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TANSEY CONTEMPORARY Art Speaks: April 24 - May 13 Inaugural Exhibition

“FYI” ~ Gino Miles ~ Bronze ~ 48" x 40" x 12" on granite base

Tansey Contemporary Sculpture Center

New Work from Clea Carlsen, Calvin Ma, Gino Miles and Patrick McGrath Muñiz Opening night Global Code Project event to benefit ArtSmart New Mexico: April 24, 5-7 619 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM Visit www.tanseycontemporary.com for details and to learn about the Global Code Project


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publisher ’ s n ot e

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contents

BRUCE ADAMS

Publisher

DAVID ROBIN

In a world that continuously reinvents itself, Santa Fe’s Canyon Road is no exception. While it may outwardly look the same (thanks to the Historic Districts Review Board), in the last couple of years, a few more dining options have cropped up, allowing visitors and local residents to grab a quality meal without having to get in their cars. More importantly, the evolution of the art world has reached Canyon Road. While there are still lots of traditional art galleries, there’s been a movement toward more collectible and more contemporary art. This is a direct reflection of the art world as a whole and speaks to the quality of the dealers on Canyon Road. Today Canyon Road has an excellent selection of galleries and shops, where you’re sure to find your next special treasure. Contemporary, traditional, and historical artwork fills these charming structures and former homes. Restaurants with national reputations are housed in extraordinary and historically significant yet understated buildings. Canyon Road is an evolving street with a friendly personality, where gallery and shop owners welcome an adoring audience of visitors. In the last several years, a welcome addition to the Canyon Road experience has been the wonderful events that build on the area’s history. I especially encourage you to experience the Passport to the Arts event in May, the Paint Out in October, and the Farolito Walk on Christmas Eve, which fills even a Scrooge like me with the holiday spirit.

2 Publisher’s Note

8 Map of Canyon Road

11 Shopping Hot Spot Canyon Road is famous for its art, but that’s not all there is to see 12 The Art of Eating Well Canyon Road offers everything from fine dining restaurants to casual cafés 15 Canyon Road Events Where to go, what to do 16 Where Art and History Meet How Canyon Road achieved its distinctive identity 18 State of the Art Canyon Road’s creative legacy 20 Passport to the Arts Celebrating Canyon Road’s creative contributions

32 Last Look Cover photograph by Efraín M. Padró

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SYBIL WATSON

22 Built to Last Canyon Road’s historic, enduring architecture


Art in Motion!

MARK414WHITE FINE ART Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM Learn more: www.markwhitefineart.com or 505.982.2073


Jacqueline’s Place

Caffe Greco

open Daily 7:30aM – 8PM

P laza de S uenos y M ilagros Jewel Mark 505.820.6304 • Jacqueline’s Place 505.820.6542 caffe Greco 505.820.7996 once you have stepped into our world you won’t want to leave 233 canyon road • santa fe, new Mexico 87501 • JewelMark.net


205 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.955.1500

GREAT SEASON OF SHOWS Visit our website:

#TheFinestArt GreenbergFineArt.com/SF

INTRODUCING Miguel Peidro, Primavera en Pirineos (Spring in the Pyrenees), Oil on Canvas, 18 x 26”

FEATURED ARTISTS Paige Bradley Wendy Higgins Mark Yale Harris Martin Eichinger Joseph Breza Bruce Cody Michael DeVore Timothy Horn Miguel Peidro Carol Hartsock Mario Jung Karol Mack Lange Marshall Laurin McCracken Gladys Roldan de Moras Alice Williams Caroline Carpio Richard Weinstein Stan Metzger Bernard Franz Carl Berney David Bottini September McGee Scott Streadbeck Dennis Smith

Your

tion fo destina

r classic

al

ired s and insp

Paige Bradley, Expansion, Bronze, 28 x 35 x 17”

info@greenbergfineart.com

culptur

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JENNIFER J.L. JONES

canyon road magazine

Infinite Rhythm MAY 15– 31, 2015 Opening Reception:

FRIDAY, MAY 22, 5 – 7pm

PUBLISHER

bruce adams b.y. cooper

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 

EDITOR

amy hegarty

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

cristina olds

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

sybil watson

GRAPHIC DESIGN CONTRIBUTER OPERATIONS MANAGER

michelle odom

ginny stewart

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, SALES MANAGER SALES REPRESENTATIVE

david wilkinson

andrea nagler

A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

Pacheco Park, 1512 Pacheco St, Ste D-105, Santa Fe, NM 87505 Telephone 505-983-1444, fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafean.com

