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LIVE THE LIFESTYLE

VOLUME 2.1 - JUNE / JULY 2015

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- Sales Team -

- Business Managers -

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- Julie GSM -

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Great food and entertainment overlooking Capitola Beach The new Sand Bar and Grill in Capitola with amazing views of the sea and sand from our sundeck

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The one and only Adam Replogle peers out of yet another dreamy drainer. Photo: Charlie Witmer

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We’ve made sure to find you the best of what’s around. We have sustainable meat and seafood, organic produce, local favorites, gourmet grab-and-go, artisanal cheeses and much more. Come in, grab some goodness and head on out to catch some waves.

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INSIDE

SANTA CRUZ WAVES M AG A ZINE

Volume 2.1 - JUNE/JULY 2015

PUBLISHER Tyler Fox

86

68 FIRST LOOK

26 Letter from the Founder 28 Best of the Web 30 Word on the Street 32 Remember When ... ? 38 Nonprofit to Know: Pajaro Valley Loaves & Fishes 40 Grom Spotlight: Ashley Held 47 Nine Tips for Surviving Summer

110

COOL OFF

58

86 The Top Dogs of Surf 96 Tattoos and Their Makers 106 Local Eats: Ocean2Table 110 Drink Up: Mutari Hot Chocolate 118 Product Reviews 122 Staycation on the Slowcoast 128 Dining Guide 150 Los Gatos Happy Hour 152 Campbell Events Calendar 154 Comic: In the Bubble 156 Event Gallery: Nexties

PHOTO EDITOR Paul Topp

PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTOGRAPHERS Dave "Nelly" Nelson Mike Santaella Sean McLean Michael Pegram Neil Simmons Yvonne Falk Matt Walker Jeff "Kookson" Gideons

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Ryan "Chachi" Craig Chip Schauer Dan Coyro Paul Schraub Doug Helton Peter Gregg Brad Mangin Kyle Thiermann Charlie Witmer

EDITORIAL

WRITERS Yvonne Falk Tyler Fox Peter Gregg Joel Hersch Neal Kearney Linda Koffman April Martin-Hansen Brad Oates Neil Pearlberg Kyle Rivera

Melissa Spiers Jake Thomas

DESIGN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Josh Becker

DESIGNER Julie Rovegno

SALES

DIRECTOR OF SALES Stephanie Lutz

Santa Cruz Waves, INC. PRESIDENT Jon Free

DROP IN

50 In Depth: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch 58 Remembering Barney 64 Faces of Surf: Ryan Buell 68 Behind the Lens: Matt Walker 76 Travel: Portugal 82 Sports Achievement: Major League Umpire Bill Miller

EDITOR Elizabeth Limbach

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Julia Cunningham Sadie Wittkins Kelly Medrano DISTRIBUTION Mick Freeman

PROOFREADER Josie Cowden CONTRIBUTING ARTIST Joe Fenton

FOUNDER / CEO Tyler Fox On the Cover: Timeless style brought to you by Tessa Timmons. Photo: @chachfiles

The content of Santa Cruz Waves Magazine is Copyright Š 2015 by Santa Cruz Waves, INC. No part may be reproduced in any fashion without written consent of the publisher. Santa Cruz Waves Magazine is free of charge, available at more than 100 local distribution points. Anyone inserting, tampering with or diverting circulation will be prosecuted. Santa Cruz Waves assumes no responsibility for content of advertisements. For advertising inquires, please contact steff @ santacruzwaves.com or 831.345.8755. To order a paid subscription, visit santacruzwaves.com.

FI ND US ONLI NE www.SantaCruzWaves.com @SantaCruzWaves

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LOCAL'S FAVORITE

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SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 2 5


FIRST LOOK

LETTER FROM THE FOUNDER

A Matter of Time

Tyler Fox spends some quality time with roomies Arthur Coulsten and Kyle Thiermann as they take a 15-mile paddle/ surf/camp trip down the Big Sur coastline. Photo: Kyle Thiermann

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Time is an interesting thing. It can heal and it can take away. It is relentless and unforgiving. It is honest and, when you’re having fun, it tends to fly by.   In our case, time has flown as our magazine reaches one year in print this month. We’ve had a blast discovering new talent, peering into provocative personalities and shedding light on meaningful causes. For myself and the rest of the team, it has been

an exciting journey watching our baby grow, and truly a team effort in all aspects of its upbringing. And for that we thank you.   In this issue, we look back at the countless times Santa Cruz surf legend Shawn “Barney” Barron made us smile and the joy he spread to so many. We take a road trip away from the hustle and bustle of city life to savor the scenery and rich lifestyle of the Slowcoast, where time flows

like honey through an hourglass. We even turn back the pages of history to the golden era of the Miss California pageant, which first took place at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk in 1924. These are mere morsels of the feast we have in store for you, so sit back, button up your bib, and enjoy your time with Santa Cruz Waves.

Tyler Fox

Founder of Santa Cruz Waves and Mavericks competitor


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SANTACRUZWAVES.COM/LOCAL-LOOP

The Highway 6

Should UC Santa Cruz expel the six students who blocked Highway 17 in protest? 7,980 views

Watsonville Ag Company Buys the Famed RedmanHirahara House Discussion begins over the fate of this historic landmark. 7,945 views

Gunman Robs Taco Bell in Santa Cruz

Disguised 5’5” man holds 54-yearold employee at gunpoint to access the safe. 1,312 views

Tonight: Sleepover at the Boardwalk

Family fun overnight complete with laser tag, access to rides and a sandcastle competition. 970 views

S A N TA C R U Z W AV E S . C O M / V I D E O S

Is this Giant Squid Real?

