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Pro surfer / filmmaker, Kyle Buthman, takes a break from the editing room to spend some quality time in the green room. Photo: @chachfiles

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long bar. happy hour. Grab your friends and join us for Happy Hour* from 4:00–6:00pm, Sunday–Thursday. Enjoy 50% off select appetizers, and $5 draft beers, select wines, and well drinks.

sanderlingsrestaurant.com • (831) 662-7120 One Seascape Resort Drive, Aptos (Across from Seascape Village on Seascape Blvd.) 8

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S ANTA CRU Z WAVES MAGAZ I N E *Happy Hour is available in the Lounge/Bar area only


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S AN TA CR UZ WAV E S MAGAZ I N E Publisher Tyler Fox Editor Elizabeth Limbach Photo Editor Paul Topp Proofreader Josie Cowden

SCW Staff Photographers Kenan Chan, T. Fox, Tyler Frasca, Jeff “Kookson” Gideon, Steve “Birdo” Guisinger, Dave “Nelly” Nelson, Jeanine Olsen, Yvonne Rew-Falk, Neil Simmons, Matt Snow, Jake Thomas, Paul Topp

VOL UME 1.3 - OC T / NOV 2014

Contributing Photographers

Word on the Street

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Grom Spotlight: Jack Conti

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What’s Your Deal? Rose Calucchia 22 Smart Choices with Seafood Watch 24 In Depth: Water Quality at Cowell Beach 28 Santa Cruz After Dark 34 Behind the Lens with Nikki Brooks 46 Travel: A Trip to Kauai 58 Local Company Story: NHS, Inc. 60 Sports Achievement: Mike Dilloughery 64

Nikki Brooks, Nick Chao, Ryan “Chachi” Craig, Julia Gaudinski, Archer Koch, Lucas Porter, Roman Wagner, Gilbert Valenzuela

Contributing Writers Kenan Chan, Tyler Fox, Tyler Frasca, Julia Gaudinski, Joel Hersch, Andy Hofman, Neal Kearney, April Martin-Hansen, Christa Martin, Jessica M. Pasko, Alea Rain, Yvonne Rew-Falk

Contributing Artists Amadeo Bachar, Darrin Caddes

Design Design nomBat Brand Development

Outdoors: Biking Trails 70

Creative Director Julie Henry

Fashion: Fall Trends 76

Ad Design Julie Rovegno, Alicia Woulfe

Artist Profile: Darrin Caddes 80

Sales

Local History: West Cliff Drive & the Wave Motor 84

Director of Sales Stephanie Lutz

Upcoming Events 86 Local Eats: Food Trucks 88 7 Days of Happy Hour 92 Dining Guide 98

Account Executives Julia Cunningham, Jillian Hogan, Jack Neenan, Sadie Wittkins Distribution Mick Freeman

Santa Cruz Waves, LLC President Jon Free

Music: Boostive 104

Founder Tyler Fox

Product Review: Electric Bikes 111

On the Cover

Event Gallery: Santa Cruz Beer Week 114

Wilem Banks lifts off at The Lane. Photo: Nelly / SPLwaterhousing

F I N D U S ONLINE

The content of Santa Cruz Waves Magazine is Copyright © 2014 by Santa Cruz Waves,

www.SantaCruzWaves.com

publisher. Santa Cruz Waves Magazine is free of charge, available at more than 100 local

LLC. No part may be reproduced in any fashion without written consent of the

@SantaCruzWaves

distribution points. Anyone inserting, tampering with or diverting circulation will be prosecuted. Santa Cruz Waves assumes no responsibility for content of advertisements. For advertising inquires, please contact steff@santacruzwaves.com or 831.345.8755.

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To order a paid subscription, visit santacruzwaves.com.


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Japanese Grill and Sustainable Sushi Bar Open every day 11 to late for lunch and dinner Saturday night jams with DJ Sparkle

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Tyler Fox – Founder of Santa Cruz Waves and Big Wave World Tour competitor

L ET T ER FROM THE FOU ND ER

Photos: Nelly / SPLwaterhousing

“Breathe … It’s good for everything.” These were the words spoken by my roommate Coco as a crew of us free thinkers sat lounging around the living room talking about life, love and happiness. I’m not sure how the topic of breathing came up, but it really struck a chord with me and piqued my curiosity. After a little research I learned that our breath responds instantly to what we think, feel, hear, observe, touch, taste or otherwise experience, yet we are mostly oblivious to our breathing patterns. I also learned that our breathing is the only automatic system in our body that we can exert control over. That’s pretty rad, right? You don’t need to be zenned out in a yoga class to find your breath; you can practice slow, deep breaths at this very moment. So when you’re about to flip your lid turtling along in traffic, breathe. When that gorilla-sized local stuffs you on the wave of your life, breathe. Let these bite-sized bits of newfound knowledge sink into your soul because, remember, if you’re not breathing, you’re not living.

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→ at PLEASURE POINT ←

H O W H A S S U R F I N G C H A N G E D YO U R L I F E ? By Yvonne Rew-Falk

It’s made me a healthier, happier per-

It’s changed my life by helping calm me. It’s

Surfing has changed my life overall. I’m

son—physically fit and eating healthi-

good for working on mindfulness. I’m out

not the same person as I was before I got

er. And it makes me have a great outlook

there on the water and it’s almost like yoga

on the board. I recommend it to everyone,

on life. Natural stoke.

or meditation. I enjoy the beautiful sights

even just to try it. It could be a life-changing

Uriah

and sounds, plus get a good workout. It

experience, especially for kids. And [I also

strengthens my body and mind.

recommend] sharing surfing with everyone

Greg Peltz

around you. José Gonzales

Whenever other things in my life are difficult, surfing was just kind of a conduit for me to go out and, for that brief period of time, nothing else mattered. My brain could focus on what was in front of me. Having that kind of relief has been really good for me. Sean

For me, it's water in general. Whenever life gets complicated I gravitate toward

Surfing is not just a sport, it’s a way of life.

whatever body of water I can. If I'm out of

It’s taught me perseverance, being in the

the water for more than four days, I feel like

moment, learning to react to what life

I'm drying out. It's like therapy for my soul.

gives me, and that we’re not in control.

Chelsea Plemons-Jones

It’s taught me to be more Zen. Mo El-Sherif

It’s helped me meet a lot of new people

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Surfing has inspired me to appreciate

and it’s helped me get into the Santa Cruz

I can’t honestly answer that because I

simplicity. That’s how it’s changed my life.

community more.

don’t remember a life without surfing.

Clint Pardoe

Quinn

Kevin Butler

SANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


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By Neal Kearney

Photo: Kookson

Photo: PaulTopp.com

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Ten-year-old Jack Conti is at one of life’s greatest ages.

Then came the shredding. Conti’s progression was lightning fast,

At 10, the world is your playground. You’re not old enough to

and it wasn’t long before he was laying down smooth carves and

drive, but that doesn’t matter—you’d rather skateboard, anyway.

popping stylish aerials. If that wasn’t enough, the tyke’s attitude

Almost every wave is head high. Dietary concerns include choos-

is always positive and he goes out of his way to show respect

ing between a Pop Tart and a bag of Skittles.

whenever he can.

It feels like yesterday when I first spotted Jack Conti out in the wa-

Darshan Gooch, my own personal mentor and a beacon of posi-

ter at Pleasure Point. As it does for most groms, when surf fever hit

tive vibrations, has been watching Conti progress and is im-

Conti, it hit hard. Soon enough there wasn’t a day in which he wasn’t

pressed by his ability. However, it’s his attitude that stands out

bobbing around in the lineup.

most in Gooch’s eyes.

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


“Jack is a unique personality,” Gooch says. “[He's] one of those

ed outlook and plenty of support, Dollar says “The Ripper,” as Conti

rare kids who is very receptive and responsive to the communi-

is known, has a promising career in the surf world ahead.

ty—bright eyed, aware of his environment, always looks people in the eye when engaging in conversation, and is always smiling.

“He’s just a gifted surfer,” Dollar says. “He’s so natural in the wa-

The burgeoning talent pool surrounding the Point seems to feed

ter and aesthetically pleasing to watch. He’s really athletic with

his hunger to catch up to the older guys and emulate their tricks. His progress has been astounding.” Shawn Dollar is another surfer who supports Conti. With a ground-

whatever he does, but he really has this passion for surfing. He’s already one of the best surfers in town for his age, and if he keeps it up, he will be amazing by the time he’s 18.”

Photo: Kookson

In H is Own Word s :

Best contest result: Back-to-back wins at the Point and the Lane in the National Scholastic Surfing Association’s Mini-Grom conference, 10 and under group.

Date of birth: July 20, 2004.

Favorite surfers in the world: Josh Kerr and Taj Burrow.

Home break: Sewer Peak, Pleasure Point.

Favorite local surfers: Nat Young, Adam Replogle, Shawn Dollar

Height/weight: 4'8", 70 pounds.

and Nic H’Dez.

Sponsors: Billabong Surf Shop, XCEL, Reef, Rusty Surfboards,

What inspires you to surf? My friends and everybody that push-

Santa Cruz Skateboards, Electric and Futures.

es me to do better.

Years surfing: Four.

If you could travel to one place to surf, where would you go

Favorite move: Air reverse.

fect rights that go forever.

Best surfing buddies: My family and all the Pleasure Point groms. Interests outside of surfing: Baseball and skateboarding.

and why? JBay [Jeffreys Bay, South Africa], because it has perAdvice for other groms? Try your hardest and respect other people in and out of the water.

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By Jessica M. Pasko Photos: Jake Thomas

Gluten-free baker. Aerial artist. Personal trainer.

Rose Calucchia Whether performing acrobatics and choreography while suspended from the ceiling or trying to create the perfect gluten-free chocolate chip cookie, Rose Calucchia thrives on challenge. The Brooklyn transplant has been practicing acrobatics and aerial arts for about a decade, balancing it with working as a personal trainer and running a gluten-free baking company. “For me, it’s the concentration it takes, the dedication it takes to building skills over time, and building the foundational strength,” she says of her acrobatics. Just a few weeks off from practicing can make her abilities start to decline, she explains, so the art form requires an intense amount of commitment. “Because of the focus you need, there’s also that element of danger,” she says. “[When practicing], you are in the present. You are really in the moment.” Calucchia, who majored in dance, got hooked after taking classes at the Lava studio in New York City, where she focused on handstands. She later joined Lava’s performance group, an all-female acrobatics troupe specializing in pieces combining visual and physical arts with collaborative choreography. Though it’s the acrobatics that she focuses on most, she has also worked extensively in aerial arts, which are like trapeze, ballet and gymnastics all rolled into one. It’s a form of performance in which artists execute aerial acrobatics and dance while suspended from the ceiling by special fabric, scarves and other rigging. Artists like Calucchia perform intricate choreography high in the air—a feat that leads many viewers to hold their breath in anticipation. Calucchia practices and teaches at Aerial Arts Santa Cruz on the Westside, where she currently teaches classes focused exclusively on handstands. She has also performed and taught in Oakland and San Francisco, where the acrobatics and aerial arts scene is more established. The level of dedication required means Calucchia has had to find flexibility in her work life as well. “My life has kind of led me to find jobs that allow me time to perform and rehearse,” says Calucchia, who also works part-time as a personal trainer at a gym in Palo Alto. And, much like acrobatics, running her own business, Sweet Cheeks Bake Shop, provides her with the excitement and innovation that she thrives on.

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SEAFOOD WATCH KEEPS CONSUMERS UP TO DATE ON THE SUSTAINABILITY OF SEAFOOD CHOICES where the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program comes in. Its bi-annually updated pocket guide illustrates which fish are the “Best Choices,” which are “Good Alternatives,” and which to “Avoid.” So why are some fish a “Best Choice” while others are on the list of which to forgo? And which fish are which? Dive into the explanations below, and then visit seafoodwatch.org for more information.

BEST CHOICES: These fish are good for both the environment and your health. Sustainable fishery operations use only stock in which the fish are healthy and abundant, do not endanger fish or marine animal populations, reduce bycatch and are proven to not harm the environment or genetic diversity. For a fish-farming operation to be considered sustainable aquaculture, it must reduce or completely eradicate its discharge of waste and toxic chemicals, use only sustainable feed, use only eggs and larvae from captivity, and not cause any harm to wildlife. Arctic Char (farmed)

Halibut: California (U.S. hook & line)

Sardines: Pacific (Canada & U.S.)