ADITI, 2015, Oil on wood panel, 54 × 54 inches

Hunter Kirkland Contemporary 200 – B Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 phone 505.984.2111 fax 505.984.8111 STEPHEN LANG

www.hunterkirklandcontemporary.com


Lyman WhiTakER Wind Sculptures™

Ryan STEFFENS Stone Fountains

ART AS EMISSARY

403 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-982-2403 866-594-6554 art@wifordgallery.com wifordgallery.com


How to Get Around Canyon Road

Free Santa Fe Pick-Up to Canyon Road

The free Santa Fe Pick-Up shuttle runs every 15­–20 minutes. Catch it at stops marked “Pick It Up Here”—there are four on Canyon Road (shown below) and one nearby at Alameda and Paseo de Peralta. The shuttle will drop passengers off anywhere along the route (safety permitting).

Route

The Santa Fe Pick-Up route starts and ends at the Santa Fe Depot in the Railyard and runs counterclockwise around downtown with the following stops: Capitol/PERA Building Canyon Road Alameda and Paseo de Peralta Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi Main Library City Hall/Santa Fe Community Convention Center Santa Fe Plaza/Museums Eldorado Hotel & Spa/Hilton Santa Fe Historic Plaza Hotel

michelle odom

Shuttle Hours

Monday–Friday, 6:30 am–6:30 pm Saturday, 7:30 am–4:30 pm For a map and more information,

visit santafenm.gov

To Plaza Ave

E Palace

ame

l

EA

Santa Fe

t da S

RESTROOMS

225 Canyon

PUBLIC PARKING

PARKING

River

ad Canyon Ro

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SF PICK-UP 610 Canyon

SF PICK-UP Gormley Ln

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SF PICK-UP Garcia

PUBLIC PARKING

St Canyon Road offers a beautiful half-mile walk beginning at Paseo de Peralta. Restrooms and parking are available at 225 Canyon. 8

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SF PICK-UP E Palace Ave

Ca Mo min nte o de So l l


“Canyon Road is an adventure into the visual arts for residents and visitors alike, offering an unparalleled view of Santa Fe’s unique historic architecture along with the most wonderful variety and concentration of art to be found anywhere in the country.” —Randy Randall, executive director, Tourism Santa Fe

Specialists in Native American Art

221 Canyon Road Santa Fe 505.955.0550 www.adobegallery.com

“Canyon Road has always been the one mandatory slow-drive-down street for out-of-town guests. The Southwestern charm of the buildings, the galleries filled with colorful artwork, the interestinglooking people on the street all combine for a memorable Santa Fe experience to take back home.” —Daniel Kosharek, photo curator, Palace of the Governors Photo Archives, New Mexico History Museum

KAREN MELFI collection

505.982.3032 karenmelficollection.com

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SYBIL WATSON

225 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 87501


shopping hot spot

GABRIELLA Marks

GABRIELLA Marks

Canyon Road is world famous for its abundance of artwork, but it has many other goods on offer as well. Independent shops abound, befitting the City Different’s origin as a trading post. You can spend a full day walking the length of the street, buying art for your home—from paintings to pottery to sculptures—or choosing the perfect ’one-of-a-kind gift for family and friends. Stop into one of the unique jewelry stores for handcrafted, locally made adornments, whether it’s a turquoise-embellished silver concho belt or a custom-made gold and diamond ring. Or check out the chic, sophisticated Western wear and high-end home furnishings on offer here as well. Beautifully made textiles (from clothing to tapestries) are also among the many popular items you’ll find while walking the length of one of the most famous shopping destinations in the world. cr

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the art of eating well Canyon Road offers everything from fine dining restaurants to casual cafés esidents of the City Different use the ultimate compliment to describe the restaurants on Canyon Road: “so Santa Fe” is what they often say. But not only are the restaurants indicative of the area’s unique charm and hospitality, they’re also ranked among some of the best fine-dining establishments in the country, with chefs earning accolades from the likes of the James Beard Foundation and Bon Appétit magazine, and eateries winning AAA Four Diamond and Forbes Four Star awards. The gastronome and art lover will find Canyon Road dotted with places to feed both body and soul. To be sure, the culinary delights are as tempting as the art on display, because, simply put, Canyon Road makes an art of dining. You can pamper your palate with comestibles ranging from sprightly gourmet teas to succulent elk tenderloin, from French roast coffee and pastries to Oregon pinot noir and Spanish tapas. Hungry for history and the plato del día? Try small plates of grilled octopus and shrimp on the cozy back patio of an 1835-era adobe while local flamenco dancers swirl around you. Or sit on the front portal and let Canyon Road’s passing parade of pedestrians be your entertainment. You can also visit a mid-20th-century eatery nestled in a cluster of homes, while a serene example of Santa Fe’s outdoor dining, secluded behind high walls and leafy trees, tempts with a high-end menu featuring salmon, striped bass, and Muscovy duck. The epicure will find no lack of earthly delights here. No matter what your tastes or taste buds crave, Canyon Road is a well-chosen spot for all things artistic, and a gastronomic must. cr

