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I n d i a n M a r k e t : C e l e b r a t i n g 9 0 Ye a r s o f N a t i v e A r t August/September 2011 santafean.com

Beat the Heat with Santa Fe’s Summer Sports Reimagine Modern Art with Poteet Victory Find Inner Peace in Your Very Own “Zen Den”


T O N Y A B E Y TA New Paintings

ARTIST RECEPTION

Friday, August 19th 5–8 pm in Santa Fe

Untitled, oil on canvas, 55"h x 67"w

130 Lincoln Avenue, Suite C, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | 505.954.9902 | www.blueraingallery.com


Blue Rain’s Annual Celebration of Contemporary Native American Art Why not collect the best?

August 17–21, 2011 in Santa Fe Wednesday, August 17 Jody Naranjo

Artist reception: 5–8 pm Marla Allison, Norma Howard, and Jody Naranjo

Thursday, August 18 Artist reception: 5–8 pm Maria Samora, David Bradley, Mateo Romero, Al Qoyawayma, Lisa Holt and Harlan Reano, and Tammy Garcia (release of new bronze sculpture)

Friday, August 19 Lisa Holt and Harlan Reano

Annual Pottery Sale and Lottery: 10 am (preview: 8 am–9:45 am) Draw names for the rare opportunity to collect a piece of pottery by Tammy Garcia or Richard Zane Smith Artist reception: 5–8 pm Tony Abeyta, Preston Singletary, and Larry Vasquez

Friday, August 19 and Saturday, August 20 Glass Blowing Demonstrations: 11 am–3 pm with Preston Singletary Richard Zane Smith

Bronze Patina Demonstrations: 11 am–3 pm with Bronzesmith Foundry

130 Lincoln Avenue, Suite C, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.954.9902 | www.blueraingallery.com Al Qoyawayma


Buck McCain

Jack Sorenson

Ghost Figures 16x12 Oil

Into the Draw 24x30 Oil

Robin J. Laws

Annual Indian Market Exhibition Opening Reception Friday, August 19 :: 5 to 7 pm

Buckaroos Ed. 30 Bronze

El Centro 102 E. Water Street Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 505-988-2727 info@joewadefineart.com www.joewadefineart.com


Roger Williams

The Visitor 36x48 Oil

Roger Williams Solo Exhibition 2011 New Mexico: Past and Present Opening Reception :: Friday, September 2 :: 5 to 7 pm

El Centro 102 E. Water Street Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 505-988-2727 info@joewadefineart.com www.joewadefineart.com


SEQUOIA L i f e s t y l e

G a l l e r y

E x o t i c R e c l a i m e d M a k a Wo o d C o ff e e Ta b l e s w i t h P e b b l e s

505 982 7000 201 Galisteo St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 www.

sequoiasantafe.com


“Cougar Canyon”

11" x 8" x 2"

Bronze

REBECCA TOBEY Indian Market Show Friday, August 19, 2011 • 5 to 7 pm

VENTANA FINE ART 400 Canyon Road

Santa Fe, NM 87501

505-983-8815

800-746-8815

www.ventanafineart.com


“Cougar Canyon” “Approaching Cheetah”

11" x 8" x 2"

Bronze

24" x 30"

Acrylic

REBECCA TOBEY Indian Market Show

JOHN NIETO

Friday, August 19, 2011 • 5 to 7 pm

Indian Market Show Friday, August 19, 2011 • 5 to 7 pm

VENTANA FINE ART 400 Canyon Road

Santa Fe, NM 87501

505-983-8815

800-746-8815

www.ventanafineart.com

VENTANA FINE ART 400 Canyon Road

Santa Fe, NM 87501

505-983-8815

800-746-8815

www.ventanafineart.com


SHELDON HARVEY

SANTA FE INDIAN MARKET BOOTH# 794 LIN-W

SheldonHarveyGallery.com


SHELDON HARVEY

“Unity and Harmony”

62 X 62, oil on canvas

505.715.8081 sheldonharveyart@yahoo.com


tootS zynsky

Riscoperta Mizimah, 2011, Filet-de-verre, 11 1/2” x 10 7/8” x 10 3/8”

August 3 - 28, 2011 | Opening reception: Friday, August 5, 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

DavidrichardContemporary.com 130 Lincoln Avenue, Suite D, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | p (505) 983-9555 | f (505) 983-1284 info@DavidRichardContemporary.com


MARY SILVERWOOD Desert Shadows Friday, September 30, 2011 • 5 to 7 pm

“Sandia Song #28”

20" x 27"

Pastel

“Desert Shadows”

20" x 25"

Pastel

VENTANA FINE ART 400 Canyon Road

Santa Fe, NM 87501

505-983-8815

800-746-8815

www.ventanafineart.com


STEVEN YA ZZIE

COLLUVIAL DREAMS

OIL ON CANVAS

66” X 48”

STEVEN YAZZIE NEW WORK & SARAH SENSE WEAVING THE AMERICAS OPENING RECEPTION FRIDAY 05 AUGUST 2011 5P TO 7P

E XHIBITING AUGUST 05 – 29, 2011

LEGENDS SANTA FE

125 LINCOLN AVENUE

SANTA FE NEW MEXICO 87501

505 983 5639

LEGENDSSANTAFE.COM


THE AFRICAN QUEEN

OPENING RECEPTION

LEGENDS SANTA FE

125 LINCOLN AVENUE

OIL ON PANEL

CAROL HAGAN NEW WORK FRIDAY 19 AUGUST 2011 5P TO 7P

SANTA FE NEW MEXICO 87501

505 983 5639

LEGENDSSANTAFE.COM

18” X 36”


CONSTANCE DEJONG JULY 29 - AUGUST 31, 2011

SCULPTURE AND DRAWINGS

CHARLOTTE JACKSON FINE ART

Tel 505.989.8688 / 554 South Guadalupe, Santa Fe, NM 87501 / www.charlottejackson.com FOUR/THREE X, 2002, COPPER, 78 X 78 X 4 INCHES


D a n i e l Wo r c e s t e r

Indian Market

2011

Booth 329 FR-N

580-504-8602 • dw3359@cableone.net


Journey of My People FEATURING NEW PAINTINGS BY

Bruce King

“Warriors in a Dream World” 24 x 56” Detail Oil on Canvas

August 16 through August 29 RECEPTION FOR THE ARTIST August 19 5 pm - 7 pm EXHIBITION DATES

WAXLANDER GALLERY & SCULPTURE GARDEN

622 CANYON ROAD, SANTA FE, NM 87501 art@waxlander.com • www.waxlander.com 505.984.2202 • 800.342.2202


Petter Robbins, Pushin Bulls, 27x39, mixed media

Ritch Gaiti, Dusk Stampede, 30x40, oil on canvas

George Toya, Pueblo Seasons, 16x20 acrylic and india ink on masonite panel

One block north of Santa Fe’s historic plaza 142 Lincoln Avenue, Suite 102 Santa Fe, NM 87501 • 505.988.5866 www.oneartistroad.com


DA N N A M I N G H A

A R LO N A M I N G H A

Desert Pictograph acrylic on canvas 26” x 24” Dan Namingha © 2011

MICHAEL NAMINGHA Fifth World #1 Indiana limestone 20” x 18” x 5” Arlo Namingha © 2011

Voyeur inkjet on paper edition of 3 24” x 26” Michael Namingha © 2011

Ar tists Reception Friday August 19, 2011 5-7pm 125 Lincoln Avenue • Suite 116 • Santa Fe, NM 87501 • Monday–Saturday, 10am–5pm 505-988-5091 • fax 505-988-1650 • nimanfineart@namingha.com • namingha.com


Mudhead Gallery

555 17th Street • Grand Hyatt Hotel • Denver, Colorado 80202

(303) 293-0007 • mudheadgallery.com


Rose B. Simp son:


September 3-11, 2011

www.santafefiesta.org

One Queen, One Promise, One City

Una Reina, Una Promesa, Una Ciudad

Fiesta

300 Years of Community 1712-2012

de Santa Fé

Fiesta Fine Arts and Crafts Market

The distinctive open-air arts and crafts market features one-of-a-kind treasures from booths that line the historic plaza Labor Day Weekend 9 am / Sept. 3-5 Fiesta Weekend 9 am / Sept. 9-11 Santa Fe Plaza

Fiesta

The oldest community festival in the continental United States. Free Entertainment - Historic Plaza For a complete listing of events, visit us on www.santafefiesta.org

The Santa Fe Fiesta Council Presents

Mariachi Extravaganza de Santa Fé Featuring: Grammy®Winning:

(c) Ellwyn Kauffman

Mariachi Los Camperos de Nati Cano 7:30 p.m., Sunday, September 4, The Santa Fe Opera Tickets: 986-5900 or 1-800-280-4654 santafefiesta.org - No Refunds or Cancellations Partially Funded:

OTAB


Su

nd

ay,

Sep tem

Collectors’ Sale

ber

18,

20

11

A unique sale of Native American art from the homes of top collectors!

Sunday, September 18, 2011

9am–4pm Museum Hill Laboratory of Anthropology - Meem Auditorium Free admission • Benefits the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture www.nativetreasuressantafe.org

SAV

Ma E T y 2 HE 6-2 DA 7, 2 TE ! 0 1 FROM CLASSIC TO CONTEMPORARY, FROM EMERGING TO ESTABLISHED 2

Orlando Dugi

Ronald Chee

Veronica Benally

Memorial Day Weekend • May 26-27, 2012

All photos on this page by Carol Franco Partial funding was granted by the City of Santa Fe Loger’s Tax

MUSEUM-QUALITY NATIVE AMERICAN ART SHOW AND SALE

Santa Fe Convention Center

Over 200 of the best Native American artists • Benefits the Mueum of Indian Arts & Culture • www.nativetreasuressantafe.org


Michael Bergt About Face August 12 - September 6, 2011 Opening Reception Friday, August 12, 5 - 7 pm The artist will be present

“UNDERGROWTH” ~ Color pencil/gouache on toned paper ~ 20" x 14 1/2"

Chuck Savoie Pattern & Light September 9 - October 11, 2011 Opening Reception Friday, September 9, 5 - 7 pm The artist will be present

JANE SAUER 652 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 87501 505 - 995 - 8513

j s a u e r g a l l e r y. c o m info@jsauergallery.com “A GENTILE CONVERSATION” ~ Glass wall sculpture ~ 90" x 44" x 3"

GALLERY


The Indian Market Issue August / September 2011

features

104 Classification Is in Session

Exploring the history of the categories that define Indian Market

108 Dances with Zoetrope Costumer Pilar Agoyo on Natives breaking into Hollywood

110 Gala Auction

Looking at the artwork to be found—and sold for benefit—at this year’s auction

115 Mapping the Market

Gauging the impact of Indian Market on the art world

120 Preserve, Prosper, and Promote How Santa Clara and other pueblos have combined cultural obligations with strong economic growth