Bass: Striped (U.S. hook & line, farmed)

Halibut: Pacific (U.S.)

Scallops (farmed)

& U.S. troll, pole)

Catfish (U.S.)

Prawn: Spot (AK & Canada)

Seabass: White (U.S. hook & line)

Tuna: Skipjack/Light canned (FAD free,

Tuna: Albacore/White canned (Canada

Clams, Mussels, Oysters

Rockfish: Black (U.S. hook & line)

Shrimp (AK)

U.S. troll, pole)

Cod: Pacific (U.S. hook & line, longline

Sablefish/Black Cod (AK & Canada wild)

Tilapia (Ecuador & U.S.)

Tuna: Yellowfin (U.S. troll, pole)

& trap)

Salmon (AK)

Trout: Rainbow (U.S. farmed)

ALTERNATIVES: Some fish on this list are caught or farmed in somewhat disconcerting ways. However, if no fish on the “Best Choices” list are available to you, any of these would be an acceptable option. Basa/Pangasius/Swai

Mahi Mahi (Ecuador & U.S.)

Seabass: White (U.S. gillnet)

longline)

Cod: Pacific (U.S. trawl)

Octopus (Spain & U.S.)

Shrimp (Canada wild & U.S.)

Tuna: Skipjack/Light canned (imported

Crab: Blue & King (U.S.)

Prawn: Spot (CA & WA)

Squid (U.S.)

troll, pole and U.S. longline)

Flounder, Sole (U.S.)

Sablefish/Black Cod (CA, OR & WA wild)

Swordfish (U.S.)

Tuna: Yellowfin (imported troll, pole

Halibut (U.S. Pacific gillnet and trawl)

Salmon (CA, OR & WA wild)

Tilapia (China & Taiwan)

and U.S. longline)

Lobster (Bahamas & U.S.)

Scallops (wild)

Tuna: Albacore/White canned (U.S.

AVOID: It is best to abstain from eating the following fish. Fishing techniques like dredging, bottom trawling, gillnetting, longlining (if not sunk deep enough) and some types of purse seining can be harmful because of bycatching (catching unintended types of fish) and, in the case of dredging and bottom trawling, damage to the seabed. Aquaculture methods such as open net pens or cages, ponds, raceways, shellfish culture, submersible net pens and tuna ranching are problematic because of the environmental impacts from waste, disease and the possibility of genetic weakness that can develop in small populations.

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Cod: Pacific (Japan & Russia)

Orange Roughy

Shrimp (imported farmed, Mexico wild)

Tuna: Bluefin

Crab: Canned (imported)

Rockfish/Pacific Snapper (AK bottom

Squid (imported)

Tuna: Skipjack/Light canned (imported

Crab: Red King (Russia)

trawl)

Swordfish (imported)

Lobster: Spiny (Belize, Brazil, Honduras

Salmon: Atlantic (farmed)

Tuna: Albacore/White canned (except

& Nicaragua)

Sardines: Atlantic (Medit. Sea)

Canada & U.S. troll, pole and U.S.

Tuna: Yellowfin (except troll, pole and

Mahi Mahi (imported)

Sharks

longline)

U.S. longline)

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

longline and purse seine)

By April Martin-Hansen | Illustrations by Amadeo Bachar

Living in a coastal region means that we have access to a wide variety of fresh seafood. But not all seafood is fished or farmed equally. That’s


cal fish resh-lo f t e g We , sell a week s y a d seven DA esh US r f a r lt only u ganic eef, or b e d a gr Choice boast n, and e k ic h C Rocky unique tion of c le e s a large ted marina , s e g sausa nd BQs, a B r o f s meat s. lty cut specia

Fresh sea items asornal riving Shopper’s o ffers up a w d a ily ide variety

of fresh, loc

al produce

– both commercia l – 150 types of im ported and domestic cheese, go urmet pasta s, salads, sauces, an d a great se lection of daily fresh bread from all the top, local bakeri es. We also feature the area’s b est wine se lection. And of cours e, we have all the usual every day staples . organic and

Good Times “Best Of ” Best Grocery Store • Best Butcher Shop Best Wine and Cheese selection in Santa Cruz

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S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

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IN DEPTH

By Joel Hersch Cowell Beach's reputation as one of California's top longboard-

Most of Santa Cruz County’s beaches, however, received excellent

ing spots has had a meddlesome shadow cast over its waters in

ratings. The only other local area to land on the Beach Bummers

recent years: for the past half decade, the cove has received dis-

list was Capitola, which came in at No. 9 in the state according

mally high bacteria ratings.

to healthebay.org. But, based on weekly test updates, Capitola's

Based on water tests conducted from April through October of 2013, a section of Cowell Beach was ranked at No. 1 on the Southern California-based nonprofit Heal the Bay's most recent "Beach

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two test points now have an A+ and B. As of press time, Cowell's test points were still rated with Fs. All other Santa Cruz County beaches boast A grades.

Bummers" list. It has been on the list for the past five years, com-

Staff at the City of Santa Cruz say the cause of the contamination

ing it at No. 2 in 2012 and 2013. The area that has been receiving

at Cowell Beach is unclear, which makes the problem very diffi-

failing grades over the years, which are based on bacteria levels

cult to pinpoint—there is “no clear-cut solution yet,” says Steve

that exceed state standards and could cause harm to water-go-

Wolfman, an engineer with the city's Public Works Department.

ers, is located just west of the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf, close

The city addressed what they believe are some of the key factors

to the beach and in front of two 66-inch outflow pipes extending

over the spring and summer and has ongoing plans that should

underground from Neary Lagoon.

help to prevent the bacteria from accumulating as severely.

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


The City of Santa Cruz searches for answers to water quality problems at Cowell Beach Wolfman says Neary Lagoon may be a source of the bacteria,

$450,000 grant to construct a system that drains the water and sends

which has led the city to work on isolating the body of water from

it to the Wastewater Treatment Facility during the summer. This will

Cowell Beach.

allow for ongoing cleaning of the pipe to prevent water from filling in,

“The lagoon has tons of fish, birds, potentially some people, and it drains a large urban area, all the way up from High Street,” Wolfman says. “And it's a very still lagoon that sits and festers with bacteria growth during the summer.” City staff determined that Neary Lagoon water was seeping

Wolfman says. This groundwater “evacuation system” is expected to be completed before next summer.

Most Santa Cruz County beaches boast A grades.

Including the grant, the city

through the outflow pipes into the sand at Cowell Beach. In April,

has a total of $1 million budgeted for improving water quality at

they installed an isolation gate to separate the lagoon from the

Cowell’s. However, Wolfman says the real issue is identifying the

popular beach and prevent the seepage.

main bacteria sources.

With gates installed, the city determined that the outflow pipes

This is complicated by variation in test results throughout the

were still partially filling with groundwater. The state has provided a

year (the summer months register much higher quantities of

Photo: multirotorcam.com

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I N D E P T H : Water Quality at Cowell Beach

bacteria than in the winter), as well as large differences in levels

ter test results, the west of the wharf location had an E-Coli rating

within very small areas.

of 556 colony-forming units, with 400 as the safe threshold. That compares to 85 at the Cowell Beach stairs and 75 at Main Beach.

“Something I'm groping with desperately is that [in past years] once October comes, our test results get much better, and they're better through the whole winter and into April,” Wolfman says. “Then, once we get back into the summer season, they start to drop off again, as they have this year.”

The next most contaminated testing points outside of Cowell’s are at Capitola Beach, east and west of the jetty, which were rated at 63 and 52. Natural Bridges beach's E-Coli rating came in at just 10. Santa Cruz County Water Quality Specialist Steve Peters says that the problem with Cowell’s, Capitola’s beach and the other beaches cited by Heal the Bay, is that they have very poor water movement during the months of April through October. Beaches with a longshore current, like Waddell Creek and Sunset Beach, do not have the build-up of organic material for these bacteria to grow in, he explains. City Councilmember David Terrazas, who has taken a center role in coordinating

Photo: Matt Snow

efforts to improve Cowell Beach, helped form a group

He suspects it could have to do with the winter swell helping to flush Cowell Beach, the population influx during the summer, rotting kelp, and/or anchovy die-offs that draw thousands of birds, which all defecate in tandem. The data also sometimes shows large variation from day to day and at other close-

comprising of the Surfrider

City Councilmember David Terrazas

Foundation's

helped form a group—comprised of

Coalition, and the Coastal

the Surfrider Foundation's Santa Cruz

Watershed Council that focuses on solutions. “It's going to be really criti-

and the Coastal Watershed Council—that

tant this is to the commu-

focuses on solutions.

cal that we show how impornity,” he says. The group outlined their

by sample points, Wolfman says. For example, sample points just

strategy for Cowell Beach during a September council meeting,

south at Main Beach, in front of the Boardwalk, and just north, in

listing plans such as forming a Cowell Beach working group that

front of the Dream Inn and Cowell’s stairs, received A grades from

will meet regularly, looking into the ways street sweeping and

Heal the Bay.

possible illegal discharges by recreational vehicles into storm

which conducts the ongoing tests and has partnered with the city

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Cruz

chapter, the Save the Waves Coalition,

According to Environmental Health Services of Santa Cruz County,

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Santa

chapter, the Save the Waves

drains could be contributing factors, and redirecting dry weather run-off through the waste water treatment plant.

to combat the problem, Cowell Beach is the only site deemed too

The group is also considering an ordinance that would require home-

contaminated for swimming. Based on the Wednesday, Sept. 3 wa-

owners to inspect their sewer laterals to ensure there is no leakage

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

Continued on Page 32 ▶


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I N D E P T H : Water Quality at Cowell Beach

◀ Continued from Page 30

“It's really a marathon and

prior to selling their property.

the Coastal Watershed Council, does have a somewhat high level

If passed, the ordinance would

of human contamination thought to be associated with illegal

not a sprint. It's going to

go into effect next year, says

homeless encampments. It is possible that some human bacteria

Terrazas.

could make its way over to Cowell Beach from the river mouth,

take time.”—City of Santa

Another new city and county

Cruz Spokesman Keith

initiative is Microbial Source

Sterling

lab technicians to see what

Tracking, or MST, which allows organisms the bacteria is com-

but there is no evidence to confirm this, Wolfman says. Based on the results showing birds as the main source, the city is currently looking into eliminating bird habitat locations under the wharf. “That's something we expect to address this winter,” Wolfman says.

ing from, human or otherwise. City spokesman Keith Sterling says that the City of Santa Cruz is “We're just starting down this route of doing the human DNA test-

committed to solving the contamination problem and making

ing,” Wolfman says.

Cowell’s a safe place for the community.

In April 2013, a Stanford University study of Cowell Beach's contamination reported high fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) levels originating primarily from birds, but also from humans. “The report from Stanford said a major contributor must be the birds—lots of birds,” Wolfman says. “But it also identified some human bacteria. Relatively, [it was] extremely low amounts.” The San Lorenzo River mouth, which undergoes regular testing by

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“We've worked on this for years and we're going to continue methodically going through each step to find out where this is coming from,” he says. “It's really a marathon and not a sprint. It's going to take time.” Learn more at brc.healthebay.org. Keep track of Santa Cruz County’s ongoing weekly water testing at: gis.co.santa-cruz.ca.us/PublicWaterQuality.


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SURF CITY COMES ALIVE

WHEN THE SUN GOES DOWN

Long exposure, flash, and artificial light are just some of the newer techniques used in nighttime photography. When most people are putting on their pajamas and getting ready for bed, this dedicated bunch packs up their gear and heads out into the darkness.