A closer look at the viral giant squid picture. 10,664 views

Man-Made Waves

Fun surfing in a wave pool in Dubai. 9,932 views

Laird Hamilton 80-100ft

Watch him take on nature’s fiercest waves. 7,084 views

Seven Ghosts: The “Bono” Surfers risk it all to ride the 31-mile Sumatran river wave. 6,545 views

@ S A N TA C R U Z W AV E S

Magical skies. Photo: @grant_ly 965

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Big Sur sunset high above the fog.

Dreaming of a Middle Peak mirage.

960

949

Photo: @rootswalker

Photo: @tradersnow

Cement Ship sunrise. Photo: @levymediaworks 946


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FIRST LOOK

WORD ON THE STREET

What is your ideal staycation?

“Going for a hike in a random place I’ve never been and bringing a picnic lunch. Then heading down to the beach and finding a little place nearby to have cocktails or drink some wine and watch the sun go down. Then go home and snuggle up in bed.”

“Taking a walk every day either at Nisene Marks, West Cliff or East Cliff. Having breakfast, lunch and dinner out every day. Spending a lot of time out of the house and with my family.” Layne Roth, sales manager at Macy’s

BY YVONNE FALK ASKED AT SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAIN BREWING

“The most awesome staycation would be to go up to Big Basin [Redwoods State Park] and do the trail to Waddell Beach, hang out on the beach, have some beers and a good picnic. Just having a relaxing day ... enjoying what Santa Cruz has to offer.”

Josh Schwochert, graduate student

Alyssa Billys, UC Santa Cruz student

Tiffany Suder, doula

“Getting a couple of friends together, throwing some surfboards in the truck, going up Highway 1 to Año Nuevo and then slowly camping our way back down and surfing along the way.”

'It would start with a hike up in Bonny Doon. Then head down to Davenport and grab some Bloody Marys and brunch. Go down to Its [Beach], pop in the water for a little surf, and then maybe have some beers and dinner.”

Kevin McBearty, landscaper

Cameron Pye, graduate student

“Going up to Pescadero and stopping at Highway 1 Brewing Company and Harley Farms [Goat Dairy], then getting fresh artichoke pesto bread from the general store [Arcangeli Grocery Co.]. And on the way back, stopping at the tide pools, plus the pie farm [Pie Ranch] right outside of Santa Cruz.” Julie Roth, UCSC sports information director

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“My ideal staycation would start with a Bagelry bagel. I’d continue by sitting on the beach, maybe reading a bit, and then going to Pacific Edge [Climbing Gym] in Midtown.”

“I’d go work on my buddy’s farm and compost his fruit trees. Then go for a late surf session and go get really good food. Probably make ahi tacos at home with corn tortillas and guacamole and Sriracha.” Chris Ziegler, gardener


SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 1


Remember When ... ?

Continued on Page 26 ďż˝

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FIRST LOOK

R E M E M B E R

WHEN ... Santa Cruz protested the Miss California pageant? BY MELISSA SPIERS

PHOTO: CHIP SCHAUER

ON A WARM JUNE DAY IN 1982, long before Lady Gaga donned her infamous meat dress, former Sports Illustrated swimsuit model and Media Watch founder Ann Simonton wore a bologna gown and hot-dog sash on the steps of the Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium. While Gaga’s sartorial choices are always a mystery, Simonton was very clear on hers: she and other women were protesting the objectification of women in the Miss California contest by staging a counter offense—their very own “Myth California” pageant.

The Miss California Bathing Beauty contest fi rst took place at the Santa Cruz Boardwalk Bandstand in 1924, when the Chamber of Commerce and town merchants sought to capitalize on the success and publicity surrounding the Miss America pageant that had begun three years earlier on the Atlantic City boardwalk in New Jersey. Hosting Miss California was a savvy business move from its inception, bringing thousands of people to Santa Cruz in the very fi rst year to

witness the pageant and its associated festivities. Popularity and success were seemingly guaranteed once two-time winner Fay Lanphier took the ultimate prize—the Miss America crown—in 1925, only a year into the California contest’s history. Throughout the 1920s and ’30s, the days-long Miss California extravaganza grew quickly, with companies all over the state sending prizes and sponsorships and contributing elaborate floats for a parade that closed downtown

streets for hours. Associated dances, dinners, concerts, contests, and other events quickly sprang up around the pageant, which was soon seen as the official start of the Santa Cruz tourist season. By the mid-1950s, an estimated 36,000 visitors came from all over California, parking as far away as Capitola and riding trolleys into downtown for the non-stop entertainment provided by stunt planes and skywriters, fi reworks, street performances, bands, parades, competitions and dances. As tourism increased and money rolled in, the only consistent problem was the Miss California pageant itself. In its early years, concerned citizens opposed the immorality of women parading around in too much makeup and too little clothing. Soon, second-wave feminists and the women’s liberation movement turned the focus from the women’s appearance itself to the fact that it was only about their appearance, and demonstrators across the country began holding beauty pageants accountable for the objectification of women. Attempting to fit in with the changing social and political landscape, Miss California officials removed the

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FIRST LOOK

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

The Myth California protests (pictured above and to the right) gained momentum in Santa Cruz throughout the 1980s. Photos by Dan Coyro.

Myth California organizer Ann Simonton dresses up as "Miss Steak" in protest of beauty pageant culture. Photo by Paul Schraub.