CHRIS CORRIE/SWAIA

124 Silver Lining

Master silversmith Cippy CrazyHorse carries on a family tradition

104

Above: Karen Clarkson with her Power Totem, oil on canvas, 36 x 18”; below, attendees enjoying the action at Indian Market

august/september 2011

santa fean

29


features 127 Fired Up

Examining the artistic and cultural process of Pueblo pottery and its historical roots and significance to Indian Market and Native art

134 SWAIA Honors

SWAIA’s 2011 Lifetime Achievement, Povika, and Fellowship award recipients

146 Longtime Listeners, First-time Owners

Native media—from FNX TV to Native American Calling and Indian Country News Today—at long last, has Native owners SWAIA’s executive director talks about the importance of Pueblo pottery

148 All in the Family

The father/son team of jewelers Richard and Jared Chavez collaborate for success

38 Publisher’s Note

departments

42 SWAIA Director’s Note

82 City Different Byliner’s e-publishing venture, Santa Fe Concorso’s auto elegance, chamber music authority James M. Keller

124

Master silversmith Cippy CrazyHorse at work in his studio

87 Chasing Santa Fe Guest columnist Cynthia Whitney-Ward appreciates the old with the new

88 Indian Market Buyer’s Guide 92 Q+A Artist Tony Abeyta’s stature continues to grow and grow 96 Santa Favorites Santa Fe’s hair salons 98 Adventure Water sports—kayaking, rafting, floating—to quench your summer thirst 100 Santa Fean Salutes Former fashion CEO Eleanor Brenner meets her matches at the net

180 30

Five Santa Feans on how they created their own at-home “zen dens”

santafean.com

august/september 2011

150 SWAIA Special Thanks 153 Art Profiles of Donald Woodman and Poteet Victory + previews 179 Living Santa Feans on finding quiet time in their home meditation spaces 193 Dining Joseph “Joseph’s Table” Wrede, formerly of Taos, makes his Santa Fe debut with The Palace, Trattoria Nostrani’s overwhelming fabulosity, and the summer’s Top Ten bites 206 Hot Tickets 208 SWAIA Events Schedule 214 History Nuns not on the run at Santa Fe’s Carmelite Monastery 216 Day Trip Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum

GABRIELLA MARKS

127


photos: Kate Russell

V I S I O N S D E S I G N G R O U P

www.visionsdesigngroup.com • 505.988.3170 111 N St Francis Dr Santa Fe NM 87501 David Naylor • Betsy Bauer • Kristin Urbanik


Fo

t

a D

o ry

d o

Ar

Gateway to the 19 Pueblos of New Mexico

n ce

t s i H

Indian Pueblo Cultural Center 1-866-855-7902 | IndianPueblo.org 2401 12th Street Northwest Albuquerque NM 87104

Cultural Center & Museum:

Mon-Sun: 9am-5pm, Closed major holidays

Shumakolowa Gifts

Mon-Sun: 9am-5pm, Closed major holidays

Pueblo Harvest Cafe:

Open Daily: Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner

History Photo: Grinding Corn ca 1915-20, Cochiti Pueblo, By T. Harmon Parkurst, Courtesy of Museum of New Mexico #30241


GOLDEN DAWN GALLERY GDGallery

Ron Denson (Professor Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY) "Off the Reservation, or, When 'Indian' Art Becomes Fine Art: A Modest Collector's Perspective"

Wednesday, August 17, 2011, 7:00pm

GDGallery

Margarete Bagshaw - Lecture

*

“The Importance of Sacred Lines, Numbers and Geometry - Where my work comes from ”

Thursday, August 18, 2011, 10:00am & 2:00pm

GDGallery

Pablita Velarde and Michael Kabotie

*

Private Screening - Idyllwild Arts Documentary filmed May 2005

Thursday, August 18, 2011, 7:00pm

GDGallery

*

Margarete Bagshaw - Opening “Sacred lines”

SMART PHONE

Friday, August 19, 2011, 5:00pm

GDGallery

Pow Wow at Golden Dawn Gallery! “Live Dancers!”

Saturday, August 19, 2011, 7:00pm

*

GALLERY LINK

* All events are reserved limited seating -

Please call for reservations - 505-988-2024 201 Galisteo St., Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 - 505-988-2024 - www.goldendawngallery.com

*Exclusive Estate Representative for Helen Hardin and Pablita Velarde

The best information and the largest selection of Pablita Velarde and Helen Hardin work - anywhere!


POTEET VICTORY Indian Market Weekend • Friday, August 19, 2011 • 5 to 7pm

M CLARRY M O D E R N www.mclarrymodern.com

225 Canyon Road • Santa Fe, New Mexico • 505.983.8589 • info@mclarrymodern.com “Native Falls” • 48” x 48” • Oil on Canvas


MIGUEL MARTINEZ

Mother of Peace, oil pastel on canvas, 40” x 30”

Indian Market Group Show Featuring Miguel Martinez: August 18, 2011

MANITOUGALLERIES

123 W. Palace Ave. · 225 Canyon Rd. · Santa Fe, NM 87501 ManitouGalleries.com · 505.986.0440


SANTA FE INDIAN MARKET 2011

KING GALLERIES + FAUST GALLERY

CLASSIC TO CONTEMPORARY: EXPERIENCE EXCEPTIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN ART

AUGUST 14 –16

AUGUST 15 –21

Antique Indian Art Show at Sweeney Center. Featuring important pottery and jewelry, including “Collected Memories: Select Pieces from the Alfred & Ellen King Collection”

Returning to our space below the La Fonda Indian Shop & Gallery. 100 E. San Francisco St., Santa Fe Open Daily 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The Life and Art of Tony Da, by Charles S. King and Richard Spivey, Available August, 2011

K I N G G A L L E R I E S .CO M

FA U S T G A L L E R Y. C O M

7100 MAIN STREET, SUITES 1 & 3, SCOTTSDALE, AZ 85251. 480.481.0187 AND 480.946.6345


LOUISA MCELWAIN oil of joy

Abundance of Peace | oil on canvas,18 x 24

05 August 5 – 7 pm | opening reception friday evening through August 31

EvokeContemporary.com


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Sheldon Harvey, Partnership, diptych, oil on board, 24 x 36" As the 2008 Indian Market award winner in two—yes, two—categories (painting and sculpture), the 33-yearold Sheldon Harvey (Diné) brings plenty of heft to whatever medium he’s working in. In the case of his oil painting Partnership, Harvey brings to bear his trademark imagination (intense), unique sense of movement, style, and color (dynamic), and intuitive method of presentation (bold but compassionate). To see more of his work, look for him at this year’s Market at booth 794 LIN–W. Painting courtesy of Andrews Pueblo Pottery 877-606-0543, andrewspp.com

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FOR MANY YEARS now, the Santa Fean has had the distinct honor of preparing the official magazine for SWAIA’s Indian Market. It is the goal of this issue to take you beyond booths and parties, and take you into the spirit of the Native American artist. We are very proud to bring you images and words that make Indian Market come alive and allow a deeper understanding of the culture and talent that goes into each piece. Actually, we don’t limit ourselves to just Native American artists. In the issue, you will also become acquainted (in the art section) with a spectacular sampling of art from throughout Santa Fe and with the variety of traditional and contemporary works that this fine art city offers. The common denominator for almost all forms of art is that it’s made with one’s hands. The photos in the pages that follow show the loving and careful use of hands to form these amazing pots and wonderful pieces of jewelry, but all art forms and all artists use their hands in innovative, creative, and useful ways to create the art that we love. There is nothing quite as interesting as watching an artist use their hands as tools or to manipulate tools to create interesting visual effects. Brushes, knives, sticks, and rocks are just some of the tools most often used and seen. Recently, while taking a ceramics class from Heidi Loewen of Heidi Loewen Porcelain Studio, Heidi herself had me using all kinds of tools, particularly my hands, to form interesting patterns and shapes. Obviously, the wonderful bowls you will see in this issue have very practical purposes, and much of the Native American art has spiritual implications. I would like to suggest that all art forms have a practical application in our lives as they give our minds and our souls a different place to live. When the challenges of our lives begin to overtake us, these beautiful creations remind us of what’s really important, and they put us in touch with the world that is bigger than ourselves. While many art forms transport me, Native American art consistently reminds me of the timeless journey between the past and the future. Enjoy the journey.

BRUCE ADAMS

Publisher

MISSY WOLF

ON THE COVER

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

In this issue, we are featuring Vueteligent. By scanning this symbol with your smartphone, you will immediately be connected to Santa Fe’s best calendar and our website.

|C O N T R I B U T O R S | Q: What do you find most compelling about Native art and why? “What appeals to me about Native arts, the traditional ones especially, is the way they are historically rooted in everyday life,” says freelance writer and editor Eve Tolpa, who’s been doing a lot of arts writing lately and finding that a very compelling part of the process is learning about different people’s relationships to intuition and creativity. “Whether the objects were utilitarian, ceremonial, or decorative, these cultures were making stuff that they felt connected to, stuff that someone could care about. I really admire that approach.”

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august/september 2011

“What I find so compelling about Native art is a work’s context within the time continuum of its people’s art and cultural history—how contemporary pieces created today reference work done by ancestors generations ago,” says Elizabeth Lake, a sculptor and recent transplant from Virginia. “Which traditions are kept and which fall away and why? Most interesting to me is how traditional methods and mediums are made relevant in the present. Take Native artist Terri Greeves’s work, like her stunning beaded high-top Chuck Taylors. She has incorporated her family and peoples’ tradition of beadwork to create her own language of what it means to be a 21st-century Kiowa.”

“When I began photographing Native American artists, what struck me was how contemporary the work can be,” says photographer Gabriella Marks, who specializes in environmental portraiture, lifestyle, and travel imagery. “Despite the legacy of tradition that informs and structures Native art, it isn’t simply about repeating the past—there is new imagery, new forms that are entirely contemporary. I’m also really taken with the family aspect—in contrast to the image of the classic Western solo artist, so much of this art is about one generation learning from the previous one and families working together to create final pieces.”