The Walon Lighthouse stands motionless under a clear, starry night. Photo: Neil Simmons

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To get long-exposure shots like this, photographers such as Steve "Birdo" Guisinger can spend hours in the cold trying to capture that perfect blend of light and motion. Photo: @xbirdo

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The lovely Capitola by the Sea sparkles in the moonlight. Photo: Neil Simmons

Old School Craftsmanship

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The archways at Natural Bridges State Beach are a photographer favorite, day and night. Photo: @xbirdo

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A view of the Milky Way as seen from Davenport. Photo: Matt Walker

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Spinning wool is a creative way to make your own little meteor shower. Photo: Lucas Porter

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Intro by Andy Hofman | Interview by Paul Topp

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| Photos by Nikki Brooks


Santa Cruz lenswoman Nikki Brooks takes us on a photographic journey through California and beyond. Nikki Brooks loves people and the funny and interesting things they do. Add that love to an irrepressible natural curiosity and an affinity for immersive experiences, and the result is a tireless devotion to documenting the lifestyles of her subjects as they venture through life. “Enthusiastic” doesn’t do Brooks justice.  She sees opportunities everywhere, and her appreciation of “the moment” translates to her photography.  It allows her to capture a perspective—an image frozen in time—that not everyone sees.  Even if others did see the moment unfold, they didn't notice it the way Brooks did.  And when they see it again, this time through Brooks' eyes, it takes on a new and deeper meaning.  This is her gift.

△ Darshan Gooch tucks his tall frame into a clean North Coast gem.

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BE H I N D T H E L E NS : Nikki Brooks

Where are you from? I am from Santa Cruz. I grew up on a creek in the Soquel Mountains. How did you become interested in photography? I was studying biology at UC San Diego and I

△ Savannah Shaughnessy going for broke in Mexico.

needed a creative outlet. I took a photography class and I loved it. Do you surf, also? Yes. Where do you like to surf? I surf mostly between the Point and Capitola. Did you start out taking surf photos or did the surf photography come later? I was surfing all the time, so it was natural to start taking surf photos. I had an

Shaughnessy returns a borrowed 9-foot gun to Skindog after her Puerto bomb. Anthony Tashnick assists in the delivery. ▽

old manual 35mm Minolta, so I would get lineup shots, but I really didn’t have the gear to get tight surf shots. My friend let me borrow his point-and-shoot water camera, so I would swim around in the Blacks lineup [in La Jolla] and take photos. It was so fun and I loved the anticipation of getting the film back and seeing what I captured from the water. What is your favorite spot to shoot? I don’t have a favorite spot, as long as it is in the water. It is less about the spot than it is about who I am with, what the waves are like, and the challenges and rewards. It could be at Sharks or up the coast, longboarding or shortboarding. Really, as soon as I am in the water, I can always get something that is unique and special to my eyes. There are a lot of photographers shooting surfing these days. How do you make your photography unique? Expressive documentation. I like the idea of capturing a moment in time, a significant event, with a flare. Sometimes that is more analytical, like a very big wave at Mavericks,

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BE H I N D T H E L E NS : Nikki Brooks

△ A competitor styles on the nose at the Joel Tudor Duck Tape Contest in Noosa, Australia. 50 | S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

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BEHIND THE LENS: Nikki Brooks

and it is ridden by a woman, and it is something that I have recorded and has a significant place in the history of surfing. Other times my photography is more about art and the feeling a photo evokes. It is my expression, or impression, of a moment the way I saw it, with an aesthetic value that draws you into the photo. △ Which photographers have influenced you in the past and do any photographers influence

Travis Reynolds and young

you now? Technically, I wanted to be skilled in the trade of photography. I learned all the correct meth-

Olin Borgeson chat about

ods of taking a photograph and using the equipment, working in the dark room, and developing film. I

design in the shaping bay.

looked up to the late Larry “Flame” Moore for guidance. He was the editor at Surfing Magazine and he gave me some invaluable tips. He came from the old school surf photography world, along with Santa

Anthony Tashnick moments

Cruz’s master lensman, Bob Barbour. I studied Barbour’s surf images—his perfect, front-lit and tack-

before annihilation during the

sharp photos of surfers really illustrated to me what makes a good surf photo, technically. However, I

2014 Mavericks Invitational.

was raised by an artist, my dad, Denny Dederick, and his constant flow of thoughts and views on the

world around me instilled a value and sense of art, which I am still learning. He taught me techniques in painting, but it was his casual remarks about daily scenes in life that has given me a unique perspective on the world. He taught me how to read waves as a surfer, and also how, as an artist, to capture them on film. For example, he is always stoked to see a surf photo where you can see the entire wave, not just a tight, cropped shot of the surfer, but what the wave is doing in front of the surfer. It leaves it up to the viewer’s imagination as to how the surfer will continue the ride. He taught me surfing and he taught me art, and whether it was intentional or innate, his words and actions made an impression on me. I am also inspired by water shots of Dave "Nelly" Nelson, bar none. And I also find the works of Edward Sherriff Curtis and Francesca Woodman intriguing.

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BE H I N D T H E L E NS : Nikki Brooks

There are very few female surf photographers. Do you think being a woman has affected your career as a photographer? That is an interesting question and something I have grappled with at times. I enjoy challenges, and being a water surf photographer is a specialized skill and takes stamina in the ocean and a passion to do it in the first place. I have had to work my way up and prove myself. It

△ The late Zeuf Hesson, “The Queen of Pleasure Point,” honored at her paddle-out.

is a competitive field whether you are male or female, and I think my perseverance has paid off. I have always felt that this is something I pursue because I enjoy it, and no matter the achievement—great or small—I am gratified. Once, I was at an award ceremony where I was a finalist for the Larry Flame “Follow the Light Foundation,” and Bob Hurley came up to me and saw my nametag and congratulated me on account of my husband being nominated for the award. But I corrected him, as I held my 7-monthold baby, and told him it was I who was being nominated. He quickly realized his mistake. This example is the exception, not the norm, as I have been supported by many in the surf community, and I have had amazing opportunities. It really is a lifestyle. I am always in tune with what the ocean is doing and the conditions. I have the good fortune of living in a beautiful place with opportunities to shoot year round, friends to shoot with, a supportive family, and an endless stream of photo projects running through my mind. To have all these things lined up, I have to work at it, and it is challenging for any female or male to pursue. What would you say to any girls out there who would like to get into surf photography, but don't know where to start? Go for it! First of all, I think it helps if you are a surfer so that you know what is going on. Go to the beach and watch surfers, be friends with surfers, watch videos and look at magazines, take a photography class, art class, Photoshop class, and talk to the old timers. Our community is filled with surfing heritage, and there are so many surfers who have been around for decades and who joyfully share surfing [stories] in Santa Cruz, and you can learn a lot from them. Not about photography necessarily, but about surfing in general and what makes it special. Their energy resonates. Just like the groms! They are so fun to take photos of and are very expressive and candid. On another note, photography gear is super expensive, and for me it took a long time to attain. So whatever gear you have, work with it and improve your skills. Digital makes the post process less expensive than film, so you can look at your images and learn what you like and what doesn’t work. Take photos of lots of things, such as of your friends, animals, landscapes, street photography, and weddings. All these things can be applied to surf photography. The more you get comfortable with your equipment and different lighting conditions, the better your photos will become. Practice and don’t give up. You've been shooting big-wave contests recently. How did you get into that? I have been shooting Mavericks since 2006, and I have been especially dedicated to documenting the few women that surf Mavericks—Savannah Shaughnessy, Jamilah Star, and Sarah Gerhardt. Over the years I have gotten in tune with the big wave locales and the surfers. I have been fortunate enough to have photographed significant swells at big wave spots such as Mavericks, Puerto Escondido, Waimea and Pipeline, Nelscott Reef [Oregon], Pico Alto [Peru]

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BE H I N D T H E L E NS : Nikki Brooks

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BEHIND THE LENS: Nikki Brooks ◁ and Jaws. Big waves and the surfers who pursue them are so rare and select, that it is only natural

Noi Kaulukukui, laid back, some-

for me to document the contests, too, and the progression of the sport. It helps that I live relatively

where on the Central Coast.

close to one of the world’s renowned big-wave spots, Mavericks, and I am friends with this group of extreme athletes, many of whom are from Santa Cruz and whom I grew up with. Let's say there is a fresh swell hitting Santa Cruz. What would a day in the life of Nikki Brooks look like? Look out the window at 5 a.m. for stars in the sky. If it’s clear, I make some coffee, pack

◁ Ryan Augenstein rips apart a green wall on the Eastside.

the bags and Pelican cases, text whoever I talked with the night before about the rendezvous, arrive before sunrise, check it, suit and gear up, swim out and shoot for a couple of hours, come in, have

Anna Braun and Lexi Wilson

some brekkie, go home, upload photos, go for a quick surf, pick up my girls from school, drop off the

living the lifestyle.

girls at ballet/swim team, and then go shoot an evening sesh wherever the waves/wind/tide/light is

best. Then I go home, thank my family for letting me have a photo/surf filled day, eat dinner and have a big glass of orange juice, and go to bed feeling so fulfilled. Are you active in social media or on the web? How has it changed the job of a surf photographer? Instagram is cool for capturing moments of life, and Facebook is conducive to showcasing current bodies of published work. I do struggle with the privacy issue a bit, and feel that personal identity is something we need to protect and respect. The same goes for my photographs—I want to showcase only good photos, but I do not want them to lose value by posting them on Facebook. If my photos are posted on the web, they lose their value and the possibility of being published. It is a fine line to draw and hip-hop across. I post things if I am feeling the vibe to do so. Are you currently working on any projects? I have been working on a portrait series on big-wave surfers. I recently began filming for a documentary on Savannah Shaughnessy. Filming is a new process for me and I really enjoy it. Savannah prone paddled the Molokai 2 Oahu Padleboard Championship race this summer and I was on her support boat and in the water filming the experience. Andy Hofman and I want to make a documentary about Savannah and her big-wave surfing and paddling exploits. Where can our readers see more of your work? My new website will be up soon: Nikkibrooksphotography.com. Instagram: @nikkitola. On a final note, any shout outs you’d like to give? My husband Narayan, for always being supportive of all my ideas and dreams.

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S H AMA N ISM

Ex p lo re . L ea rn. Di sco v e r.

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This summer I took a trip to Kauai with my family. We have always enjoyed Kauai for its laid-back vibe and its beautiful landscapes. The warm water doesn't hurt, either. The Garden Island has so much to offer, from hikes along the Na Pali coastline and breathtaking views of Waimea Canyon to crystalclear warm water. This time I stayed closer to the North Shore, near Hanalei Bay, which tends to have a more tropical and wet climate with daily showers as opposed to the dryer South Shore. The photos in this feature were mainly taken from the North Shore area and showcase spots like Tunnels Beach and Hanalei Bay. One of my favorite things about Kauai is the plants and animals you see there. Green sea turtles are a common sight at the beaches, where they are warming themselves or swimming over the reefs. Hawaiian monk seals and nenes, both of which have suffered from low populations, can also be seen around the island. And, of course, there are the ever-abundant chickens that roam the island. If you haven't already had a chance to make your way over to this beautiful, sleepy island, I would highly recommend checking it out. Until then, I invite you to explore its beauty through the following images.

- Kenan Chan

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All photos: @kenanchan


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SKATEBOARDING hen NHS, Inc. / Santa Cruz Skateboards celebrated its 40-year anniversary in 2013, the legendary skateboard company took stock of its rich history and hatched a plan to share that

AN

ORIGIN

STORY

N H S , I N C . / SANTA CRUZ S KATEBOARDS S H E D S L I GH T O N THE EARLY DAYS OF THE S K AT E BOA RD I N G INDUSTRY W ITH A NEW O NEO F - A - K I N D M U SEUM By Elizabeth Limbach | Photos: T. Fox

story with others. The result is the NHS Skate Museum, a unique shrine to the beginnings of the skateboarding industry, which NHS and its affiliate brands were instrumental in shaping. By plucking gem after gem from the NHS archives and other sources, the company has created a colorful and informative celebration of skate culture’s formative years in the 1970s and ’80s. NHS co-founders Richard Novak, Doug Haut and Jay Shuirman feature prominently in the museum’s narrative, which is told with original product

designs,

artwork,

Pultruded fiberglass deck, Sure Grip trucks, Roller Sport loose ball bearing wheels—those were the

trophies, team uniforms, and

components in the first 500 Santa Cruz Skateboards. In 1973, a friend of NHS’ named Jimmy Hoffman,

other relics. Schedule a viewing soon, in the meantime, take note of these five arti-

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T H E FI RST SAN TA C RU Z S K AT EBOARD who was living in Hawaii, was asked if he could locate a supplier of skateboards on the mainland. One thing led to another and this product became the first NHS, Inc. skateboard item ever sold. When a

facts and their significant role

re-order came in for 500 more, Santa Cruz Skateboards was in business and on its way to decades of

in skateboarding history.

pioneering in the skateboard industry.

