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L I V E T H E L I F E S T Y L E

MAGAZINE

VOL 3.6

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 APRIL/MAY 2017


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Neil Simmons Photography

Happy Hour 3:30-6:00 Tue-Fri & Sun | Large selection of appetizers, $5 well drinks, select wines & draft beers. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd, Aptos | 831-662-9799 | bittersweetbistro.com | Closed Mondays

Bittersweet Bistro Bar & Patio 3pm Dining Room 5pm

Cafe Bittersweet Breakfast 8am-1pm Lunch 10am-2pm

Bittersweet Lounge

Banquet Rooms available for private

parties & social events.

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 7


(831) 688-7442 www.deluxefoodsofaptos.com

783 Rio Del Mar Blvd #25 Aptos, CA 95003

Deluxe Foods has been the Aptos area’s favorite grocery store for almost 40 years and we are proud to offer great products and services to our customers year round. Deluxe is a one stop shop for all your entertaining needs. The managers are always happy to work with the customer’s requests and special orders to make sure you are getting exactly what you want.

Local & family owned

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COME

TO OF APTOS FOR

DELUXE FOODS ALL YOUR ENTERTAINING NEEDS Deluxe Foods has everything you need for your Springtime BBQ’s, and Memorial weekend get togethers!

local wine

artisan cheese tasty bakery

specialty meats

fresh flowers

fresh produce SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 9


Non-Toxic Full Service Hair Salon Professional hair color and services using biodynamic/ organic ingredients 831-515-7633 | 107 River St. Downtown Santa Cruz Online booking: www.MandalaStudio107.com

Community Wellness Workshops Meditation, Sound Healing, Arts, and more... For more information and workshop host inquiries, visit our website

MandalaStudio107.com 1 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


SPRING UP YO U R LO O K

DEBORAH POLVERINO-BREDY       ZAHEER ZAIDI, M.D. JILL PEARLBURG                       AMRA SAUNDERS, R.N. SKIN CARE                                MEDICAL AESTHETICS

FACIAL - PEELS SKIN REJUVEN ATION WAXIN G VITAMIN B-BAR BOTOX - FILLERS AIRBRUSH TANNIN G L ASER SERVICES TEETH WHITENIN G

APRIL / MAY OFFERS: $135 - ILLUMINATING FACIAL & AIRBRUSH TAN COMBO $11/UNIT - BOTOX 831.427.7180 | 627 CAPITOLA AVE, SUITE A - CAPITOLA | VONLUXMD.COM SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 11


Babies to adults

Private, semi-private and custom classes

Non-competitive Swim team Summer Pool Jr. Guard Camps

(831) 476-7946 | SeahorseSwimSchool.com 12 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


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Local legend Anthony Ruffo puts in more time searching for that perfect wave than most, and during this particular session he reaped the rewards. PHOTO: @CHACHFILES

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e h t e  ... duce ro P sh re F s d o o F l ra ✳ Natu Award Winning Wine Selection Full-Ser vice Butc her Shop

t  d B e t Vo

ural M ✳ p ho tcher S lection u B ✳ e r y Stor ✳ Cheese Se e c o r G aders ection l ntinel re e e S S C e S n Wi es & d Tim by Goo

OPEN DAILY 6AM –9PM Located on the corner of Branciforte & Soquel, Santa Cruz

shopperscorner.com | 831.423.1398 1 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


LASER HAIR REMOVAL

Newest Fastest Technology from Candela Laser

Full Bikini for only $200

Model

DYSPORT • BOTOX  • DERMAL FILLERS  • FACIAL REJUVENATION 

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 17


D A L E F R I D AY Favorite Realtor

F R I D AY R E A LT Y Favorite Real Estate Co.

F R I D A Y R E A L T Y . C O M 1 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 9


SUCCESSFUL PROJECTS BEGIN WITH ACCURATE, ACTIONABLE DATA

Flywheel provides professional and consulting services that support the AECO industry. We leverage technology to increase efficiency and add value to your project. BIM CONSULTING

REALITY CAPTURE

After we’ve created a model, it’s time to communicate with the various trades. Our experience comes to life as we work to coordinate your scope of work in a series of all hands on deck meetings and breakout sessions.

We pride ourselves on staying up-to-date with the latest and most precise in-class technology available. We will help you determine what tools are right for your project, and then assist you in maximizing their benefit.

Execution Plans, 3D Modeling, Mentoring, Standards Development, Project Audits, Clash Detection, Clash Resolution, Constructibility Review, As-Built Modeling, BIM to FM, BIM Coordination

UAV PHOTOGRAMMETRY • Aerial data acquisition with centimeter-level accuracy

FLYWHEEL • SANTA CRUZ, CA 2 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

831.440.8380

LASER SCANNING • 100’s of thousands of precise measurments per second

INFO@FLYWHEEL3D.COM

FLYWHEEL3D.COM


Where does your power come from?

Local Solar Power

allterrasolar.com

831.425.2608 SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 1


LOCAL ENERGY

services + shops + restaurants + wine

Carmel, Ca 93923 TEL 831.625.4106 THECROSSROADSCARMEL.COM

2 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


GROM FAVORITE

SHOP

photo: Emmett Balassone

EN, G SHOP - M IN H T O L Â C E MEN, FAVORIT SHOP - WO CLOTHING HOP S & SKATE SURF SHOP

Z E V A H C O Z R: MARC ANTA CRU

RIDAEVENUE | DOWNTOWNASCWAVE.COM TEA0M P 2 PACIFIC 58.9283 | 15

831.4

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 3


The Cleanest Energy on Earth…

SANTA CRUZ WAVES M AG A ZINE

PUBLISHER TYLER FOX

EDITOR ELIZABETH LIMBACH

PHOTO EDITOR ERIK L ANDRY

PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOGRAPHERS YVONNE FALK TYLER FOX JEFF "KOOKSON” GIDEON DAVID LEVY MARA MIL AM LESLIE MUIRHEAD DAVE "NELLY” NELSON JEANINE OLSEN NEIL SIMMONS

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS RYAN "CHACHI” CRAIG MICHAEL DANIEL DAVID DENNIS BRYAN GARRISON FRANK SCOTT KRUEGER SONNY MILLER SCOTT MOWRY SCOTTIE NELSON SCOTT PAVLINA MING POON ERIC RESSLER JEFF SCHWAB JOE TOBIN CHARLIE WITMER

EDITORIAL

WRITERS ALOE DRISCOLL TYLER FOX JOEL HERSCH NEAL KEARNEY ELIZABETH LIMBACH LESLIE MUIRHEAD DAMON ORION

MELISSA DUGE SPIERS KYLE THIERMANN TARA FATEMI WALKER

…is also now the cheapest. (Google it)

“A Local Company Employing Local People.”

(831) 687-8097

387 Coral Street, Santa Cruz CA License 987896

PROOFREADER JOSIE COWDEN

DESIGN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR JOSH BECKER

DESIGNER ELI ROE

SALES & OPERATIONS

PRESIDENT STEPHANIE LUTZ

CFO SARAH CRAFT

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES SUZIE JOSEPH K ATE K AUFFMAN SADIE WIT TKINS

OFFICE MANAGER LESLIE MUIRHEAD

DISTRIBUTION MICK FREEMAN FOUNDER / CEO TYLER FOX

On the Cover: Who says you can't have dessert for breakfast? Kyle Jouras enjoys a healthy serving of rainbow sherbert somewhere in Santa Cruz. Photo: @chachfiles

The content of Santa Cruz Waves magazine is Copyright © 2017 by Santa Cruz Waves, Inc. No part may be reproduced in any fashion without written consent of the publisher. Santa Cruz Waves magazine is free of charge, available at more than 100 local distribution points. Anyone inserting, tampering with or diverting circulation will be prosecuted. Santa Cruz Waves assumes no responsibility for content of advertisements. For advertising inquiries, please contact steff@ santacruzwaves.com or 831.345.8755. To order a paid subscription, visit santacruzwaves.com.

FI ND US ONLI NE www.SantaCruzWaves.com @SANTACRUZWAVES

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Famous Annual O'NEILL SURF SHOP MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

PARKING LOT SALE

FRI MAY 26TH - through MON MAY 29TH

N E B

O’SS TEAM RIDER BEN COFFEY

TO P HO

L : NE

FRI & MON 9AM-8PM SAT & SUN 8AM-8PM 1115 41ST AVE, CAPITOLA

LY

24-HOUR SURF REPORT: 831-475-BARL(2275)

DOWNTOWN 110 COOPER ST. 831.469.4377 CA P I TOL A 1 1 1 5 41 ST AVE . 8 3 1 . 475 . 41 5 1 S UR F B OA R D, WE TS UI T, B OO G I E B OA R D R E NTA L S

B OA R DWA L K 4 0 0 B E AC H ST. CA P I TOL A DOWNTOWN 8 3 1 . 4 59. 92 3 0 1 1 1 5 41 ST AVE . 110 COOPER ST.

B OA R DWA L K

WE TS UI TS OUT L E T

4 0 0 B E AC H ST.

1 1 49 41 ST AVE .

8 3 1WE . 475 . 41 1 OUT L831.469.4377 8 3 1 . 4 59. 92 3 0 TS UI5TS ET 1 1 49 41 ST AVE . B U Y & S E L L U S E D S UR F B OA R DS

8 3 1 - 479 - 5 61 3 photo: Nelly

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FIRST LOOK

PHOTOS: MARA MILAM

LETTER FROM THE FOUNDER

My Fountain of Youth By TYLER FOX

“Tyler, are you eating enough? You look thin.” An exasperated “Yes, Mom … ” was the pre-programmed response I had used over the years and my go-to retort on the recent day in question. It wasn’t until later that I paused for a moment to let her question really sink in. The next morning I hopped on the scale. The modern-looking silver platform thought for a moment and then replied with "148.6." 'What?! That’s not right,' I thought to myself. I stepped off and then stepped back on. The little silver square was quicker this time and immediately shot back the exact same number with conviction, as if it was mad that I had even questioned it. I instantly felt like I was a weak and feeble old man. I’ve since gotten over that feeling, but it’s amazing how the simple sight of numbers can change how we feel about ourselves. For the next few days I asked

friends, "Do I look skinny to you?" The common response was “Yeah, you look a little thinner, but you look healthy. How do you feel?” The truth is, I feel great—and not just physically. My mental outlook and attitude seemed to be at an all-time high, despite the normal potholes and speed bumps we all deal with in life. So why, then, do I look and feel this way? That answer wasn’t hard to deduce—I’d been powering it out at Pure Power Yoga, a local heated yoga and Pilates studio where you sweat your butt off and push your body to its limits. To take it one step further, immediately following the classes, I’d been taking cold plunges in either the ocean or a friend’s frigid, unheated pool. Top that with a healthy smoothie from New Leaf Community Markets, and I was Clark Kent stepping out of the phone booth, ready to take on the world.

I’m not a big fan of some of the cultlike fitness trends out there today and I don’t want to preach, but hallelujah—I think I’ve found the fountain of youth. I won’t go into all of the health benefits, but let’s just say sweating and/or cold therapy does wonders for the body and mind. Sure you might feel like you’re going to die during your first couple of classes, but believe me—when you get over that hump, the rewards are infinite.

Tyler’s Tips: H Drink water two to three hours before class to fully hydrate your body. H Eat something small like a banana with almond butter 30 minutes before class to keep your energy up. H Don’t be scared—take the plunge! A cold plunge, that is.

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 7


When You’re Passionate About Where You Live...It Shows!

RESULTS 602 EL SALTO DRIVE $2,500,000

44 ZILS ROAD $1,995,000

703 RIVERVIEW DRIVE $1,895,000

701 SUNSET DRIVE $1,599,000

1312 VIA TORNASOL $1,599,000

33 CREST LANE $1,495,000

757 VIA PALO ALTO $1,395,000

334 13TH AVENUE $1,395,000

523 BAYVIEW DRIVE $1,275,000

1115 E. CLIFF DRIVE $1,295,000

722 ESCALONA DRIVE, CAPITOLA Listed for $4,495,000 | By Appointment Only

144 MONTCLAIR DRIVE $1,098,000

Bryan MacKenzie 831.535.8101 | Bryan@SeaSantaCruzHomes.com | www.SeaSantaCruzHomes.com | CalBRE# 01176088 JENNET KRESGE | 831.345.2427 | Jennet@SeaSantaCruzHomes.com ©2017 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. All rights reserved. This information was supplied by Seller and/or other sources. Broker believes this information to be correct but has not verified this information and assumes no legal responsibility for its accuracy. Buyers should investigate these issues to their own satisfaction. Real Estate Agents affiliated with Coldwell 2 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES Banker Residential Brokerage are Independent Contractor Sales Associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT LLC. CalBRE License # 01908304.


INSIDE Volume 3.6 - APRIL/MAY 2017

54 147

86

121 FIRST LOOK

27 Letter from the Founder 31 Best of the Web 33 Word on the Street 38 Remember When ... ? 44 Local Legend: Tom Powers

DROP IN

54 The 2017 Swellies Awards 62 Beer Week Schedule 78 In Depth: Finding Sanctuary 84 One Shaper, One Board 86 Behind the Lens: Bryan Garrison 98 Outdoor: Cody Townsend's Best Ride 102 Adventure: Up the Rio Dulce 111 Environment: The Cost of Clothes

FOOD & DRINK

121 Local Eats: Fresh from the Garden 127 Drinks: New Brews 132 Dining Guide 136 Santa Cruz Beer Trail Guide

COOL OFF

147 Field Notes 148 Company Feature: Advanture Co. 152 Event Gallery: The Sandbar Shootout 154 Upcoming Events SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 9


GROM

GUIDE

Jim Booth Swim School The

BEST

in

BABY SWIMMING!

Downtown

Harvey West, Capitola and Watsonville

110 Cooper St.

I wouldn't be the surfer I am today without the help of Jim's swim school!

Boardwalk

Wetsuit Outlet 1149 41st Ave.

JIMBOOTHSWIMSCHOOL.COM

722-3500

for our Sw

amps! ingin’ Summer C

1 June 13 - June 29 Tuesadnd s sday Thur 2 July 11 - July 27 3 August 1 -August 17 ays

Open Gyms • Parents Night Out • Babies Parents Night Out CALL US OR CHECK OUR WEBSITE FOR DETAILS:

Like us on facebook junebugs gym gynastics

831-464-BUGS(2847) www.junebugsgym.com

391O PORTOLA DRIVE, SUITES 2 & 3 • SANTA CRUZ, CA 95O62

3 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

11115 41st Ave. 400 Beach St.

-Tyler Fox

NOW SIGN UP

Capitola


FIRST LOOK BEST OF THE WEB

BEST of the WEB

I INSTAGRAM

5 VIDEOS

R NEWS

PASTEL PALETTE @levymediaworks ♥ 3,573

THE WEIRDEST AND MOST WONDERFUL WAVES These are the waves that push the limits. 67,304 views

DIVING FOR GOLF BALLS OFF OF PEBBLE BEACH Two teenagers have collected thousands of decaying balls from the ocean floor along Pebble Beach. 12,004 views

SIMPLER TIMES FOR THE SS PALO ALTO IN APTOS. MAY SHE REST IN PEACE @neilsimmonsphotography ♥ 2,575

CALIFORNIA’S GLORY HOLE SPILLWAY The worldfamous “Glory Hole Spillway” overflowed and it was captured by a drone. 44,669 views

VOLUNTEERS BEAUTIFY THE RIVERWALK Volunteers helped clean and plant native plants along the San Lorenzo Riverwalk. 6,067 views

WINTER SUNSETS @bgwynn ♥ 2,431

MARC LACOMARE IN FRENCH BEACH BREAK Some of the craziest barrels caught on camera. 16,445 views

ALL TOGETHER NOW An estimated 10,000 people peacefully participated in the Jan. 21 Women’s March in downtown Santa Cruz. 4,506 views

STORM’S A BREWIN’ @heathmedders ♥ 2,314

MOOSE CHASES TWO SNOWBOARDERS Holy moose! Talk about a need for speed. 12,360 views

A NEW NATIONAL MONUMENT The Cotoni-Coast Dairies property was added to the existing California Coastal National Monument network. 3,519 views

VISIT US:

santacruzwaves.com/videos @santacruzwaves santacruzwaves.com/local-loop SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 1


Spring has arrived at Costanoa

And we have a special deal to celebrate! B O O K 2 C O N S E C U T I V E N I G H T S I N A N Y R O O M T Y P E AT R E G U L A R R AT E F O R A S T AY I N A P R I L O R M AY A N D R E C E I V E A T H I R D N I G H T F R E E ! S T AY T H E T H I R D N I G H T O R T A K E I T T O G O ! 3RD NIGHT COUPON MUST BE USED BY 12-28-17 FOR A STAY MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY. NOT VALID HOLIDAYS. SOME BLACKOUT DATES APPLY. LIMITED 3RD NIGHT FREE RESERVATIONS AVAILABLE!

C A L L T O D AY T O B O O K ! 8 7 7 - 2 6 2 - 78 4 8 3rd night reservations based on availability. Not valid for groups or with any other discounts. Must mention “3rd night” at time of booking.

C OSTANOA.C OM | 650.879.1100 3 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

2001 ROSSI RD, PESCADERO, CA 94060


FIRST LOOK

WORD ON THE STREET

What gives you hope?

Ken Swedmark, water treatment plant operator: “What gives me hope is that my wife is expecting our first child and we get to raise our child here and show it everything this area has to offer.”

Jonathan Alonso, line cook: “What gives me hope is family bonding. When I get to see my loved ones, I get to see that they made [it] and have struggled. Life is a struggle, but I’m going to make it, too.”

Jeff Dunworth, plumber: “The children of today. Just the new ideas and the new ways that they are coming into the world and presenting new ways of being.”

