l l

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SF PICK-UP Garcia

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SF PICK-UP 610 Canyon

PUBLIC PARKING

St. Canyon Road offers a beautiful half-mile walk from Paseo de Peralta to Camino del Monte Sol. Additional parking and restrooms are located at 225 Canyon.

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visitcanyonroad.com


“One of the best contemporary art galleries and a truly fascinating sculpture garden.” - Eyewitness Top 10 Travel Guide

403 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 87501 505 982 2403 & SCULPTURE GARDEN

wifordgallery.com


KARAN RUHLEN GALLERY

Ziegen Phill helPer Thomas

Baker

Jackson

Tolman

long-PosTal

New Mexico Modernists to Present Day Contemporaries Martha Rea Baker • Gary Beals • Sally Hepler • Elaine Holien • Julian Jackson Estate of Janet Lippincott • Mary Long-Postal • Martha Mans • Amy Metier • Daniel Phill Vanita Smithey • Laurel Swab • Jinni Thomas • Kevin Tolman • Pauline Ziegen

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canyonroadarts.com

Karan Ruhlen Gallery • 225 Canyon Road • Santa Fe NM 87501 505.820.0807 • karanruhlen.com • info@karanruhlen.com


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Just a half-mile long, Canyon Road is home to more than 100 art galleries.

CHRIS CORRIE

artists and collectors as a creative mecca. And the heart of that mecca is Canyon Road. It’s not hard to see why professional artists from back East began pouring in here in the late 1800s. Nationally renowned painters such as Robert Henri, John Sloan, and Randall Davey quickly solidified Santa Fe’s reputation as an important art colony. From the beginning, the center of that colony was Canyon Road, where, even into the late 1930s, the neighborhood retained much of the rural character it had had for centuries. In 1962, the city changed forever when it legally designated Canyon Road a “residential art and crafts zone.” Over the decades the Santa Fe art world has expanded well beyond its historic roots, but Canyon Road remains essential to one’s art experience in the City Different. And what better way to experience Santa Fe’s art than to walk up or down Canyon Road? During the galleries’ high season, between May and October, the weather is perfect almost every day and the Friday-night openings are star-studded affairs, reminding visitors and locals alike that there’s no place in the world like Canyon Road. cr

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C A RO L E LAROCHE GALLERY

F I V E R E D WO LV E S

G I C L E E O N C A N VA S

40” X 60”

Also showing Jill Shwaiko, Allen Wynn, Ron Allen, and Fran Segal

CHARLES MANN

415 Canyon Road Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 Open Daily 10-5 505-982-1186 e m a i l @ l a r o c h e - g a l l e r y. c o m w w w. l a r o c h e - g a l l e r y . c o m

When the U.S. Army set up fort in Santa Fe in the mid-1800s, along with it came architectural influences from the East Coast and Midwest. A new style, known as Territorial, developed; it included such features as Greek Revival window and door trim, window shutters, and brick coping at the tops of walls. Look for these elements at El Zaguán and on other buildings on Canyon Road. The building that now houses Geronimo restaurant, at 724 Canyon Road, started out as an adobe farmhouse built in the mid1700s by a man named Geronimo Lopez. A row of new rooms and a portal facing the street were added to the house in the late 19th century. Note the Territorial details, including window shutters and squared posts, painted white, on the portal. An example of classic Victorian style is the brick building, a former schoolhouse, that now houses Ventana Fine Art, at 400 Canyon Road. When the railroad reached Santa Fe in 1880, bricks and roofing tin were more readily available, and pitched-roof brick construction became popular. The building at 400 Canyon is among the few downtown structures whose brick facade was not stuccoed over in the early 20th century, when the city’s boosters began promoting “Santa Fe style”—which harkened back to a Pueblo and Territorial look. Since the late 1950s, Santa Fe’s Historical Styles Ordinance has ensured the preservation of authentic historic exterior appearances for all structures within the city’s historic district. As a result, Canyon Road galleries and shops are equipped with modern lighting and interiors that beautifully present their art and other offerings, while also retaining the warmth and historic integrity of centuries past. cr canyon road

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COME SEE THE WORLD OF ART ON CANYON ROAD ENJOY AN EVENT CELEBRATING THE RICH MULTI CULTURAL HERITAGE OF SANTA FE THROUGH ART AND MUSIC. BENEFITTING SANTA FE PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAMS. ART SHOWS | TRUNK SHOWS BOOK SIGNINGS P R E S E N T E D

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SILENT AUCTIONS B Y

T H E

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Q U I C K D R AW & L I V E AU C T I O N