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words “Bathing Beauty” from the contest title and began offering college scholarships in 1945. Organized opposition continued unabated, however, after the pageant moved indoors— from the Boardwalk bandstand to the Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium—in 1966, partly in order to control admission and possible disruptions. Local activists Simonton and Nikki Craft took protests

to a new level in 1979 with the launch of their annual “Myth California” anti-pageants on the steps of the Civic. With Simonton bedecked in meat gowns— one was crafted entirely of skirt steak, another of 30 pounds of baloney meat—and protestors wearing sashes proclaiming themselves “Miss Behavin’” and “Miss Understood,” among other things, participants graphically demonstrated their

opinion of beauty-contest culture. In spite of multiple arrests and citations each year, the Myth California protests grew in strength and variety through the mid-1980s. One year, a group of men jumped onstage during the fi nal moments as the winner was announced, hands held together overhead, shouting “Men Resist Sexism!” until local police took them into custody. At other points, contestants themselves voiced their objections. On one occassion, protesters threw symbolic vials of their own blood on the walkway and smeared it on the Civic Auditorium's columns. With Miss California director Robert Arnhym complaining to the Los Angeles Times that crowds of anti-pageant protesters had become so overwhelming that “walking into that theater [was] a potentially hazardous experience for me,” the contest was moved to San Diego in 1985. Demonstrations continued in San Diego—with some supporters busing down the coast from Santa Cruz to continue the Myth California campaign—until Miss California found another home


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FIRST LOOK

REMEMBER WHEN ... ?

Above: Miss California contestants frolic at Natural Bridges State Beach. Right: The pageant runway in 1936. Below: Fay Lanphie won the Miss California title in 1924 and went on to be crowned Miss America. Photos courtesy of the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk Archives.

in Fresno in 1994, where it has taken place ever since. Officials continue to insist that it is not a beauty contest, but rather a scholarship program promoting education, career development and community service. However, a visit to the “History” section of the official Miss California website today fails to produce anything educational or

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illuminating to the community— only glamorous photos of beauty contestants. Although the Miss California pageant reigned in Santa Cruz for more than half a century, scant evidence remains of it—or of its parallel, ground-breaking countermovement—today. Several community organizations and businesses, including the Santa

Cruz Beach Boardwalk, Santa Cruz Chamber of Commerce, and the Santa Cruz Public Libraries, keep photo collections from the era, and there is a small, permanent display of official prizes, programs, and contestants’ attire at the Museum of Art & History. The Red Room, where the crowning ceremony took place for several decades, displays a wall of fading photographs, and the rumor—slyly unconfi rmed by staff—is that an original crown can still be produced and paraded around on occasion. No official Santa Cruz exhibit, however, has been amassed or displayed to remind successive generations of the creative, colorful, culture-shift ing efforts of the Myth California organizers. There is not yet, for instance, a public collection of ceramic “Miss Ogyny” dolls, no curler caps, no “Women Are Not Cows” banners. And, of course, the meat dresses are long gone.


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FIRST LOOK

NONPROFIT TO KNOW

HUNGER

LOAVES AND FISHES DISHES UP HEALTHY SOLUTIONS By Linda Koffman Despite living in a region of world-class agricultural abundance, many locals face hunger and malnutrition. Pajaro Valley Loaves and Fishes is a nonprofit pantry and kitchen run out of a humble converted Victorian in Watsonville, and it has been working tirelessly to feed low-income populations healthy meals since 1989.

IS NOT A GAME THE PROBLEM

13.3% 20.7% 14.6% 1 in7

of Santa Cruz County residents are considered food insecure, according to Feeding America. of Watsonville residents lived below the poverty level in 2013. Food insecure: the USDA term for those who experience a “lack of access, at times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members and limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods.” of Santa Cruz County residents lived below the poverty level in 2013, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The number of Americans who turned to Feeding America’s network of food banks and food assistance programs in 2014.

THE WISH LIST

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THE SOLUTIONS In partnership with Second Harvest Food Bank and Pajaro Valley Food Network, Loaves and Fishes brings thousands of pounds of food directly to the local community, feeding 14 percent of the Watsonville population. They are the only local pantry open five days a week serving non-perishable foods, bread, fresh produce, and frozen vegetables. 80 to 100 hot lunches served each week day. 25,603 meals dished out to disabled, low-income, senior and homeless individuals in 2014. Groceries are sourced from local growers and packers, community food wholesalers and retailers, and the Second Harvest Food Bank. There were 9,592 visits to the pantry program in 2014, 43 percent of which were children under 18. $10-$100/month: the cost of participating in the Community Supported Groceries Program (CSG), which provides nutritious groceries to low-income families and individuals through public donations.

In addition to financial donations and volunteer manpower, Loaves and Fishes (pvloavesandfishes.org) has a current wish list that includes the following items and services:

• Small pickup truck • Miscellaneous handyman work and fence repairs • Security lighting • Washer and dryer • Blankets


SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 3 9


Local Legends

ASHL

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FIRST LOOK

EY

A PRO IN THE MAKING Ashley Held shreds her way to a bright future By Neal Kearney omen’s surfing has charged forward in leaps and bounds over the last decade. Top female athletes are progressing at astounding rates—look no further than the giant air reverses by Brazil’s Silvana Lima and massive power hacks from world champ Carissa Moore. They have trainers, coaches, enjoy better tour venues and media coverage with the newly branded World Surf League, and are getting paid handsomely for their efforts. And if there is one female surfer coming out of Santa Cruz who is poised for this future, it’s young Ashley Held. Held has been a frequent standout at Pleasure Point over the past few years and, along with her signature fluorescent wetsuits, her well-honed rail game is turning heads. Laura Anderson has been surfing Pleasure Point for more than 30 years, and is very impressed with Held's attitude and abilities. “What I love about Ashley’s personality is her stoke and how pumped she always is to accomplish new things—her most recent being the air reverse,” Anderson says. “She’s unique in that she likes to talk about what she’s working on and she has a bit of a silly side, so she’s always fun to surf with. I’m looking forward to watching her progress over the next few years.” IN HELD'S WORDS: Age: 17 Where did you learn to surf? Maui, Hawaii

PHOTO: NELLY / SPL

Who taught you? My dad Favorite surf spot locally: Sewers, First Peak, Pengies and the Hook

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 4 1


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GROM SPOTLIGHT

Favorite surf spot internationally: Honolua Bay Sponsors: Volcom, Janga Wetsuits, Sol Life Surfboards, Arcade Mfg, Santa Cruz Skateboards, Arnette Sunglasses, FitAID. Favorite female surfer: Carissa Moore, because she’s a super powerful surfer. Favorite male surfer: Dane Reynolds, because he’s an allaround amazing surfer. Who do you enjoy surf-

ing with the most? I enjoy surfing the most with all the Point boys, Ireland Conti, Selah Bartlett, and all of my other friends.