Leslie Hoffman, social worker: “I like how communities are coming together locally and globally to stand up to all the horrible things that are happening in our country right now under President Trump. And the things that give me hope are prayer and my faith in God.”

Anna Lovato, owner/instructor at Pleasure Point Pilates: “This Santa Cruz bubble of ours. The people of this community. The ocean, mountains and sky. Every day I work with some amazing folks who respect and revere nature and each other. This gives me hope.”

Lesley Tipton, guest teacher and caregiver: “I think the natural world gives me hope—being out by the ocean every day and seeing how it refreshes people and how it refreshes me.”

d BY JEANINE OLSEN

Margie Olsen, homemaker: “The next generation. I’m hoping that they can fulfill a better future than we have been able to.”

Terry Sardinas, farmer: “What gives me hope is seeing our community, despite all the differences and struggles, come together and really [form a] united front on important causes.”

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 3


SATURDAY MAY 13th 10AM - 4PM 140 Rancho Del Mar

APTOS, CA

45 local artists & designers showcasing fine art, handmade jewelry, ceramics, textiles, and much more.

Ideal for Mother’s Day gifts! hosted by: Ocean Breeze Boutique

www.aptosfestival.com

RANCHO DEL MAR SHOPPING CENTER 48 Rancho Del Mar Aptos, CA 95003 (btwn Comerica Bank & JC Nails) Locally owned gift boutique featuring jewelry, textiles, glass, journals, bath & body, Laurel Burch products, and much more.

(831) 708-4214

3 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


We buy GOLD, Antique & Estate Jewelry Your full Service Local Jeweler • Custom Wedding Rings • Fine Gemstones • Antique & Estate Jewelry • Goldsmiths & Watchmakers on si site • Insurance Appraisals

Custom Creations

Aptos Center 7552 Soquel Dr. 831-688-2799

Carmel by the Sea Ocean & Mission 831-624-5621

All work done on premises

Since 1962 SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 5


IndIgo Beach ProPertIes, Inc. Would lIke to Welcome nIcole PolI to theIr team!

Voted “Favorite REALTOR®” 2016 Runner Up “Favorite REALTOR®” 2017

Nicole Poli 831.234.9309

BRE 01259219 nicolepoli831@gmail.com www.indigobp.com 3 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


“It’s a staycation! People travel from all over the world to be here. We get to stop in as locals and enjoy relaxation anytime.” - Kelly D.

Admission: $46 Massage & Admission: Start at $125 Refuge.com

heat up

27300 Rancho San Carlos Rd

cool down

(831) 620-7360

relax

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 7


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FIRST LOOK

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

REMEMBER

WHEN … YOU FIRST SAW

THE GREAT MORGANI? By MELISSA DUGE SPIERS

W

hen The Great Morgani plays his accordion on Pacific Avenue, you can expect just about anything from his legendary costumes—traffic cones, dimestore cups, padded fish, plastic bottles, shower heads—but you will never see his face. “I get dressed in the parking garage and stay in costume until I get home,” says the man behind the masks— accordionist and performance artist Frank Lima. “I think it’s important to maintain the illusion, the magic. It’s all about fun, after all.” Over the past 20 years, The Great Morgani’s costumes and music have made him a local legend. Born in Los Banos, Lima’s family moved to Santa Cruz in

1947 when he was 5 years old. He became a stockbroker straight out of Santa Cruz High School and did well enough to retire at the age of 35. But retirement did not suit him, and a decade later he decided to turn his accordion-playing skills into a creative hobby. That hobby requires a great deal of work, however, and it comes with some challenges. A self-taught costumer, Lima puts in more than 100 hours on some outfits, creating and sewing them on a 1943 Singer that originally belonged to his mother. He finds inspiration in everything from his extensive travels to actor Tim Conway and grocery-store SKU labels to the Fellini film 8 ½. His elaborate creations include platform shoes that weigh up to 10 pounds, a covered accordion

weighing in at nearly 30 pounds, gloves, the all-important mask, and a variety of other props and gadgets from mannequins to bicycles. Lima has learned through trial and error not to wear outrageous shoes on high platform boxes (he’s had too many spills to count), not to incorporate funny posture positions (like the Leaning Tower of Squeeza, which left his back crimped for days), and not to play for more than a few hours at a time. He cannot get in and out of costumes easily for bathroom breaks and cannot eat or drink with most full-face masks, so he consumes nothing before or during performances and, as a result, has battled dehydration and dizziness during long hours on his feet. He handles

PHOTOS COURTESY OF FRANK LIMA

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 9


OVERCOMING

DEVELOPMENTAL

DISORDERS Powerful alternatives to medications when it comes to treating ADHD, dyslexia, autism, ODD, OCD, Tourette's, etc offering lasting results. See why these holistic treatments have been featured on NBC, FOX, New York Daily and are current researched at Harvard. currently

Inside Out Health

Dr. Nick Hyde CICAK, D.C.

www.getinsideouthealth.com drnick@getinsideouthealth.com 831.515.6041 | 501 Soquel Ave

Health & Lifestyle Expo for Women Thursday, May 18, 5-8 pm Cocoanut Grove, 400 Beach Street, Santa Cruz It’s a girl’s night out for health! Ladies, bring your friends. Moms, get a sitter and have a night out. This event is all about YOU.

Enter to win our raffle grand prize

$500 Gift Certificate Yoso Wellness Spa Formerly Santa Cruz Skin Solutions

Offered at NO CHARGE. Register early! Call 831.465.7818 or visit mysantacruzdoctor.org to register. facebook.com/dominicanmedical twitter.com/pmgscc instagram.com/dominicanhospitalsc #SCwomensexpo

1 4 0 WHF2017_scwaves_ad_v2.indd | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

3/14/17 10:02 AM


FIRST LOOK

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

THROUGH THE MORGANI MASK

Lima looks back at how downtown has changed PETS: “Twenty years ago pets were

not allowed on the avenue. I think there are more people on the avenue now because pets are allowed. I’m OK with the pets, it is the people that could use some training. I actually had a little dog stop and piddle upon my money box whilst the owners were completely unaware.”  

RETAIL: “I remember that if you

were performing on the avenue, you could not sell your CD, or do any

kind of retail business. Well, that sure has changed now, and there are more people selling stuff than there are musicians. If you are selling, it has to be something you made [or] produced. … I had better get back to knitting my accordion-shaped potholders.”

SMOKING: “It is wonderful—no

smoking is allowed [now] on Pacific Avenue, even though still some people decide to puff along.”

it all with great charm and humor, however, promising—now at age 75—to continue performing as The Great Morgani as long as he still enjoys it. “It’s not about the music … I’m honestly a little tired of the music,” he says with a wink and a grin. “I am representing myself as an artist and Santa Cruz as a community. The biggest compliment is when people say I make them smile.”

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 4 1


831 247 1987 S yosowellness.com organic S eco-friendly

raw elements raw wellness raw beauty

skincare S massage S nails

4 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


FIRST LOOK

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

IN HIS OWN WORDS:

Lima’s book The Great Morgani: The Creative Madness of A Middle-Aged Stockbroker Turned Street Musician can be purchased at Bookshop Santa Cruz.

5 UNFORGETTABLE GETUPS 1

3

2

4

Lima covered himself, his accordion, his Geo Metro convertible, two mannequins and two surfboards with stretch fabric to create “Bikini Surfer Babes from the Planet Barcode” for Halloween 2001. He recalls that the three-breasted aliens were of particular interest to hordes of pre-teen boys.

His “The Fourth of July” pinwheel get-up inspired one woman to interrupt his rendition of “Yankee Doodle Dandy” demanding to know why the pinwheel on his crotch didn’t spin like the others.

“Gyrosphere” was created for the 2012 fashionART Santa Cruz event using PVC pipe and stretch snakeskin, and was on display at the Museum of Art & History for a while. “I wanted to push the envelope,” says Lima. “People notice head and feet first and foremost, so I just made those bigger and bigger.” Lima created an impromptu wall sculpture made from dollar-store plastic cups to stage his mother’s apartment for sale. When the apartment sold he had a new “Aqua Accordionist” costume.

5

In 2012, Lima was vacationing in Paris when he spotted a photo that inspired him to rush back to Santa Cruz on Oct. 29, where he raced to create his “Monster in a Box” Halloween costume. It was a “disaster from the get-go,” he jokes, recalling how he hastily struggled into the costume on the street and spent the rest of the afternoon suspecting that his pants were falling down. He didn’t have enough room inside the cage to play his accordion properly (the intended song was, of course, Engelbert Humperdinck’s “Please Release Me”), and he ended up leaving after an hour with a whopping $2.37 in tips.

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K LOCAL LEGEND

TOM POWERS ON CAMARADERIE, STUMBLING ONTO EARLY-DAY MAVERICKS AND GROWING OUT OF HIS BIG-WAVE HABIT By NEAL KEARNEY

R

ather than wax nostalgic about the “good ol’ days” in Santa Cruz, I’ll put it simply for the sake of brevity: in the 1970s and ’80s, locals controlled the lineups, and visitors were rarely adopted by the increasingly agro local crew. So how is it that Tom Powers, an 18-yearold “valley kid” from San Mateo, happened to break into the rigid hierarchy at Steamer Lane and become best pals with Santa Cruz standouts and future big-wave legends like Richard Schmidt and Vince Collier? Determination and stoke. “I was, and still am, a total surfaholic,” admits Powers, whose ocean obsession also manifests as an avid passion for freediving and spearfishing. “I was a complete and utter surf junkie—every waking moment, the highest priority in my life was surfing.”

“NOBODY TAUGHT YOU HOW TO SURF BACK THEN. YOU WERE PRETTY MUCH ON YOUR OWN TO FIGURE IT OUT— TRIAL, ERROR, FACE-PLANTS.” This love for the ocean was birthed from a childhood spent riding mats and playing in the shore break at the Princeton Breakwater, which Powers and his family would frequent on weekends. It was there that Powers caught his first wave on a surfboard as a junior in high school, in 1972. “Nobody taught you how to surf back then,” he says, laughing. “You were pretty much on your own to figure it out— trial, error, face-plants. It helped when I got my license, so I could jam after school and surf anywhere from Half Moon Bay to

Waddell [Creek]. On the weekends it was Santa Cruz, either The Lane or Mitchell’s, but sometimes Pleasure Point.” He moved down to Santa Cruz with a couple of his buddies after high school graduation. Early on, he was lucky enough to meet and befriend brothers Richard and Dave Schmidt, Charlie Heitman, Vince Collier, and George Harper— all talented grommets on the verge of manhood. Powers was initiated into the pack by putting in his time and being respectful and mellow in the lineup.

Tom Powers’ legendary status goes beyond the surf scene. He's also an absolute ninja when it comes to stalking large fish beneath the surface.    PHOTO: JOE TOBIN

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PHOTO: JOE TOBIN

Lighting up The Lane with power and flow. PHOTO: CHARLIE WITMER   

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In the early ’80s he bought a nice camera—a high-resolution Panasonic with a 10:1 zoom ratio, which was a big investment at the time—and the friends began taking turns filming each other. “It was cool, it was fun, and it really helped our surfing, too,” says Powers. “We’d be surfing three or four hours in the morning and come in and whip up a fat breakfast and pop in our tape so we could watch our session. You have this perception of how you think you surf and you see the footage and it’s like 'oh, f@$k!’ But it really does help.” Between studying at Cabrillo College and working as a waiter at Miramar Fish Grotto on the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf, Powers surfed as much as possible. In 1978 he moved into the Schmidt household after the parents relocated to Arizona. It was around this time that big-wave fever spread across town like wildfire. But Powers’ first experience with big surf had come earlier

in his career, practically when he was still learning. “My first legit big-wave experience was at Scott's Creek in November 1974,” he recounts. “I still remember it like it was yesterday. It was a double- to triple-overhead day, but super clean and glassy. Based on my skill level at the time, I was in way over my head. I got a couple of heavy beatings that day, but also actually caught and rode a couple of bombs. From then on I was pretty hooked on heavy water.” After a couple of years hanging out with the Westside crew, Powers was getting more than his fill in the heavy stuff. They were surfing big Steamer Lane, Swift Street, Scott's Creek, and various other protected big-wave haunts up the coast. Richard Schmidt was five years younger, but was the first of their group to make a mark in the powerful breaks on the North Shore of Oahu. Schmidt’s travels also brought him


K LOCAL LEGEND

Tom Powers (center) lifeguarding at Twin Lakes State Beach circa 1975. PHOTO: SCOTT MOWRY

“WE’D SURF THREE OR FOUR HOURS ... AND COME IN AND WHIP UP A FAT BREAKFAST AND POP IN OUR TAPE SO WE COULD WATCH OUR SESSION. YOU HAVE THIS PERCEPTION OF HOW YOU THINK YOU SURF AND YOU SEE THE FOOTAGE AND IT’S LIKE ‘OH, F@$K!’” to Puerto Escondido, Mexico, where, in 1979, photographer Chris Klopf snapped a shot of him that would appear in Surfing Magazine. It wasn’t long thereafter that Schmidt’s brother, Dave, told Powers he was moving to Hawaii for six months. “I was like, ‘What!?’ I remember being insanely jealous at the time,” Powers says. Powers soon took his own surf sabbatical: a five-year voyage that included a month at Puerto Escondido with George Harper in 1980, multiple North Shore excursions, and more Puerto throughout the ’80s and early ’90s. In between, he was, of course, taking advantage of the bombing surf locally. Little did he know the ultimate big wave was loom-

ing behind the very breakwater where he caught his first waves. “We made a lot of trips up to Ocean Beach, as well as Point Arena,” he recalls. “That’s how we stumbled [upon] Mavs.” He and Dave were on a surf mission to Point Arena on a giant day in 1990. The conditions were perfect: a giant swell, no wind, and a beautiful, sunny day. But when they got to Ocean Beach, it was a zoo. “There were some guys like Doc Renneker and Jeff Clark up there,” Powers says. “Jeff pulled me and Dave aside and said, ‘Hey, I’ve got this wave that will blow your mind!’ So we followed him to Pillar Point and checked the wave from behind. Dave was sayin’, ‘My god,

that’s like Waimea!’ [and] pacing back and forth. Paddling out, we were looking at each other saying, ‘Holy shit, you could fit a single-family residence inside that barrel!’ We didn’t know what to think. We’d never seen a wave like that. [It’d been] right under our noses.” Powers got Mavericks for the next five seasons, from 1991 to 1995. Was he the standout guy every session? No. But he still put in the work. “I was always super cautious out there,” he says. “All my sessions were two to five waves, always playing it super careful. That place scared the shit out of me every time I surfed it. I loved it, but I’d be a liar if I [said] it didn’t.”

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Large

MORE THAN

R E A L E S T AT E ...A LIFEST YLE

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MIKE BLOC H

SERENO GROUP

mike@mikebloch.com www.MikeBloch.com

(831) 588-1588

CalBRE#01382661


K LOCAL LEGEND

Above: Clocking some tube time at The Lane. PHOTO: CHARLIE WITMER Below: Charging Puerto Escondido circa 1989. PHOTO: SONNY MILLER

“I SLIPPED, GLANCED OFF MY BOARD AND GOT SUCKED UP AND OVER THE FALLS. I GOT PUMMELED SO HARD. I TOOK A COUPLE MORE ON THE HEAD. I WAS DONE AFTER THAT—IT WAS ALL TOO MUCH.” The last time Powers surfed Mavericks was during a monster swell in 1995. On Monday of that week, 16-year-old Jay Moriarity caught the wave that landed him on the cover of SURFER Magazine. Powers surfed that Wednesday. “I got the worst pounding of my life,” he says. “On my last wave, I was sitting a little bit wider than the pack and a big set swept wide. I swung for it, got up and felt I was making the drop. Well, I didn’t. My board cavitated, and I slipped, glanced off my board and got sucked up and over the falls. I got pummeled so hard. Blew my squid lid off, never saw it again. I took a couple more on the head. I was done after that—it was all too much.” That

Friday at Mavericks, Hawaiian bigwave legend Mark Foo drowned after a seemingly routine wipeout. At that time, Powers was working as a manager at O’Neill Surf Shop, had kid No. 2 on the way, and it was becoming harder for him to find free time, so he was starting to tire of big waves and chasing swells. “My wife hit me up after Foo died and said, ‘Hey, it would be awesome if you didn’t surf Mavericks anymore,’” he says. “So that was a good excuse for me to bail outta there. We really did have it in its Renaissance in the beginning, though. It would be hard to replicate what we had. We didn’t even know what we had. I’m glad I was able to be a part of that movement.”

Nowadays, Powers spends most of his time working as broker for Seabright Mortgage. But, at age 62, he still surfs more than most people half his age. “With both of my daughters off to college, I’m on a much longer leash now,” he says. “No more soccer, softball, coaching, school, kids' activities, etc. As much as I love having them around, I’m getting a lot more water time.” As for his status as an elder statesman in the lineup, Powers is proud. “I feel so fortunate to still be getting out there,” he says. “Surfing is such a fun activity—truly the fountain of youth. I just feel so blessed, like I’m in the bonus round or something.”

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FAVORITE PHOTOGR APHER

DAVE “NELLY” NELSON In this shot, Nathan Fletcher enters the belly of the beast at Mavericks.

the

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the 2017 SANTA CRUZ WAVES SWELLIES AWARDS

OUR READERS HAVE SPOKEN! FOR THE THIRD YEAR STRAIGHT, SANTA CRUZ WAVES HONORS SOME OF THE COMMUNITY’S FAVORITE BUSINESSES, ARTISTS AND SURFERS BY DAMON ORION

LI ES

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Favorite Taphouse

BEER THIRTY BOTTLE SHOP & POUR HOUSE

T

rue to its name, this well-loved Soquel haunt offers a rotating selection of 30 beers on tap, as well as a giant selection of bottled beers. The purchase of a flight allows you to sample six different beers for around $10. Sweetening the deal are dog-friendly outdoor seating with heat lamps, easy access to tasty food, and games like darts, pingpong and cornhole. “It seems like just yesterday that we were searching for the perfect location to start our new business,” Beer Thirty co-owner Olive Moredock recalls. “We considered several spots that are now home to some of our favorite breweries and taprooms—think NUBO and West End Tap & Kitchen—but it was this little spot nestled between other neighborhood businesses that stole our hearts.” Beer Thirty hosts a number of annual events that support the craft beer community, including the Locals Only Tap Takeover that takes place on May 17 this year. Specialty beers from all 14 breweries in Santa Cruz County will be showcased under one roof. Check Beer Thirty Bottle Shop & Pour House’s Facebook page for details.