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

Relax over a decadent dessert and a cup of tea from India, China, or Sri Lanka at The Teahouse.

EfraÍn M. PadrÓ

R

by Kate McGraw

Geronimo offers world-class cuisine in a 1756 adobe home.

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BILL GALLEN

“The Compound Restaurant began in 1966, long before most of the galleries were here and Canyon Road was like it is now. We were a draw for the galleries back then. Now it means that almost every Saturday we’ll have guests from the United States, Japan, Australia, United Kingdom—from anywhere—walk in for a table. We depend on Canyon Road to lead people to us. And we never forget that.”

First Snow, oil on canvas, 24 x 36"

­ Mark Kiffin, chef/owner, — The Compound Restaurant

421 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 505.988.3444 sagecreeksf@aol.com sagecreekgallery.com STEPHEN LANG

Canyon Road restaurants

SAGE CREEK GALLERY

Café des Artistes 223-B Canyon, 505-820-2535 Caffe Greco 233 Canyon, 505-820-7996 The Compound Restaurant 653 Canyon, 505-982-4353 compoundrestaurant.com El Farol 808 Canyon, 505-983-9912 elfarolsf.com Geronimo 724 Canyon, 505-982-1500 geronimorestaurant.com The Teahouse 821 Canyon, 505-992-0972 teahousesantafe.com

In between gallery and shop hopping, you can rest your feet and grab a bite at numerous spots along Canyon Road.

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GABRIELLA Marks

“Canyon Road is less than a mile of many unique voices. Each of more than 100 galleries is independently owned, with each owner looking for artists with unique perspectives of beauty and poetry. Each gallery owner has a unique way of conducting business. Come and discover the uniqueness of Canyon Road.” —​Bill Hester, Bill Hester Fine Art​

CHRIS CORRIE

“I love being in the 225 compound on Canyon Road. I have ‘lived’ here almost every day for 25-plus years and it is an extraordinary place to do business. Canyon Road has a long and welldeserved reputation as the ‘art and soul’ of Santa Fe, and that means a lot to anybody’s business.”

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—Karen Melfi, Karen Melfi Collection


ADRIAN WILLS

ch a r les a zbell

Canyon Road events Canyon Road’s combination of history and culture allows visitors to enjoy a unique experience year-round, but on certain days the legendary art district’s offerings are even more noteworthy than usual. Exhibition openings, often celebrated on Friday evenings, are a Canyon Road staple. Many galleries schedule them on the fourth Friday of every month, and those “Fourth Fridays” can be particularly lively. Galleries welcome guests to take in their latest shows as well as their permanent collections, usually while offering light refreshments and sometimes live entertainment, too. For a comprehensive schedule of gallery openings, visit santafeancalendar.com. In spring, Passport to the Arts (May 8–9), a public art event, offers crowdfriendly fun like an Artist Quick Draw competition and a live auction, and many galleries and shops host artist receptions, demonstrations, trunk shows, and live music. Proceeds go to Santa Fe Public Schools’ music programs. (visitcanyonroad.com) During Santa Fe’s busy summer season, the annual ARTfeast festival presents its Edible Art Tour (June 12–14). Visitors and locals stroll between galleries, where they take in art while enjoying food from top restaurants. Proceeds support arts education programs for Santa Fe’s youth. (artfeast.com) Before the winter weather rolls in, enjoy

Celebrating 25 Years CH A R LES A ZBELL G A L L ER Y 203A CANYON ROAD SANTA FE, NM 87501 505·988·1875 charlesazbellgallery@q.com www.charlesazbellgallery.com

Rya n Benally

Joseph Bir dsong

Debor ah M artin

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a day of plein air painting with more than 100 artists during the Canyon Road Paint Out (October 17). The annual event features live music, a parade, art shows, and refreshments. (visitcanyonroad.com) The Christmas Eve Farolito Walk is arguably Canyon Road’s most popular event. On the night of December 24, the street is lined with glowing farolitos, and thousands of visitors stroll along the road guided by their light. While galleries and shops serve cookies and hot beverages, carolers sing and bonfires are lit to celebrate the magic of this special season and special street. cr

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where art and history meet how Canyon Road achieved its distinctive identity

Gabriella Marks

I “Art is subtle, tactile, personal—there is joy in physically connecting with it. Canyon Road is a place where the overwhelming number of quality galleries creates a unique destination that draws a broad cross section of collectors. It’s an unequaled environment to buy, sell, discuss, collect, and enjoy art.”