Favorite maneuver: Aerials

If you could surf any wave in the world with one other person, where would it be, and whom would you be surfing with? Lakey Peak with Ireland Conti because it looks like a perfect warm-water wave—there’s nothing better than that. And Ireland is always fun to surf with.

Is it tough being a girl in the lineup with mostly aggressive dudes? It’s cool being a girl in today’s lineup because I feel like I get treated the same as the guys, if not better. It’s nice surfing with a bunch of guys because they push me to surf harder and make me a better surfer.

Any moves you are working on nailing currently? I’m working on landing an air reverse.

FIRST LOOK

Seventeen-year-old Ashley Held not only doesn't mind surfing in a lineup of mostly guys—she thinks it has made her a better surfer. Photos: Nelly / SPL.

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–8

every day


FIRST LOOK

THE LOCAL SCOOP

surviving

Summer

Nine ways to stay sane amid the traffic and the tourists

By Neal Kearney | Illustrations by Joe Fenton

I

T’S THE BEGINNING of summer here in Santa Cruz, and a cool breeze brings a much-needed breath of fresh air in through the window of my beat-up 2001 Honda Civic. I inhale deeply as I navigate the horrendous traffic that has turned what should have been a 15-minute jaunt across town into a 35-minute, teeth-grinding exercise of patience and acceptance. Flashy cars with out-ofstate license plates, groups of pasty, overweight tourists, sun worshipers on battered cruisers, and tattooed beefcakes wearing Affliction tank tops clog the streets. A strange and acidic sense of entitlement bubbles up in my throat as I steer through the throngs of humans with a death grip on the wheel. I struggle to keep my cool as I contemplate the inevitability of this annual takeover of my dear hometown. I ease my troubled mind—and my grasp of the wheel—by

reminding myself that my town takes on a very different face during the summer season, and that the tradeoffs are well worth the trouble. Our local economy depends on this annual influx of tourism, and who are we to withhold the treasures of Santa Cruz from others who aren’t fortunate enough to call it home? Still, it takes some emotional preparedness to endure the busy streets and crowded shorelines. Here are our nine sure-fire tips for making it out alive.

1

It goes without saying that Santa Cruz traffic can be a nightmare during the summer. More than three million visitor trips are taken to Santa Cruz County each year, according to Santa Cruz County Conference and Visitors Council (CVC), many of which are during the summer months. All those cars! So little road space! With this in mind, always give yourself

a 15-to-20-minute cushion for any commute, especially cross-town journeys. Readjusting your commute habits in this way will, hopefully, spare you from succumbing to road rage.

2

Use discretion in the water. The warm water and mellow waves are perfect for beginners, and they come in droves. At times the lineup can resemble a warzone. We’d all love to surf with only a few good friends, but you can’t fight the tide—accept the crowds and keep your cool. Wearing a watch and setting a reasonable time limit for you to catch a few fun waves is a solid bet, as the more tired and frustrated you are the more likely you’ll get into a collision. Keep it short and sweet.

3

If you can’t fight ’em, join ’em. For many tourists and locals, Santa Cruz summers are synonymous with the Santa Cruz Beach SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 47


FIRST LOOK

Boardwalk. Embrace the cliché and make a point of going at least once this summer, especially to a Friday night beach concert, where aging rockers like Eddie Money give rad free shows. They also show free movies on the beach every Wednesday during the summer, when you can relive classics like The Goonies and—the quintessential Santa Cruz flick—The Lost Boys. Of course, the Boardwalk can be a touristy hellscape, so time your visits wisely, avoiding major holidays and the Monday/Tuesday $1 ride days.

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If you plan to frequent the Live Oak area beaches, it is wise to invest in a beach-parking permit. When you’ve had a great day lounging at the beach, the last thing you want is to see an expensive ticket waiting for you on your windshield.

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When possible use alternative modes of transportation. Parking is a huge issue, so duck dive that dilemma by using your bike more often. You’ll get into great shape—just remember your lock. Santa Cruz also has an all-too-often overlooked public bus system waiting to be taken advantage of.

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Don’t let the foggy mornings get you down. Go out and exercise, play the guitar, do yoga, meditate—whatever it may be,

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THE LOCAL SCOOP

get in the routine of daily activities that keep your spirits high. June Gloom can be a nasty mistress, so flip the script and show her who is boss. By the time the sun comes out you’ll be rolling into your day while others are still shaking off the blues.

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Don’t be a fool. Wear sunblock. Santa Cruz is no Costa Rica, but it can get blazing hot and your summer is sure to be more enjoyable if you aren’t red and crispy. Your future self will thank you for looking out during those memorable Santa Cruz summer days.

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Remember, be nice to the tourists! It’s not always easy, but consider this number: $513 million. That’s the size of the county’s tourism industry, according to the CVC.

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Pack your trash. Litter is a huge problem on local beaches. This is especially important on the Fourth of July weekend. When the smoke clears the beaches are littered with firework debris that contain toxic materials that can easily find their way into the sea. Plastics are the worst offenders, as they can harm our precious sea life. (Learn more about that problem on page 51.) Get involved with organizations such as Pack Your Trash and Save Our Shores, both of which host beach and river cleanups regularly. Slow the cycle of resentment toward visitors by setting a good example when it comes to keeping the beaches clean. Tidy up when you leave and politely ask others around you to do so as well.