2504 S. Main Street, Soquel; 477-9967; bthirty.com.

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Favorite Skate Shop

BILL’S WHEELS

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warm, familiar feeling welcomes customers when they walk through the front doors of Bill’s Wheels Skateshop, entering a skateboard haven filled with oldschool decks, shiny new trucks and racks of apparel. Bill Ackerman opened the business in 1977 out of a love for skateboarding. “What began as something that I just love to do turned into my entire life,” Ackerman tells Waves. As a result, he’s been a front-row witness to the evolution of the sport, from when it was a sidewalk emulation of surfing to the point when actual skate parks began being built. Skateboarding gives riders a special feeling, and it’s clear that Ackerman knows this better than most. So do his employees and team riders, which fuels the Santa Cruz company’s timeless magic and has earned it generations of local support. “We wouldn’t exist without your support,” Ackerman says. Cheers to 40 years. | By Leslie Muirhead

1240 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz; billswheels.com.

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Matty C.

Thanks For your support!

SKATEBOARD SALES & SERVICE

Just minutes away! 17 Conference Dr. Felton CA 95018

mounthermonadventures.com 6 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


PHOTO: LESLIE MUIRHEAD

2017

EATS & DRINKS ACAI BOWL

1. Samba Rock Acai Cafe 2. Cafe Brasil 3. Amazon Juices

BAR

1. Parish Publick House 2. Brady’s Yacht Club, Paradise Beach Grille (tie)

BBQ JOINT

1. Aptos St. BBQ 2. Mission St. BBQ 3. Coles BBQ

BREAKFAST BURRITO 1. Chill Out Cafe 2. Pleasure Point Market 3. Harbor Cafe

BREAKFAST SPOT

1. Harbor Cafe 2. The Buttery, Zachary’s Restaurant (tie)

BREWERY

1. Discretion Brewing 2. Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing 3. Shanty Shack Brewing

BURGER

1. burger. 2. Betty Burgers 3. Jack’s Hamburgers

CHEAP EATS

1. Steamer Lane Supply 2. Charlie Hong Kong 3. US Meal

COCKTAIL

PIZZA

COFFEE SHOP

TAPHOUSE

1. 515 Kitchen & Cocktails 2. The Red Room 3. Sotola Bar & Grill 1. Verve Coffee Roasters 2. Cat & Cloud Coffee Co. 3. Coffeetopia

DELI

1. Zoccoli’s Delicatessen 2. Garden Liquors & Deli 3. Erik’s DeliCafe, New Leaf Community Markets (tie)

DINING WITH A VIEW 1. The Crow’s Nest 2. Firefish Grill 3. Sotola Bar & Grill

GROCERY STORE

1. New Leaf Community Markets 2. Shopper’s Corner

HAPPY HOUR

1. El Palomar Restaurant 2. The Crow’s Nest 3. Hula’s Island Grill

JUICE BAR

1. New Leaf Community Markets 2. Amazon Juices 3. Perfectly Pressed Juice Bar

LATE NIGHT

1. Ferrell’s Donuts 2. Pizza My Heart 3. 515 Kitchen & Cocktails, Saturn Cafe (tie)

1. Pizza my Heart 2. Pleasure Pizza 3. Upper Crust Pizza & Pasta 1. Beer Thirty Bottle Shop & Pour House 2. West End Tap & Kitchen 3. 99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall, Lupulo Craft Beer House (tie)

RESTAURANT

1. Paradise Beach Grille 2. Cafe Cruz 3. Manuel’s Mexican Restaurant, The Hideout (tie)

SUSHI

1. Akira Sushi 2. I Love Sushi 3. Sushi Garden

SWEET TREATS

1. Marini’s Candies 2. The Penny Ice Creamery 3. Yogurtland

WINERY

1. Bargetto Winery 2. Alfaro Family Vineyards & Winery, Beauregard Vineyards (tie) 3. MJA Vineyards

SWELLI ES

HWINNERSH

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PRESENTS

BEER WEEK MAY 2 2 - M AY 2 6 All events take place from 5-9pm and include beer specials, a chance to meet the brewer, and special food pairings. Visit SANTACRUZWAVES.COM/BEERWEEK for details about the music, food, and more at each location.

APTOS

DOWNTOWN

burger. (Aptos)

Assembly

MONDAY, May 22 Featuring Elkhorn Slough Brewing & Steel Bonnet Brewing 7941 Soquel Drive

WEDNESDAY, May 24

Featuring Discretion Brewing & Tanuki Cider 1108 Pacific Ave

burger. (Santa Cruz)

Featuring Shanty Shack Brewing 1520 Mission Street

Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing Catered by Mission St. BBQ 402 Ingalls Street

EASTSIDE

Pour Taproom

New Bohemia Brewing Co (NUBO)

Featuring NUBO 110 Cooper Street

MIDTOWN

WESTSIDE

Seabright Brewery

TUESDAY, May 23 1030 41st Ave

THURSDAY, May 25

East Cliff Brewing Co 21517 East Cliff Drive

Parish Publick House

Featuring SC Ale Works and Uncommon Brewers 841 Almar Ave

FRIDAY, May 26

Wrap-Up Party Live Music with The Joint Chiefs 519 Seabright Ave #107

VISIT SANTACRUZWAVES.COM/BEERWEEK FOR MORE INFORMATION

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2017

PROFESSIONALS BANK

1. Santa Cruz County Bank 2. Lighthouse Bank

BOARD SHAPER

1. Pearson Arrow Surf Shop 2. Ward Coffey Shapes 3. Lance Ebert Surfboards

CREDIT UNION

1. Bay Federal Credit Union 2. Santa Cruz Credit Union

NONPROFIT/ ENVIRONMENTAL 1. Save our Shores 2. Celebrate Recovery 3. Surfrider Foundation

PHOTOGRAPHER

1. Dave “Nelly” Nelson 3. Hirem Chee Photography 3. Ryan “Chachi” Craig

REALTOR

1. Dale Friday 2. Natalia Lockwood 3. Nicole Poli

REAL ESTATE COMPANY 1. David Lyng Real Estate 2. Friday Reality 3. The Brokerage Properties

SALON

1. Vice Salon 2. Urban Groove Hair Salon 3. Rare Bird Salon, Soquel Beauty Bar (tie)

SOLAR COMPANY

1. Sandbar Solar & Electric 2. Allterra Solar 3. Day One Solar Inc.

TATTOO STUDIO

1. Good Omen Tattoo 2. Staircase Tattoo & Body Piercing 3. Mission Street Tattoo & Piercing

TECH COMPANY 1. Plantronics 2. Looker

VIDEOGRAPHER 1. Perry Gerkshow 2. Kyle Buthman

WAXING

1. European Wax Center Capitola, Bella Dawna Esthetic Artistry & Care (tie) 2. Smooth Body Lounge 3. Von Lux Skin & Body

OUTDOOR & HEALTH/ FITNESS GROM (BOY) 1. Fisher Baxter 2. Sam Coffey 3. Cole Sandman

GROM (GIRL) 1. Keanna Miller 2. Esme Brigham 3. Sirena Kaempf

GYM

1. Santa Cruz CORE Fitness + Rehab 2. In-Shape, Toadal Fitness, Kaijin MMA (tie)

LONGBOARDER (MAN) 1. Paul “Steiny” Steinberg 2. Reilly Stone 3. CJ Nelson,

LONGBOARDER (WOMAN) 1. Keanna Miller 2. Biance Dootson 3. Ashley Lloyd

SHORTBOARDER (MAN) 1. Nat Young 2. Ben Coffey 3. John Mel

SHORTBOARDER (WOMAN) 1. Autumn Hays 2. Ashley Held 3. Kim Mayer

SUP SCHOOL

1. Kayak Connection 2. Pearson Arrow Surf Shop, SUP Shack Santa Cruz (tie)

SURF SCHOOL

1. Richard Schmidt 2. Santa Cruz Surf School 3. Club Ed Surf School

YOGA STUDIO

1. Hot Yoga Aptos 2. Santa Cruz Yoga 3. Divintree Yoga and Art Studio, Luma Yoga (tie)

A&E ARTIST

1. Vince Broglio 2. Sarah Jane Morobito 3. Taylor Reinhold

FESTIVAL

1. Capitola Art + Wine Festival 2. Santa Cruz Music Festival 3. Tequila + Taco Music Festival

LIVE MUSIC VENUE 1. Kuumbwa Jazz Center 2. Moe’s Alley 3. The Catalyst

LOCAL BAND

1. Nomalakadoja 2. Extra Large 3. The Expendables

SHOPS BIKE SHOP

1. Bicycle Trip 2. Another Bike Shop 3. Family Cycling Center

CLOTHING SHOP (MEN) 1. Stripe Design Group LLC 2. Pacific Wave Surf Shop 3. So Fresh Clothing

CLOTHING SHOP (WOMEN) 1. Stripe Design Group LLC 2. Zen Island 3. Pacific Wave Surf Shop

GROM STORE

1. Pacific Wave Surf Shop 2. Childish Santa Cruz 3. Santa Cruz Boardroom

HOME DECOR

1. Botanic and Luxe 2. Zen Island 3. Home/Work, Lumen Gallery (tie)

NEW BUSINESS

1. Botanic and Luxe 2. Steamer Lane Supply 3. Shanty Shack Brewery

SKATE SHOP

1. Bill’s Wheels Skateshop 2. Santa Cruz Boardroom 3. Pacific Wave Surf Shop

SURF SHOP

1. O’Neill Surf Shop 2. Pacific Wave Surf Shop 3. Freeline Design Surf Shop

SWELLI ES

HWINNERSH

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The Swellies is going BIG in 2017... We're taking over the MAH! Join us for three levels of fun that will include local bands, djs, brews, wine and food. Space is limited and is guaranteed to sell out. Thursday April 20th @ the MAH. Go to SantaCruzWaves.com to buy your tickets today!

Thank you to our sponsors:

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Favorite Artist

VINCE BROGLIO

D

uring a lull in business brought on by the closure of the surfboard blank manufacturing factory Clark Foam in 2005, the namesake of the surfboard fiberglassing business Vince Broglio Glassworks looked around his studio and found a large amount of leftover resin from boards he had laminated over the years. “People had come in to see my rack, and there would just be all these wild colors and all kinds of crazy stuff,” Broglio says. “Everybody’s going, ‘That looks like art!’ So that’s when I decided to cut my rack up and start doing some sculptures.” Little did he know that he’d one day be the winner of a Swellie for the sculptures and bowls that he continues to make from recycled resin and fiberglass materials. Broglio, who was finishing up some new ocean-themed sculptures and paintings when Santa Cruz Waves called to tell him about his award, says he draws inspiration from “being out in the water, feeling the power of the waves.” He adds, “The energy that the ocean gives off is pretty inspirational.”

(831) 234-7225; theresinartist.com.

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Favorite Cheap Eats

STEAMER LANE SUPPLY

F

ran Grayson’s vision for Steamer Lane Supply (SLS) was born of necessity: She used to routinely find herself hungry after surfing. “I generally never had it together enough to bring a snack, and I didn’t want to give up my spot,” she explains. After hearing the same complaint from numerous Westsiders in the water and on the cliffs, Grayson opened SLS at Lighthouse Field State Beach on West Cliff Drive. While it also sells surf supplies like wax, leashes, sunscreen, T-shirts and hats, the shop’s main stock-in-trade is healthy, affordably priced food—something Grayson has been creating for the better part of the present decade as the owner of a café-on-wheels called The Truck Stop. Some of SLS’s biggest crowd-pleasers are its poke bowls, its spicy tuna sandwich and its pressed quesadillas, among the most popular of which are the breakfast, kale, pulled pork and kimchi quesadillas. On the weekends, Grayson and her crew bring the food truck over to make grass-fed burgers and fish tacos. “Lots of people say that they are the best fish tacos they have ever had,” she notes. SLS also makes its own drinks, including seasonal organic aguas frescas and cold Turkish coffee with coconut cream. The café even has a dog menu that features items like a doggie frittata made from eggs, organic brown rice, cheese and meat scraps. In an effort to keep the beach clean and safe, SLS does not sell any plastic or packaged goods, using only brown bio paper and recyclable aluminum foil to wrap its products. Add to that the fact that it gets all of its produce from local organic farms—and that the state park gets a percentage of every dollar—and customers have every reason to feel good about eating well for a low price.

698 West Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz; steamerlanesc.com.

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Favorite Shortboarder (FEMALE )

AUTUMN HAYS

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PHOTO: KOOKSON

What’s the best wave you caught this past winter? “I had my best wave of the winter at The Lane. It was a fairly big day. I was about to jump off the point when a cleanup set came. The set washed in the whole lineup, so when I jumped off, I was all alone out the back. Shortly after, the set of the day came. I was in perfect position. I took off on the first wave and surfed it all the way from the slot to the surfer statue. It was one of the longest waves of my life—I probably got 12 turns. My legs were burning!”


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Favorite Shortboarder (MALE )

PHOTO: KOOKSON

NAT YOUNG What’s the best wave you caught this past winter? “My best session this year was up at Ocean Beach. It was at the very beginning of this year—probably within the first week of 2017. There was one day up there in particular where the swell was pretty big; it was probably 15-foot faces there, and the winds were perfectly offshore. Ocean Beach is a hard place to get everything to come together, as far as the size of the waves, the wind, the sandbars, and stuff like that. A lot of times when you surf there, it’s hard to be in the right spot, and it’s a lot of work to get on the good waves. But that day I managed to get three really good waves in a row. There was one in particular that stood out. I had just gotten home from Hawaii, and I ended up catching a couple of waves that day that were as good as some waves I’ve had in Hawaii.”

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Our source plantation on reclaimed farmland in Guatemala. TIM DAVIS © 2016 Patagonia, Inc.

We grow our own. The world’s first neoprene-free wetsuits, made with natural rubber from sources that are Forest Stewardship Council ® certified by the Rainforest Alliance. By replacing the neoprene in our full suits with renewable natural rubber tapped from hevea trees, we’re reducing CO2 emissions by up to ~80% in the manufacturing process. Our rubber is sourced from a plantation that meets the rigorous standards of the Forest Stewardship Council—meaning the trees aren’t planted on newly clear-cut rainforest, like some of the world’s supply, and biodiversity and workers’ rights are protected. Refining the rubber through the Yulex® method that removes over 99% of impurities, we end up with a strong, stretchy and nonsensitizing elastomer with performance characteristics that equal those of conventional neoprene.

V I S I T U S AT PATAG O N I A O U T L E T S A N TA C R U Z I 415 R I V E R S T R E E T

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Favorite New Business & Favorite Home Décor

BOTANIC AND LUXE

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round the age of 5, Leilani Kanter and Ariel Carlson took their first steps into the business world by selling tropical flowers and leis to passing tourists at the end of their driveways on the Hawaiian island of Kauai. After high school, the friends went their separate ways, with Carlson studying landscape architecture and Kanter studying holistic nutrition. “At the back of our minds, we both always knew we would go into business together,” Kanter notes. With several years’ worth of experience in their respective fields now under their belts, Kanter and Carlson have reconverged and launched Botanic and Luxe, a lifestyle store that carries plants, home goods and décor, gifts and personal care products. The shop offers a broad selection of plants to beautify local living spaces, as well as Bay Area-made products such as Santa Cruz-crafted Mutari Chocolate’s single-origin sipping chocolate, jewelry from Mountain Side Made and Alyse Lattanzio, and Golden Bear Bitters cocktail mixers that are made with organic and wildforaged ingredients in Carmel Valley. Kanter says that one of her and Carlson’s greatest joys is being part of their customers’ lives. “It’s such a rewarding feeling to help someone find the perfect thing for their home or just the right gift for a wedding or birthday,” she says. “We really enjoy visiting with people, and we’re looking forward to getting to know even more of Santa Cruz the longer we’re open.”

701 Front St., Santa Cruz; 515-7710; botanicandluxe.com.

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CATAMARAN SAILING

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Favorite Tattoo Parlor

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o matter how many times you’ve gone under the needle, you’re bound to get a little nervous whenever you put yourself at the mercy of a tattoo artist. Well, relax—you’re in good hands at Good Omen. The wall-to-wall five-star reviews on Good Omen’s Yelp page bear witness to the solid reputation of this business, whose founders, Aaron Cooper and Tim Buonagurio, have more than 40 years of combined tattooing experience. Now in its fifth year, the shop disposes of all equipment after use rather than re-sterilizing. Cooper says his and Buonagurio’s original vision for Good Omen was to open a shop that “did not have that typical rock-star-tattoo-shop, overly inflated-ego vibe. We wanted to make a friendlier environment for the customer. Getting tattooed is already stressful enough.” He attributes the shop’s success to the fact that he and the rest of the staff keep things simple and make the clients feel at home. “We joke; we laugh; we keep their minds as busy as possible so they are not focusing on getting tattooed,” he notes. “We also treat all customers how we would want to be treated if we were to walk into a business. From the smallest tattoos to the largest tattoos, each one will get the same attention to detail.”