Vic toria Ad a m s

photo: James Hart

Southern Cheyenne Jeweler

Santa Fe Indian Market booth: 209 PAL -N Introducing her new collection of clutch purses info@victoriaadamsjewelry.com


2/3 PAGE VERT 5.1875” x 9.75” (Non-Bleed, Please print border)

bruce adams

PUBLISHER

anne mulvaney

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER 

CREATIVE DIRECTOR EDITOR

devon jackson amy hegarty

EXECUTIVE EDITOR EDITOR-AT-LARGE

dianna delling john vollertsen

FOOD+DINING EDITOR

sybil watson

GRAPHIC DESIGNER CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER ONLINE EDITOR GRAPHIC DESIGN INTERN OPERATIONS MANAGER

b.y. cooper

michelle odom

trinie dalton monique martinez

ginny stewart-jaramillo

SALES REPRESENTATIVES

kate collins, robbie o’neill, david wilkinson HOME+DESIGN DIRECTOR

emilie mcintyre

WRITERS

jan ernst adlmann, steven horak elizabeth lake, kate mcgraw zélie pollon, craig smith eve tolpa, cynthia whitney-ward PHOTOGRAPHERS

(505) 989-3435

chris corrie, jennifer esperanza gabriella marks, julien mcroberts douglas merriam, ann murdy, daniel nadelbach A PUBLICATION OF BELLA MEDIA, LLC

1 1 0 D O N G A S PA R , S A N TA F E

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION

215 W San Francisco Street, Suite 300 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Telephone 505-983-1444; fax 505-983-1555 info@santafean.com santafean.com

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santafean@pcspublink.com Copyright 2011. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. CPM#40065056

santafean.com

august/september 2011

Santa Fean (ISSN 1094-1487) is published bimonthly by Bella Media, LLC, 215 W San Francisco, Ste. 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501. Periodicals postage paid at Santa Fe, NM and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to Santa Fean P.O. Box 469089, Escondido, CA 92046-9710.


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DIRECTOR’S LETTER

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welcome to indian market Welcome to the 90th Santa Fe Indian Market. Beginning in 1922, Indian Market has built a road of success and artistic achievement. As much art extravaganza as family reunion, Indian Market is the central annual gathering of the Native arts and culture world. Communities of artists, collectors, and newcomers convene yearly and reconnect over astonishing artwork, which often takes months if not years to create. Extraordinarily, now six and seven generations deep, the first families of Indian Market are still prominent participants. The measurement of Indian Market success is both individual and collective. Artists continue to showcase their best work at Indian Market as well as earn a significant portion of their annual income. Indian Market’s importance to Native communities is founded on its role as a catalyst for cultural sustainability and vitality. One hundred percent of your purchase goes directly to the artist. SWAIA’s own success barometer is more complicated to access because while we are the planners and builders of the Market, once the artists arrive we step into the background. SWAIA takes pride in working with the City of Santa Fe so that we can cover 14 square city blocks with the best art, food, music, film, and literature. Indian Market is a time of the year as much as a state of mind. Within its boundaries and outside its borders, it has created an acceptance of innovation and understanding of the traditional. It is an obligation that the staff and board continues to hold as bond and trust with today’s artists as much as in equal doses with their past and future ancestors. That obligation is the assurance that Indian Market, despite the inevitable changes to people, technology, and values, will continue into the future.   SWAIA doesn’t have the opportunity to close doors to rearrange or remodel its showplace or re-vamp the wording of a panel. In fact, there are no signposts, display cases, whispers to be quiet, or do-not-touch or directional signage by design. It is the artists’ market where they curate themselves and where we are allowed unfettered self-discovery.   With all lasting legacies, the formula for success needs constant tinkering. SWAIA is currently enjoying four consecutive years of positive financial growth—the strongest it has been in the last three decades. The artist electronic database, for example, is putting accurate and current information at our fingertips and is enabling SWAIA to produce the artist book with an image of every participating artist, as well as helping to organize and archive tens of thousands of images of art and artists for current and future use.   The Board and Staff of SWAIA are pleased that you are here to see artistic excellence and learn about Native cultures and arts. Meaningful partnerships with the Santa Claran Development Corporation, New Mexico Museum of Art, Andrea Fisher Fine Pottery, Hotel Santa Fe, and La Fonda on the Plaza are helping make the 90th anniversary year possible. In particular, SWAIA welcomes Sealaska Heritage Foundation, which brings to Santa Fe the vibrant cultures of southest Alaska, and the National Museum of the American Indian, which is producing a week of film. Please enjoy yourself—there is something for everyone.   With best wishes,

BRUCE BERNSTEIN, PHD

JULIEN MCROBERTS/SWAIA

Executive Director, SWAIA

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ENT PENING EV O L A U N N A 3, 5 – 7PM , AUGUST 1 Y A D R U T A S

ERIES LECTURE S S A N TA F E , 1PM 0 2 T S S H I P RO C K AUGU S A T U R D A Y, R T C U R AT O ORE, GUES O T I M B I Y D H D X E O R UM IGHT MUSE F O RY L W H E E LW R E W E IRD J O L B THUNDERB E U MINGO P S A N TO D O 8 5 0 5. 98 2 . 8 47 LECTURE: RSVP FOR

Tr ail 53 Old Sant a Fe Plaza Upstairs on the Mexico Sant a Fe, New 505.982.8478 com shiprock sant afe.


CHarlotte Foust SWAIA BOARD Chair

Stephen Wall Vice Chair

august 12 – 28, 2011 Opening Reception: Friday, august 12, 5 – 7pm

(White Earth Chippewa)

Stockton Colt

Dr. Jenny Auger Maw

Secretary

Bidtah N. Becker

Treasurer

(Diné)

Richard Altermann Nocona J. Burgess

(Comanche)

Jed Foutz Roger Fragua

(Jemez Pueblo)

Elizabeth Pettus Stephanie Pho-Poe Kiger Pat Pruitt

(Santa Clara Pueblo)

(Laguna Pueblo)

Jenny Kimball Charles King L. Stephine Poston

(Sandia Pueblo)

Brian Vallo

(Acoma Pueblo)

SWAIA STAFF Executive Director Deputy Director:

Bruce Bernstein, PhD

John Torres-Nez, PhD (Diné)

Director of External Affairs:

Gabe Gomez

Artist Services/Indian Market Manager: Paula Office Manager: Finance: Programs/Tribal Liaison:

Rivera (Taos Pueblo)

Sharon Lopez

Mary Erpelding, CPA

Shawna Shandiin Sunrise (Diné/Kewa)

Development and Membership:

Denise Keron

Executive Assistant and Volunteer Coordinator:

High Altitudes, 2011, mixed media on canvas, 48 × 48 inches

PR/Marketing:

Tailinh Agoyo (Narragansett/Blackfeet)

PR/Marketing:

Corey Garcia (Acoma Pueblo)

Graphic Design: Indian Market Manager’s Assistant: Zone Manager:

Whitney Stewart Allen Duran (Tesuque Pueblo)

James Arquero (Cochiti Pueblo)

Zone Manager: Zone Manager:

Hunter Kirkland Contemporary 200 – B Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 phone 505.984.2111 fax 505.984.8111 www.hunterkirklandcontemporary.com

Zone Manager:

Kit Howard

Lavita Paquin (Zuni Pueblo)

Henry Brown Wolf (Kewa/Cheyenne River Sioux)

Summer Associate:

Montana Brown

Summer Associate:

Tiffany Win

Official Indian Market Photographer: 44

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august/september 2011

Lisa Morris

Kitty Leaken


Photo Eric Swanson

CAROL KUCERA

FOSSIL FORESTS

Acrylic on canvas, 4 panels, 16" X 70" each

CAROL KUCERA GALLERY New Art for a New Century WWW.CAROLKUCERA.COM 112 W. San Francisco St., Suite 107 Santa Fe, NM 87501 866 989-7523 kucera@carolkucera.com Open daily 10-5, Closed Tuesday


Your Santa Fe Vacation Home ... Just a Stroll from the Plaza

Downtown Santa Fe’s only luxury residence club was designed for you—someone who appreciates the finer things in life. Enjoy a luxurious vacation home with first-class service, zero maintenance hassles and an ideal location just a stroll from the Plaza—all for a sensible price.

Located just three blocks from the Plaza on the corner of Catron Street and Grant Avenue.

Ownership from $130,000 Pricing subject to change without notice. Owners receive a 1/8 th undivided, deeded interest in a Club residence.

Call us today at 866.721.7800

Or visit us online at www.ElCorazonSantaFe.com Model homes open daily. Destination Club Realty—New Mexico

505.820.0850

This advertising material is not an offer to sell nor a solicitation of an offer to buy to residents of any state or jurisdiction in which registration requirements have not been fulfilled. All information is subject to change without notice and not guaranteed.


MARIA SAMORA Artist Reception at Blue Rain Gallery Thursday, August 18th, 5–8 pm Santa Fe Indian Market, August 20–21, 2011, Booth 311 fr-n

130 Lincoln Avenue, Suite C, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | 505.954.9902 | www.blueraingallery.com


A llaann A Alan Alan

Sooffffeerr S Soffer Soffer

No w ow N Now l2y 92-9 A-uAg uu gs tu s1t9 ,1 92 ,0 11 2 0 11 JNuJloyu w J u l y 2 9 - A u g u s t 1 9 , 2 0 11 Opening Reception

pening R JO - eeAccueegpp utt ii oos nnt 1 9 , 2 0 11 Oupleyn i2n9g R F pr Fiednr aii dnygaAyRueAgcuue gps tuti os5nt, 55, -57 - p7mp m O Friday August 5, 5 - 7 pm SF orSifdfoeaffryedAri usdcgi us cs ust es5s, :e5s :- 7 p m Soffer discusses: T err Pod cri soeccsuesssossef soE:fn Ec anuc satui cs t i c S hoTef hf eP The Process of Encaustic MVnyicsVi TPhaPei naPti inrnotgicneagsnsad noMdf yE ai uossnitoi cn Painting and My Vision u syt V6i,s 1i o n- 2 p m PS aSitnuatrtidunargdy aAynudAg M S a t u r d a y A u g uu gs tu s6t, 61 , - 12 - p2m p m Saturday August 6, 1 - 2 pm

In My Own Language, encaustic on board, 40x49 inches IInn MMyy OOwwnn LLaanngguuaagge e, ,e en nc ac ua sutsi ct i co no nb obaoradr,d4, 04x04x94 i9n ci nhcehs e s In My Own Language, encaustic on board, 40x49 inches

A ll ee tt aa A A lleettaa A

P PPiiippppppii innn Pippin

P oo tt ii oo nn PPee err ppr pee tteuut aau lla M M le mM t2in,o2n0 11 A ue g urspt e 1 9t u - a S el p tM b teoir o P o A u g u s t 1 9 - S e p t e m b e r 2 , 2 0 11