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PHOTO: @NICKPUMPHREYPHOTO

Soup

Our world produces such massive quantities of plastic waste that it often flows into our oceans, where it has amassed into colossal “garbage patches.” What will it take to fix the problem? BY JOEL HERSCH

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n October of last year, local surfer Danny Wright embarked with a friend on a sixmonth road trip from the Monterey Bay down through Mexico, across four Central American countries, and into Costa Rica. From the seat of their ’84 Westphalia van, and at the many surf breaks they visited, Wright noted a troubling trend: near most large coastal communities, countless tons of trash—much of it plastic—had accumulated on otherwise spectacular beaches. Large quantities of that plastic, he knew, would eventually enter off-shore currents and float into the sea. “I saw whole beaches covered,” says Wright, who volunteers for Surfrider Foundation’s Santa Cruz Chapter and acts as the coordinator for its Blue Water Task Force, an extensive water-quality testing initiative. “It got me thinking about the bigger picture and the harm that plastics are causing our oceans.” SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 5 1


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PHOTO: DOUG HELTON/NOAA

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By the Numbers: It would require 67 ships one year to simply survey the area of the GPGP, at a cost of about $498 million. The amount of plastic debris in the GPGP has multiplied by 100 in the past 40 years. Americans use more than 182 billion plastic straws per year—enough to fill up Yankee Stadium nine times over. The average American throws away approximately 185 pounds of plastic every year.

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There is no better way to grasp the gravity of plastic pollution than by taking a look at the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch,” or GPGP—a fluid area, described by some as twice the size of Texas, between California and Hawaii where millions of tons of marine debris float in the ocean currents’ convergence zone, a feature known as a gyre. Each year, approximately eight million metric tons of plastic litter makes its way into the ocean, where it will eventually drift into one of five gyres around the planet, according to a recent study by the University of Georgia. The author compares that figure to putting five plastic grocery bags full of more plastic on every foot of coastline in the world. The North Pacific Gyre, the site of GPGP, is the planet’s

largest such vortex, containing roughly 3.5 million tons of trash, 90 percent of which is plastic debris, according to Santa Cruz-based nonprofit Save Our Shores. Many people think of this patch as something sturdy and definable—something you could walk on or crash a ship into. In reality, the majority of it is very small plastic pieces, distributed at different depths, that float like confetti in the water. This makes it more like a plastic soup than a “patch.” While this may seem like a better scenario than solid plastic waste, it means the pieces are easily consumed by sea life and makes the prospect of cleanup much more complicated. So, in a country where the average person tosses out 185 pounds of plastic every year, according

to Ecowatch.com—50 percent of which was only used once—where does fixing the problem begin?

Cleaning up the Gyre Removing the plastic waste from the GPGP has been deemed impossible by many researchers, who say it would cost many billions of dollars, take hundreds of years, and use so much ship fuel that the emissions would likely cancel out the cleanup benefits. Dianna Parker, of NOAA’s national Marine Debris Program, explains that studies have calculated that it would take 67 ships one year to simply survey


IN DEPTH

the area of the GPGP at a cost of about $498 million. Plus, because so many of the plastic pieces are so tiny and scattered at various depths, recovering them would be extremely complicated and likely result in staggering by-catch (many organisms have actually attached themselves to plastic particles, further complicating matters). Gary Griggs, a professor and director of the Institute of Marine Sciences at UC Santa Cruz, compares a cleanup initiative to the idea of “mowing the grass covering the entire state of Texas with a hand lawn mower.” “In my view, it is simply not practical or economical,” Griggs writes in an email. “And I don’t think there is enough plastic in any one location to make this feasible. Fuel use would be huge, and converting all of these small pieces of plastic to fuel I don’t think is possible.”

One project that has become a beacon of hope for some—including Wright— and the source of skepticism for others, is The Ocean Cleanup organization, which was founded by a young Dutchman named Boyan Slat. Last year, the organization completed a feasibility study with more than 100 experts on engineering, oceanography, ecology, maritime law, finance, and recycling. The concept, which was judged viable, uses ocean currents and winds to passively transport plastic toward a collection platform, saving massive amounts of fuel as well as eliminating the need for nets that could entangle sea life. The Ocean Cleanup posits that after deploying the system for 10 years, almost half of the plastic in the GPGP could be removed. “I think this is one of the best chances we have at cleaning up the garbage patch,” Wright says.

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Many people think of this patch as something sturdy and definable— something you could walk on or crash a ship into. In reality, the majority of it is very small plastic pieces, distributed at different depths, that float like confetti in the water. This makes it more like a plastic soup than a “patch.” SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 5 3


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IN DEPTH

Local surfer Danny Wright heads the Santa Cruz Surfrider Foundation's Blue Water Task Force. Photo: Mike Santaella.

BAD BAGS It is estimated that an individual person goes through an average of 500 plastic bags a year. In California alone, people collectively throw away an average of 14 billion bags annually, according to Save Our Shores. A statewide plastic bag ban that was supposed to go into effect in July of this year is now delayed until November of 2016. This is because the American Progressive Bag Alliance (a group funded by plastic manufacturers) was able to gather enough signatures to get a referendum on the ballot to repeal the ban. Californians will vote on the ban next year—make your voice heard. Learn more at saveourshores.org/whatwe-do/ban-plastic-bags.

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Garbage to Gold? Cleaning the patch up is all well and good, says Parker, but won’t matter much if the problem of plastic production isn’t tackled. “The garbage patch is really a symptom of a much larger problem,” says Parker. “It’s not just in the Pacific Ocean, it’s everywhere—it’s in our lifestyle. Ocean cleanups are incredibly difficult—it would be impossible to remove all of it—so the focus really needs to be on preventing plastic from entering the ocean in the first place.” Wright’s road trip into Central America got him thinking about recycling incentives. He says the fundamental change that needs to occur is to establish systems for recycling plastic waste that generate revenue and create jobs, especially in Latin America.