1025 Water St., Santa Cruz; 425-1107; goodomentattoo.com.

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Sunrise or Sunset Photo

JEFF SCHWAB

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S A N C

Protestors march through downtown Santa Cruz during the Women's March on Jan. 21. Many participants showed solidarity with immigrants' rights. PHOTO: MICHAEL DANIEL

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U A R Y Both the City and the County of Santa Cruz have reaffirmed their “sanctuary” status, establishing our jurisdictions as safe spaces for undocumented immigrants. But in the face of the Trump administration’s controversial new immigration policies, how far can local policy really go? By JOEL HERSCH

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n the early morning hours of Monday, Feb. 13, with the sound of a police helicopter roaring above the Beach Flats neighborhood and armored vehicles bearing the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) insignia blocking off several streets, heavily armed officers in combat gear zeroed in on the Nueva Vista apartment complex. The operation, which was conducted by the DHS Investigations (HSI) unit with support from the Santa Cruz Police Department, was the culmination of a years'-long investigation of suspected members of MS-13, a notorious street gang with origins in El Salvador. They had warrants for 10 men wanted for crimes including multiple murders and extortion of a local business. Knowing that the subjects were likely armed, police ordered the apartment complex’s residents—

mostly Latino immigrant families, some of whom were undocumented—to come outside with their hands on their heads. Similar gang raids by federal agents were simultaneously taking place in a total of six locations across the county. Ten suspects were taken into custody. A sweep of the Beach Flats apartments afterward revealed guns and machetes, police said. But in the days that followed, a troubling realization circulated through the immigrant community, making its way to the SCPD and the Santa Cruz City Council: the agents from HSI had arrested 10 additional residents based solely on their status as undocumented immigrants. The City of Santa Cruz is a sanctuary jurisdiction, meaning no local resources can be utilized to enforce immigration law,

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“Leaders are prepared to stand for their values, even if it means paying a price. We’re a wealthy state, we’re a wealthy community, and we’re not going to sell out our most vulnerable population—not to the Trump administration, not to anybody.” —SANCTUARY SANTA CRUZ ORGANIZER PAUL JOHNSTON

which put the SCPD in a compromising position after its involvement in the raid. Police Chief Kevin Vogel stated during a press conference that HSI boldly lied to SCPD about the immigration enforcement aspect of the raid, which police say occurred after local officers had left the scene. The incident illustrates a deepening disconnect between the policies of local jurisdictions and how the new president’s administration is handling immigration law—with about 21,000 undocumented individuals in Santa Cruz County caught in the middle, unsure of what tomorrow holds for them and their families. Under President Donald Trump’s Jan. 25 executive order, “Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States,” new rules make the nation’s estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants fit new criteria for deportation. The administration has stated that their priority for removal focuses on undocumented individuals who “pose a threat to public safety,” including anyone who has simply been accused of a crime. But immigrant rights groups say the level of discretion given to authorities is so broad that just about anyone lacking documentation could be apprehended, detained and expelled from the country. With this hostility from the new administration, it has fallen on local jurisdictions to take a stand for their undocumented population’s sense of security—and that has taken place in the form of more than 300 declarations and

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resolutions of “sanctuary” status across the country. There is no legal definition for a sanctuary jurisdiction, though a core aspect is policy that dictates that a city or county’s law enforcement agency does not facilitate Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) efforts, such as inquiring into people’s legal status, jail staff honoring extended detainment requests, or proactively reporting information about inmates to the DHS. The cities of Santa Cruz and Watsonville have both had sanctuary policies for many years—Santa Cruz since 1985. Both cities reaffirmed their sanctuary directives in the week prior to Trump’s inauguration, and the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors adopted a “Resolution to Maintain Trust and Safety for Local Immigrants” around the same time. The latter states that upholding trust between California’s immigrant residents and local agencies is “essential to carrying out basic local functions … and that trust is threatened when local agencies are involved in immigration enforcement.” But, as the federal government ramps up what could potentially serve as a mass deportation apparatus— including a mandate to hire 10,000 new ICE officers—how much can sanctuary policy really stand in the way? Paul Johnston, who is a public sociologist affiliated with UC Santa Cruz and a lead organizer for the local group Sanctuary Santa Cruz, says that policy

is a key component, but as deportation efforts increase, it will require bootson-the-ground community activism— “people who are wiling to take a stand,” he says. Johnston says that under the executive order, the definition of who can be deported has been so significantly expanded that innumerable hardworking, law-abiding families will be split up by ICE raids. “That’s a hole that could suck in an awful lot of good people,” he says. A number of the undocumented residents who were arrested during the Feb. 13 raid were taken to a DHS detention facility, served with immigration papers, and allowed to go home with ankle bracelets, meaning future deportation could be in store. Moving forward, some community members are prepared to do everything in their power to keep these kinds of arrests from taking place. In conjunction with Sanctuary Santa Cruz, which has more than 300 volunteer members, local organizers have also established a group known as Your Allied Rapid Response (YARR). The formation of YARR enables a rapid response network of locals—approximately 300—who say they are prepared to interfere with ICE incursions. According to Sanctuary Santa Cruz coordinator Ernestina Saldaña, members of YARR are willing to “peacefully obstruct” ICE deportation efforts at targeted individuals’ homes and assist in any other ways possible. “For immigrants who are targeted and


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On Sunday, Feb. 5, hundreds of people, including immigrant families, gathered at Hartnell College in Salinas for an immigration town hall with Congressman Jimmy Panetta. A number of attendees wore headphones for English to Spanish translation. PHOTO: JOEL HERSCH

manage to escape the neighborhood, [YARR members] will also help them get to a safe place,” she says. Some members of the YARR network are also willing to lend their own homes as safe houses for targeted immigrants for “anywhere from a week to six months,” says Saldaña, who was born in Mexico and came to the United States 28 years ago without documents. It took her 10 years of bureaucratic hoop jumping to acquire legal status, which she says explains why so many people come into the country illegally. Following the gang raids, Saldaña says that her trust in the SCPD has dampened significantly. However, she holds out hope for immigrant rights in Santa Cruz, where she feels the community has demonstrated a determination to make all people feel safe. “I refuse to

In the days that followed, a troubling realization circulated through the community: the agents had arrested 10 additional residents based solely on their status as undocumented immigrants. allow the fear of what happened destroy that feeling,” she tells Santa Cruz Waves. “That’s why I’m volunteering with Sanctuary [Santa Cruz]—to ensure I live the rest of my days with peace and freedom by my side, able to see the beauty surrounding me and able to show

this to my grandchildren.” According to Johnston, it is these kinds of grassroots efforts, and the willingness to stand up for neighbors when they need help, that begins to truly define the nature of “sanctuary status.” “These actions are a reflec-

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“I refuse to allow the fear of what happened destroy that feeling. That’s why I’m volunteering with Sanctuary [Santa Cruz]—to ensure I live the rest of my days with peace and freedom by my side, able to see the beauty surrounding me and able to show this to my grandchildren.”— SANCTUARY SANTA CRUZ COORDINATOR ERNESTINA SALDAÑA

Sanctuary Santa Cruz coordinator Ernestina Saldaña pictured at Cabrillo College, where she discussed immigration policy and sanctuary. PHOTO: MICHAEL DANIEL

tion of our culture,” says Johnston, who, prior to academia, organized for the United Farm Workers Union. “The most important goal for us right now is helping the thousands of families that are panicking to get access to the information they need to know their rights, to have a plan to protect themselves, and to take care of their kids in the event that ICE does come to their door. “We’re heading into a period of struggle across this country and it’s a time when we’re going to have to reach out to each other, support each other, and move forward together,” Johnston says.

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Deputy City Manager Scott Collins says that since the Feb. 13 operation, the city has been working to restore the trust it lost within the immigrant community. He says that the city is establishing new immigrant outreach services and hiring a new employee to assist immigrants struggling with deportation and legal issues. City schools were heavily impacted following the arrests of undocumented residents. Attendance across the district plummeted, and it was determined that many students stayed home out of fear that deporta-

tion enforcement could be occurring throughout the city. “Parents were worried about their kids, so a huge component of rebuilding trust is through the school district,” Collins says. As of press time, the city was working with Rep. Jimmy Panetta (D-Carmel) and Sen. Kamala Harris to attain clarity on why the gang enforcement operation happened the way it did. What they discover will inform SCPD’s decision to work with HSI in the future. “It’s going to be hard to trust that organization moving forward,” Collins says. On Tuesday, Feb. 28, after months of pressure from Sanctuary Santa Cruz and various community members, the city council replaced its sanctuary resolution with an ordinance—a move Saldaña says establishes strong accountability for public officials and how they uphold sanctuary policy. Collins says that, legally, immigration enforcement falls under the purview of the federal government, and that there are not laws preventing ICE from conducting incursions locally, despite a sanctuary ordinance, but that the city’s police force will not be involved—if they know that immigration enforcement is occurring. During the Feb. 28 city council meeting, Deputy Police Chief Dan Flippo stated: “We are not trying to distance ourselves from the gang enforcement aspect of this case [with HSI] but the immigration enforce-


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ment during the raid shouldn’t have occurred … We don’t enforce immigration law—it’s beyond the scope of a local jurisdiction.” In regard to the way the HSI maneuvered the immigration arrests, Chief Kevin Vogel added that he wonders “where else in America this is happening.” The county sheriff’s office, headed by Sheriff Jim Hart, does not honor ICE hold requests—which enable federal agents to come apprehend undocumented detainees even after their release date—nor enforce immigration law in any way. Sgt. Chris Clark says that acting on behalf of ICE puts local law enforcement further out of tune with immigrant populations, who become less inclined to report crimes, cultivating a new category of victims. In 2016, seven inmates were released to ICE out of an approximate 8,700 total bookings in the Santa Cruz County Jail, Clark says. While the protocol at the sheriff’s office for undocumented individuals meets the basic standards of sanctuary status, by contemporary definitions, Clark distances the department from association with sanctuary terminology. “It’s not to my knowledge that we’ve adopted that title [of] sanctuary county,” Clark says. “But we’re taking all the measures we can to protect the rights of the people who live here in our county and keep people safe.” The phrase “sanctuary city” can have very different meanings depending on which side of the coin it is examined from. To one person, it may suggest organizational criminal activity and harboring criminals, while to another, it might convey protection of civil liberties and the defense of one’s community. “It depends on who you talk to and what they mean by the terms,” Johnston says. The executive order has language that empowers the attorney general to designate jurisdictions as “sanctuary” for the purpose of “punishing them,” which Trump has suggested could be actionable by withholding funding. The term could

Paul Johnston shares details of the work being done by Sanctuary Santa Cruz outside of the Santa Cruz City Council chambers. PHOTO: MICHAEL DANIEL

“We’re heading into a period of struggle across this country and it’s a time when we’re going to have to reach out to each other, support each other, and move forward together.” —PAUL JOHNSTON

also lend ICE further priority on what jurisdictions they choose to target. “So,” Johnston says, “I can understand [the sheriff’s office] not wanting to put a target on their back. But, by the policies employed [there], and by everything the board of supervisors has set in place, this county is absolutely a sanctuary county.” Sanctuary policies set forth around the country put local governments at odds with an administration that has demonstrated zero qualms with pushing its powers on states, counties and cities, and it’s likely that Trump

will go to great lengths to make localities tow his line on immigration. But, in Johnston’s eyes, any repercussions that come as a result of standing by sanctuary policies will be worth it. “Ultimately, from what I’ve been hearing from major jurisdictions like San Francisco, L.A., and the state itself, leaders are prepared to stand for their values, even if it means paying a price,” Johnston says. “We’re a wealthy state, we’re a wealthy community, and we’re not going to sell out our most vulnerable population—not to the Trump administration, not to anybody.”

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Ventana Surfboards shaper Martijn Shiphout on the art of handplanes By NEAL KEARNEY

re the choked lineups getting you down? Do you feel as though, with all of the ego and aggression in the water, surfing has lost its fun? I hear you. But don’t give up: open your curtains and put down the ice cream, because there’s still hope! One of the best ways to escape the madness of the surf scene wherever you are is to body surf. Pulling into closeout barrels on your stomach with only your pals around is one of the most thrilling and pure forms of wave riding there is. And while it doesn’t require anything except you and your arms, there are a few accessories that can enhance the experience. First there are flippers, which help you zoom around the water with greater ease, increasing your wave count. Second on that list are handplanes. Some are plastic, some are carbon fiber, and most have a hand strap to give you increased flotation and propulsion during your ride and more control in the tube. For the last seven years, Martijn Shiphout of Ventana Surfboards has been upping the handplane game with handmade models crafted out of recycled wood. Waves recently caught up with Shiphout to get the lowdown on his miniature joy-makers. What kind of wood do you use and where do you get it? The kinds of wood I use vary, but I have my staple: redwood. Most everything that I build has redwood in it and that comes from the fact I love working with it— it’s a beautiful wood, both to work with and visually. Also, it’s everywhere here in Santa Cruz! … It’s also light, which is nice. We work with Santa Cruz Guitar Company and get all of their waste wood. I’ll repurpose their wood, a lot of which is exotic species of wood that there’s not much of and [that is] hard to come by, but I can make use of small bits. We get a lot of cedar from the Monterey Bay Aquarium, as well.

Why wood? Wood has different characteristics. Wood handplanes, like a wood surfboard, are going to be heavier than … a foam or plastic handplane. So you get a little more weight out of it. I still try to keep them as light as possible [because] you’ve got a rocket attached to your hand, hitting you in the face. The materials are up to the consumer, but of course we are trying to incorporate exotic and historic wood into the handplane. What makes a good handplane? What I look for in any handplane is: how comfortable does it feel strapped to your hand, and do you think you could rest your hand on it for an hour-plus? To me, it’s also important to have a good bottom contour and a little bit of rocker in it. Are they only for beach breaks/shore-pound use? In general, yes, however I’ve done pretty well at Capitola on some big days where you could easily get 150-yard-long rides from the outside all the way in—but it gets pretty tiring. The ones I build have a standard “fish” shape, and on a bigger wave you can easily get both hands on there and push your upper body out of the water. So they work well at point breaks, too. What was your best handplaning session? My best time was at Moss Landing: [it was] the longest ride, getting barreled and coming out on the shoulder and actually cutting back into the pocket—I never knew you could do that on a handplane until I managed to pull it off. Why should someone give handplaning a try? I’ve found that handplaning and body surfing are the most fun [types of] surfing. Everyone’s just having a good time—no one’s worried about priority or anything. To me, handplaning is like becoming a kid again and just having a great time.

PHOTO: DAVID DENNIS

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B R Y A N

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S O N ENGINEERING CREATIVITY FROM FLASH TO FINISH By ALOE DRISCOLL

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ut in front of his house on the Eastside of Santa Cruz, Bryan Garrison wraps up a game of frisbee with his kids, 12-year-old Kirra and 10-year-old Kadin, and heads into his backyard. Piles of shells, jars full of sea glass, and art projects in various stages of construction are strewn across the deck. A tree house that Garrison built winds around an old tree, with a rockclimbing wall tacked onto the partition in front. It’s no surprise, given his imaginative creations, that Garrison started off in the engineering program at San Francisco State University before switching to industrial design. As a student, he saw the dawn of the digital age, borrowing floppy disk cameras from the school to use for his projects. In 1999, after earning his bachelor’s degree, he moved to Santa Cruz, where he founded a landscape company called Dreamscape and put his design background to work.

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Darshan Gooch drops into a hair-raising left.

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BEHIND THE LENS Have other mentors influenced your photography?

Dave [“Nelly”] Nelson has been really great about sharing information, especially on equipment and on the surf side of things. He’s always open to questions. Lanny Headrick showed me how to do wood-transfer prints. I’ve been really drawn to that process. It’s kind of like Christmas. You lay your image down on the wood and it has to dry. You don’t really know what you'll get until you peel the paper away. I have been working with Craig Jones and Jeff Bettencourt on creating images from my photography and putting them on the faces of the Wave Clock [an app and a physical clock that displays real-time wave height, swell period, and tide data] in a variety of different mediums.

Garrison doing his best curious seal imitation.

Do you have a favorite technique?

“YOU LAY YOUR IMAGE DOWN ON THE WOOD AND IT HAS TO DRY. YOU DON’T REALLY KNOW WHAT YOU'LL GET UNTIL YOU PEEL THE PAPER AWAY.” Over the past few years, photography has become Garrison’s main focus, and his approach is as dynamic as his skill set. He engineers images from start to finish, capturing iconic moments in the water and on land, and experimenting with unique substrates—like metal, wood, and fiberglass—for his prints. After a tour of his burstingwith-creativity yard, the lensman filled Waves in on his process. When did you start surfing?

I spent a lot of time bodysurfing and bodyboarding in Ventura as a kid. My dad got me my first surfboard when I was 10 or 12. But surfing was never a mainstream part of my life until I lived in San Francisco and I was working in a snowboard warehouse with a crew that was into surfing. They took me out to

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the jetty at Half Moon Bay. I remember I thought I was going to die and they were all laughing at me. How did you get into photography?

I’ve always been attracted to photography. The whole reason I got into surf photography was I wanted to get pictures of Kadin and Kirra surfing. I’ve been down to Baja with my kids a few times. I wanted to get images of them but I could only do it on land or with a GoPro. It was fun for awhile, but I was looking to do more. … Ryan “Chachi” Craig had a flash housing for sale, which I thought looked like a great opportunity. He showed me how to work the whole thing and set it up. We shot some wave photos one evening and he showed me how to use a flash. Talk about getting hooked. It was an unreal feeling.

On the surfing level, it has to be flash, because you have such a small window, typically, to work in. The flash only bursts once. That’s where you really have to know your surfer, what they’re going to do and what they’re capable of. You have just that half a second—or whatever it is—to capture that moment. I don’t like to use tripods that much. I don’t like setting my camera up in one spot and leaving it there. The camera is usually in my hands; I’m walking around and moving. It’s rare that you’ll see me standing in one spot for very long unless there’s a specific angle I’m working on that day. What are some of your biggest accomplishments as a photographer?