A u g u s t 9e1c -9e pS-t ieoSpnet epm t ebme br e2r, 22 ,0 11 2 0 11 O A ppueegnnuii nnsggt 1R O Reception F prOiedpnaei nnygi nARguegRc uee pcs etti po1tni9o,n 5 - 7 p m O Friday August 19, 5 - 7 pm F rFi dr iadya Ay uAguugsut s1t91, 95, -5 7- p7mp m

PIPPIN PIPPIN contemporary PIPPIN contemporary PIPPIN

1 contemporary 2 5 L i n c o l n A v e n u e , S u i t e 11 4 1 2 5 L i n c o l n A v e n u e , S u i t e 11 4 Santa Fe, NM 87501 04 1 1 2 5 L i n c o lSnaAnvt ae nFuee, , NSM u i t8e7 511 1 2 5 L i n c o l n Av5e0n5 u. 7e9, 5S. 7u4i t7e6 11 4 . 7M 9 5r8y. . 7c4 e0,5 N 57 06 1 w w w. p i p pSi nacnSot aanntF e5 t am pFoer,aN M o8m 7501 w w w. p i p p i n c o n t e5m 0 5p.o7r9a5r y. . 7c4o7m 6 505.795.7476 w w w. p i p p i n c o n t e m p o r a r y. c o m

contemporary

O n c e U p o n a Ti m e , a c r y l i c o n c a n v a s , 4 8 x 5 0 i n c h e s O n c e U p o n a Ti m e , a c r y l i c o n c a n v a s , 4 8 x 5 0 i n c h e s O n c e U p o n a Ti m e , a c r y l i c o n c a n v a s , 4 8 x 5 0 i n c h e s

O n c e U p o n a Ti m e , a c r y l i c o n c a n v a s , 4 8 x 5 0 i n c h e s

w w w. p i p p i n c o n t e m p o r a r y. c o m


land use/misuse The Celebration and Exploitation of the American Landscape

Don Stinson, Wyoming Energy Romance, oil on linen, 18 x 24 inches. Š Don Stinson, courtesy Gerald Peters Gallery.

W o r k s b y: C h u C k F o r s m a n , Eri C aho , k a r E n k i t C h E l , J o h n G a n i s , J . h E n r y Fa i r , h a r o l d G r E G o r , t o m u t t E C h , m i Ch a E l s C o t t, W i l l i a m C l i F t, st E p h E n h a n n o C k , J o h n a l E x a n d E r , b r i an Far r Ell, dE nnis b l aG G , to ny Fo stEr, do n stin s on , k E i t h J a C o b s h a G E n , Cr a i G Va r J a b Ed i a n a n d man y o t hE r s v i e w m o r e w o r k s at w w w.g p g a l l e r y.c o m

august 5 - october 1, 2011 Forum discussion with the artists: Friday, august 5th, at 3pm opening reception with the artists: Friday, august 5th, from 5-7pm

1011 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | tel 505-954-5700


Enchanting sunsets included

877.262.4666 198 State Road 592, Santa Fe, New Mexico encantadoresort.com Auberge Resorts: Auberge du Soleil, Napa Valley, CA | Auberge Residences at Element 52, Telluride, CO | Calistoga Ranch, Napa Valley, CA Rancho Valencia, Rancho Santa Fe, CA | Esperanza Resort, Cabo San Lucas, MX | The Inn at Palmetto Bluff, SC


NATHAN HART

Santa Fe Indian Market Lincoln Avenue, Booth 785 LIN-W

w w w.nathanhar tstudio.com | t: 4 05.820.4267 boxelder burl, 9.75” h x 10.25” dia

Photo by JD Merryweather


75

To Peñasco & Taos to Sugar Nymphs Bistro

to Dixon

76

Cardona-Hine Gallery

Ojo Sarco 73

Hand Artes Gallery

Judith Hert Studio

Ojo Sarco Pottery

75 Truchas

to Dixon

Jeane George Weigel Studio

The Cordova Hand Weaving Workshop Bill Loyd & Anna Karin Studios

Anna Karin and Jeane George Weigel Gallery

6

Centinela Traditional Arts

C�rdova

Oviedo Carvings & Bronze Rancho de Chimay� Restaurant Santuario

Chimay�

to Dixon & Taos

98

503

503

Española

Nambé 84/ 285

Bill Loyd & Anna Karin Studios

Anna Karin & Jeane George Weigel Gallery Cardona-Hine Gallery

Jeane George Weigel Studio Hand Artes Gallery Ojo Sarco Pottery

76 68

Oviedo Carvings & Bronze

Judith Hert Studio

Castillo Gallery

76

Centinela Traditional Arts

To Santa Fe & Albuquerque 84/ 285


DAVID ROTHERMEL

“Sienna Moment”

60”x72” acrylic on board

575-642-4981 | 123 Galisteo ST., Santa Fe, NM 87501 | www.drfa-sf.com


TRADERS SINCE 1860

ONE OF THE MOST INTERESTING AND COLORFUL INDIAN TRADING COMPANIES IN THE WORLD can be found in downtown Gallup on historic Route 66.

Photo © Eddie Rivera

Established as traders on the Navajo Reservation since the turn of the century, the Richardson family continues a long and historic tradition in Gallup, New Mexico. The atmosphere inside recalls the old trading days, when Navajo families might travel for several hours and then spend an entire day at the trading post, selling wool, trading blankets and jewelry to the trader for food supplies and clothing, and exchanging stories with friends or neighbors seen only on these occasions. Wood floors, pew-like benches, cases full of polished silver and turquoise jewelry, piles of richly-colored Navajo rugs, and the sweet smell of aged leather saddles fill the interior of the store. Indian pottery, baskets, beaded items, artifacts hundreds of unique, one-of-a-kind Indian art pieces are displayed prominently throughout the store.

505-722-4762 • Fax: 505-722-9424 222 W. Hwy. 66, Gallup, NM 87301 • e-mail: rtc@cnetco.com


Let your spirits soar at Pueblo

de San Ildefonso

Pueblo de San Ildefonso

02 Tunyo Po • Santa Fe, NM 87506 • 505 455-3549 Visitor’s Center Office • 505 455-2273 Governor’s Office


TERRANCE TERRANCE TERRANCE TERRANCE TERRANCE TERRANCE TERRANCE TERRANCE TERRANCE GUARDIPEE GUARDIPEE GUARDIPEE GUARDIPEE GUARDIPEE GUARDIPEE GUARDIPEE GUARDIPEE GUARDIPEE (LAST (LAST (LAST (LAST (LAST (LAST (LAST (LAST (LAST GUN) GUN) GUN) GUN) GUN) GUN) GUN) GUN) GUN) TERRANCE TERRANCE GUARDIPEE GUARDIPEE (LAST (LAST GUN) GUN) TERRANCE GUARDIPEE (LAST GUN

Photographed by: New Era Photography

Photographed Photographed by:by: New New Era Era Photography Photography Photographed by: New Era Photography Photographed Photographed by: by: New New Era Era Photography Photography Photographed by: New Era Photography Photographed Photographed by:by: New New Era Era Photography Photography Photographed by: New Era Photography Photographed by: New Era Photography Photographed by: New Era Photography Photographed by: New Era Photographed by: New Era Photography Photography

“Iron “Iron “Iron “Iron “Iron “Iron “Iron “Iron “Iron Chest” “Iron Chest” “Iron Chest” Chest” Chest” Chest” Chest” Chest” Chest” Chest” Chest” “Iron “Iron Chest” Chest” “Iron Chest”

32” 32” 32” 32” 32” 32” 32” x32” x32” x41” x32” x41” 32” 41” x41” 41” xx41” x41” xFramed 41” x41” Framed Framed 41” Framed Framed 41” Framed Framed Framed Framed Framed Framed 32”32” x 41” x 41” Framed Framed 32” x 41” Frame

Booth Booth Booth Booth Booth Booth Booth Booth Booth Number Number Number Number Number Number Number Number Number 235 235 235 235 235 235 235 235 235 PAL PAL PAL PAL PAL PAL PAL PAL PAL ----S S --S --S --S S -S S S Booth Booth Number Number 235 235 PAL PAL S S Booth Number 235 PAL - S www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com www.terranceguardipee.com

Inquiries Inquiries Inquiries Inquiries Inquiries Inquiries Inquiries Inquiries Inquiries Inquiries Inquiries Directed Directed Directed Directed Directed Directed Directed Directed Directed Directed Directed to to to to to Catherine to to Catherine Catherine to Catherine Catherine to to Catherine to Catherine Catherine Catherine Catherine Catherine Black Black Black Black Black Black Black Black Black Black Black Horse Horse Horse Horse Horse Horse Horse Horse Horse Horse Horse Inquiries Inquiries Directed Directed to Catherine to Catherine Black Black Horse Horse Inquiries Directed to Catherine Black Horse blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com blackhorsestudio1@yahoo.com


Soak yourself in our

historic

Hot Springs

Truth or Consequences • Sierra County, New Mexico Paid for by Truth or Consequences Lodgers Tax

Hot springs, lakes, waterways, art, history, shops, galleries and Spaceport America await you along the Geronimo Trails Scenic Byway ... an oasis in the desert!

Find out more at www.torcchamber.org


Announcing The

“A Celebration Of Indian Women Of All Art Genres”

Opening Soon! Founders:

Margarete Bagshaw, Dan McGuinness, Roxanne Swintzell, Tim Star, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, Marigold Linton, Cate Stetson, Eric Phillips, Bruce Adams

for information: info@PVMIWA.org


Willie Nelson & Family at the

Santa Fe Opera

September 17th, 2011 Buy your tickets now!

Join us for a Very Rockin’ Evening of Music with the

Legendary Willie Nelson & Family

at the Santa Fe Opera A benefit concert for the

Santa Fe Watershed Association

September 17th, 2011 • 7:30 p.m. Tickets available at www.santafewatershed.org/willie or by calling 505-986-5900 For information call the Santa Fe Watershed Association at 505.820.1696 Thank you to our media sponsors: Santa Fean and Green Fire Times

Our River, Our Water, Our Future. august/september 2011

santa fean

67


Gues t Chefs & Gues t Wine speAkers

Laura Werlin Author

Jonathan Waxman Barbuto

Michael Ginor Hudson Valley Foie Gras

Emily Wines Master Sommelier

Joe Spellman Master Sommelier

Tim Gaiser Master Sommelier

21st AnnuAl

Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta september 22—25, 2011

Eric DiStefano Coyote Cafe & Geronimo

Joe Wrede The Palace

Mark Kiffin The Compound Restaurant

Tom Kerpon Balconies on the Plaza

Fernando Olea Epazote

Charles Dale Terra Encantado

Grand Tasting at The Santa Fe Opera 75 Great Santa Fe Restaurants 90 World-Class Wineries

Megan Tucker Amavi

Martin Rios Restaurant Martin

Daily Wine Seminars Reserve Wine Tasting Live Auction Guest Chef Luncheon Winery Dinners Nightly

Louis Moskow 315 Restaurant & Wine Bar

Kim MĂźller Real Food Nation

Tony Smith Eldorado Hotel

Roland Richter Joe's Diner

tiCkets AvAilAble At

www.sant af ewineandchile.or g 505-438-8060


Handwovens

garet Roach Wheeler Margaret Roach Wheeler www.margaretroachwheeler.com

Booth #285 PAL


Recognized by Barron’s Respected by peers Focused on clients

courtesy of Kim Kurian

We salute John Vazquez for being named to Barron’s “Top 1,000” Financial Advisors list. Putting clients first is why John was recognized as being one of the very best Financial Advisors in America in 2010 and 2011.