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michelle odom

—Paul Hartsock, Greenberg Fine Art

by Eve Tolpa

t’s hard to imagine one of Santa Fe’s artistic epicenters as a dirt path running along the river into the mountains, but over time Canyon Road has evolved from a familyoriented farming area into a vibrant and internationally known art district. One of the key factors in this development has been Santa Fe’s long history as a center of trade. “An art community that settles in a trading center is going to have a very distinctive feel, with very vital art,” says historian Elizabeth West, editor of the book Santa Fe: 400 Years, 400 Questions. “It’s going to bring in new ideas, and the people who stay and contribute artistically are going to be much more interesting.” One person who stayed and made an indelible mark was the Portuguese-born photographer and painter Carlos Vierra, Santa Fe’s first resident artist. Vierra, like many others, came to Santa Fe for health reasons, seeking treatment for tuberculosis at Sunmount Sanatorium in 1904. Sunmount’s treatment philosophy contended intellectual stimulation was a key element in curing TB. In the interest of revitalizing body and soul, the sanatorium hosted lectures by literary luminaries such as Carl Sandburg, Robert Frost, and Santa Fe poet and bon vivant Witter Bynner. According to West, “Bynner knew everybody in the world,” from Rita Hayworth to Ansel Adams. “[Santa Fe] really didn’t become an artist community until the time of Carlos Vierra,” says West. “Then word spread, and one thing led to another.” One of those things was the railroad, which, in the decades after its arrival in town in 1880, transported artists here from across the country. A rise in plein air painting, popularized by the Impressionists, inspired painters to trade their urban studios for outdoor inspiration. Santa Fe’s unique charm and high desert light made it a magnet for artists, and Canyon Road became a desirable place to live because “it was safe, easy, inexpensive, and beautiful,” West says. One of Canyon Road’s early artist/settlers was commercial lithographer Gerald R. Cassidy, who came west in 1915 to seriously pursue painting. Cassidy and his wife Ina first visited Santa Fe in 1912. Three years later, entranced with the area and its Native population, they bought a house at the corner of Canyon and Acequia Madre. The couple thoroughly remodeled their home, expanding it to showcase altar paintings from a ruined Nambé mission church.


SYBIL WATSON

GREG REICHE

Their neighbors included New York artist Randall Davey, who in 1919 bought a sawmill at the end of Upper Canyon Road that today is home to the Randall Davey Audubon Center & Sanctuary. Indiana native and celebrated muralist Olive Rush moved to Santa Fe shortly after Davey, residing in what’s now the Quaker Meeting House. Santa Fe painter Jerry West, son of the late artist Harold West, recalls spending part of his childhood with Rush, who had orchards on her property. “When I was a kid in 1942,” Jerry says, “I’d work for Olive on the weekend and help her with her gardens.” Through most of the 1950s, Canyon Road remained primarily residential, hosting just a handful of businesses—four of which were grocery stores. “There were hardly any galleries before then,” Jerry recalls. A creative atmosphere had already begun to emerge on the street, but it gained significant momentum in 1962, when the street was officially designated “a residential arts and crafts zone,” which meant that artists living on Canyon Road could now sell work from their homes. The number of businesses on the street began to rise, and, not surprisingly, many of them were arts-related. Modern-day Canyon Road is a narrow lane boasting old adobes that house an eclectic mix of galleries, shops, and restaurants. In 2007, the American Planning Association named Canyon Road one of the 10 “Great Streets in America,” noting that “the buildings themselves are works of art—doors and gates all painted in rich shades of turquoise, purple, red, and yellow.” In 2013, Canyon Road finished second in a USA Today poll of readers’ “Favorite Iconic American Street.” According to an early 1900s piece in The Santa Fe New Mexican, archaeologist and anthropologist Edgar Lee Hewett, who founded the Museum of New Mexico, said that “the arts have kept Santa Fe from becoming an ‘up-to-date’ burg and made it unique and beautiful. Artists and writers constitute only a small percentage of the population, but their influence is everywhere you look.” Nowhere is that influence more visible than on Canyon Road. cr