“There’s no ownership over the problem, so the only way we’re going to make change on an international level is by making it profitable,” Wright says. “We need to fi nd ways to recycle plastic waste on land— treat it like gold before it ever gets to the ocean.” Plastics are recovered from landfi lls, a “complex waste stream,” at a rate of less than 10 percent, while metals, such as steel and aluminum, are recovered at a rate closer to 90 percent. However, on a cost per weight basis, plastic is significantly more valuable than metal, according to MBA Polymers, a company in Richmond, Calif. specializing in plastics recycling. The MBA Polymers system reclaims plastics from landfills— what its founder calls “aboveground mining”—sorts them, melts them down and converts

them into plastic pellets, then markets it for new goods. The process uses 20 percent of the energy traditional plastic manufacturing requires, reduces the need for petroleum-based feedstocks (yes, plastics are made using petroleum), and reduces carbon emissions. And though the company’s plants are based overseas and operate on a small scale relative to “virgin plastic” manufacturing and plastic waste output, the system is a viable template for closing the supply loop and keeping this meddlesome material out of the ocean. Another technology that bodes well for plastic waste prevention is the ability to convert plastic waste—things like milk jugs, water bottles, and plastic bags—into clean, ultra-low sulphur liquid fuel. Captain Jim “Homer” Holm, the founder and executive director of Santa Cruz’s The


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What you can do Clean Oceans Project, says that propelling an industry around the conversion of plastic-to-fuel will get people to start thinking about plastic leftovers as a profitable material and not just as something to be thrown away and forgotten about. He believes, like Wright, that people’s motivation to make a dollar has a better shot at changing the way society thinks about the plastic waste than altruistic environmental concerns. “People don’t need to support whales or turtles or surf or sail to rid the shoreline of plastic debris,” says Holm, whose organization hopes to work on converting ocean plastic pollution into fuel. “If they make a profit by collecting plastic waste then the streets and shores will be cleaned daily around the world and the oceans will get a break.”

Changing Our Ways There’s no way out of this problem without changing how we consume and discard plastic materials in the first place. It is the daily consumer’s plastic waste stream that seems so minuscule on an individual basis, but in reality adds up greatly. For example, it is estimated that Americans use more than 182 billion plastic straws per year— enough to fill up Yankee Stadium nine times over. Alexandria Hays, a local singer and energy healer, challenges herself to produce zero plastic waste. Adhering to the steps on myplasticfreelife. com, Hays carries a mason jar for drinking, shops at farmers’ markets with reusable bags, buys in bulk, declines plastic straws, and composts to eliminate the need for plastic garbage bags.

“Global change happens one person at a time,” Hays says. “By spreading awareness about what we do as individuals we can minimize the amount of waste we all produce on a daily basis, and avoid contributing to more plastics going into our oceans.” Still, Rachel Kippen, program manager for Save Our Shores, explains that no single tactic will solve the plastic contamination problem. “We need to encourage outside-of-the-box thinking and a collaborative and collective approach,” she says. “Creating innovative technology designed to deal with the plastic waste that we continuously produce as a society is an important step, [but, at the same time] we need to reduce and ultimately eliminate our reliance on single-use plastics. It’s important that we approach the issue from multiple platforms.” To truly change the way plastic waste is contaminating the planet, everyone—individuals, nonprofits, governments, and researchers—must tackle the problem from their own vantage point, Kippen explains. Making that change will have to include educational campaigns, policy changes and legislation, as well as new research, innovative thinkers, and funding for diversion and cleanups. Home in Santa Cruz, Wright is still haunted by foreign beach breaks tainted by plastic trash, but holds out hope that people will realize what is happening to the ocean and strive to be part of the solution. “Anyone who has a strong connection to the water, like surfers, [knows that] it’s that connection with nature, with sea life, that makes us love it,” he says. “With the garbage patch out there, it’s obvious we can’t keep going down this path.”

1/ Shop with re-usable bags and use nondisposable cups and water bottles rather than plastic water bottles.

2/ Buy food from farmers' markets and purchase goods in bulk.

3/ Volunteer at a beach cleanup. Santa Cruz Surfrider Chapter and Save Our Shores organize beach cleanups regularly. (Santacruz. surfrider.org; Saveourshores.org)

4/ Refuse plastic lids, cups, straws, and all forms of “disposable” plastics.

5/ Support plastic-bag bans, polystyrene foam bans and bottle recycling bills.

6/ Compost at home to reduce the need for plastic garbage bags and/or consider using reusable trash-can liners made by Santa Cruz-based Bagito (bagito.co).

+++ Spread the word to others about the harm plastic waste causes the environment and how they can make a difference.

Why It Matters As plastic debris accumulate and float across oceans and through off-shore currents, millions of aquatic creatures—birds, fish, sea turtles, and whales—mistake the small pieces of plastic for something edible. The carcasses of countless Pacific seabirds, such as Albatrosses, have been found to contain heaps of plastic items clogging their stomachs, and more than 26 marine mammal species, including whales, manatees and seals, have also been confirmed to consume plastic debris, according to Dianna Parker, of NOAA. But another less-studied aspect of plastic ingestion among wildlife is how these tiny debris may be working their way up the food chain and into the meals we eat here on dry land. A wide variety of fish also eat plastic, including some commercially-fished species, such as the Opah and Bigeye Tuna. And then there are the smaller creatures, such as

lantern fish—a direct food source for tuna and salmon—that are eating plastic as well. And, true to the food chain’s cycle, one animal’s “dinner” ultimately becomes another bigger fish’s dinner as well. On top of plastics being made with petroleum, most also contain toxic chemicals like Bisphenol-A (BPA)—which can disrupt estrogen levels and has been found in more than 90 percent of Americans’ blood—and Phthalates, which are used to make plastic materials soft or flexible, but has also been proven to cause a host of scary disorders: abnormal male sexual development, infertility, premature breast development, premature birth, cancer, miscarriage, and asthma, according to Save Our Shores. According to Myra Finkelstein, an adjunct professor of microbiology and environmental toxicology at UC Santa Cruz, the implications are still hazy but very troubling.