Vazquez Portfolio Group John Vazquez Senior Vice President–Investments Senior Portfolio Manager 141 East Palace Avenue Coronado Building Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-989-5112 800-450-2843 john.vazquez@ubs.com

ubs.com/team/vazquez UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Barron’s is a registered trademark of Dow Jones & Co. ©2011 UBS Financial Services Inc. All rights reserved. Member SIPC. 1.32_Ad_9.25x11.125_KK0627_VazJ


b

INdIAN MArKet SHoW AUGUSt 20-21, 2011 featuring New Works by AlvIN MArSHAll and Increased offerings and Incentives in our

ALL JEWELRY 50% REDUCTION AUGUST 20-21 2011

eNd of tHe trAIl SAle Highlights of our 2011 Indian Market Show will be the introduction of superb new works by nationally recognized master Navajo sculptor Alvin Marshall and increased concessions on our legendary art offerings in conjunction with our eNd of tHe trAIl SAle.

As the end of our long and successful business experience nears reality we wish to share our appreciation with our art patrons that have contributed to our 30 year history as one of Santa fe’s most respected and cherished galleries.

tHe eNd of tHe trAIl SAle is providing serious collectors and those introducing art into their lives a most unique opportunity to acquire art treasures.

A SANTA FE TRADITION 128 W. PALACE AVENUE • SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO 87501 505/983-9219 • www.wadlegalleries.com

“HArveSt dreAMS” UtAH AlABASter 21” H


W WII LLIILLLLLII A AM MSSSSII E GA ALLLLG GA ALLLLLLLE RY W A M EIIEEG GG AA GG AA EEERY RY W IIA M RY A AN NC CII E NTT T C COONNT TE EMMP POOR RAAR RY Y AA NN CC EII EEN NN T CCOONNT TEEMMPPOORRAARRYY

AFRICAN AFRICANTEXTILES TEXTILES AFRICAN TEXTILES AFRICAN TEXTILES 19th 19th - 20th - 20th Century Century

19th - 20th 19th - 20thCentury Century Democratic Democratic Republic Republic ofof Congo Congo Democratic DemocraticRepublic RepublicofofCongo Congo

JUDY JUDYTUWALETSTIWA TUWALETSTIWA JUDY TUWALETSTIWA JUDY TUWALETSTIWA AA Patterned Patterned Language Language AAPatterned PatternedLanguage Language

July July29 29-- -August - August August23, 23,2011 2011 July 29 August 23, 2011 July 29 23, 2011 540540 S GUADALUPE S GUADALUPE STREET STREET SANTA SANTA FE FE NMNM 87501 87501 RAILYARD RAILYARD 505.820.3300 505.820.3300 WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM INFO@WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM INFO@WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM 540540 S GUADALUPE STREET SANTA FEFE NMNM 87501 RAILYARD 505.820.3300 WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM INFO@WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM S GUADALUPE STREET SANTA 87501 RAILYARD 505.820.3300 WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM INFO@WILLIAMSIEGAL.COM


Photo © 2011 Kim Ashley

MENTOR AMERICAN INDIAN CHILD AN

BUILD A RELATIONSHIP THAT LASTS A AND

LIFETIME

We need your help! Please Donate or Mentor.

Call 800-545-6843 or visit our website for information on how you can become a mentor or Youth Leadership supporter: www.futuresforchildren.org. If you wish to sponsor a Youth Leadership Program or mentor a child, when you contact Futures for Children please mention code: SIM11, and you will receive a free gift.

FUTURES FOR CHILDREN 9600 Tennyson St NE Albuquerque NM 87122-2282 Where Native Youth become Tomorrow’s Leaders!

FUTURES FOR CHILDREN AMERICAN INDIAN

STORE

Shop our online store for authentic American Indian merchandise. All Net Profits go to Futures for Children. www.ffcais.com

Reader’s Special Enter coupon code B25 and click REDEEM to receive 25% off your purchase. Expires 09/30/11


Jeff Ham

D i n n e r w i t h t h e A rt i s t During Indian Market At Epazote New World Cuisine with Music by Ramon Bermudez Reservations: www.opentable.com/epazote FEATURING ARTISTS: UPTON ETHELBAH, RANDALL BLAZE, JERRY INGRAM, JULIENNE BARTH, RYAN CUNNINGHAM, RICHARD STUMP, CLINT MORTENSON, NANCE LOPEZ, DAVID DEVARY, DORIS STEIDER, JAMES ROZEK, DAVID MARTY, RAMON LOPEZ,

J.D.CHALLENGER, CRAIG MOYA, CATHERINE MAZIERE, H-HOLDEN, CARRIE LYNN KORZAK, SAM BEAR, JOHN ARENSKOV, GUILLOUME, BRENT LEARNED, REGGIE JACKSON, MARY EMMERLING, GUADELOUPE APODACA & EARNIE APODACA

M I C H A E L H E N I N G T O N F I N E A RT

4 1 6 A G UA F R I A S A N TA F E N M

505/690 9160

h e n i n g t o n f i n e a rt. c o m


hemlock_gorman1.qxd:halfpage 6/10/11 3:14 PM Page 1

Haudenosaunee of the Eastern Woodlands Babe & Carla Hemlock Mohawk

Booth # 791 LIN-W

www.hemlocks.net

Cradleboards and Paintings

Ronni-Leigh & Stonehorse Goeman Onondaga / Seneca Booth #297 Palace

Quilts accented with Iroquoian Style Beadwork

nativeblackashbaskets.com

One of a kind Black Ash Baskets with Sculpture

LES NAMiNGHA STUDIO

Dazzle, 5.75” x 9”, clay, acrylic

Study for Polychrome Bowl, 10” x 8”, acrylic on board

Artist Receptions • August 17, 18, & 19, 2011 • 5pm–8pm 821 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM • (505) 490-6704 • lesnamingha.com 80

santafean.com

august/september 2011


melvinSANDOVAL

camilleBERNAL

KESHi

the zuni connection

227 don gaspar santa fe, nm 87501 505.989.8728 keshi.com

Saturday August 20 1 pm - 3 pm Taos Potter Camille Bernal Sunday August 21 11 am - 2 pm Zuni Fetish carver Melvin Sandoval all proceeds go directly to the artists

SWAIA ad 2011 Indian Market.indd 1

A MERICAN INDIAN ART

BIDDING BEGINS END OF AUGUST, HA.COM/6062

6/22/11 8:14 AM

S E P T E M B E R 1 6 , 2 0 11 | D A L L A S

Plateau Beaded Cloth Dress Yoke Estimate: $4,000-$6,000

HA.com/6062-38002

A Plateau Beaded Hide Dress Yoke Estimate: $4,000-$6,000

HA.com/6062-38003 Free catalog and The Collector's Handbook ($65 value) for new clients. Please submit auction invoices of $1,000+ in this category, from any source. Include your contact information and mail to Heritage, fax 214-409-1425, email catalogorders@HA.com, or call 866-835-3243. For more details, go to HA.com/FCO.

An nu al Sale s Ex c eed $700 M i l l i on | 600, 000+ On l i n e Bi d d e r- Me m b e r s

Delia E. Sullivan Senior Specialist 214.409.1343 DeliaS@HA.com

3 5 0 0 M a p l e A v e n u e | D a l l a s , Te x a s 7 5 2 1 9 | 8 0 0 - 8 7 2 - 6 4 6 7 | H A . c o m

D A L L A S | N E W Y O R K | B E V E R LY H I L LS | PARI S | GE NE VA TX Auctioneer licenses: Robert Korver 13754; Mike Sadler 16129; Andrea Voss 16406. This auction subject to a 19.5% buyer's premium.

21859

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6/21/11 4:02 PM


staying the course-o

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the buzz around town

e*read

COURTESY PETERSEN AUTOMOTIVE MUSEUM

AUTOMOBILES There are car shows and then there are concorsos. The former events conjure up gearheads in T-shirts shimmying their way into the innards of hot rods and showing off their latest airbrushed embellishments. The latter occasions, however, reputedly modeled after one of the first concorsos, staged in Italy back in 1929, are stately affairs, elegant competitions wherein classic and vintage automobiles are judged by astute aficionados. The Santa Fe Concorso, which debuted only last year at the 140-acre La Mesita retreat, has already established its uniqueness in this rather rarefied world of automobile exhibits. Again set at La Mesita, just 20 minutes north of Santa Fe, near Nambé, Santa Fe Concorso will run from September 23–25. And being that it’s a nonprofit, whose proceeds go to various northern New Mexico youth groups, its organizers are hoping for an even better event this time. “The plan is to keep it—and continue to build it—as a boutique event,” says board secretary Beverly Little, who concocted the Concorso several years ago with her husband, former Cadillac chief designer Dennis Little. “We want you to be able to interact with the owners and the cars. Apart from the wonderful climate, the roads being a joy to drive on, and the restaurants, the music, and the culture that people all love coming here for, the plan is to keep it as an intimate gathering. That’s what made it so successful.” That and the cars—and motorcycles (which this go-round will be judged as well). This year’s theme is Need for Speed—so there’ll be plenty of sleek, superfast vehicles to ogle (60 juried and 30 on display), from Paul Newman’s lavender Honker 2 to the Lotus #79 once raced by Mario Andretti to the oddly airfoiled Chaparral 2D to the twin-engined Harley-Davidson that until two years ago was the world’s fastest hog to the Ghia-bodied Cadillac (below) driven by Rita Hayworth. “We’re trying to make this more than a car event,” says Dennis Little. “We want to make it a lifestyle event. And Santa Fe’s a perfect fit for that: It’s already a world-class draw. Here’s something, though, that’s 180 degrees from everything else going on but still encompasses Santa Fe.”—DJ