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L OC AL C OM PANY S TO RY: NHS / Santa Cruz Skateboards

◀ Continued from Page 60

O R I G I NA L ROA D RI D ER W H EEL S This “wheel wall” is comprised of original Road Rider #6 wheels from 1976. Before these soft and smooth-riding urethane wheels arrived on the scene, skateboard wheels were based on clay rollerskate wheels and had 23 loose parts per wheel, making for a loud, uneven, and sometimes-unsafe ride. This all changed when Rhode Island resident Tony Roderick moved to California and came to NHS in 1975 with the idea for sealed-precision bearing wheels—a system that had four parts per wheel with rubber seals over the bearings. NHS sold more than 6 million Road Rider Wheels in the first year, revolutionizing the sport by allowing for a smoother, quieter, safer roll, and opening the door to more radical riding. In Roderick’s words, “The innate desire in every human being is to love a smooth ride.”

THRAS H E R SKAT E B OA R D M AGAZ I N E Vestiges of punk culture populate the museum’s exhibit about the 1980s, when skateboarding was driven underground. “Keep Out” signs, cigarette butts, punk rock concert fliers and graffiti evoke the outcast status skaters at the time embraced. Nearby this display are early copies of Thrasher Skateboard Magazine, which was founded in 1981 by NHS and Ermico (the makers of Independent Trucks). Known as “the Skater’s Bible,” the magazine is still considered the voice of skateboard culture today.

THE SA NTA CR U Z D OT LO G O

I N D EP EN D EN T T RU C KS ART I FACTS

There is perhaps no image associated with Santa Cruz that is

In the mid-1970s, skateboard makers embarked on a quest for

more recognizable or more ubiquitous than this logo. “The Santa

better trucks, which are maneuvering mechanisms on a skate-

Cruz Dot,” as it is known, was created for NHS in the mid-1970s

board akin to the axel on a car. NHS tinkered with a suspension

by the company’s then-art director, graphic designer Jim Phillips.

design to be used in skateboard racing, while Ermico set about

These early sketches show the creative process as NHS co-found-

rethinking the existing truck altogether. They joined forces and,

er Jay Shuirman helped Phillips develop the now-iconic red circle

in 1978, NHS launched the brand Independent Trucks, “the first

with yellow, slanted text. Much more of Phillips’ work is featured

production skateboard truck that could be easily adjusted, with-

at the museum, such as original skate deck illustrations, as well

stand a serious beating, and turn better than anything else avail-

as photos of Phillips and his creative team.

able,” according to the museum display. Along with Road Rider Wheels, these trucks signaled the dawn of modern skateboards as we know them today.

HOW & WHEN TO VISIT: The museum is open for private tours by appointment only. Two tours per day are given Tuesday – Friday during the following possible slots: 9–10 a.m., 10:30–11:30 a.m., 1–2 p.m., and 2:30–3:30 p.m. Drop-in visitors will not be admitted. To schedule a tour, email Crystal Martinez at NHSSkateMuseum@gmail. com at least two weeks prior to the requested reservation date with the date included in the email’s subject line. Visit Facebook.com/NHSSkateMuseum/info for more info. Instagram/Twitter: #NHSSkateMuseum

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B ay B r e a k e r Mike Dilloughery’s 52-mile paddle from home to the horizon and back By Yvonne Rew-Falk

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| Photos: T. Fox


ike Dilloughery started the day of Sunday, July 20 with a daunting objective. He was going to paddle across the Monterey Bay, from Cowell Beach in Santa Cruz to Lovers Point in Monterey, and back. The trip was a total of 52 miles and took 12 and a half hours of paddling. His weapon of choice was a Joe Bark 17’9″ Ghostryder Waterman Club model paddleboard and a Buell 2-mil short-sleeve wetsuit to keep him warm on the voyage. There was no escort boat to cheer him on or give assistance—just a marine radio, cell phone, GPS, iPod shuffle, food and water, and his determination, which fueled him mile after grueling mile. Santa Cruz Waves sat down with the 49-year-old, who is a quality engineer in the aeronautics industry by day, soon after the feat was completed to get the story of this spur-of-themoment adventure. What inspired you to paddle to Monterey and back? I’ve paddled it one way quite a few times. The first time I paddled to Monterey, I set the goal that someday I’d paddle there and back. I knew it’d always be a challenge because the wind comes up from the northwest or west. That’s it—[it was] just a personal goal. I didn’t want to be the first guy to do it, [and I] don’t know of anyone else who’s done it, but regardless … I still wanted to do it myself. How long have you been paddling? I’ve been paddling pretty regularly for about 10 years now. I got into it because I love surfing—that’s my primary sport. I’m always going to surf. But when there are no waves, I really had nothing else to do. I got into mountain biking a bit, fell … got hurt, and then I couldn’t surf. I tried the gym, [but that] wasn’t really for me. I found padding and it was perfect. It keeps me in shape and allows me to compete with the young kids in the [surf] line-up. Why did you choose to travel from Cowell Beach to Monterey, rather than the other way around? Living on the Westside, I have a lot of connection with Cowell Beach. I was born across the street at the Sisters Hospital. I surfed my first wave there. My earliest childhood memories are with my mom bobbing in the water at Cowell’s. Also my brother’s ashes and my sister’s are scattered off that point, as well as the historical value with the Santa Cruz Surf Club and all that. For all those reasons, it was really important for me to start and finish at Cowell’s. What about the journey itself—how did it go? Walk us through the experience. I knew I was in for a pretty long paddle so I took off in the morning when it was really glassy. It was buttery, as glassy as the bay can ever be. The visibility was awesome—you could see Lovers Point at Monterey and Pacific Grove. I thought it was an easy route. I took my time going down, knowing that the northwest wind could pick up in the afternoon and coming home was going to

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S P OR T S AC H I E V EMENT: Mike Dilloughery

be a battle. I watched the whales. I’ve never seen a whale show like that, it was insane, and I’ve been out on the bay quite a bit. There were so many, it got to the point where they were exploding [out of the water all] around me, left and right. When I got to Monterey, it took me a while to find Lovers Point—I kind of forgot where it was. When I got there I refueled. I got my water from the little snack stand there, had the powders with me and mixed my drinks for the trip back. I talked to my wife and told her, ‘The wind has started to come up, I don’t know if this is going to work.’ I decided to paddle out to the Point of Monterey again. I know by looking at the weather and how the wind has been up the coast that it has been pretty glassy outside the bay. I was hoping conditions would be different out there and, sure enough, it actually was glassier. I headed a little bit out of my original line that I took down. And then about five miles out I hit a little bit of wind and thought, ‘This isn’t bad.’ And then it glassed off again until about mile 10, when it just started blowing. I thought, ‘Oh no, [I’m] 10 miles out, I’m not turning back.’ I knew I was going to be in for a battle the rest of the way. It really got bad outside of Moss Landing where I think I paddled for around two and a half hours and my GPS showed no movement. I was ready to quit quite a few times. It could have been really easy just to go downwind right back into Moss Landing and call it [quits]. I finally saw a little movement on my GPS. Then I could see this little white dot out in the distance. I had a feeling it was the Dream Inn, but I thought, ‘There’s no way that could be the Dream Inn, it must be a boat.’ I saw that thing from half way out, so I just kept looking at that white dot and that was my course. Finally I was positive it was the Dream Inn and it got my blood pumping. That was a huge, huge bonus to see that thing getting bigger and bigger. But then my music stopped because the battery died. When I lost my music, I lost a lot of inspiration. What were some songs on your playlist? McKenzie, my daughter, made an awesome playlist for me on her iPod Shuffle. The playlist consisted of everything from Metallica and ACDC to Bob Marley and Stick Figure. It was a great mix of old and new. I was singing like a front man out there. There are not many places on this planet where I can get away with singing out loud. This was my first experience paddling with tunes and it kept me pumped, until the battery died. I sure could have used that music on the return trip. It's no mystery the Monterey Bay is teeming with wildlife, including major predators like great white sharks and orcas. Did you have any run-ins or concerns? No, I have yet to see a great white shark in the ocean. Spending my entire life in Santa Cruz and playing in the ocean since I was a baby, I feel like I deserve to see one, dammit! I would settle for seeing an orca but that hasn’t oc-

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S P OR T S AC H I E V EMENT: Mike Dilloughery

curred, either. I feel cheated. No shark stories, knock on wood. Nor-

like a runway strip out of kelp with a nice little ribbon to cross. It

mally, I don’t think about sharks but with all the activity going on in

was awesome. So when I touched down at Cowell’s, it was a great

the bay this summer, you have to assume there are more than a few

feeling. It really was. It was my No. 1 challenge that I’ve had, and I

great whites out there. It did get a little creepy from time to time.

completed it. I’m pretty happy.

Floating over one of the deepest canyons in the world, I couldn’t help but wonder what was swimming underneath me. I convinced myself if I did get attacked I have roughly a two out of three chance of not getting bitten. I’m 5 foot 10 and my paddleboard is 17 foot 9, so I was only occupying one-third of the paddleboard.

|

Did having a community of fellow paddle boarders help you? Oh, for sure. The support of the club I’m in, The Ghostryder Waterman Club, aka GRWC, was key. They looked out for me on land and were ready to go if I had any issue. They’re a great bunch of guys. We have an annual paddle race every May, The Santa Cruz

I was more worried about getting crushed by a whale. The

Downwind Ryder Cup, from Davenport Landing to Santa Cruz.

amount of whale activity out there was crazy. They were breach-

We get people from all over the world. It’s really becoming one of

ing, slapping tales and basically flying out of the water. It was all

the world ’s best downwind races. All the money made from that

a little too close to me. I thought they were going to land on me.

event goes right to the Santa Cruz Junior Lifeguards. It’s a great

How did the last leg go? How did it feel to finally reach

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club. [Editor’s Note: Learn more at facebook.com/ghostryders.]

Cowell’s? The greatest sight, actually, was when I saw my

Do you think you’ll do it again? If you asked me the day after

buddies Zach Wormhoudt and Matt Hamil in Zach’s boat honking

the paddle I would have said no, but now I would say there is a

and coming at me. Right when they showed up they were cracking

slim chance. If I did it again, I would need to up the ante and do it

jokes and they lifted my spirits pretty good. They kept me going

on a 12-foot stock prone paddleboard, with no rudder. It might be

and cheered me on. They escorted me all the way to the finger

a good call to do it at night to avoid the wind on the return leg of

buoys at Cowell’s and laid on the horn. My kids were on the beach

the trip. There are a few things I could have done to make it more

to greet me with this unreal finish line that they made me. It was

enjoyable and easier.

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HEALTH & FITNESS

By Tyler Frasca

Santa Cruz County is as ripe for biking as it is for surfing. See for yourself by hitting these five trails.

Santa Cruz County residents are a lucky bunch. We have famous surf spots, majestic redwood forests, and miles of gorgeous beaches. What a lot of people don’t know, however, is that Santa Cruz also offers some of the best bike riding in California. Whether you want to take your cruiser out for a relaxing sunset ride or push your skills and fitness to their limits, you can find what you are looking for within Santa Cruz County. We’ve outlined five great places to ride, but the options are far more numerous. As with most things that are worth doing, the best way to experience riding in Santa Cruz is to grab a bike and hit the trails, pump track, or bike path. Enjoy the ride. W ILD ER R A N CH STATE PA R K Location: Two miles north of Western Dr. on Highway 1 Best for: Mountain biking Because of its iconic views of the northern Santa Cruz coast, Wilder Ranch is arguably the most scenic mountain biking venue in the area. For an easier ride, stay on the coastal side of Highway 1 and explore the fire roads that meander along the cliffs. If you’re looking for more climbing and a slightly more challenging singletrack, head to the inland side of the park and ride Enchanted Loop, Old Cabin, and Wild Boar. There are some technical sections in Wilder Ranch, but overall it serves as a great introduction to mountain biking. PO GO N I P ’S EM M A M cCR A RY T R A I L Location: Golf Club Drive and Highway 9 Best for: Mountain biking The Emma McCrary multi-use trail starts at the Golf Club Drive trailhead and climbs almost two miles into the Pogonip forest. This trail was built to accommodate riders of varying skill levels, and the grade is gradual from start to finish. Once you make it to the top, you can continue climbing up U-Con trail, which proContinued on Page 72 ▶

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Tepui Adventure Trailers are

tough, offroad camping trailers ready to rent and fully equipped for your next adventure. - Tepui XL Ruggedized Tent large enough for four adults. - Full cooking galley including wash basin, stove top and grill. - Built in locking storage compartment - Cooler. - 2� receiver hitch for bike racks or other accessories.