Getting a spread of Kyle Jouras in [the June/July 2016 issue of] Santa Cruz Waves was a proud moment. He and I had been working so hard together for a long time, poking around in those nooks and crannies, finding that backdrop. Getting that [February 2017 surf photography] publication in Blue [a Japanese magazine] came about through Ashley and Alex Thomson. They asked me to shoot that, and I was really stoked to do it.


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Jesse Colombo casually sets up for some time behind the curtain.

Do you have anything special lined up for 2017?

My biggest show this year is going to be at Sawyer Land & Sea Supply on April 15. It’s going to be boutique style, which lends [itself] toward the artistic side of what I’m doing. I have prints on metal, but I’m also doing wood-transfer prints and stuff on fiberglass. [I’m also partnering] with JP Garner and Zuey Tleimat from The Huda House to develop my imagery into line art and put it on T-shirts. We launched the KJ shirt this winter and [are] in the works of getting another design out. I’m trying to put some stuff together with groups of people around town … a couple [of] trips a year, being the photographer. I want to be able

“THE CAMERA IS USUALLY IN MY HANDS; I’M WALKING AROUND AND MOVING. IT’S RARE THAT YOU’LL SEE ME STANDING IN ONE SPOT FOR VERY LONG.” to travel, using a photojournalistic approach. It would be great to travel with some great surfers, but going with great people is more important to me. Is there etiquette to surf photography?

There should be. Last year, when the harbor started breaking, I was just starting surf photography, got excited

and posted a few pictures. Luckily, I was told nicely to stop that. [Laughs.] I was grateful for that experience, because it made me look at what I was doing in a different way, and see that there are more people involved than just me. I have a ton of imagery of some really great days just sitting here, waiting for the right time to expose them.

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X Style master Bryce Suba dancing on glass.

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X Yes, that is a square chunk of foam with no fins. Josh Denning does the impossible during an electric evening on the Eastside.

“THE FLASH ONLY BURSTS ONCE. THAT’S WHERE YOU REALLY HAVE TO KNOW YOUR SURFER, WHAT THEY’RE GOING TO DO AND WHAT THEY’RE CAPABLE OF." What advice can you offer aspiring photographers on instant gratification?

If you’re shooting some spot that doesn’t break that often, hold on to it. Don’t post it today. It takes away from what I feel is special about this coast. You can surf an hour north or south from Santa Cruz every day. There’s somewhere that’s going to have

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the right wind, the right swell. If everyone knows where those little nooks and crannies are every single day of the year, it takes away from the appeal of the search. Find Garrison online at wetfeetphoto.com and on Instagram @wetfeetphoto.


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X A lone surfer prepares to enter the frigid waters at Steamer Lane.

X Darshan Gooch is a favorite subject for many photographers, including Garrison. The guy can pretty much ride anything with style and flow.

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Timmy Reyes grew up in Huntington Beach but spends much of his time in NorCal on the hunt for uncrowded perfection. We think we know which surf city he likes best. PHOTO: CHARLIE WITMER

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CHAMPAGNE

WINTER Skier Cody Townsend reflects on his most memorable session during last winter’s epic conditions

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OUTDOOR

PHOTO: MING POON

“Rarity is a key ingredient of that which is special. For instance, if you drink champagne every day, its illustrious and celebratory appeal is lost. Which is why the winter of 2017 in the Sierras—preceded by six years of arid, snowless droughts—was the true ‘champagne season.’    With more than 20 feet of snow in the month of January alone, runs, lines and peaks that can go

many years without being rideable were suddenly rideable. On Jan. 14, photographer Ming Poon, skier Michelle Parker and I went to a face that hasn’t seen rideable snow in at least six years. Its low elevation, sun-baked aspects and steep, gnarled terrain holds little to no snow in most seasons. We climbed more than 2,000 feet off the lake to a lookout that took in nearly every

peak in the Tahoe basin. Descending at sunset, we ripped turns down a continuously steep, rolling alley of slash turns and high-speed arcs down to our cars. The only thing missing at the bottom was a champagne toast.”—Cody Townsend Find Townsend online at codytownsend.com and on Instagram @codytownsend. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 9 9


Photo: A. HERSHEY

E X A M S AVA I L A B L E

7 D AY S A W E E K 1101 Pacific Ave E, Santa Cruz 831.466.3937 | eyeqsantacruz.com

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Up the

RIO DULCE ILLUSTRATION AND STORY BY JOEL HERSCH

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ADVENTURE

W

hen I was 14 years old, I had been living aboard a small sailboat with my family for close to two years, vagabonding throughout Mexico and Central America. While migrating north along the Caribbean coast of Guatemala in 2000, we decided to seek out a storm-protected harbor up the Rio Dulce, where a recent string of pirate attacks had earned the area a bad reputation.

Some sailors traveling along the river had taken to hiring local off-duty policía—men in uniforms who would perch on boat decks with revolvers on their belts. The idea was to send a message to any pirates who may be watching: “This vessel is not worth your trouble.” Other boats went up in convoys of twos and threes, many of them also armed—especially the Americans. But that wasn’t my parents’ way. Instead, my dad, Marc—with his oversized black mustache and aviator sunglasses across his face—and I sat in deck chairs on the stern of the boat with spearguns propped over our shoulders like Civil War re-enactors and listened to The Doors greatest hits over the speakers.

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The hope was that any potential attackers, perhaps studying us from just beyond the veil of mangroves and mangle trees, might mistake our spearguns for rifles. Better yet, maybe they’d think we were crazy enough to try and use them in a showdown. The music and the rumble of the diesel engine echoed out over the emerald waters. Towering limestone cliffs flanked the gorge and the sounds of the jungle played off their walls. My mom, Monica, read a book in the shade as we powered up into the outflowing “sweet river,” leaving the open ocean and the small town of Livingston in our wake. My parents had decided we would ditch our tight quarters for a while and take a bus into Guatemalan high country to see the ancient Mayan ruins of Tikal. But to do that, we needed a secure harbor to leave our home, a 42-foot monohull named Songline. Despite the talk of piracy, the Rio Dulce was known for dozens of well-reputed marinas up river, on Lake Izabal, where sailors could leave their boats for weeks on end, safe from Caribbean storms. The rumors circulating the Rio Dulce were frightening, but there were horror stories almost everywhere you went in Central America, and many were doubtlessly inflated as they were passed around. Gossip among “cruisers”—international individuals and families living aboard boats— was like a currency, but for kids such as myself, the real pastime was finding other kids and seeking out adventure or trouble. Sometimes friends abounded, and other

The hope was that any potential attacker ... might mistake our spearguns for rifles. Better yet, maybe they’d think we were crazy enough to try and use them. times there was no one. The news making its way around the sailing community included a recent attack on a cruising family from the United States. Guatemalan pirates— usually bandits in dugout canoes with outboard motors, equipped with guns and machetes—had boarded the boat and demanded money. In the process, their boy, a 14 year old like me, was shot in the chest. Fortunately, we learned, he had been quickly evacuated to a hospital and survived. The same year, armed men hijacked a commuter ferry, killing five people, and another cruiser was found shot to death aboard his boat while at anchor.

Still, countless other sailors talked mostly of the country’s immense beauty and the genuine and welcoming nature of most of the locals. These travelers tended to believe that stories of these gruesome attacks and ruthless pirates were blown out of proportion. According to the U.S. embassy, which recommends “exercising caution” in the remote Rio Dulce region, piracy in Guatemala is part of a larger trend of lawlessness in the nation. “The police force is young, inexperienced and under-funded and the judicial system is weak, overcrowded and inefficient. Criminals, armed with an impressive array of weapons, know that there is little chance they will be caught and punished for their crimes,” reads a 2007 U.S. government crime and safety report, which goes on to say, “The number of violent crimes reported by U.S. citizens and other foreigners has increased in recent years. Incidents include, but are not limited to, assault, theft, armed robbery, home invasion, carjacking, rape, kidnapping, and murder.” (In 2004, four years after my family’s departure, owners of some of the major establishments on the Rio Dulce, along with government assistance, hired the Guatemalan Navy to patrol the river, according to online cruising forums. Many of the marinas in the area are now secured by armed guards with watch dogs, allowing the Rio Dulce to “flourish” as a foreigners’ cruising destination.) It took a full day for Songline to motor 20 miles up the river. Our speed under engine power was

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7 knots, conservatively, but the river flowed against us, reducing our speed to a slow crawl. All around us the jungle loomed and rose steeply into mountains obscured by mist and clouds. There were small communities of Mayans, dressed in embroidered traditional garb. Young women washed clothes, men fished, and boys leapt playfully off of low branches into the cool waters. They seemed happy, busy and vibrant. While the cruising community sounded their alarms over the incidences of piracy, the history of violence and tragedy in the country, which I gathered bit by bit, made the recent spree of attacks on foreigners seem almost melodramatic. During our four months in the country, I learned about a 36-year civil war in Guatemala in which a general commanded a campaign that massacred more than 200,000 Mayan Indians, mostly in the course of just three years during the '80s. Over the next few months, we heard firsthand accounts of the horrors that befell families, and on one occasion were invited into an indigenous family’s home on the outskirts of Guatemala City to watch video they had secretly taken documenting the genocide. My mom and I stepped outside when the footage became disturbing, but my father stayed. As we motored deeper into the jungle, the sun sank lower. Two Mayan girls around my age rowed nearby in a dugout canoe. I waved at them and they waved back, smiling—20 yards away but a world apart, I thought, noticing

that one of them had an electric smile and high cheekbones. We wound our way up the Rio Dulce without incident. The spearguns were laid on the deck, forgotten, within an hour. And if any pirates on the shore nefariously evaluated our worth, we were deemed not worth the sting. Maybe it was the wet laundry hanging across the deck, or perhaps the tune of Jim Morrison’s “Hello, I Love You” rambling across the riverbanks was enough for them to second-guess their motives. We emerged from the river’s narrows at dusk into a wider, open body of water. The sun hung low and red like a ripe papaya. Waterfront businesses sprang from the riverbanks and a massive bridge

I wanted to be back in Santa Cruz, doing “normal” things— playing on sports teams, having friends, maybe going on dates—not always saying goodbye.

spanned the distance, connecting Lake Izabal with a town called El Relleno. The smell of oil and trash lingered in the humid air, and as darkness filled in, large bats crisscrossed the violet sky. We found our new digs, temporarily at least, at a dock slip in a secluded yacht club called Suzanna’s Laguna. There was access to electricity and water, and it featured a small restaurant and bar with a tin roof, a book exchange, and showers. It reminded me of a trailer park, and that would have been fine except that there were no other kids. For a short time there, I wanted to be back in Santa Cruz, doing “normal” things—playing on sports teams, having friends, maybe going on dates—not always saying goodbye. Homeschool was a daily routine, which included 8th grade algebra lessons, assigned reading and writing, and multiple choice quizzes. Class ended with illustration, because it was the only subject with which I would lose track of time. The marina was full of melancholy, self-satisfied adults, most of whom asked me in one way or another if I truly understood what an extraordinary experience I was having. I wasn’t certain what they wanted to hear, but I wondered if I could escape in a dugout canoe, or perhaps an inner tube from the market, and float back down the Rio Dulce to meet the Mayan girls who had smiled at me. I was pretty sure they weren’t concerned with what was extraordinary; they probably just wanted to be happy.

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TAKE A LOOK IN THE MIRROR: Chances are you’re wearing an environmental nightmare. ‘Fast fashion’ is devastating the planet—here's how you can help

W

hen we talk about our environmental footprints, we often consider the food we eat, how we get around, and the water and energy we use. But what about what we wear? Each year, the global fashion industry churns out enough clothing to give every person on the planet 20 new items. Of course, it doesn’t work out this evenly—Americans, the vigorous consumers we are, buy an average of 64 items per person, per year. By mass-producing low-cost clothing and pushing a high turnover of styles and trends, major apparel brands have steered us to shop more over the years: we buy a whopping 400 percent more clothing than we did 20 years ago, according to the documentary The True Cost. (As a result, we’re adding massive amounts of textiles—82 pounds annually per person—to landfills.) This ushered in the age of “fast fashion,” when cheap, low-quality

By ELIZABETH LIMBACH

clothes are used up and tossed out as casually as an order of fries. And just like the amount listed on a drive-thru menu, the low cost of a fast-fashion item masks myriad environmental and social costs: Behind the $18 price of a nylon skirt is the fact that 70 million trees are logged each year to make synthetic fabrics. The price tag on a T-shirt includes 713 gallons of water and a 5-mile-drive’s worth of carbon emissions. And a trendy new jacket may seem like a bargain, but it made a river in China run red. (See the sidebar titled “The Dirty Truth” for more details.) Fashion’s high price is a product of the supply chain, as well as consumer habits. It’s shaped by every stage in a garment’s life cycle, from how the materials were sourced, manufactured, dyed and packaged to how the finished product was transported, cared for and disposed of. The trillion dollar-plus fashion industry, which relies largely on cheap

labor in developing nations, is rife with workers’ rights and safety issues—the severity of which earned international attention when a garment factory collapsed in Bangladesh in 2013, killing more than 1,100 people. The years since have seen a rise in ethical fashion campaigns and actions. Sustainable clothing is also having its day in the limelight, with a blossoming crop of eco brands and plenty of buzz (even on the red carpet, from Emma Roberts’ “Red Carpet Green Dress” statement at the 2017 Oscars to Emma Watson’s 2016 Met Gala gown made entirely from trash). But this isn’t a problem we can shop our way out of: while eco-friendly and ethical clothes are certainly preferable, they still require resources to produce and transport, and they don’t help curb waste. To make a real dent in this cycle, we need to change our habits. Read on to learn what you can do.

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The DIRTY TRUTH 1.2 7 STEPS DROP IN

ENVIRONMENT

70 million

$

TRILLION The size of the global

FOR A GREENER CLOSET

The number of trees logged every year to create fabrics including rayon, viscose, modal and lyocell.

fashion industry, with more than $250 billion spent annually in the United States. SOURCE: U.S. Congress, Joint Economic Committee

SOURCE: University of Iowa, Office of Sustainability

1. REDUCE. Shop less. Own less.

The pivotal first step in slowing the waste stream is slowing consumption.

200 TONS

2. BUY INVESTMENT PIECES.

Keep a fairly minimal closet comof water are required prised mostly of timeless, highto produce one ton quality staples. of fabric.A bigger upfront cost now means a bigger payoff in the fuSOURCE: Natural Resources Defense Council ture: Well-made clothes last longer, diminishing the cycle of spending and waste.

3. GET TO KNOW YOUR LOCAL SEAMSTRESS, SHOE REPAIRER, ETC. Why toss a gar-

CO2

ment when it can be fixed? Don’t let ripped, scuffed or stained clothing languish in your closet. Instead of replacing a damaged item with something that will, inevitably, also The fashion industry fall apart, make the small trek to the is the second largest industrial local after tailorthe to oil getindustry. it repaired. Upkeep polluter, likeThe this makes particular sense with SOURCE: Danish Fashion Institute expensive investment pieces that you’ll stillThe want to wear (and that climate impact of one is roughly to from willT-shirt still be stylish)equal 10 years thenow. carbon footprint of driving a down on While you’re at it, cut passenger car for 5 miles. your annual holey-sock disposal by SOURCE: “Sustainable Apparel Materials,” MIT learning to darn, and become more mindful ofThe overwashing increase in clothes (a waste of water and aa shirt wearison fabrics). carbon emissions when worn four times versus 50 times.

2ND

FIVE

550%

DANTE CALCAGNO SOURCE:PHOTO: Zady.com

4. BUY WISELY. When you do

shop, consider brands that have ethical practices and use sustainable materials and methods. (See the "Clean Clothes" sidebar for more info.)

5. REUSE.

When you get the itch for a new look, try secondhand troves like Crossroads Trading Co., on Pacific Avenue, and The Closet Shopper, on Front Street. Shop your own closet for items you may have forgotten about or that can be “upcycled” into something new and different. Have a fancy occasion coming up? Instead of buying an outfit you’ll only wear once, consider borrowing one from a friend or utilizing services like Rent the Runway (renttherunway.com).

6. SELL, SWAP AND DONATE. Take a three-pronged approach to offloading your wearable, but unwanted, clothes: first, try to sell the nicer items to a used clothing store. Next, let your buddies dig through the pile. Better yet, arrange a clothing swap— a get-together where, perhaps over drinks and appetizers, friends offer up unwanted clothes and choose from what other people brought. Donate everything that’s left to a local charity

64

like Goodwill Industries (204 Union St.), Hope Services (220 Lincoln St.) or the Salvation Army Family Store (812 The average number of Pacific Ave.). clothing items Americans purchase each year.

7. SAY A PROPER GOODBYE.

SOURCE: Overdressed: The Shockingly

No matter what, don’t condemn yourFashion, Elizabeth High Cost of Cheap Cline unwanted clothes to eternity in the dump. For clothes that are no longer wearable, consider your recycling options: can you turn them into something new (a pillow case, quilt patch, or sock puppet for the kids), or use them as rags (and cut down on your paper towel use, while you’re at it)? If clothing is not worth giving to friends, donating to charity, or Thenew, average upcycling into something it is amount of textiles an American throws likely still recyclable—meaning it can away each year. be processed back into fibers SOURCE:to Themake True Cost new clothes. An increasing number of retailers, including Patagonia, H&M and Nieman Marcus, are offering take-back and clothes recycling programs. Call your favorite store … of textile to ask. If they don’t already doisit, waste added to American landfills annually. request that they start. Unusable The True Cost clothing can be donatedSOURCE: to Hope Services or labeled as “Textiles for Salvage” and delivered to the loading dock near the Goodwill Bargain The length Outlet (292 Pioneer St.).of time non-biodegradable clothing will spend in landfills, releasing harmful gasses.