Gaia Chalice II, stone, steel glass

Into the Wind

Opening Reception, Friday, May 22, 5-7pm Show runs May 20 through June 2 200 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 87501 (505)795-7476 “a sensory experience of color and mood”

pippincontemporary.com


state of the art Canyon Road’s creative legacy

visitcanyonroad.com

hen 17th-century Spanish settlers used burros to haul firewood from the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to customers in Santa Fe, they could never have known that the little backwater would become a world-class destination—thanks largely to a vibrant arts scene that would emerge here in the early 1900s. Today the city is home to a large number of accomplished creative talents. Boasting the third largest art market in the country, Santa Fe ranks among the world’s major cultural metropolises—an accomplishment that’s particularly impressive given that the city’s population numbers around 80,000 people. The strength of Santa Fe’s artistic soul is especially evident on Canyon Road, a half-mile stretch that winds into the shadowy folds of forested mountains and was once the route for those Spanish settlers and their loyal if not overburdened burros.   With its dense assemblage of more than 100 art galleries—plus shops, restaurants, and historic adobe homes—Canyon Road is a draw for locals, tourists, and art collectors from around the world. In this quaint enclave, visitors can enjoy a broad range of work, from Native American pottery and Spanish Colonial–inspired wood carvings to contemporary sculpture, photography, and abstract paintings. At a handful of galleries, visitors can check out works by early-20th-century artists like Carlos Vierra, Gerald R. Cassidy, Theodore Van Soelen, John Sloan, and Randall Davey, whose depictions of the area’s natural beauty and rich cultural traditions put Santa Fe and Canyon Road (where many of the artists lived, worked, and congregated) on the map in terms of its importance as an art destination. Throughout the year, Canyon Road hosts gallery openings that showcase exciting exhibitions and typically include refreshments and live entertainment and sometimes artist demonstrations and discussions. The storied and picturesque road further comes to life during the annual Canyon Road Paint Out (held in October), when roughly 100 artists take to the street to set up easels and turn their creative process into an interactive experience between them, the viewer, and the one-of-a-kind setting. cr

SYBIL WATSON

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SYBIL WATSON

Stephen Lang

W

by Ben Ikenson


Phyllis Kapp

Love Comes to Call 33 x 40 fr

watercolor

Waxlander Gallery

celebrating thirty-one years of excellence

622 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, NM 87501 waxlander.com • 505.984.2202 • 800.342.2202


Passport to the Arts celebrating Canyon Road’s creative contributions

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anyon Road’s creative and artistic legacy is celebrated during Passport to the Arts, an annual public event held May 8–9 along the famous half-mile-long street. More than 100 artists from around the country—whose styles range from abstract to figurative and from traditional to contemporary— make the event, presented by the Canyon Road Merchants Association (CRMA), the unofficial kickoff to Santa Fe’s high art season. “Passport to the Arts celebrates the process of creating art while erasing any fence drawn between the public and the artists,” says CRMA secretary Nancy Leeson, owner and director of the gallery Canyon Road Contemporary Art. “The tradition of live art has always been what sets Canyon Road apart from other districts.” On May 8, in addition to the usual Friday-night show openings (which are typically accompanied by refreshments and often live music and entertainment as well), galleries will host artist demonstrations, lectures, and other goings-on. That evening and the following day, you can also bid on artwork that will be included in Passport to the Arts’ silent auction. An Artist Quick Draw kicks things off on May 9. During the two-hour event, 70 Canyon Road artists take to the street, rain or shine, to complete an original work while spectators look on—giving both locals and visitors a chance to experience Santa Fe’s plein air tradition firsthand. You can then head to Wiford Gallery & Sculpture Garden for a cocktail reception, which will feature live entertainment by student musicians, followed by a live auction of artworks representing a variety

of styles and mediums. (A portion of the auction’s proceeds will go to student music programs.) Bruce Adams, publisher of Santa Fean magazine, will serve as auctioneer. “A passport is traditionally associated with traveling the globe, but, more importantly, it allows one to expand his or her mind through varied experiences,” says Bonnie French, CRMA president and director of Waxlander Art Gallery & Sculpture Garden. “Here on Canyon Road, Passport to the Arts honors local, national, and international artists, and nestled within the galleries are paintings and sculptures by these same groups of artists. . . . Combined with the rich history and congeniality of the road, any visitor can get the feeling of world travel while staying in the heart of Santa Fe.” For artist and bidder registration information, as well as a detailed schedule of events and general information about Passport to the Arts and the Canyon Road Merchants Association, go to visitcanyonroad.com. cr