C A N Y O N

R O A D

M E R C H A N T S

|

MUSIC

Partially funded by OTAB Occupancy Tax Advisory Board

FOOD

A S S O C I A T I O N

SATURDAY MAY 12 | ALL DAY visitcanyonroad.com

|


MILL FINE ART

Gail Factor Metamorphosis XX, oil on canvas, 30 x 36�

MILL FINE ART

530 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 | 505 982-9212 millfineart@gmail.com | www.millfineart.com


C L A S S I C A L LY

R E F I N E D

A RT

AT THE ENTRANCE TO CANYON ROAD 201 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.995.9795

R E F L E C T I O N

info@reflectiongallery.com

G A L L E RY

w w w. re f l e c t i o n g a l l e r y. c o m REPRESENTING A DIVERSE GROUP OF INTERNATIONAL & AMERICAN PAINTERS & SCULPTORS


the time to relax in almost any one of its restaurants. Because virtually all of them, like the galleries, like the homes, have been preserved and date back in construction to the 1600s, or the 1800s. And it’s not a nostalgic reaction that it elicits—these buildings rich in history and in design—it’s more a romantic emotion. It’s no wonder dining out on Canyon Road can be such a transcendent experience. Art, food, romance. What better way to spend a day, a vacation, a life. cr


journey to the past Canyon Road history b y K at e M c Gr a w

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visitcanyonroad.com

Efraín M. Padró

W

andering up Canyon Road, the backbone of Santa Fe’s famous arts district, you might not realize you’re trekking through an old farming community. But for much of its recorded history, that’s what this area was. When Spanish settlers first arrived here, Canyon Road was an old dirt path leading into the mountains. Walk down Canyon Road and imagine that it’s 1750 or so. On the north side, a river winds through a deep arroyo, the lands running down to it planted in maize (corn) and beans. Some small adobe houses—two-room dwellings, mostly—are clustered here and there above the flood plain. In fields set aside for winter pasture, sheep and goats are grazing. Soon their owners will drive them up the trail into the higher reaches of the canyon for summer pasturing. A quarter-mile or so to the south is the long, large ditch dug in the mid1600s at the direction of the Spanish government. That’s the acequia madre, the mother ditch, which parallels the river and feeds the system of smaller acequias that the Spanish settlers used to assure a consistent and equitably distributed stream of irrigation to their land grants. Larger homes were built along the acequia madre. All summer, Santefesinos who are prudent and thrifty take their little burros into the upper canyon and cut firewood. Los leñadores, the woodcutters, bring the wood back to town in ridiculously high piles on the backs of the patient little beasts and stack it in their own yards. Often they gather enough to sell to their neighbors or other townsmen, leading the burros to—you guessed it—Burro Alley (which still exists, near the Lensic Center for the Performing


Arts) to line up and wait for customers. Now it’s 1846, and the U.S. Army has arrived in Santa Fe to bring Americans, and American trade, into the Plaza. Canyon Road is still a dirt trail through a farming community, but the Army soldiers have discovered the river. Under the direction of their superior officers, they build a sawmill up in the Canyon where the Randall Davey Audubon Center is now. They bring wagonloads of the lumber they are sawing back into the city and up to the foothills northeast of the Plaza where they are building Fort Marcy. In spite of these changes, the farming community of Canyon Road will remain much as it has been for another 100 years. Once the railroad comes, in 1880, the Anglos start arriving, especially the artists. Ironically, Canyon Road as we know it—the street that in a 1980s marketing campaign would be dubbed “the art and soul of Santa Fe”—could be called “the street that tuberculosis built.” For it was Sunmount Sanatorium, established at the turn of the 19th century on property near Sun Mountain (where the Carmelite Monastery now is) that drew so many of the artists who would forever influence the character and canyon road

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Joshua Tobey

Represented by

Gallery 822 822 CANYON ROAD SANTA FE, NM 87501 505-989-1700 www.gallery822.com

“Bellydancer”, bronze ed/50 19”H x 10”W x 8”D

architecture of the road. In the time before antibiotics, the dry, clean air of the Southern Rockies was a life-saving beneficence for infected Easterners. One of those artists, Gerald Cassidy, came to Albuquerque in 1890, under sentence of six months to live with TB-complicated pneumonia. He survived and thrived, making friends among the Indians at the pueblos in Northern New Mexico. He married in 1912 and, according to records, in 1915 he became the first artist to buy property on Canyon Road, purchasing a house at 1000 Canyon Road for a studio and home. Formerly a commercial artist, Cassidy decided to make a serious stab at becoming recognized for his fine art, and he succeeded, distinguishing himself for his Southwestern landscapes, portraits of Indians, and depictions of pueblo scenes. He lived until 1934, most of that time in his Canyon Road house. In 1913, Sheldon Parsons arrived at Sunmount, having relapsed from TB. He was a widower and he and his small daughter lived in an apartment near the Plaza before moving into Cassidy’s house on Canyon Road (his hosts were traveling abroad). In 1924, Parsons bought a tract of land at the foot of Upper Canyon Road and built a Spanish Pueblo– style adobe home and studio, where he lived and 24