V O L TepuiTents.com 1 .3 - O C T / N OV 20 14 1-800-301-9874 Sales@Tepuitents.com 2703 41st Ave, Unit E, Soquel, CA 95073

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O U T D OOR S: Bike Trails

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vides access to the UC Santa Cruz campus and miles of fire roads through the redwoods. The Chinquapin fire road continues across the meadows behind UCSC and ultimately crosses Empire Grade into Wilder Ranch State Park. More advanced riders may want to start on the Emma McCrary trail and ride all the way to the coast and back through Wilder Ranch. While there are trails in the upper Pogonip area, bikes are legally allowed only on the fire roads. S O QUE L D E MO NST R AT I O N F O R E ST Location: Highland Way off of Soquel San Jose Road Best for: Mountain biking Soquel Demonstration Forest, or simply “Demo,” is home to the largest network of legal mountain biking trails in Santa Cruz County. A typical ride in Demo involves lots of climbing on steep fire roads and descents that test riders’ skills. Be sure to bring plenty of food and water, as there are no places to refill a bottle once you’re in the forest. Advanced riders will want to ride Braille and Sawpit. Braille is a steep descent with many optional jumps and tight corners. Sawpit is less steep, but includes some technical rocky sections and high-speed corners to keep you on your toes. CH A N T I CL EER PA R K PU M P T R AC K Location: On Chanticleer Avenue in the Live Oak neighborhood Best for: Dirt jump bikes One of the best ways to improve your cycling fitness and skills is by riding a pump track. These purpose-built courses include berms, jumps and rollers, and are designed to be ridden without pedaling. The Chanticleer Pump Track has some very tight turns and challenging lines to hone riders’ abilities. As you become more comfortable navigating the pump track, you’ll notice those skills cropping up in your trail riding. While it’s certainly possible to ride any pump track on a trail bike, a smaller “dirt jump bike” is recommended. WEST SI D E B I KE PAT H Location: Natural Bridges Drive to Peasley Gulch in Santa Cruz Best for: Fitness and recreational bicycling For true beginners, this paved bike path on the Westside of town is a perfect place to get some exercise and fresh air. The path is relatively short at only two miles in length, and runs along coastal fields and rolling grasslands. It extends north from the ever-popular West Cliff Drive bike and pedestrian route. The path ends where the Wilder Ranch fire roads begin, so bring a mountain bike if you’re feeling adventurous.

Where to Gear Up: Family Cycling Center 914 41st Ave., Santa Cruz (831) 475-3883 familycycling.com

Bicycle Trip 1001 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz (831) 427-2580 bicycletrip.com

Spokesman Bicycles 231 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz (831) 429-6062 spokesmanbicycles.com

Vintage Electric Bikes 1685 Russell Ave., Santa Clara (408) 969-0836 vintageelectricbikes.com

Santa Cruz Bicycles 2841 Mission St., Santa Cruz (831) 459-7560 santacruzbicycles.com

Epicenter Cycling 1730 Mission St, Santa Cruz (831) 423-9000 8035 Soquel Drive, Aptos (831) 662-8100 epicentercycling.com

Another Bike Shop 2361 Mission St., Santa Cruz (831) 427-2232 anotherbikeshop.com

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1017 Pacific Ave. Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (831) 423-2700 oldschool-shoes.com

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HOME DESIGN

IN APTO S Sisters define relaxing Santa Cruz Style.

For the Relaxed Santa Cruz Lifestyle Twin sister duo Naomi and Monica partnered together to run Warmth Company. Coming from two very different lives, they

L IGHTING

each bring their own unique style to the company. Naomi’s back-

A wide varirty with which to express your

ground includes furniture sales, accessories buyer for Ethan Al-

unique style.

len, tile specialist, residential projects and commercial work. Naomi realized that to follow her passions, she needed to get out of the corporate world and start something new. Monica was a A RT

stay-at-home mother who helped her husband build a success-

Everything from dogs to waves.

ful local automotive business. With two grown sons, she decided that she wanted to do something more creative for the rest of her

life. After exploring several different avenues such as landscaping and sewing, Monica jumped at the opportunity to buy Warmth Company with Naomi. For the last eight years the sisters have been working hard to create a unique, special place on the Central Coast. The Warmth Company idea of living beautifully has become a staple in Santa Cruz County. They offer a wide variety of distinctive home furnishings, bedding, accessories and lifestyle products. At Warmth Company you can expect to wander for awhile. Along the way you might discover a new favorite book, candle or cashmere scarf; browse sumptuous bedding, elegant tableware or fun gifts with a unique story to tell. Naomi and Monica strive to offer products made with integrity that will add character and soul to your home. Feel at ease as you are taken care of by our kind and capable staff. Our desire is to help you create your own story of warmth in your home. P.S. We love to wrap your chosen gift, too!

FU R N IT U R E Wide variety of Sofas, Recliners, Coffee Tables, Rugs, Bedding, Side tables, etc.

www.warmthcompany.com

Visit us on Facebook & Instagram

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presents

The latest styles from local boutiques Crew: Photographer: Nick Chao / Stylist, Creative Director: Christa Martin / Model: Stephanie Armstrong / Makeup: Jillian Wilkey for Salon on the Square / Hair: Tara Murphy for Salon on the Square. Clothing: Shoes, Maguba Clogs, Navy, $148, Stripe / Jeans, Mother, Rascal, Dark Wash, $205, Pacific Trading Company / Top, Elk, Chambray, $94, Stripe / Jacket, Eileen Fisher, $498, Pacific Trading Company / Scarf, Mara Snipes, $110, Stripe / Bag, Corral Made Tote, $298, Stripe / Hat, Olive & Pique, Panama, $40, Stripe / Earrings, Sharelli, $133, Artisans Gallery / Ring, Tiger Lilly, $50, Artisans Gallery.

About the shoot: Santa Cruz Waves teamed up with ThePennyRose.com (a Santa Cruz fashion blog) to create this editorial fashion spread. Photographer Nick Chao captured this image during a photo shoot at Pleasure Point. Christa Martin styled and produced the project.

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FASH I ON : Fall Trends

Fall Fashion Up Close How to take on Santa Cruz’s fall fashion trends By Christa Martin, thepennyrose.com As fall fashion breezes into town, cut-offs and tanks take a back

As for finishing touches, a hat is required for the season. Make it

seat to warmer looks. This season calls for smart layering,

playful and polished by choosing one with a floppy brim and a

ocean-inspired hues, chunky outerwear, and individualized ac-

sleek ribbon. The camel color seen here ties the look together.

cent pieces. Seen here, Pleasure Point resident Stephanie Armstrong models the latest looks that speak to how Santa Cruz women can embody the fall trends and make them their own. First up—jeans, of course, because every local woman wears them. But how do you mix it up and have a fashion-forward point of view? Go for a dark wash like these Mother jeans from Pacific Trading Company. This straight-leg version complements all body types. But don’t drag them around. Lift the hems by adding a cuff. A small rolled hem is playful and charming. A singular big cuff is dramatic and bold.

popularity. Make it your own by finding original pieces at Artisans Gallery like these matte gold hoops and oversized ring. Finish your fall look with a bag that’s practical, memorable and worth the investment. This striking leather creation by Corral Made, a local line, offers inside and outside pockets as well as comfortable straps and a buckle that will keep your goods tucked safely inside. It’s roomy enough to house your scarf when the sun comes out to play (like it always does in Santa Cruz), and can also comfortably fit a water bottle, novel and

monochromatic look can be tricky, but Stephanie nails it by us-

more essentials for a spontaneous jaunt to the beach.

Stripe (in a contrasting denim shade) to make the outfit sing. Stephanie digs in her heels with a pair of striking navy Maguba clogs (a must-have shoe for the season), because any local style setter knows she needs to kick off her shoes in a flash if the ocean beckons. Next up: insert texture and patterns. This indigo linen scarf is eye-catching and cozy at the same time and can be wrapped in myriad creative ways around the shoulders and neck. Add a cocoon-shaped coat in a classic fall shade of brown to honor the season and stay warm at the same time.

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strong for a few seasons and is continuing to ride the wave of

Then, build your wardrobe from the jeans up. Pulling off the ing blue as a grounding color. Add a chambray boxy top from

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Don’t forget your jewelry. The minimalism look has been going

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


Artwork • Ceramics • Jewelry Woodworking • Kids • Cards & More

1368 Pacific Avenue, Downtown Santa Cruz artisanssantacruz.com 831.423.8183

1330 Pacific Avenue | Downtown Santa cruz 423-4100 | www.dellwilliams.com V O L 1 .3 - O C T / N OV 20 14 | 7 9 Open Monday through Saturday 10am - 5:30 pm


REINVENTION AND THE SEARCH FOR MEANING AT THE INTERSECTION OF DESIGN, TECHNOLOGY AND ART Life doesn’t always proceed the way we planned it. Many of us come to some kind of road block or By Neal Kearney

speed bump that forces us to hit the brakes, change lanes, or turn around back the way we came. But what matters isn’t the loss of time or the frustration endured in the face of such an obstacle. What matters is how we choose to keep moving forward. Enter designer/artist Darrin Caddes, a former board sports and motorcycle junkie who awoke facedown in the Mexican desert on March 6, 2001 with a broken back. He had been motorcycling from Southern California to Los Cabos with friends, and, around 600 miles from the border, he went into a corner at 60 miles an hour, lost control, and crashed on a long dirt road. The accident resulted in the loss of movement from his chest down, dramatically altering his life in a matter of seconds. While some would understandably struggle with how to continue on, Caddes managed to kickstart his new life. He adapted to life in a wheelchair and learned to cope with his physical and mental duress by pushing through, shifting his spiritual motor back into the high gear that helped him achieve success prior to his injury. He worked in Italy designing cars for Fiat from 1991 to '94, and for BMW designing cars and motorcycles from ’94 to 2001. He designed the first BMW GS Adventure, which was a bike set up for long-distance travel for both on- and off-road excursions. On his design, one could literally circumnavigate the globe. (Actor Ewan McGregor and his buddy Charley Boorman did just that, then wrote a book and produced a mini series about their travels, both called the “Long Way Round.”) After leaving BMW, Caddes took a job at Indian Motorcycle as director of design from 2001

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AR T I ST P R OF I L E: Darrin Caddes

"I told myself, 'I’m going to

◀ Continued from Page 80

to 2004, where he learned how to get the job

The sketches range from simple cartoons to intricate motorcy-

done with his new limitations.

cle designs, illustrations of waves to skateboarding scenes, and

When offered a job as vice president of cor-

paintings to tattoo-inspired designs.

draw something

porate design at Santa Cruz-based tech com-

The posts began to attract a following. Without promotion, he

pany Plantronics in 2004, Caddes found a

garnered about 350 Instagram followers.

every day in

position that let him work on something else

2013.' I didn’t

a wheelchair can stifle one’s ability to freely

care if it was a

and he found that headsets helped solve this

smiley face, I just needed to do something."

he was passionate about: headsets. Being in move about an office space fielding calls, problem. Since joining Plantronics, Caddes

He has just two simple rules for himself: he must draw and post the image on the same day, and he must post a drawing every day. “I’m so afraid that if I miss a day, the whole thing will be broken,”

trial designers.

he says. He hasn’t missed a day since he started the Daily Doodles

His noteworthy work at Plantronics led the

on Dec. 28, 2012, sometimes posting more than one per day.

group Santa Cruz NEXT to honor Caddes as

“So I constantly remind myself, ‘I’m doing it every day, I don’t

one of their four “Nextie” recipients in 2013.

care how bad it is, or how bad I feel. If I’m sick, in pain, or travel-

This award is bestowed yearly upon individuals promoting com-

ing, it’s going to be done,’” he adds. “They don’t all have to be

munity action, spearheading innovation, and helping to reduce

masterpieces. It’s more about the discipline of drawing every day.

inequalities along the Central Coast.