82 LBS

11 MILLION TONS

100s OF YEARS SOURCE: The True Cost

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 113


DROP IN ENVIRONMENT

7 STEPS FOR A GREENER CLOSET 1. REDUCE. Shop less. Own less.

The pivotal first step in slowing the waste stream is slowing consumption.

2. BUY INVESTMENT PIECES.

Keep a fairly minimal closet comprised mostly of timeless, highquality staples. A bigger upfront cost now means a bigger payoff in the future: Well-made clothes last longer, diminishing the cycle of spending and waste.

3. GET TO KNOW YOUR LOCAL SEAMSTRESS, SHOE REPAIRER, ETC. Why toss a gar-

ment when it can be fixed? Don’t let ripped, scuffed or stained clothing languish in your closet. Instead of replacing a damaged item with something that will, inevitably, also fall apart, make the small trek to the local tailor to get it repaired. Upkeep like this makes particular sense with expensive investment pieces that you’ll still want to wear (and that will still be stylish) 10 years from now. While you’re at it, cut down on your annual holey-sock disposal by learning to darn, and become more mindful of overwashing clothes (a waste of water and a wear on fabrics).

114 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

4. BUY WISELY. When you do

shop, consider brands that have ethical practices and use sustainable materials and methods. (See the "Clean Clothes" sidebar for more info.)

5. REUSE.

When you get the itch for a new look, try secondhand troves like Crossroads Trading Co., on Pacific Avenue, and The Closet Shopper, on Front Street. Shop your own closet for items you may have forgotten about or that can be “upcycled” into something new and different. Have a fancy occasion coming up? Instead of buying an outfit you’ll only wear once, consider borrowing one from a friend or utilizing services like Rent the Runway (renttherunway.com).

6. SELL, SWAP AND DONATE. Take a three-pronged approach to offloading your wearable, but unwanted, clothes: first, try to sell the nicer items to a used clothing store. Next, let your buddies dig through the pile. Better yet, arrange a clothing swap— a get-together where, perhaps over drinks and appetizers, friends offer up unwanted clothes and choose from what other people brought. Donate everything that’s left to a local charity

like Goodwill Industries (204 Union St.), Hope Services (220 Lincoln St.) or the Salvation Army Family Store (812 Pacific Ave.).

7. SAY A PROPER GOODBYE.

No matter what, don’t condemn your unwanted clothes to eternity in the dump. For clothes that are no longer wearable, consider your recycling options: can you turn them into something new (a pillow case, quilt patch, or sock puppet for the kids?), or use them as rags (and cut down on your paper towel use, while you’re at it)? If clothing is not worth giving to friends, donating to charity, or upcycling into something new, it is likely still recyclable—meaning it can be processed back into fibers to make new clothes. An increasing number of retailers, including Patagonia, H&M and Nieman Marcus, are offering take-back and clothes recycling programs. Call your favorite store to ask. If they don’t already do it, request that they start. Unusable clothing can be donated to Hope Services or labeled as “Textiles for Salvage” and delivered to the loading dock near the Goodwill Bargain Outlet (292 Pioneer St.).


DROP IN

ENVIRONMENT

Fast Fashion 101 “Fast Fashion” is just like fast food: quick, cheap, and low quality. And the two are similar in another important way—the low number on a price tag, like the amount listed on the drive-thru menu, masks myriad hidden environmental and social costs. The term refers to our modern “wear it once” culture, in which clothes are bought and tossed casually. And when clothes are cheap and seen as disposable, we buy more of them, magnifying the industry’s environmental impact and resulting in more waste.

Clean CLOTHES

#whomademyclothes The 2017 Fashion Revolution Week takes place April 24-30, exactly four years after the tragic garment factory fire in Bangladesh. It’s part of The Fashion Revolution campaign to unite fashion lovers in the fight for a fair, safe and clean garment industry. Want to join the revolution? Start by using the hashtag #whomademyclothes to pressure your favorite brands to be transparent about their practices. Learn more at fashionrevolution.org.

Chemical Waters The flood of clothing dyes in the Citarum River in Indonesia has created, in the words of Greenpeace, a “chemical Fukushima” in that nation. Hundreds of textile factories line the river’s shores, and a lack of thorough infrastructure has led to the Citarum being used as a dumpster for manufacturers’ chemical waste. Meanwhile in China, where dyes and chemicals from garment factories also wind up in waterways, some rivers “run red or blue or green … based on whatever color is in style,” according to Elizabeth Cline, author of the book Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion. These pollutants wind up in the oceans, becoming a global problem.

Learn More -Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion by Elizabeth Cline: How often do you buy clothes? How many items of clothing do you own? How much of your wardrobe gets worn? When Elizabeth Cline—a self-professed “typical” American consumer hooked on trendy, discount clothes—set about pondering these questions, the result was this 2012 investigation into fast fashion. -The Love Your Clothes Campaign (loveyourclothescampaign.org. uk): Learn how to smartly handle your clothes from start to finish. -Remake (remake.world): A site full of stories about our clothes, who makes them, and how to be conscious consumers. -Clean Clothes Campaign (cleanclothes.org): An organization that has been fighting to improve working conditions in the global garment industry since 1989. -The True Cost: a documentary about the impact our clothes have on people and the planet. Find it online at truecostmovie.com.

The good news is that eco-friendly and ethical apparel companies abound. Here are just a few to note. Indosole (indosole.com): Hip shoes made from discarded rubber tires. Goose Organic (gooseorganic.com): A Santa Cruz-based organic clothing company. Nuala Leather (etsy.com/shop/nualaleather): Upscale, postconsumer leather bags and accessories made by local Terry McInerney and sold at Stripe. Synergy Organic Clothing (synergyclothing.com): Environmentally and socially responsible women’s clothing designed in Santa Cruz and made by artists in Nepal. Dash Hemp (dashhemp.com): A local maker of quality hemp clothing for men and women. Patagonia: Through its “Worn Wear” program, this environmentally minded brand aims to reduce fashion waste by making high-quality clothes that can be worn (and repaired) for many years. When an item has finally reached its end, they encourage customers to bring it in to a local store for recycling. Big brands: Out of 40 major fashion brands, the 2016 Fashion Transparency Index, an effort of The Fashion Revolution, found Levi Strauss & Co., H&M, and Inditex to be the most transparent about their practices, policies and supply chains. Levi Strauss, with its Water<Less campaign to reduce the amount of water used to manufacture its jeans, scored the highest for social and environmental efforts.

For more, check out the Sustainable Fashion Directory (sustainablefashiondirectory.com) and The United Nation’s Ethical Fashion Initiative (ethicalfashioninitiative.org).

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PHOTO: MARA MILAM

Garden Fresh By TARA FATEMI WALKER

A look at three local restaurants using ingredients from their own gardens

S

pring has sprung in Santa Cruz, and the season is a great time to celebrate our local bounty. If you’re a fan of dining out, take note of these three restaurants that are keeping menus fresh thanks to on-site gardens—not to mention talented chefs.

Home

Home’s garden has decades of history, which is why chef BRAD BRISKE selected the location for the new eatery. The property was Theo’s restaurant for 20-plus years, then Main Street Garden & Café. Briske was chef there from 2010-2012, and then worked in Carmel for four years (at La Balena and Il Grillo). During this time, the Soquel property changed from Main Street Garden to La Gioconda, which closed in 2016. Briske opened Home with his wife, Linda Ritten, last November. The garden,

which boasts eight terraced vegetable beds, was in great condition when they took over. They added new plants like lemongrass, which Briske calls a “key flavor” for his menu. “Part of the beauty is there are things here like lemon and apple trees [that are] 30 years old,” Briske says. “Same with the sage. It would be impossible to create that out of nothing, to start from scratch— that’s why the history is so special.” Rosemary, thyme, borage and rhubarb return to the garden every year. “When we cut herbs fresh from our garden, the flavor, aroma, everything is so much stronger than when it has been transported and touched

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LOCAL EATS

by more people,” Briske explains. At Home, herbs go into everything: brine, stock, marinades, and sauces for homemade pastas. Butter is infused with freshly picked herbs like chives, rosemary, sage or oregano. “We just don’t write it all out,” Briske says of the menu. “If we listed every ingredient, the menu would be four pages.”

Mariquita Farms is Home’s predominant supplier for produce that doesn’t hail from the on-site garden. “During the winter, we were basing our menu on what they had,” says Briske. Home also uses Swank Farms, Live Earth Farm and Blue Heron Farms. Briske and Ritten have two girls, ages 2 and 6, and the restaurant is

family friendly. One benefit of having Home, says Briske, is having a place where the kids can run around. During the summer, Home plans to grow tomatoes—and they’ll encourage all kids to pick them. 3101 N. Main St., Soquel; homesoquel.com.

PHOTO: MARA MILAM

Shadowbrook

The on-site garden at Shadowbrook, a turf roof that covers the restaurant’s kitchen area, was originally planted 40 years ago with ornamental flowers. “Then it morphed into having some kitchen products, and now it primarily features edible plants,” says Executive Chef ROGER GOWEN. During the spring, Shadowbrook gardener Carol Fuegel, who has worked there for a decade, harvests herbs and spices for the bar and kitchen. Fresh mint is featured in cocktails, and garden basil appears in a gin-based specialty cocktail called the Basil English Cucumber. Herbs like rosemary, spearmint, thyme, and sage can be found in the garden nearly year-round, and are used to season soups, mushroom ragout and sauces. “They are also important ingredients in some fish and steak recipes,” says Gowen. “For a past special, I used lemon verbena from the garden for a poached sea bass dish.” Kale and Swiss chard grow during early spring and mid-summer. In late summer and early fall, Shadowbrook harvests Padrón peppers and purple heirloom tomatoes, among others. Because the basic menu changes three times a year (not counting seasonal dinner

“WHEN WE CUT HERBS FRESH FROM OUR GARDEN, THE FLAVOR, AROMA, EVERYTHING IS SO MUCH STRONGER THAN WHEN IT’S BEEN TRANSPORTED AND TOUCHED BY MORE PEOPLE.” —HOME CHEF BRAD BRISKE SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 12 3


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FOOD&DRINK

LOCAL EATS

specials), the garden also changes from season to season and year to year. For example, per Gowen’s request, edible flowers will soon be planted to garnish plates and season fish and other light summer entrees. Shadowbrook sources fruits and vegetables from local farms to supplement the garden’s produce. One farmer Gowen relies on is Dan Haldeman. “He’s a wonderful farm partner to Shadow-

brook,” says Gowen. “Not only do we get great items from him, like phenomenal pear tomatoes last year, he actually asks me, ‘What can I grow for you?’” Gowen, who has been at Shadowbrook since 2012 and was promoted to executive chef in 2014, believes the garden greatly enhances the restaurant. “It inspires ideas for the regular menu and specials,” he says, recalling an instance when there was an abundance of basil.

He used the basil to create pesto for a Rock Room pizza special, which he says customers loved. The garden also provides respite from a busy kitchen: “There are benches alongside the garden that provide a wonderful place to take a break, think and relax in a beautiful setting,” he says. 1750 Wharf Road, Capitola; shadowbrook-capitola.com.

Seascape Beach Resort

Sanderlings featuring

executive chef, started his on-site garden—located just outside the kitchen— shortly after joining Seascape 18 years ago. What began as a small herb garden has grown into a much larger terraced garden with irrigation and a deer fence. His parents, of German origin but born in Romania, taught him at a young age about the difference it makes to grow fresh, healthy fruits and vegetables. “They had an amazing organic garden,” Staub says. Staub uses everything he grows, which includes lettuces and radishes in the springtime and plants like spinach, chard, tomatoes and squashes at other times of the year. The garden’s year-round herbs, used for soup stocks and more, include rosemary, bay leaves (from laurel trees) and pineapple sage. Seasonal herbs include tarragon, which blooms in the summer. “I always use fresh herbs for fantastic flavor,” the chef says. Staub oversees all of Seascape’s culinary operations, including its flag-

PHOTO: MARA MILAM

KARL STAUB, Seascape Beach Resort’s

ship restaurant Sanderlings. He designs menus for holiday events, weddings, and more, while Chef de Cuisine Mario Garcia creates Sanderlings' menus. During the last tomato season, fresh heirloom tomatoes inspired Garcia to create a fried green tomato appetizer special. More recently, he used garden sunchokes for a special featuring Alaskan halibut, braised cipollini onions, roasted beets, sunchoke puree and blood orange relish. The garden’s artichokes also appear as a starter on the regular menu. Garcia supplements the garden’s harvest with produce from local provider Mon-

terey Farms when needed. “We source as locally as we can and look for the best purveyors,” says Staub, “like honey from Carmel Honey Co., and items from Nelson Farms and Yellow Wall Farms.” Longtime Sanderlings employee Lindsay Eschleman, who has evolved into the resident mixologist, also regularly uses garden herbs. Fresh mint goes into her mojitos, while rosemary and thyme appear in other cocktails. One Seascape Resort Drive, Aptos; sanderlingsrestaurant.com and seascaperesort.com. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 12 5


bring this ad into either of our locations for (1) complimentary tasting 328A ingalls street, santa cruz (westside) 831.421.9380 24900 highland way, los gatos (summit) 408.353.6000 www.mjavineyards.com

12 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


FOOD&DRINK

DRINKS

Humble Sea founders Frank Scott Krueger, Nick Pavlina and Taylor West. PHOTO: SCOTT PAVLINA

THE NEWS IN

B R EWS FIVE NEWBIES TO NOTE IN SANTA CRUZ COUNTY’S

EVER-EXPANDING CRAFT BEER SCENE By MELISSA DUGE SPIERS

S

aying Santa Cruz has a beer scene is sort of like saying we live by the water: it is technically true, but entirely misses the epic scale. The number of local breweries has swelled to 15 in recent years, making Santa Cruz a destination for beer aficionados far and wide. With everything from traditional Scottish and British ales brewed with natural carbonation to organic fruit beers made from local hops and homemade yeast, there is truly something for everyone. Herewith, we check in with the latest crop of breweries to check out.

1.humble

brewing

se a

.

co

A Q&A with co-founder Frank Scott Kreuger Where did the brewery’s name come from? Co-founder Nick Pavlina came up with it almost eight years ago while homebrewing in a surf bungalow in Pleasure Point. He mashed up two of the most important concepts for him—humility and the ocean. After all, what could humble you more than the sea?

How about your tagline, “A Brewery That Gives a Shit?” We’re referring to the social aspect of our company: one of the core values is to do good for the community. It just didn’t seem like fun to start a business with the core motive of making a profit. For now, mainly because we have no money, we give our time and community participation. Building out a brewery is damn expensive, so the money isn’t exactly flowing while we’re deep in the throes of construction. Over the past year we’ve donated a portion of our sales

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 12 7


Open 8:00am-2:00pm Everyday (Closed Tuesday) 427 Capitola Ave, Capitola

Paul Topp Photography

831- 515-7559 avenuecafecapitola.com

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831 . 713 . 5520

FRESH

PLEASURE POINT

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7528 SOQUEL DR

APTOS 831.688.4465

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HEALT

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HOURS : TUESDAY-SUNDAY 11:30AM- 8:30PM

EYARD ...IN THE VIN WINE TASTING SATURDAYS ALL YEAR SUNDAYS ALL SUMMER

12 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

831.728.5172 420 HAMES RD CORRALITOS ALFAROWINE.COM


FOOD&DRINK

DRINKS

Humble Sea's first tap takeover, at West End Tap & Kitchen in January 2016. PHOTO: ERIC RESSLER

[from 5 to 10 percent] from nearly 20 events to ocean-oriented nonprofits that we believe in, namely Save Our Shores and Save the Waves. We’ve also volunteered for beach cleanups and collaborated to spread awareness with local sustainable surf company Ventana [Surfboards & Supplies]. As we grow, we hope that our social impact on the community and our ocean grows with us.

Let’s talk beer … We are incredibly passionate—almost freakishly passionate—about beer. When we’re not brewing it, we’re talking about it, researching it, or trading for it. When we travel we bring home strange and exotic bottles for the other brewers to taste. However, we are attempt-

ing to create an experience that is larger than just the beer itself. We are eager to create a beer-drinking experience that engages all of your senses, not just one or two. Visually, the lighting, color palette, and glassware are imperative to a strong craft-beer encounter. In our taproom we’re aiming to engage our community through friendship, awesome service, and stories that are deeper than just the beer style known as “IPA.” Even though we work to brew the best beer possible, we try not to take it too seriously. That’s why you’ll see our beers named after goofy beach scenes like “Socks & Sandals” or “My Morning Speedo.” We hope our playful nature translates into our beers and the experiences that surround them. 

Taylor West with the Socks and Sandals IPA. PHOTO: FRANK SCOTT KRUEGER

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 12 9


13 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


FOOD&DRINK

DRINKS

2.

e ast

cliff

brewing

.

co

East Cliff Brewing Co. brings authentic British ales to Santa Cruz. Their traditional porters, stouts, and ales are all brewed using casks, not kegs, with only natural carbonation and no added CO2, and are hand pumped, old-school style, right into your glass.

getting there

• Create your own “beer passport” and follow the Santa Cruz Beer Trail (santacruzbeertrail.com).

3.

4.

e lkhorn slough

brewing

shanty

.

co

Elkhorn Slough’s husband and wife team, Michael Enos and Julie Reinhardt, just celebrated their first year of brewing in a warehouse in Watsonville. Their philosophy is to keep it simple and local: harvesting and propagating some of their own yeast, and using local hops with ambient temperature to ferment with untreated water. “We believe that creates a beer that embodies the flavor of this beautiful environment we live in,” says Reinhardt. “We love the Watsonville community [and] we want to represent all that we love in our beer.”

shack

brewing

Shanty Shack brewers Nathan van Zandt and Brandon Padilla started with a community-supported brewing (CSB) delivery service and have now opened a brewery, all with the goal of bringing their musical, artistic, and culinary friends together over beer. The brewery, which has a small stage, a space for food trucks in an outdoor patio, and rotating art on the walls, showcases different artists. “We see beer as art,” says van Zandt. “We brew with style as opposed to sticking to style guidelines. We still love our IPAs and experimenting with new hop varieties, but we have about 40 oak barrels for aging sour beers that take roughly a year to complete their long complex fermentations.”