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EFRAÍN M. PADRÓ

“Moonlighter”, bronze ed/50 18.5”H x 13”W x 8”D


In the 1920s, Canyon Road began the transition from its agrarian past to “the place where those artists live.” But it was the post-WWII period that pushed Canyon Road into the commercial prominence it enjoys today. painted Northern New Mexico landscapes until his death in 1943. The year 1916 was a stellar year for the incipient art colony, when artist and teacher William Penhallow Henderson and his wife, the poet and editor Alice Corbin Henderson, arrived so Alice could be treated for advanced tuberculosis at Sunmount. While Alice was residing at the sanatorium, William bought a small adobe house at the bottom of the road up to the hospital, called Camino del Monte Sol. By 1924, Alice was well enough to leave the sanatorium and the couple built a larger house on an adjoining tract of land; William then converted the original house into a painting studio. The two became doyens of the Santa Fe art scene, entertaining visiting poohbahs of poetry such as Vachel Lindsay, Robert Frost, and Carl Sandburg, as well as the artists coming in from the East. Henderson began a construction business, The Pueblo Spanish Building Company, which was devoted to recreating what he and others had designated “Santa Fe style.” A big contributor to this style was the architect John Gaw Meem, who had come to Santa Fe in 1920 to recover from TB at

CHARLES AZBELL GALLERY 203A CANYON ROAD SANTA FE, NM 87501 ch a r l e sa zb e l l g a l l e r y@q .co m

505 • 988 • 1875

w w w.ch a r l e sa zb e l l g a l l e r y.com

Red D t Gallery Raymond Davis

Bonnie Bishop

Melissa Dominguez

Sam Haozous

Bart Ellison

Paula Romero

Annie McGovern

Terry Colby

Larry & Nancy Buechley

Tori Strick

A sampling of our artists. To see these and other emerging artists visit

826 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 505.820.7338 www.red-dot-gallery.com canyon road

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

enchanted treasures

Karen Melfi Collection

Desert Son of Santa Fe Woven leather whites from Henry Beguelin—what could be more fun for summer? Available at Desert Son of Santa Fe. 725 Canyon, 505-982-9499, desertsonofsantafe.com

Peach sapphire and natural color diamond pendant For 20 years, the Karen Melfi Collection has been representing the finest local and national jewelry, wearable art, and contemporary craft artists. Located on Canyon Road, KMC offers a wide selection of high-quality, handcrafted items in all price ranges. 225 Canyon, 505-982-3032, karenmelficollection.com

Shopping on Canyon Road Canyon Road is one of the most gallery-packed streets in the world—but there’s more here to see than just art. Diverse shopping opportunities abound, with goods from jewelry and clothing to fine rugs and other home furnishings on offer at stores as quaint as the nearby galleries. The wide variety of retailers on this historic avenue just adds to its charms. One of the key components to whatever shopping you do on Canyon Road—you’re looking for that perfect engagement ring for your partner, you need a lightweight but beautifully designed dress for the Santa Fe Opera, you’re thinking of getting your parents a kilim for their living room back in Ann Arbor—is atmosphere. The weather’s perfect almost year-round. There’s very little automobile traffic to deal with. There’s the lovely garden at El Zaguán in which you can rest, relax, and literally stop and smell the roses. And the winding alleys and side streets off Canyon Road itself are as unique and funky as the stores themselves. In short, there’s hardly a road in America as easy and inviting—for strolling along, for window shopping, for shopping shopping—as Canyon Road. There are stores for your dog, for your home, for finding something to wear that’s casual yet refined. The typical Canyon Road shopping experience is personal, casual, elegant, and informed. Just the way life is in Santa Fe itself.