(1913 - 2010)

Ernest Chiriacka

Three Kings

203 W. Water Street & 713 Canyon Road casweckgalleries@gmail.com

Oil on Board

24" x 30"

Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.988.2966 www.casweckgalleries.com


built to last Canyon Road’s historic, enduring architecture by Charles C. Poling

Chris Corrie

S

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anta Fe’s unique aesthetic is vividly on display along its world-famous thoroughfare, Canyon Road. During the half-mile walk from the road’s top to bottom, you’ll encounter simple adobes that have roots in Pueblo Indian architecture and that sometimes reveal Territorial-style updates on that original Native design. Canyon Road winds up the Santa Fe River to the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, eventually forming a steep-sided canyon. That terrain offered little flat land for settlement, but the nearby river, via the abutting acequia madre (“mother ditch”), supplied precious water for farming. A few Spanish Colonial farmers homesteaded in the middle 1700s along a burro track just wide enough for a wagon. They built what we today call Pueblo-style homes, using local materials—mud, stone, and timber—and incorporating a few lessons learned from the neighboring Pueblo Indians. As you walk along Canyon Road you’ll pass several examples of these originally plain homes. In addition to being constructed out of mud, the homes were also distinctive for protruding beams known as vigas, which sat below shallow parapets and flat roofs. Deep-set windows with plaster-wrapped, bullnosed corners punctuate rippling, lumpy adobe walls that sometimes run four feet thick. A building (now a shop) at the lower end of Canyon Road illustrates this Pueblo style, although its simple, lintel-capped, post-and-viga portal hints at an update to the original house. An early-1700s home on Canyon Road demonstrates a subtle evolution, its blue window framing and lintels evoking the Territorial style. That mid-19thcentury aesthetic reflected New Mexico’s


—Tresa Vorenberg, Tresa Vorenberg Goldsmiths

“Deva” oil on canvas 41 x 41”

“I most love Canyon Road for its diversity, its lack of uniformity, and its strength of character. It’s a special place that honors the artist in a cookie-cutter world. On Christmas Eve, after hundreds of people have enjoyed walking Canyon Road [during the Farolito Walk], by midnight the road has the magic of an empty cathedral just after Mass.”

brigitte brüggemann studio 667 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-614-5762 brigittebruggemann.com

art to lift your spirit and feed your soul

new status as a U.S. territory, revealing Army design influences. Over time, the Territorial style incorporated increasingly available manufactured materials like fired-clay bricks and milled lumber. Many people simply added ornamentation to the existing Pueblo-style buildings, and newly built homes showed greater scale, made possible by the new materials and construction techniques. For a great example of Territorialstyle architecture, amble up the road to El Zaguán, where a settler built his farmhouse in the mid-18th century, and which now houses the Historic Santa Fe Association. Many remodels later, the home’s Pueblo roots show beneath an overlay of Territorial ornamentation, from wood shutters, crown molding over wood window framing, and a portal with white milled 8 x 8' posts. A periodperfect, pedimented lintel forms a shallow pyramid atop the framed entry door. Not far from El Zaguán, a lovely brick building capped with a white cupola demonstrates non-Native architecture that sprang up following railroad expansion

“I am so inspired and honored to be one of the few to carry on the tradition of working and living as an artist in a gracious, historic home and studio on Canyon Road. Last year we hosted at least a dozen weddings in the gallery and garden, which is an amazingly fun way to share this beautiful space while building great memories of Canyon Road for many happy families to share with generations to come.” —Teresa Neptune, Teresa Neptune Studio/Gallery into New Mexico in the late 19th century. With the trains came more AngloAmericans, manufactured materials, and East Coast influences. As a balance to this Americanization of the region’s look, legendary local architect John Gaw Meem reimagined the area’s original pueblos for public buildings, churches, and private homes in the early- to mid-20th century. In 1939, the Catholic diocese commissioned his masterpiece of Pueblo Revival architecture, the Cristo Rey Parish Church at Canyon Road and Camino Cabra. Built with more than 150,000 adobe bricks, the church remains one of the largest adobe structures in New Mexico. cr

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C A N YO N R OA D E V E N T S Plan to Visit Santa Fe in 2015