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PHOTO: NELLY / SPL

Bar


(Timeless)

Remembering surfer and artist Shawn “Barney” Barron N O V. 1 1 , 1 9 7 0 —M AY 5 , 2 0 15

rney BY JAKE THOMAS

The late Shawn “Barney” Barron was a great surfer and artist, but he’ll be remembered mostly because he was a truly distinct and good person. Santa Cruz Waves CEO Jon Free introduced me to Barney in early 2014 and we hit it off instantly. We got right to work on “Barney Vision,” the docu-fiction video series we made for Waves. On the first day of filming, as we were driving north to shoot surf footage, he asked my age. I told him I was 37 and asked how old he was. He snapped his head toward me and shouted, “I’m timeless!” Barney’s passing last month, at age 44, left an entire community in disbelief. So many people loved the man and nobody can quite believe that he’s gone.

He'll live on in the many anecdotes and Barney-isms that those who knew him will share for years to come. As for me, I learned a lot about this man, and from him, in the short time I knew him. What follows are some of my observations. His love for his mother was absolute. His mom passed away last year, and it was the most painful thing he ever endured. It was fitting, then, that Barney’s memorial service was held on Mother’s Day. Lighthouse Field overflowed with people expressing their love and grief. He was a prolific multi-media artist who made collages, installations, performance art, paintings and fashion pieces, and produced fashion and art shows. He was a master of spontaneity

and flow and a genius at generating ideas. The guy’s mind was never stale: Something was always on its way out and moving fast. He always had a joke ready or a jab aimed and ready to fire. The ocean was his cure for everything. Even if he just got in and paddled around, the water would take away his stress and return him to even ground. He kept this disposition even when in the water to get surf footage, which is more rare than it should be. Some people get so caught up in trying to get clips that they forget the reason they got in the water in the first place—because it's fun and it heals. Barney surfed because it was his passion, but he shared the ocean with others because it was his way of giving back.

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From Mavericks to Tahiti, Barney charged anything and everything the ocean would throw at him. Photo: Nelly / SPL SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 6 1


Top: Ouch—Barney shows off a little tropical souvenir. Photo: Nelly / SPL

SURFER cover: Photographed by the legendary Sonny Miller, Barney landed the cover of SURFER Magazine in September 1989. Bottom: Barney in action. Photos: Kookson

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It was his way of showing love to the ocean and to humanity. He was trying to get us all in tune. Barney was a complex person. He was truly a balance of opposites. I remember him talking about how fun it was to be Frida Kahlo last Halloween. He went around all night pretending to catch Diego Rivera cheating, and he later told me that he thought it was interesting to be a woman for a night. “I’ve been studying women my whole life,” he said. He was a soldier. He loved life, and he attacked the

mission of living with a militancy that made him fit in with the toughest of the tough and the meanest of the mean. The guy had strength and stamina like no other, in the water and out of it. The fact that his heart gave out without him ever complaining of a single symptom tells us a lot. Barney was punk rock. He was a DIY master. His style was raw, aggressive, direct and radical. There was no pretense to the man. He loved what he loved and he wanted to share it with you. He was intensely caring, and also tough as nails.

He was a diamond-minded ocean warrior artist. He described surfing as dancing, and he danced with style. He liked the weird waves and the people who were different. He had a lust for living and a knack for finding funny bones. And rocks—we can’t forget about the rocks. Barney hunted for rocks after almost every surf session. One hunt, in particular, sticks in my memory. It was after surfing in Mauli Ola, while we were interviewing Gavin Beschen and Jason Magellenes. All of the sudden, Barney was no-


where to be seen. I poked around until I spotted him back down on the beach looking for rocks. I went back to the crew and said, “I’ll buy a beer for whoever can guess what Barney’s doing.” His friend Melissa, a Mauli Ola surfer he surfed with twice a week, guessed right away: “He’s getting rocks!” I was so happy to buy that beer. That’s what he was doing the day he died. I saw him down on the beach at Mitchell’s collecting rocks. It’s still impossible for me to think about Barney in the past

tense. It feels like it’s some kind of gag. Barney wouldn’t believe that Barney was dead. Barney would think that aliens had abducted him. I would give anything to go back to the day before he passed, when he surfed one last session in the golden hour.

Above: Barney's art was one of a kind, just like him. Photo: Yvonne Falk Right: Barney gets barreled. Photo: Paul Topp

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PHOTO: NELLY / SPL

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buell FACES OF SURF

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WHAT DRIVES WESTSIDE WETSUIT MASTER RYAN BUELL? BY NEAL KEARNEY

From master shapers to professional surfers and photographers, there’s something about Santa Cruz's frigid water and powerful surf that seems to breed excellence. The Westside’s Ryan Buell has carved himself a place on that roster of impressive innovators. A full-time wetsuit guru, part-time webcast announcer/rapper, and all-around waterman, Buell aims to excel at all he does. I entered the entrepreneur’s lair expecting to find him toiling away on his latest wetsuit design, but instead found him freestyling with mic in hand and a thumping beat in the background. When he finished his verse I was quick to grab the mic and take a turn. As I ran out of lyrical steam, he turned down the music and we sat down to discuss his life and the evolution of his brand. On Becoming a Surfer and Waterman: Barring a boogie board, Buell’s first surfing experience was on a primitive, square-nosed and waterlogged soft-top

down at Tower 2 near Casinos, a fickle break on the south side of the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf, when he and some friends sneaked away from Junior Lifeguards. That day got him so jazzed on surfing that he asked his parents for his own soft-top, which they bought for him that very Christmas. His experience on the Soquel High School surf team, where Coach Richard “Frosty” Hesson taught him to calm down and smooth out his lines, was influential, as were mentors like John Hunter, who showed him that fitness and nutrition were both part of being a good surfer and athlete. Buell’s Junior Life Guard experience translated into a career as a state lifeguard and, in turn, into a life as an all-around waterman. “As a lifeguard, I traveled the world competing in whatever events I could, specializing in paddling and beach flags,” he says. “I once won the Auckland, New Zealand regional paddle final in giant surf at Muriwai beach in front of a packed crowd. Winning the first Jay [Moriarity]