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visitcanyonroad.com

Sunmount Sanatorium. Once recovered, Meem settled on the Camino and began devoting himself to designing structures around town in the Santa Fe style. Municipal officials jumped on this bandwagon fairly early on, as did the incoming artists. The indigenous architecture was a major draw, as far as they were concerned, and they went to great lengths to build—or have William Henderson build—houses and studios that echoed the stylistic themes. Henderson’s construction projects included the Wheelwright Museum on Camino Lejo, artist Fremont Ellis’s last home on Canyon Road, and the restoration of historic Sena Plaza just east of the Plaza. In 1919, the fledgling art colony got a boost with the arrival of artists John Sloan and Randall Davey and their wives. Already well-known and established in the art world, their decisions to settle in Santa Fe added needed cachet to the growing colony. Sloan mostly summered in Santa


Fe for the next 30 years, living in a small adobe on Garcia Street (one of the side streets to Canyon Road), while Davey settled here permanently, buying a large tract of land where the old sawmill had been. Davey, his wife, and his son renovated the old building into a home and studio where he painted portraits, landscapes, and horse-racing scenes until his death in 1964. In the 1920s, Canyon Road began the transition from its former agrarian character to “the place where those artists live.� But it was the plump and prosperous post-WWII period that pushed Canyon Road into the commercial prominence it enjoys today. In the early 1960s, the street was finally paved and the artists began opening their studios to show their work. From their success grew the plethora of galleries, studded with high-end restaurants and boutique shops, that are found on Canyon Road today. But the imaginative visitor can still see vestiges of the road that was. cr

ROBERT NICHOLS GALLERY CoNTEmpoRARy CERAmiC ART

Clockwise,Top Left: Alan E. Lasiloo, Diego Romero, Glen Nipshank, Nathan Begaye

419 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, Nm 87501 505.982.2145 www.robertnicholsgallery.com

canyon road

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Dominique Boisjoli Fine Art Dominique Boisjoli, A Stream of Passion, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48" Dominique Boisjoli has a wide range of expression, from floral to abstract paintings. Her compositions are accented with thin gestural splashes and drips of paint conveying a great feeling of happiness and freedom.

the

Siri Hollander, Tranquillo, bronze sculpture Ms. Hollander translates her equine passion into bronze, cement, and steel. 621 Canyon, 505-989-7855, dominiqueboisjoli.com

gallery ART SHOWCASE

The William & Joseph Gallery Stephanie Shank, Holding the Dream, acrylic on panel, 4 x 5' The William & Joseph Gallery celebrates 11 years, featuring the finest collection of contemporary paintings, glass, and sculpture. 727 Canyon, 505-982-9404, thewilliamandjosephgallery.com

Lakind Fine Art Lisa Linch, New Growth oil on canvas, 48 x 48" Lakind Fine Art features Lisa Linch, an artist whose virtuoso skills in composition, design, color, and execution give her paintings their broad and enduring appeal. Linch has a unique ability to bring a distillation of collected experiences into a visual unity. Amusingly, if asked, she’ll tell you “I’m still learning.” For Linch it’s always about new growth. 662 Canyon, 505-982-3221 lakindfineart.com

Intrigue Gallery Pamela Frankel Fiedler, Love Fades, Memory Remains, oil on gold metal leaf, 36 x 30" Intrigue on Canyon has created just that, a unique crossroad collaboration where contemporary, figurative, and antique African art intersect. Pamela and Robert Fiedler opened Intrigue Gallery, which features her accomplished paintings and his authentic African art. This merging of divergent art forms is as compelling as it sounds—exotic, powerful, sensual, and, by all means, intriguing. 715B Canyon, 505-820-9265, frankelfiedler.com, gallerytribalart.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Delgado Street Contemporary Gary Denmark, Wayne’s World, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 48" Six years ago, international artist Gary Denmark moved from San Francisco to New Mexico. DSC is exhibiting Denmark’s marvelous new abstract interpretations of New Mexico’s colors and patterns. Visit DSC to experience the very best in contemporary painting, works on paper, and sculpture. 238 Delgado, 505-982-6487, delgadostreetcontemporary.com

Teresa Neptune Studio/Gallery Teresa Neptune, Vigil’s Store, Chimayó, NM, photograph, 18 x 12" See Teresa Neptune’s acclaimed black-and-white photography of South America, Europe, the Southwest, and wherever the road leads her in one of the town’s most charming, historic adobes, off the beaten path, directly behind Geronimo. Call for hours. Vigil’s Store is one of seven Neptune photographs on display at the New Mexico History Museum in the exhibit Contemplative Landscape, through December 2012. 728 Canyon, 505-982-0016 teresaneptune.com

Alexandra Stevens Gallery Katrina Howarth, Red Chair, oil on canvas, 18 x 24" “I love contrasting colors and making them dance around with one another,” says Katrina Howarth. “The oil pigments are like having a conversation in which I melt into the painting itself. Once I complete a painting, I set it aside and then continue the dialogue until I feel I have said enough.” 820 Canyon, 505-988-1311, alexandrastevens.com