Edible Art Tour

Passport to the Arts

Friday Night Openings

Historic Canyon Historic RoadCanyon Paint Out Road & Sculpt Paint Out Out

Halloween Trick or Treat

Canyon Road Farolito Walk

PASSPORT TO THE ARTS | FRIDAY & SATURDAY | MAY 8 & 9 SUMMER OF COLOR | MEMORIAL DAY TO LABOR DAY FRIDAY NIGHT OPENINGS | EVERY FRIDAY | MAY THRU OCTOBER EDIBLE ART TOUR | SATURDAY | JUNE 13 HISTORIC CANYON ROAD PAINT OUT & SCULPT OUT | FRIDAY & SATURDAY | OCTOBER 16 & 17 HALLOWEEN TRICK OR TREATING | SATURDAY | OCTOBER 31 CHRISTMAS EVE FAROLITO WALK | THURSDAY | DECEMBER 24

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%$#

369 MONTEZUMA #270 SANTA FE, NM 87501 505.795.5703 100 YEARS | 100 GALLERIES

CANYON ROAD: 100 YEARS | 100 GALLERIES

PASSPORT TO THE ARTS 2015 EXPERIENCE THE WORLD OF ART ON CANYON ROAD

FRIDAY & SATURDAY | MAY 8 & 9, 2015 FRIDAY EVENING & SATURDAY ALL DAY GALLERY OPENINGS | MUSIC | ARTIST RECEPTIONS | ART AUCTIONS EXCEPTIONAL FOOD | ARTISTS AT WORK | SHOPPING SATURDAY ARTIST QUICK DRAW | 11 AM - 1 PM | MULTIPLE LOCATIONS TENT EVENTS | WIFORD GALLERY | 403 CANYON ROAD STUDENT MUSICAL PERFORMANCES | 1 TO 2:30PM LIVE AUCTION REGISTRATION | 3PM SILENT AUCTION BIDDING | 3 – 6PM COCKTAIL RECEPTION | 4PM Hors d’oeuvres compliments of The Compound ARTIST QUICK DRAW LIVE AUCTION | 5PM

VCR.

505.795.5703

PRESENTED BY THE CANYON ROAD MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION CRMA.SF@GMAIL .COM


The

William&Joseph Gal William&Joseph The

Gallery

“Metropolis” encaustic 48x60 by Patricia Aaron

727 Canyon Road t 505.982.9404

727 Canyon Road t 505.982.9404

Santa Fe

Santa Fe

“Metropolis” encaustic 48x60 inches by Patricia Aaron

thewilliamandjosephgallery.com

thewilliamandjosephgallery.com

Carole laro Che Gallery

G o l D e N Wo l F PaC K

aC ry l I C o N C a N va S

40” x 60”

Also showing Jill Shwaiko, Allen Wynn, Ron Allen, Josh Gannon and Fran Segal 415 Canyon road Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 open Daily 10-5 505-982-1186 e m a i l @ l a r o c h e - g a l l e r y. c o m w w w. l a r o c h e - g a l l e r y . c o m

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“Canyon Road has been my life, my sanctuary, my purpose. It’s the only place I’ve ever fit in in my life, and it’s been supportive and healing and enabled me to live a dream of being an artist, being able to bring something positive to others. I am so very thankful every day to work and live in the most beautiful place on the planet.”

Canyon Road Merchants Association

—Brad Smith, Brad Smith Gallery


COURTESY OF THE CHARLES AZBELL GALLERY

—Connie Axton, Ventana Fine Art

CHRIS CORRIE

“Canyon Road is unique in the world—a magical half-mile of extraordinary galleries offering the greatest variety and highest standards in fine art, all in the most beautiful setting. Superb restaurants and other retail businesses contribute to a synergy that makes a supremely enjoyable experience for everyone who comes to Canyon Road.”

Classic elements of Santa Fe’s historic architecture— such as a kiva fireplace, as seen here in the Charles Azbell Gallery—abound along Canyon Road.