BOOKS When best-selling author Jon Krakauer (Into the Wild, Into Thin Air) recently burst many a do-gooder’s bubble with his exposé of the fraudulent practices of Three Cups of Tea writer Greg Mortensen, the entity behind the e-book that laid it all bare was Byliner, the brand-new web-based literary and publishing venture. Essentially cofounded by The Colony author John Tayman, now its San Francisco–based CEO, and former Outside editor-inchief Mark Bryant, its Santa Fe–based editorial director, Byliner launched its website only this past June—months after landing the kind of publicity money can’t buy (courtesy of Krakauer’s book, Three Cups of Deceit, which became Kindle’s best-selling e-book in its history, as well as Amazon’s number-one nonfiction best seller, and his appearance on 60 Minutes and the exposé they did on Mortensen). “The Krakauer story just took off,” marvels Bryant, who oversaw Outside for 17 years and has lived here since the outdoor magazine relocated to Santa Fe in 1994. “It also exemplifies what we want to do: we want everything to feel of-the-moment.” Equating it to Pandora, the personalized Internet radio service that matches its subscribers to new music based on their old and current favorite songs, Bryant sees Byliner as a clearinghouse (of an archive already 29,000 stories strong) where readers can find, discover, and share new and established authors (currently, there are close to 200 to choose from). Working off a robust search algorithm in addition to employing some strong human-element curation, Byliner specializes in narrative nonfiction journalism with stories ranging from 8,000 to 35,000 words. “It’s a really nice length to tell a story the way it’s meant to be told,” says Bryant. “In one sitting. It’s a very lean, very focused company. It’s getting back to what it’s all about: the storytelling.” Byliner plans to publish new e-books or stories about every 10 days, which will be available on Amazon; for Kindles, iPads, and Nooks; and in many other formats. “It’s a two-pronged thing,” says Bryant. “Taken together, though, we hope it’s a pretty potent combination. The key is building a community of readers who sometimes need help discovering things. But,” he adds, “it’s called Byliner for a reason: it’s really about the writers.”—Devon Jackson


after-treatment exercises HEALTH For the nearly quarter of a million women and men who are diagnosed with breast cancer every year—and for dealing with the life-changing struggles that it puts them through—Nancy Hewitt, a marketing and advertising guru who found out she had the disease four years ago at age 62, and Lisa Gulotta, onetime professional dancer and certified cancer exercise specialist, created The Next Step, Vol. 1: Restorative Exercises After Breast Cancer, a DVD specifically aimed at and designed for that group. Now available for just $25, the DVD consists of four classes, based on a curriculum Gulotta designed for a course she’d been leading at a Santa Fe community center. Billing themselves as 2 Women on a Mission, they shot the DVD, which they envision as the first of a series, at Sunrise Springs Inn and Retreat over a four-day period. “It’s gentle for people coming out of treatment,” says Hewitt, who moved to Santa Fe in 1995. “There’s no overall exercise program that’s a mix, which is what we offer.” It’s also their way of giving back (Gulotta devised her program in response to her mother’s and aunt’s breast cancer battles). “I’m trying to attract women like myself,” says Hewitt. “It’s my obligation to give this out to as many women who don’t have a Lisa Gulotta around the corner.”—DJ

2 WOMEN ON A MISSION

For more information, go to exerciseafterbreastcancer.com

Lisa Gulotta demonstrating a Next Step exercise


Cochiti Pueblo Historic Drums

Exhibit & Sale from the Dana Lipsig Scarpitta collection Opening Evening Reception

Monday, August 8th, 4 to 6 pm

James M. Keller

enter the chamber

AUGUST 2011 Two Very Special Exhibits 221 Canyon Road Santa Fe 505.955.0550 www.adobegallery.com

“Mother and Child Herding Sheep” by Quincy Tahoma, watercolor, 12” x 20-3/4” image size

Paintings by

Quincy Tahoma

Opening Night book signing with both authors of the new book

Opening Evening Reception Thursday, August 18th, 4 to 7 pm

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MUSIC Santa Fe is a music-lover’s town, so it’s not surprising that it can claim one of the music world’s finest scholars as its own. James M. Keller, who was a writer and editor on the staff of The New Yorker for more than 10 years before moving to Santa Fe in 2000, is the program annotator as well as a frequent lecturer for the New York Philharmonic and the San Francisco Symphony. He is also a staff writer for The Santa Fe New Mexican’s weekly arts and culture magazine, Pasatiempo, and a contributing editor for Chamber Music magazine. It’s this last sphere of musical interest that Keller has chosen to focus on in his new book, Chamber Music: A Listener’s Guide (Oxford University Press). “Chamber music is a special passion of mine,” Keller says. “I make my living largely through symphonic repertoire, which I love, of course, but if I’m listening on my own time, I’m likely listening to chamber music.” In his book, Keller―—who won the prestigious ASCAP– Deems Taylor Award for feature writing for his work in Chamber Music magazine—―provides nearly 200 highly engaging and beautifully written essays about the pieces that constitute the A-list of the chamber music repertoire, from J.S. Bach’s Trio Sonata in G major (circa 1732) to Osvaldo Golijov’s The Dreams and Prayers of Isaac the Blind (1994). A music historian by training, Keller is quick to point out that, despite


the lively anecdotes and details he provides for all of the works he covers, at the heart of the book are the pieces themselves. “This collection isn’t really the history of music, the history of chamber music, or the story of the great composers,” he says. “But rather it’s about the pieces that have gained the greatest renown and have occupied the most prominent niches in real-life performance.” Also, given that Chamber Music is part of Oxford’s Listener’s Guide series (which also includes The Symphony, The Concerto, and Choral Masterworks by Keller’s close friend and mentor, the late Michael Steinberg), this collection is “meant to have more practical use for concertgoers,” he adds. “The essays are accessible to readers or listeners who have not necessarily studied music themselves.” The hardest part about writing Chamber Music―—which, in June, was named book of

the month by BBC Music Magazine―—was “deciding who was in and who was out,” Keller says. One of the greatest rewards, however, came from discovering that there were still surprises to be had. “The composer who is represented with a density that I hadn’t really thought about until it happened was Brahms,” Keller notes. “Because he threw out so much of what he wrote, of the great composers Brahms is the one who allowed the least dross to go into posterity.” Other highlights for the reader-listener include the story of Mozart’s Piano Quartet in E-flat major—―“one of the summit works of all music,” Keller says, “and one that I call the little miracle piece because it came perilously close to not existing at all”―—as well as the thrill of discovering messages composers embedded within their works. “Berg’s Lyric Suite for String Quartet is really a very detailed love

letter and kind of a love diary about a woman he was having an affair with,” Keller says. “He went to his grave never revealing that, and it was only much, much later that what was really going on in that piece was decoded. Now, of course, we hear it—―there’s sort of a narrative that we can follow—―but there are a lot of examples of such things. Chamber music is the intimate art in music, so very often composers would use it as a way of conveying something that’s rather private.” Although Chamber Music had been in the works for a while, its publication seems more timely than ever, given the well-publicized troubles orchestras around the country are currently facing as they look to gain firmer financial footing. “The economic model is so different for chamber music,” Keller says. “I think, in many ways, this is a golden age for chamber music.”—―Amy Hegarty

STEPHANIE TAXY

it’s kind of a funny story THEATER You don’t have to be funny or dramatic or even aspire to being the next Will Ferrell or Robert DeNiro to get into improv. Which is key, especially in a town where developing and sustaining either one— comedy or theater—has been anything but amusing. Enter—by way of Chicago (his birthplace), Baltimore (childhood stomping grounds), Harvard (major: psychology), and Los Angeles, where he worked with the Groundlings and the Upright Citizens Brigade, wrote for Family Guy, and taught improv and stand-up comedy for 10 years while also ghostwriting—Ben Taxy. Now 37, Taxy (pictured below, standing far left) and his former MGM executive wife, Stephanie Palmer (author of Good in a Room), moved to Santa Fe three years ago (“It was like a bell rang,” says Taxy of the City Different’s impact). Eager to get back on the boards and impressed by the “many talented, interesting people living here,” last October Taxy founded Santa Fe Improv. Unlike stand-up or skits or dramatic sketches, improv relies on its performers’ trained dexterity, as they must conjure scenes (seemingly) extemporaneously, based on ideas given to them by their audience. “People benefit from improv in so many ways,” says Taxy, who began teaching classes of 15 to 20 last fall at Warehouse 21 and who’s now based at Teatro Paraguas. “Listening is key. It helps communication. People who do improv come away with a better understanding of each other.” And anyone and everyone can and does participate—not just actors and writers (who’re looking to hone their auditioning or thespian skills, or who’re interested in creating better characters) but software developers, engineers, nurses. “Improv’s especially good for people who work in a group environment,” says Taxy. “Fundamentally, it’s about teamwork.” Intent on educating and building an audience, one that’ll grow as his classes and students grow—not peter out the way other theatrical ventures have—Taxy has had three SRO shows thus far and plans for more this fall and beyond. “It’s important to grow it slowly and organically,” he says. And as an endeavor, he adds, “It’s fun, inexpensive, and easy to learn. Besides, we’re a country in need of a good time.” No kidding.—DJ

For info on classes or performances, see santafeimprov.com. The show Unscripted: A Live Comedy Event will be held September 2–3 at 8 pm at Teatro Paraguas. august/september 2011

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Laurence Sisson Indian Market Exhibition Wednesday, August 17 • 5:00-7:00 PM

fathers and sons POETRY American Book Award–winning poet, essayist, memoirist, novelist, and Santa Fe native Jimmy Santiago Baca recently released a new book of poetry, The Esai Poems (book one in his Breaking Bread with the Darkness series), all dedicated to his infant son. Weaving the political and the cultural into tender odes and quasi-odes to his own son and to children in general, Baca’s Esai poems, such as the one below, exemplify what poet Carolyn Forché, in her foreword, calls “a primer for paternity.”—DJ

Laurence Sisson (Born 1928) Painted Desert – Painted Clouds, Oil on Panel, 40 X 50 Inches

Eric Sloane, N.A. (1905-1985) Representing the Estate of Eric Sloane

Eric Sloane, N.A. (1905-1985) October Hilside – 1974, Oil on Panel, 21 X 34 ½ Inches

Michael Wigley Galleries, Ltd. Our New Location: 1101 Paseo De Peralta, Santa Fe NM 87501 MichaelWigleyGalleries.com 505-984-8986 Art SantaFe.com

Jimmy Santiago Baca

12-30-03 much of what I write, the poems that is, are stones I litter the dusty roads with so kids can pick them up readily to throw at tanks. Much of what I write are like bullets to reload the rifles of peoples fighting for their land and their way of life. Much of what I write is my way of revealing to me what CEOs want to conceal— my words the black blindfolds I cut loose and when I do, I find myself in basements, in strange places I have never been, and outside I hear gunshots and children running from dictators.