Overall, it’s been very therapeutic for me. It keeps me in touch with who I am.”

volvement in the creative side of the design work. Eventually, he

Fueled by successes at work and his artistic endeavor, Caddes has

found himself itching for an artistic outlet, and was inspired to fill

nurtured a hard-to-miss joie de vivre.

this creative void with another long-lost passion of his—drawing.

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feed—every day, and that’s been my thing,” says Caddes.

has managed a world-class team of indus-

While Caddes enjoys his job, his role as an overseer means less in-

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“Now I have this little audience who I have to feed—that I want to

“A lot of people ask me, ‘How do you do it despite all of your limi-

“One day, I told myself, ‘You know, I’m going to draw something

tations?'” he says. “I find myself saying, ‘Honestly, I don’t find my

every day in 2013,’” he recalls. “I didn’t care if it was a smiley face,

accident or me being in a chair that interesting—because there

I just needed to do something.” He stuck to the challenge, posting

are so many other things in my life that are so much more inter-

his “Daily Doodles” to his Instagram account (@unclewillard).

esting and meaningful.’”

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LOCAL HISTORY

Behind the Blowhole

Waves spout through the old wave motor shaft on West Cliff Drive. Photo: © Mobile Ranger 2012

By Julia Gaudinski, mobileranger.com

West Cliff Drive & the Wave Motor Along West Cliff Drive, just east of Natural Bridges State Beach, is a strange cement cork on the edge of the sea cliff. Locals know it as the blowhole. If the waves and tide are just right, you’ll see and hear water being forced up and out of its three holes with a huge

The local sea cliffs are made of the fairly erosion-resistant Santa

"thwump!" The cement cap covers a shaft that is the last remain-

Cruz mudstone and the small peninsula on which the wave mo-

ing evidence of a wave motor built in 1898 by brothers William

tor stood has not eroded much since the 1890s. Both wave mo-

and John E. Armstrong.

tor shafts were intact until at least 1979. In 2004, the ocean-ward

Wave motors came into vogue between 1890 and 1900, when many wave and tidal energy projects were undertaken in California, including several near the Cliff House in San Francisco and

cement plug in 2005 for safety reasons. The idea of using wave and tide energy was quite visionary for the

ity and failed, this one, which was designed only to pump water,

late 1800s, and the Armstrong brothers' wave motor was a great

was one of the few successes.

source of pride for Santa Cruz for decades. Unfortunately, the tech-

storage tank on a high platform. The water was later used to fill a smaller tank on a horse-drawn carriage, and was then sprinkled along what was then just Cliff Drive to keep the dust down for the tourists. The wave motor was commissioned by the City of Santa Cruz in 1897 after the Armstrong brothers created a successful prototype at Black Point, about five miles east of here. The venture was a great success: The dirt streets of Cliff Drive were dust free and sparkled with salt from the ocean water for about

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of the bore from the water. The land-ward shaft was filled with a

one on the Capitola Wharf. While most tried to generate electric-

Its purpose was to pump ocean water 125 feet upward into a large

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shaft was breached, but passersby can still see the curved surface

nology of the day was not up to the challenge as far as electricity generation was concerned. But, over a century later, the idea of harnessing tidal energy is now proving to be possible. In fact, France's La Rance Station has successfully generated about 250 megawatts since 1966 and there are seven other projects around the globe in operation today, generating from one to 254 megawatts. Several other plants are currently being planned or built, including one on the East River in New York City that is supposed to open in 2014 and generate 2.4GWh of electricity annually.

12 years. The need for it evaporated, however, with the arrival of

Discover more great history about the Santa Cruz coast with Mobile

pavement, when the clever motor was shut down permanently.

Ranger’s mobile AppTours. Mobileranger.com

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UPCOMING EV ENTS • O’Neill Coldwater Classic Invitational

• A Taste of Santa Cruz

Last year, O’Neill introduced a revolutionary new contest for-

For a night of delicious food and rewarding philanthropy, there

mat to the world of professional surfing. The annual O’Neill

is no better way to spend the evening than at A Taste of Santa

Coldwater Classic, which has been going on for decades and

Cruz. Booths will feature food and wine from some of the best

was on the Association of Surfing Professionals World Cham-

restaurants in Santa Cruz and the proceeds help low-income,

pionship Tour in 2012, became a specialty ASP event in 2013.

first-time homebuyers obtain the grants they need to purchase

This year, 16 unsponsored surfers will be competing not only

a house. Each year this event raises $30,000 for the SCARR

for the 2014 title, but also for the sponsorship opportunity of a

Housing Foundation’s Closing Cost Assistance Grant Program.

lifetime. There is no video that can compare to the joy, excitement and tangible energy of the crowd, so come out and support these surfers as they fight for their dreams, and witness an incredible display of high-performance surfing. Oct. 28 – Nov. 1, Steamer Lane, West Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz. oneill.com/cwc.

• Curator-Led Garden Walk: UCSC Arboretum Succulents  Succulents are a great way to have the joy that growing plants brings into your life without having to devote too much room or time for a garden. In the final event of the UC Santa Cruz

If you love art, sea glass and the ocean, come to the Santa Cruz

garden tour series, Stephan McCabe, the Director of Research

Sea Glass and Ocean Art Festival. This year’s festival will include

and Curator of Succulents, will take you through the green-

40 artists, a free raffle, a bar, delicious food, and a contest. If

houses in which he conducts much of his research and propa-

you attend and buy jewelry or art, you should also know that

gates the largest Dudleya collection in the world. Tickets are

you’re helping our local environment, as 10 percent of all pro-

$15 and should be ordered ahead of time on Eventbrite.com.

ceeds will go to the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. santacruzseaglass.com/festival.

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Nov. 13, Cocoanut Grove, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz. atosc.com.

• Santa Cruz Sea Glass and Ocean Art Festival

Nov. 8 – Nov. 9, Cocoanut Grove, 400 Beach St., Santa Cruz.

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Compiled by April Martin-Hansen

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Nov. 18, UCSC Arboretum. arboretum.ucsc.edu.


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Find gourmet grub to go at these five local food trucks

By Christa Martin

| Photos: Yvonne Rew-Falk

In the era of kale chips and craft cocktails, perhaps nothing is

Woodie (which, like Zameen, also has a brick and mortar loca-

more emblematic of the hipster culinary zeitgeist than the food

tion) specializes exclusively in private catering, while Low N Slow

truck. But while these roving eateries have flooded the streets

hops from First Friday to private parties to festivals.

of cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco, the craze has been slower to hit Santa Cruz County—a veritable hub of fresh, delicious food—because of a host of homegrown rules that regulate the trucks. Yet, a small but impressive group of trucks do exist locally, and if you can find one, it will be well worth the effort of tracking it down.

“Unfortunately, current local laws make it difficult for us to just drive around, pull up on a street corner and start selling, so the contract with the university was essential to making the truck work, as it gives us a steady stream of income during the week, and then allows us to attend festivals, private parties and events on weekends,” says Ed Watson, owner of the Zameen food truck.

Because of a laundry list of local dos and don’ts, these popular trucks and their owners can only stay in one public residential or industrial spot for 15 minutes before having to get a move on. West Cliff, East Cliff and downtown are also off limits. So where are they? The Truck Stop grabs a parking spot at the Live Oak Farmers’ Market and does private event catering. Cruz N Gourmet books weekend events and has found a home at UC

A “genuine food truck scene” may soon be possible in Santa Cruz County, Watson says, if the county moves forward with relaxing restrictions on these mobile food vendors. “I know the locals want it,” he says. “It's just a case of getting the green light.” In the meantime, here’s a look at the five local food trucks making the rounds.

Santa Cruz, as has Zameen Mediterranean Cuisine. Wood Fire

Zameen • Zameencuisine.com/food-truck Where to find it: With a storefront in Aptos, the truck can be spotted at events like the Capitola Art and Wine Festival, California Beer Festival, Tequila and Taco Festival and Mountain Bike Festival in Aptos, among others. When school is in session, find it on the UCSC campus outside the Music Center and the Digital Arts Center from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on weekdays. What they serve: Mediterranean fusion including falafel wraps, spicy chicken wraps, gyro wraps, and sweet potato fries. Prices range from $4 to $9. Top sellers: Zameen Burger, Gyro Wrap, and Falafel Wrap. Why they love it: “I think Santa Cruz is crying out for a food truck scene and it would be great to help grow that,” says Watson. “People seem genuinely excited to try food from our truck.”

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L OC AL E AT S: Food Trucks

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Wood Fire Woodie • Woodfirewoodie.com Where to find it: A brick-and-mortar location is in Scotts Valley and the mobile truck caters at special events. What they serve: Wood-fired pizza, as well as salad, dessert and bar items. Top sellers: “All the pizzas,” says owner Pat Flanagan. For example, the “Capitola” is a combination of Italian capers, truffle oil, caramelized onions, and Gorgonzola, and the vegan “Makena Beach” is topped with capers, crimini mushrooms, caramelized onions, roasted roma sauce, and arugula. Why they love it: “You are supplying a product that nourishes someone’s appetite and makes them happy,” says Flanagan. “I love being in the business of food and hospitality. You get to meet new people every day whether it [is at] a film shoot party with Nicole Kidman or the last event [we did] at Candlestick with Joe Montana.”

Low N Slow • Lownslowsc.com Where to find it: Private parties, festivals and at First Friday events. What they serve: Gourmet sliders, locally sourced meat and vegetables and more. Top sellers: Pulled Pork with brandy-apricot BBQ sauce ($8), House-Smoked Tri-Tip with pepper jack, grilled onions and garlic aioli ($10), and the Buffalo Chicken Sandwich with blue cheese spread and hot sauce ($9). Why they love it: “Not only can you nourish people with food, you can also evoke emotional response even with the simplest things,” says co-owner Heidi Martinez.

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LOCAL EATS: Food Trucks

Cruz N Gourmet • Cruzngourmet.com Where to find it: UCSC’s Baskin Circle, 11:45 a.m. to 2 p.m. on weekdays and at private events. What they serve: "World food in motion." Top sellers: Sweet Indonesian Pulled Pork, Chicken Tikka Masala, Thai-Style Ground Turkey. $3 to $9. Why they love it: “Some people eat at the truck every day,” says co-owner Kathy Wallace. “Our customers are very happy that we bring awesome, quality, fresh food to them every day.”

The Truck Stop • Thetruckstopsc.com Where to find it: The Live Oak Farmers’ Market and special events. Look for an announcement on the website this month about a new location. What they serve: “I combine flavors—Asian, Latin, etc.—from different places in the world in strange ways,” says owner Fran Grayson. “It’s also driven by what’s in season.” (Grayson has her own farm where she grows her produce.) Top sellers: Arepas (tortilla-like corn flour stuffed with things like smoked ham, eggs and cheese or butter and jam), breakfast tacos, and kimchi combinations. $4 to $8. Why they love it: “I literally know that food from when it was a seed [at her farm] and I go through the whole process of growing it, making it and cooking it,” says Grayson. “I love that it’s both creative and technical. It’s an art and science kind of thing and I love that.”

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What better way to soak up the last of the weekend than with Sunday Funday at Süda? This Pleasure Point joint serves up an array of wines, beers and creative cocktails, many made with locally sourced herbs, fruit and other mixers. They offer happy hour specials Monday through Thursday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., including $2 off signature cocktails of the day, but the real fun is on Sunday. From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., get your boozy brunch on By Jessica M. Pasko

| Photos: Yvonne Rew-Falk

with $3 mimosas and $4 Bloody Marys. Need something with more substance? A burger and brew combo is $10, and you can choose from Humboldt grass-fed beef, Diestel turkey or a gar-

GET YOUR DAILY DOSE OF HAPPY HOUR WITH THESE TASTY SPECIALS After a long day of work, there’s something so right about meeting up with friends at your favorite watering hole to unwind over a delicious libation. That taste of freedom and relaxation can only be made sweeter by awesome discounts. The longstanding tradition of happy hour is alive and well in Santa Cruz and, as we are here to show you, you can find excellent happy hour specials every day of the week.