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CHRIS CORRIE

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S P E C I AL ADV E R T I S I NG S E C T I ON

Canyon Road

treasures

New Concept Gallery

Desert Son of Santa Fe Henry Beguelin, Officine Creative Booties Fabulous Spring sandals, boots, tennis shoes and handbags are here from Italy. Come see us. 725 Canyon Rd, 505-982-9499, desertsonofsantafe.com

Julia Roberts, Canto III, carborundum and drypoint print, 24.25 x 20.5" Prints by Julia Roberts, May 8–25, 2015, shows Roberts’s fine art etchings and collagraphs of ethnic pottery, as well as stunning, evocative nudes. Her work grows out of a love of ethnic artifacts and her fascination with the human form. 610 Canyon Rd, 505-795-7570 newconceptgallery.com

Manitou Galleries Maura Allen, All Points West, mixed media, 40 x 30" Maura Allen’s work speaks to the rugged nature and allure of the American West. Working on wood, steel, clay and paper for her one-of-a-kind mixed media paintings, she pushes the traditional boundaries that have long defined the western art genre. 225 Canyon Rd and 23 W Palace Ave 505-986-9833 manitougalleries.com

Silver Sun Captivating jewelry in sterling silver with natural turquoise and other exciting stones. Spanning 40 years we’ve collected stones from over 30 American mines to be used in magical contemporary designs by creative Native American silversmiths. 656 Canyon Rd, 505-983-8743, silversun-sf.com

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S P E C I A L A D V E RT I S I N G S E C T I O N

Canyon Road

treasures

Canyon Road Contemporary Art Kathy Beekman, Plenty of Sunshine, pastel on paper, framed Contemplate the vibrant colors and vast scapes of Beekman’s pastels. Her textured palette of barn reds, lush greens and peaceful blues intermingle with sparse landscapes to evoke the familiar and far-away. 403 Canyon Rd, 505-983-0433, info@canyoncontemporary.com canyoncontemporary.com

Canyon Road Contemporary Art

STEPHEN LANG

Molly Heizer, Sitting Koshari, ceramic Enjoy Native-inspired totems, kachinas and animals by Molly Heizer. Wisdom and whimsy embody her pieces as they reinterpret tribal folklore. 403 Canyon Rd, 505-983-0433 info@canyoncontemporary.com canyoncontemporary.com

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Tresa Vorenberg Goldsmiths 14 Karat Gold, Amethyst, Diamond and Freshwater Pearl Set, Barbara Hendricks Featuring wildly imaginative handcrafted designer jewelry by over 35 artists. Specializing in unique custom jewelry since 1974. 656 Canyon Rd, 505-988-7215 TVGoldsmiths.com

Garcia Street Books Just a block away from Canyon Road, Garcia Street Books carries your favorite new fiction, nonfiction, Southwest, art, and design titles. Your locally owned and independent bookstore, we are open seven days a week. 376 Garcia St, 505-986-0151 garciastreetbooks@yahoo.com garciastreetbooks.com

MEI Gallery Navajo Medicine Mask Collection in gold, silver, and a variety of stones and diamonds This exquisite jewelry is handmade and features symbols for protection, prosperity, healing, and nourishemnt. Artist Fernando Benally is a thirdgeneration Navajo jeweler, and his artwork is highly recommended and collected by those who collect the best of American Indian art! 662 Canyon Rd, 505-490-2487, meiartinfo@gmail.com, meigallery.com

La Mesa of Santa Fe Christopher Thomson, Blooms Inspired by his flute playing, this new series of improvisational, hand forged steel sculptures is powder coated in flamboyant colors. Perfect for the garden! La Mesa has shown the work of contemporary artists in a variety of mediums since 1982. 225 Canyon Rd, 505-984-1688 lamesaofsantafe.com

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STEPHEN LANG

ANN MURDY

SYBIL WATSON

ANN MURDY

STEPHEN LANG

Art is everywhere on Canyon Road, not just behind gallery doors. Keep your eyes open for sculpture gardens, curated courtyards, and stand-alone sculptures—made from bronze, stone, steel, and other materials—that are an integral part of the half-mile stretch’s unforgettably immersive experience.

SYBIL WATSON

STEPHEN LANG

last look


“Passport to the Arts” BARRY MCCUAN, JOHN AXTON & DOUG DAWSON Friday, May 8, 2014 • Preview Reception 5 to 7 pm Saturday, May 9 • Quick Draw 11am to 1pm • Live Auction 4 pm

MCCUAN, “Sous Un Beau Ciel”

36" x 36"

Oil

AXTON, “Stones on the Shore”

48" x 48"

Oil

DAWSON,“Hidden in the Shadows” 14" x 15" Oil

ROBERT T. RITTER “New Mexico Forward 2015” One Man Show • Friday, May 22 • Reception 5 to 7 pm

RITTER, “Federal Man”

24" x 24"

Oil on Canvas & Burlap

VENTANA FINE ART 400 Canyon Road

Santa Fe, NM 87501

505-983-8815

800-746-8815

www.ventanafineart.com


Canyon Road April May 2015 Digital Edition  

Canyon Road April May 2015 Digital Edition

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