—Jimmy Santiago Baca, The Esai Poems


CYNTHIA WHITNEY-WARD

´ Andale

chasing the chaser My visual sensibility is eclectic clutter, but I always appreciate contemporary spaces that know when less is more and can place objects in interesting and sparse juxtapositions. So when I stepped into Gerbert Contemporary at the Railyard recently and spotted this curvaceous, sculptural loveseat and the sweeping blue, ballpoint painting on the wall just behind, I knew I had a great shot. I took it from several angles before I got it right, and I realized that I was becoming quite smitten with contemporary art. It made me reflect on how the Santa Fe art scene is not just happening along Canyon Road—that the Railyard District was now coming into its own as a destination for what’s hot and cutting edge in the world of contemporary art. It’s what I love about Santa Fe: in the middle of all that’s familiar—―ristras hanging from doorways; clouds dancing in an impossibly blue sky; a tiny, heart-shaped milagro imbedded into a sidewalk; a battered old bucket of crosses sitting just so―—there’s always something new to explore, something to challenge the old, and something unexpected to capture with my lens.—Cynthia Whitney-Ward To see more of Whitney-Ward’s images and impressions, visit chasingsantafe.blogspot.com GOINGS-ON

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Whether it’s your first time or you’re a regular, visiting the Santa Fe Indian Market can be a daunting experience. It needn’t be. Take your time, spend a day or two enjoying the art, meet some artists, and experience the best of the Native worlds. Remember, though, that while our backgrounds might equip us to understand the basics of painting and sculpture, the beadwork, Pueblo pottery, and jewelry—as well as some of the other Native works at Indian Market—are much more culturally specific, what we sometimes refer to as “traditional,” and involve if not often require precise materials and techniques. Which is why SWAIA has put together this handy Buyer’s Guide. Basically, we worried and fretted about the rules so you don’t need to. But knowing about them might heighten your appreciation of Native arts and help make Indian Market a more memorable experience. These basic official criteria should help you better understand the intricacies of Indian Market and its spectacular artwork. Indian Market is built around traditional Native art forms; they were the first Markets’ first art forms, and remain at the core of today’s Indian Market. Indian Market Standards, or rules, are designed to help artists distinguish traditional from nontraditional work. In turn, SWAIA utilizes the Standards to classify the art received for judging. Judges, too, use the Standards as a guideline for the particular and broad categories of each art form. The Standards are also here to protect the buyer. Outside of Indian Market boundaries, for example, you are not assured that the item is handmade or that the materials are not mass-produced. An Indian Market artist, however, must follow the Standards; therefore, you are assured of the highest quality materials and craftsmanship. In the end, take your time at Indian Market—it was the first and remains the foremost in providing interested visitors the opportunity to meet and talk directly with artists. To help ensure that you are buying quality art from Indian Market artists, all booths are clearly marked with SWAIA signage and every artist has 88

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SWAIA PHOTO ARCHIVE

Indian Market buyer’s guide


photo identification. SWAIA’s standards are for the buyer and artist; they help ensure the uniqueness and high quality of Indian Market. jewelry Native American jewelry is one of the most distinct and delightful of all the art forms. Buyers should be aware of the range of materials today’s jewelers use, including stones and setting techniques. SWAIA requires full disclosure of some materials, including stabilized stones. Most machine-made, imported, or non-Native components are not allowed. allowable 1. Organic and stone materials a. shell and natural organic materials, such as bone and wood; natural stones, such as turquoise, coral, lapis, etc.; other natural untreated stones and gemstones; and ceramic medallions and/or objects set as stones. b. natural pearls, finished stones, and gemstones in cabochon and faceted shapes set in metal settings. 2. Metals—all non-plated metals are allowed and must be clearly identified. For example, iron, silver, brass, gold, etc. Gold must be 14K or higher. 3. Chip inlay in the ratio of no less than 85 percent stone, 15 percent adhesive. No powder is allowed, only chips. allowable findings Allowable findings for the purpose of Indian Market are defined as “an ingredient part of the finished product that adapts the product for wearing or use.” Examples of allowable findings are: jump rings, earring backs, clasps, barrette clips, money clips, hooks and eyes, leather for bolos, conchos, and buckles. For shell and bead makers only: single bead/cone combination to finish ends of necklaces or earrings. allowable with disclosure 1. According to the New Mexico Indian Arts and Sales Act, stabilized turquoise must be disclosed to the consumer. 2. Commercially available coral from temporary strands must be natural and undyed. The use of coral can only be used in combination with a handmade item or items. 3. Commercially available glass beads can only be used in combination with a handmade item(s). a. Multiple-strand glass-bead necklaces strung in the tribal tradition of the maker are allowed. 4. Cast jewelry to include sand, cement, lost wax, and tufa. a. Editions are limited to 25 and must be signed with the artist’s hallmark and numbered. b. Rubber molds are allowed, as long as edition requirements are adhered to. 5. Commercial chain may be used (as a finding) with handcrafted items, but may not be sold individually. 6. Fabricated, laminated-pattern sheet metals such as mokume- gane can be used but must be disclosed to the consumer. 7. Precious metal clay.

Contemporary Masters PRINTS AND ORIGINAL WORKS ON PAPER September 30 through October 21 O PE N I N G R E C E PTI O N :

Friday, September 30th, 5–7 pm

HELEN FRANKENTHALER Causeway. Aquatint, 47.25 x 35.5 inches JIM DINE Watercolor Boys, 2007-09. Edition 6/10. Lithograph, hand watercolored, 36 x 52 inches

ZANEBENNETT CONTEMPORARY

ART

435 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 505 982-8111 www.zanebennettgallery.com Monday–Saturday 10–5, Sunday Noon–4, or by appointment Railyard Arts District Walk last Friday of every month

non-allowable 1. Imported or non-Indian handmade stone or shell beads and fetishes, excluding coral in handmade items. ZB.SantaFeanContMast11.indd 1

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2. Imported and/or color treated nuggets or tumbled chips of any material. 3. Laboratory-grown, plastic, or synthetic-block reconstituted or compressed materials, such as coral, lapis, opal, etc. 4. All color-treated (dyed, heated, or irradiated) materials, such as blue onyx, blue topaz, irradiated red coral, etc. 5. Items assembled from non-Indian or manufactured components, such as: a. machine-made or die-struck components or purchased cast blanks, such as rings, bracelets, bezel cups, leaves, bolo tips, etc. b. machine-made or other metal beads. c. commercially drilled or pre-strung gemstone, natural pearls or glass beads (See C2/C3), including restrung necklaces and “treasure” necklaces made with commercial “found” objects, machinemade “liquid” silver and gold, or plated materials; gold under 14K. pottery Native American pottery is one of the most popular items at market. Look for balance, symmetry, and a smooth finish to most traditional pots. Types of clay will differ depending on the geology of each pueblo. Some purists prefer pots fired only over an open flame, although kiln-fired pottery is becoming more common. SWAIA allows both. Traditional paints come from vegetal and mineral sources like wild spinach, kaolin, and naturally ELD 2330 colored Santaclays. Fean OH AprMay pottery 2011.qxd Nontraditional can run6/3/11 the

gamut of color, form, and function. allowable 1. All handmade traditional and contemporary pottery forms. allowable with disclosure 1. Kiln-fired and/or double-fired pottery. 2. Pottery made with commercial materials, such as clay, glazes, and temper. 3. All decorative stone, shell, or metal elements (such as turquoise, coral, and silver cabochons), and shell, glass, or metal beads must be properly identified and comply with the same Standards established for allowable materials and non-allowable items for jewelry. non-allowable 1. Slip molds, greenware, non-Indian, or commercial pottery. paintings, drawings, graphics, and photography Native American drawings can be traced back thousands of years, to the petroglyphs and pictographs discovered in caves and kivas throughout the Southwest. Today’s Native American artists embrace ancient tradition as well as the immense range of style and media abundant in the contemporary art world. The only limitation SWAIA places in this category is that hand-pulled prints be limited to editions of 50 or fewer, all of which must 2:17 PM and Page 1 be signed numbered. Indian Market includes

a breadth and depth of Native American painting and drawing unsurpassed almost anywhere in the world. allowable 1. Hand-pulled prints, including lithographs and serigraphs, in a numbered and signed edition of no more than 50. It is recommended that a certificate of authenticity from the printer be provided to the consumer. 2. For photography: All works must be signed and numbered in an edition not to exceed 50. non-allowable 1. Any photomechanical reproduction, including note cards, posters, and T-shirts. 2. Giclée, Iris, or other digital photographic reproduction techniques are limited only to photography. pueblo wooden carvings Although the three-dimensional wood carvings of the Hopi and Zuni could be considered sculpture, SWAIA provides them with their own category. Hopi carvings are popularly known as kachinas and must be made from cottonwood root. Zuni artists employ pine and cottonwood root and/or limbs. Other types of woods may be used in contemporary carvings with disclosure. Buyers should consider precision and consistency in technique over size, given that even some of the smallest kachinas can be superb examples of the medium. continued on page 211


JENNIFER ESPERANZA

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| Q + A |

soon to transcend

former Indian Market artist Tony Abeyta appears destined to rise by De von Jack s on

IN MUCH THE SAME way that various Caucasian boxers of the past half-century have served as the next Great White Hope of their sport, Tony Abeyta seems to have been invested, by Natives and non-Natives alike, with the expectation that someday, tomorrow if not sooner, he will assume the status of Fritz Scholder, Allan Houser, and Dan Namingha. Abeyta, the 46-year-old son of painter Narciso Abeyta and sculptor Elizabeth Abeyta, the product as much of Western art programs (a BFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art, years of study abroad in the south of France and in Florence, Italy, and graduate work at the Chicago Art Insitute) as of his Native influences, like Gallup, where he was born and raised, and the Institute of American Indian Arts, where he received his B.A., has a shot at transcending his Native roots (he is Navajo) while still clearly being of them and in them artistically. Versed in many media, his chosen field has been painting. Inclined toward largescale abstract and figurative depictions of the Navajo underworld and Navajo spirituality, and toward plants and landscapes, Abeyta renders many of his works with sand, with encaustic wax and collage, with layer upon layer of vibrant color or a Guernicalike combination of black, white, and gray. It’s a style and an oeuvre that have caught on not only with influential collectors and critics but with museums and institutions as renowned as the Heard Museum and the National Museum of the American Indian. Easygoing, articulate, socially nimble, and unassuming, Abeyta lasted a mere two Indian Markets before being snapped up by savvy gallery owners. Nevertheless, Market is one of his busiest times of year. At work on as many as half a dozen paintings at once in the roomy, second-floor studio he maintains less than a block off the Plaza, Abeyta has recently added jeweler to his expansive skill set.