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den veggie patty. 3910 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz, Eatsuda.com. Hangover Sundays at Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing: From 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., enjoy $10 chavelas or $5 pint-sized Beermosas, as well as $4 pints from 5 to 6 p.m. Scmbrew.com. Kauboi: All day on Sundays and from 4 to 7 p.m. the rest of the week, this Japanese-style whiskey bar and grill in Aptos brings you $5 signature cocktails, $3 well drinks, $5 select glasses of wine, $5 select draft pints, $3 cans of Sapporo and $1 sake shots. Kauboigrillandsushi.com. Cafe Mare: For $7, select a Maker’s Mark Old-Fashioned, a Ruby Red cosmopolitan, berry lemon drop or Ginger Island. Well drinks, draft beers and glasses of house wine are $4. Hungry? The happy hour menu includes polenta grigliata, pizzettas, bruschetta and more, all for $5 a pop. Specials run Sunday through Thursday from 5 to 7 p.m. Cafemare.com. Sudsy Sundays at burger.: All day, select pints are $4. Burgersantacruz.com.

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◀ Continued from Page 92

Cartoon cat Garfield is notorious for

Tuesday gets a bad rap. You’re kind of in

Sailboat races have wound down for the

his hatred of Mondays and, while his

the swing of the week but you haven’t

season but that doesn’t mean the Crow’s

opinion certainly isn’t without merit,

reached the midway point yet. Liven

Nest in the Santa Cruz Yacht Harbor

there are plenty of ways to turn that

up those Tuesday doldrums with Tiki

isn’t still the spot to be on a Wednesday

Monday frown upside down. It’s all-day

Tuesdays at Hula’s Island Grill and Tiki

evening. Sit outside under the heaters

happy hour at Reef Bar Santa Cruz, for

Room. It’s happy hour all night long on

and enjoy a spectacular view of the bay

one thing. It’s hard to stay cranky when

Tuesdays starting at 2 p.m. Choose from

from the Breakwater Grill upstairs. If

you’re sipping a $5 Dark and Stormy and

a selection of tiki drinks for just $5 each

you’re lucky, you’ll catch a glimpse of

enjoying some fresh, citrusy poke from

including the Dark and Stormy, the Pink

some whales. From 3:30 p.m. on, enjoy a

Pono on their outdoor patio downtown.

Bikini Martini and, the most classic of

well drink, a pint or a glass of house wine

Other specials include $5 margaritas and

them all, the Mai Tai. House wines are

Mai Tais, $2 Bud lights and $1 off wine,

$5 by the glass and if you need some

for just $3.99. Rotating lists of selected

beer and other cocktails. 120 Union St.,

food with those drinks, a selection of

Santa Cruz, Reefbarsantacruz.com.

“pupus,” or appetizers, are also $5 each.

Hot jazz and cold oysters at Soif: Starting at 5 p.m. each Monday, this stalwart wine bar downtown offers a variety of raw oysters, starting as low as $1 a pop. Soifwine.com. Zelda’s: Monday through Friday from 2:30 to 5 p.m., margaritas are just $1.99. Up the ante to José Cuervo for $3.99. Draft beers,

$5 and select glasses of wine are $5.

Neighborhood

Night

at

Seabright

Burgersantacruz.com.

Brewery: From 3 p.m. to close, enjoy

Canton: Draft beer is $3 all day, along

$4 pints, $9 pitchers, $4 well drinks and

with bottles of Corona and Lucky

$2.95 fish tacos. Seabrightbrewery.com.

Buddha; sake is $3 for a small and $5

for the price of one in the Rock Room, and select cocktails, beer and wine are $5.95. Shadowbrook-capitola.com.

off appetizers, $2 street tacos, and $5

West End Tap & Kitchen: Pints are $3

tapas from 3 to 6 p.m. Monday - Friday.

and pitchers are $10 all day long.

SANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

Santa Cruz, Crowsnest-santacruz.com. burger.: All day, select pints are $4 and

day long, pizzas and appetizers are two

Elpalomarsantacruz.com.

ranch dressing. 2218 East Cliff Drive,

Cruz, Hulastiki.com.

are $4. Zeldasonthebeach.com.

Plus, they have $3 draft specials, half

house-made potato chips with chipotle

of potstickers. 221 Cathcart St., Santa

Twofer Tuesdays at Shadowbrook: All

just $4.50 and $5 for 100 percent agave.

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hopping with a Hurricane and a plate

well drinks and house wine by the glass

Taco Bar at El Palomar: Margaritas are

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So go ahead, make Tuesday a little more

appetizers are half price. Try the warm,

for a large, and well drinks are $3, as are glasses of house wines. There’s also a full menu of $3 happy hour appetizers. Cantonsantacruz.com. UnWined Wednesdays at Vino Prima: Every Wednesday, this hidden gem on the Wharf brings in a new winery for a pouring event. There will be special bottle and

Olita’s Cantina and Grille: On Tuesdays

glass prices that change weekly, and $15

and Thursdays, it’s just $6 for a margarita

will buy you the all-night-long tasting fee.

and taco. Olitassantacruz.com.

Vinoprimawines.com.

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◀ Continued from Page 94

Who doesn’t love a little alliteration here

West End Tap & Kitchen, located in the

Start the night off right with a little

and there? Head on over to 99 Bottles

former Bonny Doon tasting room in the

happy hour action at 515 Kitchen and

on Walnut Avenue for Thirsty Thursdays.

Swift Street courtyard, always seems to

Cocktails in downtown Santa Cruz.

Treat your friends (and yo’self) to a

be hopping. Get on over there between

From 4 to 7 p.m. every day they offer

pitcher of craft beer for $3 off the normal

3 and 6 p.m. for $3 pints of their house

several cocktails on special, including

price or spring for pints, which are $1 off.

brews and glasses of their house wine.

the Cucumber Rhubarb Cooler for $5

Want a 25-ounce mug? That’s $1.50 off,

Both the Camelot chardonnay and cab-

and the sophisticated Le Pamplemousse

and wine by the glass is $1 off. For a bo-

ernet are on tap. But the real standout

for $6. Also for $6, try the Gambit, a

nus, most appetizers are $2 off. Plus, this

just might be the snacks: choose from $2

sweet and spicy mixture of Kraken dark

downtown spot is introducing live music

marinated olives, $2 duck-fat popcorn

spiced rum, simple syrup, lime juice,

on Thursdays. 110 Walnut Ave., Santa

with smoked paprika, $4 pastrami bites,

two kinds of bitters and ginger ale. A

Cruz, 99bottles.com.

$5 calamari, $5 small Caesar salad and

selection of wines, beers and small

$5 mozzarella flat bread. 334D Ingalls

plates are on hand at special happy hour

St., Santa Cruz, Westendtap.com.

prices. A cold Gambit and a platter of

Cafe Rio: A $5 house margarita goes great with calamari ($5) and blistered peppers

Lúpulo Craft Beer House: Downtown’s

bottles of Budweiser and Coors Light are

newest craft beer bar offers $1 off all

$3, and well drinks are $5. Specials also

sandwiches and full pours from 3-6

include a full happy hour menu from 3 to

p.m. Monday through Friday. Try the

6 p.m. Monday through Friday. Check out

papa sandwich—it’s like a grilled cheese

Mimosa Saturdays at Vino Prima: All

the dog-friendly patio. Caferioaptos.com.

blended with a loaded baked potato.

day long, enjoy $5 mimosas made with

Facebook.com/Lupulosc.

juice of your choice: orange, grapefruit,

The Red: It’s happy hour all night long on Thursdays. Starting at 3 p.m., signature

Johnny’s Harborside: Between 3 and 5

cocktails are $6, draft beers are $3, and

p.m., margaritas, martinis and glasses

wines are $2 off.

of house wine are $4; draft beers are

Redrestaurantandbar.com.

$3. Choose from a special happy hour

Little Shanghai: $2 beers all day long. Choose from Tsingtao, Sapporo or Sierra Nevada. Littleshanghai.com.

menu of appetizers between $4-$6, such as cheddar bacon potato skins or smoked salmon and goat cheese crostini. Johnnysharborside.com. Mimosa Fridays at the Harbor Cafe: Mimosa, $4 for a full pint, $2 for a small. Harborcafesantacruz.com.

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($4). Butterfield Station wines are $4,

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

second floor patio is pretty hard to beat. 515 Cedar St., Santa Cruz, 515santacruz.com/menus.

mango or cranberry. The fun—and deal—continues

on

Vinoprimawines.com.

Sunday,

too.


t s e b d e vot

y t r a p e c dan

y t n u o c z u r c a t by san

best night club best dJ’s best bar Inspired culture (831) 429-8070 • www.motivsc.com 1209 pacific ave. santa cruz, ca 95060

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. Downtown .

Kiantiʼs Pizza & Pasta Bar Unique menu, family style, full bar.

Assembly Seasonal rustic Californian cuisine.

1108 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

www.assembleforfood.com

740 Front St., Santa Cruz

www.cafemare.com

1100 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

www.kiantis.com

Laili Santa Cruz's answer to high-quality organic Mediterranean / Indian / Pakistani

(831) 458-1212

/ Afghan food.

101 Cooper St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

www. lailirestaurant.com

1336 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

www.elpalomarsantacruz.com

Hoffmanʼs Bistro & Patisserie

and tapas-inspired seasonal menu. (831) 425-7575

Family-owned and operated bistro,

233 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz

www.lupulosc.com

1209 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

1102 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

www.motivsc.com

www.hoffmanssantacruz.com

(831) 420-0135

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(831) 429-8070

Pacific Thai Authentic Thai Cuisine and Boba Teas in a modern and casual

Hula's Island Grill California twist on Hawaiian island grill and tiki bar. 221 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz

(831) 454-8306

MOTIV High-end cocktails, appetizers and entrees with fresh ingredients.

serving breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days a week.

(831) 423-4545

Lúpulo Craft Beer House Tasting room and restaurant with rotating taps

El Palomar Unique and fresh Mexican cuisine, family recipes.

(831) 469-4400

(831) 824-6100

Cafe Mare Authentic Italian dining, fresh, organic local ingredients.

(831) 426-4852

dining atmosphere.

1319 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

www.pacificthaisantacruz.com

(831) 420-1700


The Wharf . Boardwalk . & Harbor

Pleasure Pizza Downtown Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures.

1415 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

www.pleasurepizzasc.com

(831) 600-7859

Pono & The Reef Traditional Hawaiian grill, poke bar, fresh ingredients, full bar.

120 Union St., Santa Cruz

www.ponohawaiiangrill.com

(831) 426-7666

415 River St., Santa Cruz

www.rivercafesantacruz.com

2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz

www.crowsnest-santacruz.com

(831) 420-1280

106 Beach St., Santa Cruz

www.idealbarandgrill.com

819 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

www.zacharyssantacruz.com

(831) 427-0646

1534 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz

www.zoccolis.com

view of the harbor.

493 Lake Ave., Santa Cruz

www.johnnysharborside.com

(831) 479-3430

Picnic Basket Simple, delicious food and treats.

Zoccoli’s Iconic delicatessen, sandwiches, salads, sides.

(831) 423-5271

Johnny’s Harborside Fresh seafood in casual atmosphere, with stunning

Zachary’s Diner-style American cuisine in a casual family-friendly atmosphere.

(831) 476-4560

Ideal Bar & Grill  located by the wharf, fun atmosphere.

River Cafe Local, organic, farm fresh gourmet.

Crow’s Nest Iconic restaurant and bar located at the harbor.

(831) 423-1711

125 Beach St., Santa Cruz

www.thepicnicbasketsc.com

(831) 427-9946

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◀ Continued from Page 99

. Midtown .

Chill Out Cafe Fatty breakfast burritos, espresso drinks, beautiful garden.