Beals & Abbate Fine Art

Fred Calleri, The Sheriff Gets a Freebie, framed oil on canvas, 41 x 29" “Fred Calleri’s works take you to another time and place. His figures are full of character, and the background gives you insight into just exactly where his characters came from.” —Bobby Beals, owner of Beals & Abbate Fine Art. Fred Calleri 2012 Show, reception May 11, 5–8 pm. 713 Canyon, 505-438-8881, bealsandabbate.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

GVG Contemporary Blair Vaughn-Gruler, Geometric Universe, oil on wood on canvas, 44 x 48" Gallery co-owner Blair VaughnGruler continues to explore the geometric universe in a plethora of new small pieces and a few larger ones. To see more, please visit our newly redesigned website. 202 Canyon, 505-982-1494 gvgcontemporary.com

Mark White Fine Art Join us here in Mark’s calming, meditative, kinetic garden to experience bliss. These wind-driven sculptures welcome you through to his gallery. Inside, you will find his exquisitely patinaed, engraved metal canvases and bronzes. We look forward to your visit. 414 Canyon, 505-982-2073 markwhitefineart.com

DR Contemporary David Rothermel, Cashe, acrylic on panel, 32 x 24" Now in its new location, DR Contemporary is the exclusive gallery of artist David Rothermel. His new, contemporary works hold sway to his previous work and still give a sense of place to the classical abstract format. 616½ Canyon, 575-642-4981 drcontemporary.com

Chalk Farm Gallery George Underwood, Miro, oil on linen, 43 x 34" George Underwood’s paintings are held in many private art collections. One of his art collectors, David Bowie, says: “George has, over the years, refined his work to the point where I would put him among the top figurative painters coming out of the UK right now. There’s a sublime isolation surrounding his subjects that really touches the viewer, the figures being both heroic and vulnerable simultaneously.” Opening reception for the solo exhibition Soulful Warriors on May 4, from 5 to 8 pm. 729 Canyon, 505-983-7125 chalkfarmgallery.com 30

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New Concept Gallery Kathleen Doyle Cook, New Mexico 2 acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 50 x 40" Kathleen Doyle Cook’s intuitive, abstracted images can be described as sensory landscapes. Her one-woman exhibit will be in June 2012 with an opening reception on Friday, June 1, from 5 to 7 pm. New Concept Gallery exhibits contemporary works by Santa Fe painters, sculptors, and photographers. 610 Canyon, 505-795-7570, newconceptgallery.com


Jewel Mark presents

Rush Cole

BULL DANCER, 39in x 54in, oil

PICKUP MAN, 36in x 54in, oil

Jewel

GOLD!, 48in x 72in, oil

VIVA SANTA FE!

OPEN EVERY DAY 10-6 • 505.820.6304

mark 233 Canyon Road • www.jewel-mark.com


last look

Outdoor Adventure: Canyon Road action extends beyond the gallery walls. Decorative outdoor art—from wind sculptures to well-tended gardens—also dominates the area. At this home, a whimsical wrought-iron gate adorned with sculptural flowers is surrounded by lush greenery, welcoming visitors with charm and beauty.

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nadelbachphoto.com

photo by Daniel Nadelbach


Arles 48 x 60 Fresco & Oil on Canvas

Arles 48 x 60 Fresco & Oil on Canvas

600600 canyon canyon road, road, santa santa fe nm fe nm

Olga Olga Antonova Antonova Kevin Kevin BoxBox Aaron Aaron Bushnell Bushnell MFMF Cardamone Cardamone Christina Christina Chalmers Chalmers Rodney Rodney Hatfield Hatfield Margi Margi Lucena Lucena GigiGigi Mills Mills Julie Julie Schumer Schumer Susan Susan Stamm Stamm Evans Evans Sandra Sandra Pratt Pratt KirkKirk Tatom Tatom Nicholas Nicholas Wilton Wilton Elena Elena Zolotnitsky Zolotnitsky

alicia alicia lachance lachance

800.992.6855 800.992.6855 505.992.8877 505.992.8877 selbyfleetwoodgallery.com selbyfleetwoodgallery.com

The Present is the Other Shore 70 x 55 Oil on Canvas

The Present is the Other Shore 70 x 55 Oil on Canvas

adam adam shaw shaw

Canyon Road Magazine April May 2012  

Canyon Road Magazine Apri lMay 2012 - Presented by the Santa Fean

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