5.

ste e l

bonnet

brewing

Steel Bonnet’s husband/ wife team, Donald and Sue Cramb, aim to celebrate the techniques, recipes, and ingredients of both UK-style and West Coast brewing in their small-batch craft brew selection of British ales, porters, stouts, and IPAs. Often you will find two beers on tap of the exact same style, one British and one American, each brewed with their own traditional and local techniques and ingredients. They want to give customers the opportunity to sample both the British and American version of the same beer so they can experience how surprisingly different yet similar they can be.

• Hire the Brew Cruz bus to drive you (and friends) around to the breweries of your choosing (scbrewcruz.com).

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 13 1


MICHAEL'S ON MAIN

DINING GUIDE Downtown ASSEMBLY Seasonal rustic California cuisine. 1108 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 824-6100, www.assembleforfood.com

BETTY'S EAT INN Locally owned burger joint with a fun vibe. Features award-winning

soups, salads, burgers and delicious desserts. Eat-in, take out and delivery available. 381 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 621-2248, www.eatearthbelly.com

EL PALOMAR Unique and fresh Mexican cuisine, family recipes. 1336 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-7575, www.elpalomarsantacruz.com

burgers, fries, salads, beer, wine and shakes. Soak up the sun on the

HINDQUARTER BAR & GRILLE

outdoor patios at all three locations.

Meat-centric dishes plus hearty sides and wine in a rustic, family-friendly steakhouse with a patio. 303 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-7770, www.thehindquarter.com

Expanded menu and full bar at this location only. 1222 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7056, www.bettyburgers.com. Other locations: Midtown (505 Seabright Ave.) and Capitola (1000 41st Ave.).

EARTHBELLY Food stop featuring 100-percent non-GMO and organic sandwiches,

13 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

HULA'S ISLAND GRILL California twist on Hawaiian island grill and tiki bar. 221 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-4852, www.hulastiki.com

LAILI

PONO HAWAIIAN GRILL AND THE REEF

Santa Cruz's answer to highquality Mediterranean / Indian / Pakistani / Afghan food. 101 Cooper St., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-4545, www. lailirestaurant.com

Traditional Hawaiian grill, poke bar, fresh ingredients, full bar. 120 Union St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-7666, www.ponohawaiiangrill.com

PACIFIC THAI

POUR TAPROOM

Authentic Thai cuisine and boba teas in a modern and casual dining atmosphere. 1319 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 420-1700, www.pacificthaisantacruz.com

Gastropub fare with vegan and gluten-free options. Sixty beers and eight wines on tap. 110 Cooper St., Ste. 100B,(831) 535-7007, pourtaproom.com/santa-cruz.

PLEASURE PIZZA

SANTA CRUZ ALE WORKS

Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures. 1415 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7859, www.pleasurepizzasc.com

Handcrafted microbrews and deli sandwiches, salads and wraps are served at this family-owned taproom. Family and dog friendly. 150 Dubois St., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-1182


Live Music Wednesday thru Sunday Sat/Sun Brunch at 9am | www.michaelsonmain.net

(831) 479-9777 / 2591 Main St. Soquel

TUE - FRI 11 AM - LATE / SAT - SUN 9 AM - LATE / CLOSED MONDAYS

UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP

Food-Spirits-Entertainment

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 13 3


FOOD&DRINK DINING GUIDE ULTERIOR

SEABRIGHT BREWERY

Exquisite foraged, organic, local and gluten-free dining and cocktails in the heart of Santa Cruz. 110 Pearl Alley, Santa Cruz, (831) 295-3100, www.ulteriorsc.com

Rotating beer selection, with dogfriendly outdoor patio. 519 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-2739, www.seabrightbrewery.com

ZOCCOLI’S

LUNCH: MON-SUN 11:30-3:15 HAPPY HOUR: MON-FRI 4-6 LIVE MUSIC: THURS 6-9 • SAT & SUN 2-5 15% OFF LUNCH MENU 11:30 - 3:15 AT BAR STOOLS ONLY

Specials

SUNDAY "LOCAL'S NIGHT" 3 COURSE PRE-FIXED DINNER $30 MONDAY "GARY'S RIB NIGHT" (FULL RACK) $20 ALL NIGHT HAPPY HOUR WEDNESDAY "SURF & TURF" $30 THURSDAY "DATE NIGHT" FEATURED WINES BY THE BOTTLE HALF PRICE WITH ANY ENTREE

Iconic delicatessen, sandwiches, salads, sides. 1534 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-1711, www.zoccolis.com

Harbor THE CROW’S NEST Iconic restaurant and bar located at the harbor. 2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 476-4560, www.crowsnest-santacruz.com

Midtown AKIRA Sushi made with fresh-caught seafood and locally grown produce. 1222 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 6007093, www.akirasantacruz.com

ALOHA ISLAND GRILLE Authentic Hawaiian-style plate lunches. 1700 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 479-3299, www.alohaislandgrille.com

THE CRÊPE PLACE Array of savory and sweet crêpes, French food and live music. 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 4296994, www.thecrepeplace.com

CHARLIE HONG KONG

VOTED FAVORITE

RESTAURANT!

RUNNER-UP FAVORITE BAR

215 ESPLANADE

CAPITOLA, CA 95010

831-476-4900 PARADISEBEACHGRILLE.COM

13 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

Vegan-oriented menu. Southeast Asian fusion, organic noodle and rice bowls. Chicken, beef, pork and salmon offered. Family and dog friendly. 1141 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 4265664, www.charliehongkong.com

EL JARDIN RESTAURANT Delicious and authentic Mexican cuisine featuring locally grown, fresh ingredients. 655 Capitola Road, Santa Cruz, (831) 477-9384, www. eljardinrestaurant.net

Westside/Scotts Valley BURGER. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, and a great beer menu. 1520 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-5300, www.burgersantacruz.com

CASCADES BAR & GRILL AT COSTANOA California cuisine, local, organic, and handcrafted ingredients. 2001 Rossi Road at Hwy 1, Pescadero, (650) 8791100, www.costanoa.com

HOLLINS HOUSE At Pasatiempo. Magnificent views, award-winning cuisine, and outstanding wine list. 20 Clubhouse Road, Santa Cruz, (831) 459-9177, www.pasatiempo.com/hollins-house

MISSION ST. BBQ Serving up smoked barbecue, craft beer and live music. 1618 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 458-2222, www.facebook.com/missionstbbq

PARISH PUBLICK HOUSE British-influenced pub food with full bar. 841 Almar Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 421-0507, www.parishpublickhouse.com

WINGSTOP The go-to destination when you crave fresh wings, hand-cut seasoned fries and tasty sides. Save time and order online. 845 Almar Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 454-9464, www.wingstop.com

Eastside/Capitola AVENUE CAFÉ Serving traditional breakfast and lunch, along with some Mexican favorites. 427 Capitola Ave., Capitola (831) 515-7559, www.avenuecafecapitola.com


& VOTED BEST HAWAIIAN CUISINE BEST DOG FRIENDLY RESTAURANT 2017

800.332.2780

Best Locations. Best Value. Located within Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breathtaking Central Coast, Allen Property Group hotels offer the best coastal locations for the best value. We are dedicated to making sure your stay is a memorable one.

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capitolavenetian.com 1500 Wharf Road Capitola

ON-SITE G PARKIN

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riosands.com 116 Aptos Beach Drive Aptos

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3/17/17 2:15 PM SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 13 5


H

SANTA CRUZ WAVES PRESENTS

BEER WEEK MAY 22 - MAY 26

831-425-1182 | 11 AM- 6 PM DAILY

150 DUBOIS ST SANTA CRUZ, CA 95060 WWW.SANTACRUZALEWORKS.COM

All events take place from 5-9pm and include beer specials, a chance to meet the brewer, and special food pairings. Visit SANTACRUZWAVES.COM/BEERWEEK for details about the music, food, and more at each location.

NEW H BOHEMIA BREWING COMPANY S A N T A

C R U Z ,

C A

visit our brewery and taproom at 1030 41st ave.

a santa cruz original, inspired by the traditional.

Tasting Flights, Wine on Draft, Kombucha, Root Beer, Seasonal Beer Dog Friendly Tap Room & Beer Garden

scmbrew.com

13 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

H

11:30 - 10:00 Mon - Fri 10:00 - 10:00 Sat - Sun

Downtown Santa Cruz

H


OPEN EVERY DAY Lunch 11:30am Dinner 5:00pm

A Santa Cruz neighborhood brewery and pub specializing in hand-pulled, cask conditioned ales. 21517 EAST CLIFF DR • 831-713-5540

IN THE EAST CLIFF VILLAGE | www.eastcliffbrewing.com ww

HAPPY HOUR Mon - Thurs 3-6pm & Fri 3-5pm

NEIGHBORHOOD NIGHT Tuesdays 3pm - Close. Happy Hour Drink Prices!

RUSTIC CUISINE with ELEGANT FLAVORS Sotola overlooks the ocean in the heart of Capitola Village. Our menu showcases seasonal California Cuisine prepared mostly with locally sourced, sustainably produced ingredients.

231 Esplanade Ste 102. Capitola, CA 95010

(831) 854-2800

www.sotolabarandgrill.com

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 13 7


13 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


FOOD&DRINK

DINING GUIDE

CHILL OUT CAFE

SURF CITY SANDWICH

Breakfast burritos, espresso drinks, beautiful garden. 2860 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 477-0543, www.chilloutcafesantacruz.com

Fast-casual dining with craft sandwiches, gourmet soups, salads, and a microtaproom. 4101 Soquel Drive, (831) 3466952, www.surfcitysandwich.com

EAST SIDE EATERY, PLEASURE PIZZA

TORTILLA FLATS

Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures. 800 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 431-6058, www.pleasurepizzasc.com

PARADISE BEACH GRILLE Fine dining in the Capitola Village. An award-winning beachside restaurant with spectacular ocean views. 215 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 476-4900, www.paradisebeachgrille.com

For more than 25 years, their Mexican food has blended the fieriness of Mexico with the sophistication of French sauces, and the earthiness of the Yucatan and complexity of Santa Fe with all the freshness and lightness that Californians expect. 4616 Soquel Drive, Soquel, (831) 476-1754, tortillaflatsdining.com

Aptos/Watsonville APTOS ST. BBQ

Capitola's new hot spot for great food, cocktails, and weekly live music. 211 Esplanade, Capitola. (831) 462-1881

Santa Cruz County's best smoked barbecue, craft brews and live blues every night. 8059 Aptos St., Aptos, (831) 662-1721, www.aptosstbbq.com

SHADOWBROOK

BITTERSWEET BISTRO

Fine dining with a romantic setting, cable car lift. A Capitola tradition since 1947. 1750 Wharf Road, Capitola, (831) 475-1511, www.shadowbrook-capitola.com

American bistro cuisine with Mediterranean influences. Outstanding dessert menu and an award-winning wine list. Heated, dog-friendly outdoor patio. Open every day except Monday. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Aptos, 831-662-9799, www.bittersweetbistro.com

THE SAND BAR

SOTOLA California farmstead concept focusing on local farms, ranches and seafood. In convivial quarters with an outdoor patio. 231 Esplanade Ste. 102, Capitola, (831) 854- 2800

ZAMEEN AT THE POINT Fresh, fast and healthy Mediterranean cuisine. Made-to-order wraps, bowls and salads. Open Tuesday through Sunday. 851 41st Ave, (831) 713-5520

Soquel CAFE CRUZ

BURGER. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, great beer menu. 7941 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 662-2811, www.burgeraptos.com

CAFE BITTERSWEET Breakfast and lunch served Tuesday through Sunday. Outdoor dog-friendly patio. 787 Rio Del Mar Blvd., Aptos, 831-662-9799, www.bittersweetbistro.com

CAFE RIO

Rosticceria and bar, nice atmosphere, fresh and local. 2621 41st Ave., Soquel, (831) 476-3801, www.cafecruz.com

Enjoy ocean-front dining with breathtaking views. 131 Esplanade, Aptos, (831) 688-8917, www.caferioaptos.com

MICHAEL'S ON MAIN

CALIFORNIA GRILL

Elevated bar and eatery with a whimsical feel serving a New American menu of small plates and entrees. Weekly live music. 2591 S Main St., Soquel, (831) 479-977, www. michaelsonmain.net

Lunch, Dinner, Full Bar M,W,TH,FRI, SAT, SUN 11:30-9:30

Tuesday's Dinner only 5-9:30Â

Semi private room available for parties up to 24 guests

TWO YEARS IN!

THANK YOU TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND PATRONS FOR YOUR SUPPORT!

831-688-5566 9051 SOQUEL DR APTOS

www.thehideoutaptos.com

Favorite Restaurant

Featuring fresh, local, organic produce from Lakeside Organic Gardens, choice meats, fresh seafood and refreshing drinks. 1970 A Freedom Blvd., Freedom, (831) 722-8052, www.californiagrillrestaurant.com

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 13 9


FOOD&DRINK DINING GUIDE CILANTROS Authentic Mexican cuisine with fresh ingredients, high-quality meat and seafood. 1934 Main St., Watsonville, (831) 761-2161, www.elpalomarcilantros.com

PALAPAS RESTAURANT & CANTINA

ZAMEEN MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE

OAK & RYE

Coastal Mexican Cuisine. Extensive

Flavorful meals in a casual dining

craft cocktails are the draw at this

tequila selection. Happy Hour,

setting. 7528 Soquel Drive, Aptos,

sophisticated Italian bistro.303 N

and dinner specials. 21 Seascape

(831) 688-4465,

Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos.(408)

Blvd., Aptos, (831) 662-9000,

www.zameencuisine.com

395-4441, www.oakandryepizza.com

www.palapasrestaurant.com

THE HIDEOUT Fill your plate with good grub, pour a good drink, enjoy attentive and friendly service. 9051 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-5566, www. thehideoutaptos.com

Wood-fired pies, small plates and

Over the Hill

Moss Landing

Where your dining experience is as

FORBES MILL STEAKHOUSE Upmarket chophouse purveys Kobe

HAUTE ENCHILADA CAFE

spectacular as the view. 1 Seacscape Resort Drive, Aptos,

beef and other prime cuts in a stylish,

SANDERLINGS IN THE SEASCAPE BEACH RESORT

(831) 688-7120,

fireplace-equipped setting. 206 N

MANUEL'S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

www.sanderlingsrestaurant.com

Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos, (408)

Traditional, delicious recipes, cooked

SEVERINOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAR & GRILL

fresh daily, served with a genuine

Award-winning chowders, locally

smile. 261 Center Ave., Aptos,

sourced ingredients. 7500 Old

(831) 688-4848,

Dominion Court, Aptos, (831) 688-

www.manuelsrestaurant.com

8987, www.severinosbarandgrill.com

395-6434, forbesmillsteakhouse.com

PALACIO

An eclectic menu made with sustainable seafood and local organic produce. Wine and beer tasting plus two art galleries featuring local artists. 7902 Moss Landing Road, Moss Landing, 633-5843, www.hauteenchilada.com

Upscale Latin restaurant offers a

THE WHOLE ENCHILADA

variety of classic entrees, plus tapas

Mexican seafood restaurant with a relaxed harbor atmosphere. 7904 CA-1, Moss Landing, 633-3038, www.wholeenchilada.com.

and a big tequila menu. 115 N Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos, (408) 4023811,www.palaciorestaurant.com

Gif t certificates available. party trays and catering available.