Akira Sushi made with fresh-caught seafood and locally grown produce.

1222 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz

www.akirasantacruz.com

2860 41st Ave., Santa Cruz

www.chilloutcafesantacruz.com

(831) 477-0543

(831) 600-7093

East Side Eatery, Pleasure Pizza Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures.

Aloha Island Grille Authentic Hawaiian-style plate lunches.

1700 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz, CA 95062

www.alohaislandgrille.com

(831) 479-3299

1 Chaminade Lane, Santa Cruz, CA 95065

www.chaminade.com

(831) 475-5600

611 Ocean St., Santa Cruz

www.pleasurepizzasc.com

820 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, CA 95062

www.thepennyicecreamery.com

(831) 600-4545

www.solairerestaurant.com

3910 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz

www.eatsuda.com

Paradise Beach Grille On the water in Capitola, quality food and service.

www.burgersantacruz.com

beer and live music.

1618 Mission St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

Parish Publick House British-influenced pub food with full bar. 841 Almar Ave. Santa Cruz

www.parishpublickhouse.com

215 Esplanade, Capitola

www.paradisebeachgrille.com

(831) 421-0507

since 1947.

1750 Wharf Road, Capitola

www.shadowbrook-capitola.com

Zelda’s on the Beach Breakfast, lunch, brunch and dinner overlooking

203 Esplanade, Capitola

www.zeldasonthebeach.com

list, and list of local farmers and ranchers. 1917 Mission St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060

www.ristoranteavanti.com

1501A Mission St., Santa Cruz

www.vasilisgreekrestaurant.com

Cafe Cruz Rosticceria and bar, nice atmosphere, fresh and local.

(831) 458-9808

twist. 334 Ingalls St., Santa Cruz

www.westendtap.com

2621 41st Ave., Soquel

www.cafecruz.com

(831) 471-8115

landscaped garden.

3101 N Main St., Soquel

www.mainstreetgardencafe.com

. Eastside .

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www.cantonsantacruz.com

S ANTA CRU Z WAV E S MAGAZ I N E

(831) 477-9265

. Aptos & Watsonville . Aptos St. BBQ Santa Cruz County's best smoked barbecue, craft brews and

Canton Cantonese, Szechuan, and other Asian fare, full bar.

(831) 476-3801

Main Street Garden & Cafe Organic Italian Mediterranean in a beautiful

West End Tap & Kitchen The flavors of a traditional pub with a California

(831) 475-4900

. Soquel .

(831) 427-0135

Vasili’s Authentic and fresh, with vegetarian-friendly Greek food.

(831) 475-1511

beautiful Capitola Beach.

Ristorante Avanti Featuring local, sustainable, organic foods. Menu, wine

(831) 476-4900

Shadowbrook Fine dining with a romantic setting, cable car lift, in Capitola

(831) 458-2222

www.facebook.com/missionstbbq

Voted Restaurant of the year 2014.

(831) 425-5300

Mission St. BBQ Serving up real smoked barbecue, plus some of the best craft

(831) 600-7068

. Capitola .

burger. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, and a great beer menu. 1520 Mission St., Santa Cruz

(831) 204-2523

restaurant 2013.

. Westside .

(831) 431-6058

Süda Contemporary cuisine in retro-modern restaurant. Voted best new

Solaire Locally sourced ingredients, sophisticated pairings.

800 41st Ave., Santa Cruz

Penny Ice Creamery Locally farmed and organic ingredients.

Chaminade Indulge in decadent culinary choices and fine dining in Santa Cruz.

live Blues every night. (831) 475-8751

8059 Aptos St., Aptos, CA 95003

www.aptosstbbq.com

(831) 662-1721

Continued on Page 102 ▶


FROM THE HEART PLEASURE POINT

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Voted TOP RESTAURANT in Santa Cruz 2012, 2013 & 2014 Voted BEST COCKTAILS 2013 & 2014

Voted BEST BARTENDER 2014

600-7068 • 3910 Portola Dr. Santa Cruz 95062 Sun – Wed 11:30am – 9pm, drink ‘til late • Thurs – Sat 11:30am – 10pm,V O Ldrinks 1 .3 - O C T ’til / NO Vlate 20 14

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burger. Aptos Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, great beer menu.

7941 Soquel Drive, Aptos

www.burgeraptos.com

(831) 662-2811

Cafe Rio Enjoy oceanfont dining with breathtaking views.

131 Esplanade, Aptos, CA 95003

www.caferioaptos.com

(831) 688-8917

California Grill The finest, locally grown produce, meats and desserts of the Pajaro Valley.

1970 Freedom Blvd., Freedom, CA 95019

www.californiagrillrestaurant.com

(831) 722-8052

Cilantros Parrilla y Cantina Authentic Mexican cuisine with fresh ingredients, high-quality meat and seafood.

1934 Main St., Watsonville

www.elpalomarcilantros.com

(831) 761-2161

Kauboi Seasonal organic ingredients, traditional Japanese.

8017 Soquel Drive, Aptos

www.kauboigrillandsushi.com

(831) 661-0449

Manuelʼs Mexican Restaurant Traditional, delicious recipes, cooked fresh daily, served with a genuine smile.

261 Center Ave, Aptos, CA 95003

www.manuelsrestaurant.com

(831) 688-4848

Severino’s Bar & Grill Award winning chowders, locally sourced ingredients.

7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos

www.severinosbarandgrill.com

(831) 688-8987

Zameen Flavorful Mediterranean Cuisine in a casual dining experience

7528 Soquel Drive, Aptos, CA 95003

www.zameencuisine.com

(831) 688-4465

. Scotts Valley . Wood Fire Woodie Artisanal wood-fired pizzeria and mobile catering.

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3105 Scotts Valley Drive, Scotts Valley

www.woodfirewoodie.com

(831) 316-9001


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J by os ot as | ds or W ai aR le

A by n

Be h on ind t e-o he f- a s c e -kin ne dl sw it o BO cal b h the OS and T

IVE

Continued on Page 106 â–ś

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Downtown Santa Cruz

1515 Pacific Ave. Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (831) 429-6101 sockshopandshoeco.com

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M U SI C : Boostive

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◀ Continued from Page 104


Boostive exists where collaboration and creativity collide. The band formed as the product of seven young musicians working together to create a unique sound. Inspired by the classics of hip-hop, jazz, reggae, and psychedelic rock, along with some down-tempo electronica, Boostive has cultivated a sound that is one of a kind and yet still manages to cater to a wide range of people. All of the band members participate in the development of songs and play multiple instruments, including bass, guitar, percussion, samples (vinyl), saxophone, trombone, vocals, and more. Boostive sees music as a powerful vessel that is capable of inspiring social and political change. They believe it is a catalyst to open minds, and many of their songs speak about the harsh realities of corporate America and race and class inequality. Their chemistry on stage, both with each other and the audience, creates an infectiously feel-good atmosphere. As said by sax and keys player Nathan Kocivar, “Our music comes from a place of love, and from that place we practice constantly and share our creations with other people, which brings us immense joy.” Continued on Page 108 ▶

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M U SI C : Boostive

◀ Continued from Page 107

Boostive’s origins were in San Diego, where Kocivar, Seiji Komo, Dylan Webber and Andrew Hawes grew up together listening to music. They migrated to Santa Cruz in 2011, where they found the last three members—Al Bundi, Travis Gibbs, and Brian McNamara—to complete their ensemble. Since then, Boostive has performed with artists such as Slightly Stoopid, Pharcyde, Zion I, and Gramatik, playing more than 50 shows in the Bay Area and continuously expanding their horizons. Their most recent EP, Feed The People, was released this past May, and they have a full-length album in the making. Find them online at Facebook.com/boostive and soundcloud.com/boostivemusic.

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PRODUCT REVIEW Everything you need to know about three electric bikes

By Tyler Frasca

Vintage Electric E-Tracker » The Details: The E-Tracker is a vintage cruiser with a powerful (up to 3,000 watts) electric motor. A thumb throttle controls the power output, and there is no pedal-assist mode. It’s got disc brakes, balloon tires, and no suspension. In “Street Legal Mode,” it should travel up to 30 miles on a charge, which takes two hours to complete with the included charger. Cost: $4,495 Highlights: The first thing anyone notices about the E-Tracker is its striking style. Unlike other electric bikes on the market, this simple, bold machine will impress motor heads and environmentalists alike. The second, and perhaps more important characteristic, of the E-Tracker is its speed. In “Race Mode,” we clocked the bike at a top speed of 36 mph, which is exactly what the manufacturer claims. That much speed without having to turn the pedals over at all makes it feel more like a motorcycle at times, proving that the crew at Vintage Electric value form and function equally. Drawbacks: Riders over 6 feet tall may feel cramped on the E-Tracker’s low-slung frame. Although the cable-actuated disc brakes were adequate, it would be nice to see a model with more powerful hydraulic disc brakes. The Verdict: A head-turning, stylish electric bike for the nostalgic adrenaline junkie.

BionX PL 250 M Add-On Kit » The Details: BionX offers a solution for riders who already have a bike, but are looking for some electronic assistance. It has a thumb throttle for on-demand power and four pedal-assist modes to increase the rider’s output by 20, 50, 100, or 200 percent. As with most other electric bikes, there is a regenerative mode so the battery can be charged while pedaling or coasting on long declines. BionX claims a 40-mile range, which will vary slightly on different bikes. Charge time is around three hours. Cost: $1,200 Highlights: Since the BionX kit is just a battery, motor, and controller, the price is considerably lower than other options on the market. It’s also light. The entire set-up weighs only 16 pounds, so the overall bike weight can be quite a bit less than other e-bikes. Drawbacks: The 250 M has, as you may have guessed, a 250-watt motor. Compared to the other bikes in this review, it’s a little slower and may have some trouble getting up steeper hills. If you think you may need a little more power, check out some of BionX’s 350-watt models. The Verdict: A cost-effective way to add some boost to your favorite commuter bike.

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P R OD U C T R E V IEW: Electric Bikes

Specialized Turbo S » The Details: The Turbo S is Specialized’s top-of-the-line pedal-assist electric bike. There is no throttle, and the motor can be activated only by pedaling. At first glance, this e-bike may look like an ordinary bike, but after the first few pedal strokes, it becomes something more. The electric motor in the rear hub senses input from the pedals and effectively doubles the rider’s output, meaning the Turbo S will go only as fast as you make it. As their slogan goes, “It’s you, only faster.” Cost: $6,000 Highlights: One of the best things about the Turbo S is that it looks and rides like a normal bike. The geometry is comfortable enough for recreational riding, and the smooth power-assist can turn an easy ride to the store into quite a lot of fun. The most obvious use for an electric bike is commuting, and the Turbo S is equipped with a headlight and can accept a full set of fenders and racks. Another bonus for the Turbo S is that it comes in five different sizes, so riders of all sizes can partake. Drawbacks: The price of this machine is a bit exorbitant. The sticker shock from a $6,000 electric bike will send most buyers in another direction. Fortunately for Specialized, that direction may be the base model Turbo, which comes in at $3,800. The Verdict: A practical, efficient, fun way to run errands and get just the right amount of exercise.

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Need extra units?

Online and late starting classes are available Register

Now! CyberSession! Classes start October 27!

Breakthroughs happen here™

www.cabrillo.edu V O L 1 .3 - O C T / NOV 20 14

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SANTA CRUZ BEER WEEK August 4 - 10, 2014

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Taken at O'Neill Yacht Charter, Beer Thirty, West End Tap Room, Assembly, Parish Publick House, 99 Bottles, and the CA Beer Festival. Photos: Jeanine Olsen, Yvonne Rew-Falk, Matt Snow, Jake J. Thomas


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Yes, the water was really warm this summer. Kyle Jouras sheds the rubber on a sunny afternoon at Pleasure Point. Photo: Kookson

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No leash required here. Sean Peterson takes Josie for her afternoon ride. CAPTION THIS! Find this photo on our website at www.santacruzwaves.com. Leave your best caption in the comments section for a chance to win a Santa Cruz Waves prize pack. Photo: Nelly / SPLwaterhousing

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Santa Cruz Waves Magazine Vol 1.3  
Santa Cruz Waves Magazine Vol 1.3  
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