What have you been working on since your Underworlderness show at the Heard Museum? I’m working on modernist landscapes, nonobjective works, and three-dimensional sculptural paintings. Lately, though, I’ve been focused on the abstract works. Strange nonobjective, biomorphic paintings. They’re color abstracts. I started them four to five years ago with black-and-white large-scale drawings. They were biomorphic, botanical, biomechanical. I’ve translated them into canvasses and moved them into color. The color just kind of happened. I took some blackand-white information and superimposed it onto canvasses. I used to separate the black and white from the color; the black and white had its own identity. I wanted them to have a separate definition, but as time went on the color came in. I was timid about it at first. I was using sepia and yellow ochre, rust and reds, black and white. The color—and what I

normally do is very colorful—it occurred as a linear progression. They’re very retro. Yeah. The larger forms, with the large reds, recall 1950s mid-century modernist elements. What are they getting at? They’re describing how evolution occurred. I’m also working in Native American images and spiritual figures and belief systems of the Southwest Native American religions. Those are very much a part of who I am. But I’ve always been an artist of three or four hats. What about the landscapes? There’s one you just did for La Fonda hotel that’s of Pedernal Mountain near Abiquiú. They’re emotional landscapes. I’m describing how it feels to be in nature. The landscapes don’t deviate from what I do. But they’re

Opposite page: Tony Abeyta in front of Storm Canyon, oil on canvas, 40 x 76", the painting he did for the La Fonda hotel, with his daughter Margeaux in the distance; this page: Trio in Song, oil and sand on canvas and panel, 60 x 80" august/september 2011

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Left: Pueblo Labyrinth, oil on canvas, 24 x 30"; below, three of Abeyta’s most recent pieces of jewelry, made of sandcast silver and turquoise.

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not that Say what? kind of painting, like the big red abstract one. Your jewelry’s pretty straightforward too—not at all of the Say what? variety. Yeah, it has a modernist feel but it’s also ancient. The silverwork mirrors the paintings. They’re all sandcast. They’re a little masculine and bulky, but that’s my style. I don’t do filigree or dainty. I tend to like large stones with a matrix. And it’s an extremely gray American turquoise. Which I love. How’s it been working so close to downtown and all these people? I’m really loving it, though it has its up and downs. Part of me likes all the people dropping by, but it also distracts from my creative muse. I’m trying to keep that equilibrium of solitude. But how do you do that in the middle of where it’s hard to park your car? Has that been more of a challenge lately—finding the time to do the jewelry, paint, hang out with friends, and be a single dad? I’ve been pretty prolific. But the key is balance. To keep inspiration going I have a lot of irons in the fire. I also stay creatively inspired by taking downtime—going biking, going hiking.

JENNIFER ESPERANZA, BLUE RAIN GALLERY

What are your thoughts on Indian Market? It’s important, and I support SWAIA. Most of my friends are out there; that’s their key time. But a lot of what I do isn’t booth-friendly. (Most of my paintings are too big.) I did it for two years. My first year was great. I established a relationship with clients. I learned how to put together a body of work and how to deal with people patiently.

want to live there. It doesn’t have the support system. Plus, here there’s such a magnetic environment for art collectors and an infrastructure for artists. I’ve lived and worked in New York. It’s difficult and expensive. It’s space restrictive. And Santa Fe’s not restrictive on your career? On getting more exposure? It’s a perfectly legitimate place to be. But by definition, I’m a regional artist. That’s the cultural significance of my background. And how has being here influenced your work? All the places I’ve been in have reflected my palette. The black and white came out of Chicago. New York focused me on content and that art can be whatever I want it to be. And you can’t do New Mexico landscapes living next to the water in Italy. Which is why you’ll see me painting Pedernal more than Venice or Italian landscapes. Untitled, oil on canvas, 46 x 36"

How has your work changed from where you started out? I still respond to color and textures. I still like the process, the materials, but I now have total confidence that I can start a painting and finish it. But I still feel as though I need to add more spice and flavor to what I do. Where does your imagery come from? Sometimes you have to go through 12 paintings to get to that 13th one that’s the breakthrough. The difficulty is convincing people that not everything is a masterpiece. The muse, inspiration, isn’t always there. So I wait. As far as the images themselves, the cultural parts draw from the traditional belief systems. But I’m not a traditionalist.

You’ve lived and worked in so many other art cities—New York, Chicago, Florence. Do you plan on staying here in Santa Fe? I do tend to pick up and move about every three to four years. But Santa Fe’s always been my base camp. I have a lot going on here and I’m still inspired. And I still get away a lot. I go to Chicago, where my son’s in school, or to New York, or to Los Angeles to see my girlfriend. And wherever I go, I’ll see other work and other galleries. That’s all great but New Mexico, it’s a cultural attraction. There’s the Navajo, the Pueblos, the Rio Grande. The light, too, is paramount. That’s all kept me here.

Did you start out as a painter? For a short period I wanted to sculpt. In the painting, I was having a hard time with color and getting the images across. So I started drawing in Baltimore. It came out huge and fast. That was the beginning of tapping into my subconscious. I got a lot of black-and-white images out of that. Unfortunately, I lost them all in a fire. But they gave me insight into the possibilities of information. You just have to tap it and follow where it runs. Really good art isn’t planned, it happens. You are a conduit and you’re drawing on your resources.

Would you ever move back to Gallup? Growing up in Gallup was great, but I wouldn’t

How much of a conduit? Well, you can’t just sit around waiting for an

aha moment. On the other hand, I didn’t start the jewelry thing; it happened to me. How do you define yourself? Your artistic self? I’m a contemporary Native American artist who’s fairly urban. Am I a traditionalist? Nah. Not really. And getting back to your earlier question about Gallup, I’d be a fish out of water if I moved to the reservation. What styles or artists do you like? I respond to ’30s and ’40s WPA regionalist landscape painters and paintings. I echo what they were doing, only in a more contemporary manner. But a lot of things fascinate me. I’m three artists in one. But I don’t mind that. It’s who I am. If I wasn’t an artist, I’d be a schizophrenic. I don’t know that they always cancel each other out. I don’t know that they always cancel each other out. Well, I’m definitely grateful that I can do what I do, and that all my coworkers are really talented artists. Agnes Martin. Roxanne [Swentzell], Diego [Romero], his brother Martin, Cody [Sanderson], Pat [Pruitt]—all these guys are part of this innovative community. It’s like Paris here. We all do something different but we all learn from each other, too. When people ask me why do I stay here in Santa Fe I say, Why be anywhere else? It’s a creative community. august/september 2011

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| S A N TA FA V O R I T E S |

haute heads Sa nt a Fe ’s hair salons

by Eli z abe t h L ak e photo graph y by Ga briella Ma r ks

OUR OBSESSION WITH HAIR and its reflection of personality and status go back millennia. From the ancient Egyptians’ elaborate wigs to Marie Antoinette’s 18th-century pouf to Justin Bieber’s fringe, hair is a mode of expression and identity. But finding the perfect coiffure can be daunting. For many, the right stylist is worth his or her weight in gold (or hair extensions). Being a place that fosters individualism, it’s not a surprise that Santa Fe’s boutique salons sport some great talent, not to mention a bevy of progressive beauty services and products. And while there’s an unspoken rule that a client’s relationship with his or her stylist is a monogamous one, if you’re not currently in a serious relationship (or if you just haven’t found the right fit yet), check out the following salons, which are some of the best Santa Fe has to offer. Run by the husband-and-wife duo of owner Angela Del Mar and manager Kevin Wilson, Salon Del Mar (1225 Cerrillos) offers a warm and sophisticated vibe that the couple describes as “New York City meets the Southwest.” Having worked in the hair industry for 21 years in cities like Sarasota, Seattle, New Orleans, and New York, Del Mar fell in love with Santa Fe and opened her stylish Railyard District space three years ago. She credits much of the shop’s success to a team ethic shared by her, Wilson, and stylists Vanessa Perez and Chelsea Tang. The salon’s ambience and amenities—organic refreshments, free wi-fi, music by DJ Maynard Del Mar (Angela’s brother), and walls dressed with art and photography by local artists—create a fun space for primping.

Stylists tend to their customers at Rock Paper Scissor (this page, top left, and opposite page, top right), Chop Shop (right), Adorn (below left), and Salon Del Mar (opposite page, bottom two photos).

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For those looking to knock out hair, nails, and waxing in one visit, check out Rock Paper Scissor Salon Spa (500 Montezuma, in the Sanbusco shopping center). Owned by Melodi Wyss-Feliciano and her husband, Aaron Feliciano, this spacious, lavender-walled spot is an airy respite for the weary (and hairy). Clients can stay up to date on the latest beauty trends by watching RPS’s online video series called Hot in My Salon. Another bonus of shelling out for services here is that RPS has a strong philanthropic track record, and, rather than spending money on advertising, it puts that money toward health care for its employees, resulting in low turnover among its stylists. If you’ve ever found yourself coveting the balayaged tresses of Gisele Bündchen or Sarah Jessica Parker, then a visit to Adorn Hair Studio (1600 Lena, Suite D) is in order. Owned by Christie Haynes, Jeanna Gienke, and Lori McDaniel Whitmire, the salon’s attentiveness to clients’ individual needs―—matching their look to their personality through hair color, extensions, or a precision cut―— is among the reasons this popular spot has such a devoted following. At Lotus Beauty (845 Agua Fria), the focus is on a natural, holistic approach to maintaining and enhancing one’s appearance. For customers weary of the chemicals used in hair treatments, Lotus (which also offers manicures, pedicures, facials, and waxing) promotes organic products and works with ammonia-, sulfate-, and paraben-free materials. The salon is also known for doing feather extensions. Johnny & Jane’s Chop Shop (317 S Guadalupe) has a vintage barbershop appeal but is a hit for its edgier looks—―a― lthough owners Johnny Akers and Laura Jane Rivera note that their full-service salon offers everything “from the extremely conservative to funky.” Akers is Chop Shop’s go-to guy for men’s cuts, ladies’ short cuts, and “making blondes blonder,” while Rivera specializes in, say, retouching a starburst-pink head of hair. The only request the pair might not accommodate is “anything resembling an early ’90’s prom ’do. No ribbon curls!” Consider yourself warned.

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Click here for Part 2 of the August/ September 2011 Santa Fean Magazine

Santa Fean Magazine- Aug/Sept 2011-Indian Market Issue- Part 1  

August/September 2011 Santa Fean Magazine- Indian Market Issue- Part 1

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