14 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


FROM WINGSTOP SANTA CRUZ

SANTA CRUZ 845 ALMAR AVENUE â&#x20AC;¢ (831) 454-WING (9464) CORNER OF MISSION BLVD & ALMAR AVE IN THE SAFEWAY SHOPPING CENTER

SKIP THE WAIT. ORDER @ WINGSTOP.COM OPEN DAILY FROM 11AM-MIDNIGHT

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 14 1


FOOD&DRINK SI N C E 1 9 65

DINING GUIDE

Monterey County ABALONETTI Specializes in Monterey Bay calamari and offers almost a dozen varieties of squid dishes. 57 Fisherman’s Wharf, Monterey, (831) 373-1851, www. abalonettimonterey.com

ALVARADO STREET BREWERY Brewery serving craft beer and local eats in a historic space with an industrial vibe. 426 Alvarado St., (831) 655-2337, www.alvaradostreetbrewery. com

BIG FISH GRILL Open for lunch, brunch, and dinner, or stop by to enjoy a cocktail and stunning views at the restaurant’s bar and lounge. The ambiance is casual California. 101 Fisherman's Wharf #1, Monterey, (831) 372-7562, www. bigfishmonterey.com

BULL AND BEAR WHISKEY AND TAP HOUSE Chill hangout with a patio and live music. Dishes up classic American eats plus a variety of brews. 479 Alvarado St., (831) 655-3031, www. bullandbearca.com

CANNERY ROW BREWING CO. A family-friendly, beer-concept restaurant that offers the second largest number of beers available on tap in Northern California. 95 Prescott Ave., Monterey, (831) 643-2722, www. canneryrowbrewingcompany.com

ESTEBAN Chic spot for Spanish and Mediterranean fare with an indoor fireplace and outdoor patio with fire pits. 700 Munras Ave., Monterey, (831) 375-0176, www.hotelcasamunras.com/ esteban-restaurant

JACKS RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE Eatery at the Portola Hotel serving sustainable cuisine in a nauticalthemed dining room and lounge. 2 Portola Plaza, Monterey, (831) 6492698, www.portolahotel.com/jacksrestaurant-lounge

14 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

MISSION RANCH Serving American comfort food in a farmhouse restored by Clint Eastwood with pastoral views. 26270 Dolores St., Carmel-By-The-Sea, (831) 624-6436, www.missionranchcarmel.com

MY ATTIC A great place to take a date or go with friends after work for appetizers and signature cocktails with a plush vibe. 414 Alvarado St., Monterey, (831) 6471834, www.myattic1937.com

MYO FROZEN YOGURT Create your own fro-yo masterpiece with rotating yogurt flavors and creative toppings. Multiple locations around Monterey County. 1091 S. Main St., Salinas, (831) 759-9769 and 840 Obama Way, Seaside, (831) 375-3769

PASSIONFISH Californian-inspired fare featuring seafood along with hard-to-find wines in a small, modern room. 701 Lighthouse Ave., Pacific Grove, (831) 655-3311, www.passionfish.net

PETER B’S BREWPUB This casual eatery and on-site brewery offers American bar bites, beer flights and growlers. 2 Portola Plaza, Monterey, (831) 649-2699, www.portolahotel.com

SARDINE FACTORY This recently made-over seafood spot is still a classic, serving American fare in an upscale setting. 701 Wave St., Monterey, (831) 373-3775, www. sardinefactory.com

TASTE BISTRO AND CAFE Treasured by the local community for excellent food and service. 1199 Forest Ave., Pacific Grove, (831) 655-0324, www.tastecafebistro.com


Voted Favorite Breakfast Burrito

Santa Cruz

WE ROLL THE FATTIES! 22 DIFFERENT KINDS OF BREAKFAST BURRITOS •••• HOUSE-MADE CHAI • ESPRESSO DRINKS ORGANIC FAIR TRADE COFFEE • STEEL CUT OATMEAL BAGELS • SMOOTHIES • SANDWICHES AND SALADS

Live Acoustical sets are back! Every Sunday from 11am-1pm

M–F: 6:30am–3pm • Sat–Sun: 7am–4pm 831-477-0543 • ChillOutCafeSantaCruz.com • 860 41st Ave

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SANTA CRUZ’S NICKELODEON & DEL MAR FEATURING STATE OF THE ART DIGITAL PROJECTION, AWARD WINNING ORGANIC GMO FREE POPCORN & DELICIOUS, LOCALLY CRAFTED TREATS

FRINGE

Voltaire’s

Candide

ADAPTED BY THE INTERN COMPANY

Our theatres showcase a wide variety of films — ranging from independent and foreign film to 3-D movies and smart films from Hollywood. We deliver a unique, sophisticated entertainment experience through our embrace of compelling content and unsurpassed customer service.

www.landmarktheatres.com 14 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

Directed by Kate Jopson August 23, 29 & 30


t-shirs | hodi# | Has & ^R S8ACRuzalHA.C= SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 14 5


PMG_SCWaves_Community2017_final.pdf

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FIELD NOTES

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EXIT ROUTE 5 SOUTH TO THE CONFLICT ZONE By KYLE THIERMANN

A Mapuche woman poses in front of the remains of her home after it was burned down by police. The home was built on land that both Mapuche and Chileans claim to have rights to. PHOTO: MARA MILAM

W

e left Santiago at midnight. Three gas station coffees later, the clock on my dashboard hits 7 a.m. and I am still driving south. Chile’s Route 5 is a straight highway that spans more than 2,000 miles. Behind mining, logging is Chile’s second largest industry. This far south, the only vehicles that accompany us on this long, straight road are 18-wheeler trucks hauling lumber, much of which will be exported to the United States. Two Chilean producers and our shooter have covered themselves with blankets in the backseat of our rental car and all three of them seem to have entered deep REM sleep. The lack of curves in the road and the identical tollbooths that require us to stop periodically make the highway feel like one relentless treadmill. The odometer says I’m doing 120 kph, but I question whether we’re actually moving at all. When I stop at a Pemex station along Route 5 to refill my coffee cup and gas tank, everything looks the same as the previous station. The coffee

machine is placed on the left side of the store, just like the one we visited two hours prior. The cashiers are all women and they all wear the same white button-up shirt. As I drive, my teeth chatter from the caffeine and although I am sleep deprived, I feel hyper-aware of my surroundings. As the car’s clock passes 7:15 a.m. and the darkness gives way to a thick morning fog, I notice that each 18-wheeler seems to carry the same type of lumber—Monterey pine. The Monterey pine is native to three very limited areas located in Santa Cruz, Monterey, and San Luis Obispo counties, but its rapid growth and desirable lumber and pulp qualities have led to it replacing much of Chile’s native forests. This tree is a focal point of the conflict we are here to cover for Seeker Network, the digital media outlet that I work for as a video host. Chile’s indigenous tribe is known as the Mapuche. They make up about 9 percent of the total population and are now in a violent turf war with the Chilean police and lumber companies,

who they claim stole thousands of hectares of Mapuche land that is now used for logging. As we finally exit the long highway and enter the rural town that is our destination, I notice Monterey pine trees growing in 4-by-4-meter rows in the surrounding mountains. In front of us I see armored cars and police carrying AK-47s. In recent years this conflict has become more violent. As we arrive in front of the courthouse, I see 10 Mapuche dressed in traditional attire standing in a circle outside. Last month, these Mapuche shut down the local municipalities in protest and are now being charged for trespassing. Although I drove all night to arrive in this small town in Southern Chile, the temperature feels like Santa Cruz on a foggy summer morning. I inhale deeply and the smell of the pine trees makes me feel closer to home than I really am. View the mini-documentary at kyle.surf/blog.

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PHOTO: SCOTTIE NELSON @SCOTTIE_CHARLES


J COMPANY FEATURE

L E S S

D T R A V E L E

ADVANTURE CO. TURNS FREEWHEELING SANTA CRUZANS’ VANS INTO OFF-THE-GRID HOMES By DAMON ORION

I

t’s no secret that siblings have a way of getting on each other’s nerves. So you’d think that as business partners, local brothers Brandon and Scott Nelson, cofounders of the local van conversion company Advanture Co., would knock heads from time to time. You’d be right. “We are polar opposites,” Scott admits with a laugh. “I’m not saying we should have a reality show, but we could. There can be some drama sometimes!” Luckily, the brothers Nelson— Brandon, 28, and Scott, 26—have a mediator in Shane Titus, their best friend since infancy. Along with resolving disputes, Titus literally deals with the nuts and bolts of turning vans into viable living spaces. Advanture’s vehicle conversions take place on a 20-acre parcel in Aptos where Titus lives. The company’s services include the installation of flooring, insulation,

sound-deadening materials, showers, toilets, stoves, refrigerators, heating, air conditioning and/or lighting. As of this writing, Advanture’s newest client was the famed outdoor landscape photographer Chris Burkard, who will be working with Advanture to put together a film about the conversion of his new van. One of the company’s most memorable creations was a redwood countertop that was custom-built for the van that Brandon was living in until last January, when he began working as a full-time videographer and content creator for an elite fisherman with whom he is currently on the

road. The countertop was made from an 800-plus-year-old tree that was harvested in the Santa Cruz Mountains a century ago. “That’s just so fulfilling to be able to take something that’s been sitting in the woods, purposeless, for a hundred years, but also, before that, alive and growing for 800-plus years, and make it a piece of art,” notes Brandon, who serves as Advanture’s media director. Scott, the company’s businessperson, interjects, “We’re trying to keep that as a mission as we go forward: find things that people consider trash and make beautiful art out of it. Maybe it applies to [the van owner’s] history; maybe it has to do with their childhood. How can we pull in pieces of that to each van?” Putting the pieces together requires skill and ingenuity. In addition to having the standard knowledge required of a building contractor, the Advanture team must choose roadworthy, malleable materials and find creative ways to fit the amenities of a full-sized home into a tiny container.

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PHOTOS: SCOTTIE NELSON @SCOTTIE_CHARLES

COMPANY FEATURE

“WE’RE TRYING TO … FIND THINGS THAT PEOPLE CONSIDER TRASH AND MAKE BEAUTIFUL ART OUT OF IT.”—SCOTT NELSON

“No van is square,” Scott says. “You can’t shore up anything in a van, so it’s a game of finesse, and it’s a time-consuming process. Nothing fits the way you think it’s going to fit, so it takes a lot of brain work to try and figure out how each little piece fits together in a way that makes every piece of the van really usable and functional. There’s such little space that you don’t want to give any up.” Especially in light of the housing crisis that Santa Cruz County faces, Advanture provides a much-needed opportunity for free spirits who are ready to take the road less traveled. “Forget paying rent every month; forget paying a mortgage every month,” Scott says. “Invest a small amount of money in a van, and you’re not tied to one place. ... The tiny home movement was the start. Now we’re seeing vans and container homes. I think it’s just going to get bigger and bigger.” He adds that these vans are completely solar-powered, off-grid vehicles. “You don’t have to tie into

anything; as long as you can fill up some water once in a while, you’re good to go,” he says. “And if you have your reverse osmosis hooked up, you can pull straight from the river,” Brandon notes. The legalities of living in a van are, of course, complex. Because it is illegal to live in your vehicle, the van owner is technically required to park on private property, a campground or an RV park. However, Scott says he and the rest of the Advanture team would like to see those laws adapted to address the changing housing market, especially in areas like Santa Cruz. “If you drive up Highway 1 at night, you will see quite a few vans or small RVs camped out along the coast,” he says. “So navigating the laws is currently a part of the ‘van lifestyle.’”   Advanture is an extension of a way of life that the Nelson brothers came to love during their days of surfing, raising animals, gardening, dirt bike riding and hunting while growing up on a farm

in Corralitos. “What I envisioned as a kid was a life of adventure—something untamed and outside the ordinary that no one has ever done before,” Brandon recalls. “This was a means to achieve that: live in a van and create content for clients. I think this is a fun and fulfilling way to give back and help people achieve their goals and dreams.” Expanding on this idea, Scott says, “I talk to people whose dream has been to be a blogger, a photographer or a journalist. What happens is: They bought a house or they’re stuck in a 9-to-5, and it’s a cycle they can’t get out of. They either don’t make enough money to get out of it or they just never had enough money in the first place. I try to encourage them [by saying], ‘Let’s break that cycle. Think about buying a van, because you spend maybe a small fraction up-front of what you’re going to spend in a couple of years living in a normal house, and instantly you’re able to put yourself in a position to at least try to do those things you were passionate about.’”

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COOL OFF

MAKING

WAVES Photos by Yvonne Falk

THE 6TH ANNUAL SANTA CRUZ WAVES SANDBAR SHOOTOUT SPONSORS: Seascape Foods, Zen Island, Village Host Amadeo Bachar Fine Art, Santa Cruz Salmon Jerky, Local Style, Surf City Sandwich, Santa Cruz Engraving Company, New Leaf, Pleasure Pizza/East Side Eatery, Rainbow Fin Company, GoPro, The Hideout, Severinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Alibi Interiors, Thieves, Reef, Suerte Tequila, Oakley, Pacific Wave, Berdels and Bay Federal Credit Union. 1 5 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


RESULTS: MEN: First: Nat Young; second: Noi K.; third: Shaun Burns; fourth: Chad Underhill-Meras WOMEN: First: Autumn Hays; second: Kim Mayer; third: Keanna Miller; fourth: Edan Edwards

V IE W MORE GAL L E RI ES @

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EVENTS

EBB & FLOW KINETIC ART PARADE

APRIL

MAY

HUNT The Roaring Camp Eggspress takes children and their families to Bear Mountain to hunt for candy, eggs and prizes. x Saturday, April 15 and Sunday April 16, Roaring Camp Railroads, 5401 Graham Hill Road, Felton, roaringcamp.com.

APTOS SPRING ARTS & CRAFT FESTIVAL Forty-five local artists and designers will showcase their fine art, handmade jewelry, ceramics, textiles and much more. Hosted by Ocean Breeze Boutique. x Saturday, May 13, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Rancho Del Mar Shopping Center, 140 Rancho Del Mar, Aptos, aptosfestival.com.

15&16 EGGSTRAORDINARY EGG

18-23 EARTH WEEK AT THE SEY-

MOUR MARINE DISCOVERY CENTER Visit the Seymour Marine Discovery Center for free during Earth Week when you travel via people power (bicycle, walking, etc.) or public transportation. x Tuesday, April 18 through Sunday April 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Seymour Discovery Center, 100 McAllister Way, Santa Cruz, seymourcenter.ucsc.edu.

20 THE 2017 SANTA CRUZ WAVES

SWELLIES PARTY The third annual Swellies awards party will be our biggest celebration yet—so big, in fact, that we’re taking over the MAH! Join us for three levels of fun, including DJs, brews, wine and food, and to find out who won in categories from favorite longboarder to favorite taphouse. x Thursday, April 20, 6- 9 p.m. Museum of Art & History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. Buy tickets at 2017swellies.eventbrite.com.

22 EARTH DAY SANTA CRUZ

Whether you’re a veteran eco-warrior or a newbie looking to learn how to live a greener life, this festive annual celebration is the place for you. There will be activities for kids, arts and crafts, live music and a focus on green businesses. x Saturday, April 22, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., San Lorenzo Park, Santa Cruz, scearthday.org.

29&30

THE LOG JAM A family oriented, local vintage surfboard contest brought to you by the Big Stick Surfing Association. x Saturday, April 29 and Sunday, April 30, Pleasure Point, bigsticksurfing.org.

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MOTHER’S DAY WALK: WOMEN OF BIG BASIN Celebrate Mother’s Day in nature by honoring the spirited women who lived in, worked in and fought for Big Basin throughout its history. x Sunday, May 14, 1-2 p.m. Big Basin Redwoods State Park, parks.ca.gov.

26-28 CALIFORNIA ROOTS

MUSIC AND ARTS FESTIVAL California Roots isn’t just a music festival—it’s a movement. Catch some of the best live reggae music around while soaking up the Central Coast sunshine. x Friday, May 26 through Sunday, May 28, californiarootsfestival.com.

27&28

SANTA CRUZ LONGBOARD CLUB MEMORIAL DAY INVITATIONAL The West Coast’s longest-running competitive longboard surfing event, featuring both amateur and professional surfers. x Saturday, May 27 and Sunday, May 28, all day. Steamer Lane at Lighthouse Point, santa-cruz-longboard-union.com.

JUNE 3

EBB & FLOW KINETIC ART PARADE Join this parade of moving art as it meanders along the San Lorenzo River, where you’ll see 11 new temporary sculptures made by local artists. The parade ends at the Tannery Arts Center, where the Ebb & Flow River Arts Celebration begins at 1:30 p.m. x Saturday, June 3. Registration begins at 11 a.m., parade starts at noon. Artscouncilsc.org/ebb-flow.


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Check today’s rates and apply online at www.bayfed.com.

Federally Insured by NCUA. Equal Housing Lender.

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Call to schedule your FREE consultation!

831-226-2108

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ACUPUNCTURE | HERBS | ENERGETICS | DIET | MASSAGE

Five Branches University Health Center Come to the voted best Acupuncture Clinic in Santa Cruz three years running!

Specialties include: F Pain Management and Orthopedics F Pediatrics, and Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health F Dermatology F And much more

Our clinic is open late and on Saturdays to accommodate your schedule.

200 7th Avenue, Santa Cruz CA

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HOURS: Mon-Thurs 9:00am-7:30pm Friday 9:00am-5:00pm Saturday 9:00am-4:30pm To make an appointment call: 831-476-8211

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Accepting Applications for Preschool - 8th Grade 6-Week Preschool Summer Camp Holy Cross School Advantage

JUNE 26, 2017 – AUGUST 4, 2017 !  Program offers arts, crafts, cooking, music & outdoor exploration in our Life Lab. Ages 2 – 5. !  Flexible schedule available between 7:30 am - 5:30 pm !  To register, please call (831) 425-1782 or contact Director Crissy Roubal at crissy.roubal@holycsc.org Preschool is located behind Holy Cross Church 170 A High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060

Explore SUMMER

!  Fosters academic excellence, spiritual growth and social responsibility !  Technology integration via 1:1 iPad program, Chromebooks, Smartboards !  Spanish, Life Lab, P.E., music enrichment Call us for a !  Championship sports program personal tour! (831) 423-4447 K-8 school is located at www.holycsc.org 150 Emmet Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060

inspiration challenge support community

PROGRAMS

2017

Chartwell School in Seaside provides CORE academic skills and ENRICHMENT programs for students with dyslexia and other learning challenges.

JUNE 19 — JULY 14 Register Online At CHARTWELL.ORG 1 5 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

1280 17th Ave / next to Toadal Fitness in Live Oak


GOOD SHEPHERD CATHOLIC SCHOOL

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS 2017-2018 Providing children the tools for success for over 50 Years!        

2727 Mattison Lane, Santa Cruz

All Faiths are Welcome! Preschool through 8th Grade Half & Full Day Preschool Full Day Kindergarten Extended Care Science, Art, Life Lab, Spanish, Music Middle School Overnight Field Trips: Marin Headlands, Yosemite & Colonial Virginia Afterschool Sports: Basketball, Golf, Lacrosse, Co-ed Flag Football & Soccer, 831-476-4000

www.gsschool.org

Good Shepherd Catholic School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, nationality and/or ethnic origin, age or gender in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loans programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs. SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 5 9


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Cannonball! Wilem Banks poised to feel a whole world of hurt while Alex Martins logs another textbook Mavericks drop. PHOTO: NELLY / SPL

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 6 1


ACNE BOOT CAMP! ENJOY NATURALLY CLEAR SKIN THIS SUMMER

Fast Results for Face and Body Acne

Customized program • 95% success rate •

Call today for a

FREE CONSULTATION

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I A T I YOU MA EREST INT

IN

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Profile for Santa Cruz Waves

Santa Cruz Waves April/May 2017 Issue 3.6  

Santa Cruz Waves April/May 2017 Issue 3.6  

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