Race back in 2002 will always be memorable and something I’m very proud of, as well.” On Getting into the Surf Industry: Buell got his start working at Santa Cruz Surf Shop, a post that was followed by a position in the design and production department at Hotline Wetsuits. He was soon promoted to head of the department. “I had to perform all the same tasks that a larger brand like O’Neill would have to do, only I had to do it all myself,” he explains. “The good part is that I taught myself along the way, and after 10-plus years, in my good friend Mark Taylor’s words, I had become an ‘eight-armed wetsuit monster,’ destined to do my own thing.” On Building the Buell Brand: “Once I released my commitment to Hotline, I decided fairly quickly that I wasn’t done designing and producing wetsuits, and that my biggest wetsuit moments were yet to happen,” Buell VOL 1 .6 - A P R I L / M AY 20 15

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Above: Prize fighter Luke Rockhold (left) and Ryan Buell do a little flexibility testing. PHOTO: NELLY / SPL

After a 45-minute battle with the never-ending walls of whitewater at Ocean Beach, Tyler locks into one of his most memorable rides of the season. Follow Tyler’s adventures on

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FACES OF SURF

goes on. “When I decided to start my own wetsuits, I came in hot.” Started in 2009, Buell Wetsuit Co. sought to differentiate itself by producing high-performance wetsuits made for the intermediate to professional surfer looking for the highest-grade neoprene with the best designs available. In addition to his own brand, Buell began working with private labels such as Volcom, Nike, RVCA, Rusty, Reef, Monster Energy, Rockstar, Inc. and Maui and Sons, and became a personal wetsuit designer for many top pros, including Carissa Moore, Nat Young, Mitch Coleburn, and Michel Bourez. At one point Buell was outfitting more than 40 percent of the world’s top 100 surfers with specialized rubber. “These respected pros helped me cement my street cred in an industry that can be hard to navigate,” he says. On the Gratification of Making a Quality Product:

While seeing the world’s best surfers wearing his suits brings Buell a great sense of pride, it’s seeing his impact on the local community that really fires him up. “Christmas morning has always been a special surf day for me,” he says. “When I see people in the water and they [point] to their new Buell suit and say, ‘best Christmas gift I ever got, loving it!’—that’s what makes it all worthwhile.” Among other accomplishments, Buell cherishes his involvement in the major motion picture The Hunger Games: Catching Fire. Western Costume Supply (the most well-known and enduring Hollywood costume designers), which was hired to create the Hunger Games outfits, sought Buell out because of his reputation for custom wetsuit design. Because Hunger Games: Catching Fire was filmed almost exclusively on the beach and in the water, they wanted neo-lycra

wetsuits custom made for the cast members. He was very proud to watch the movie and see the results of his hard work on the big screen, especially because his wife is a big fan of Hunger Games novels. On the Future: While still making custom suits for private labels, Buell hopes to root himself even deeper here in Santa Cruz, scaling back on international distribution and focusing more on outfitting Santa Cruzans. He’s opened up a new Buell Co. shop on the Westside to serve as a hub for everything Buell. He’s also looking forward to this coming summer, when he plans to spend time with the Junior Life Guards down at Cowell Beach—the place where it all started for him. “I love this place—the cliffs, the people, the swells, the sunsets, dining on the wharf, Fourth of July fireworks,” he says. “I’m proud to call it home.”


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SHOOTING

FOR THE

MOON PHOTOGR APHER MAT T WALKER ON GETTING THE PERFECT SHOT

M INTERVIEW BY PAUL TOPP

MATT WALKER will go to great lengths to

get a one-of-a-kind shot. If his heart is set on

capturing a specific moment in time, he’ll wait

years for the right conditions to align so that he can turn that fleeting instant into an enduring image. He’ll stay out from sunrise to sunset— “and all that time in between”—on the hunt for

his day’s inspiration. Although he is not proud of the fact, he has even hid in a bush while chasing down a particularly tricky photo opp.

"The Grateful Moonset" Walker waited several years for the moon to align with San Francisco's Transamerica Building on a night with clear skies.

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BEHIND THE LENS

Whether it’s the sky, the sea, San Francisco, or another of his favorite subjects to shoot, the selfdescribed long-exposure junky takes his time, preferring to “slow time down with filters whenever possible.” The self-taught photographer’s patience pays off in majestic moonscapes and surreal scenes—a blanket of mysterious fog masking a forest canopy, for instance, or the Milky Way bursting through an inky night sky above Big Sur’s iconic Bixby Bridge. It’s no surprise that Walker’s work has drawn attention from the likes of Popular Photography magazine,

which has featured his work in print and also awarded him Best Landscape/Nature Shot in 2013. Waves caught up with Walker, who is also known as “Roots”—he is the “R” in Santa Cruz’s NRB Photography (nrbphoto.com)—to learn what goes into building such an awe-inspiring portfolio. Of every shot you’ve managed to get, what was the most memorable? That is a really tough question to answer because there are so many memorable moments, but if I had to choose it would be a moon-

set that I photographed back in early April. I captured the full moon setting directly over the Transamerica Building and the City of San Francisco. I waited years for the alignment of the moon to set behind the Transamerica Building with the perfect conditions. So many times the weather prevented me from getting that shot. Also, upon arriving I soon realized that there was nowhere to park with every square inch of 7th Street and Middle Harbor Road filled by semi trucks with cargo containers waiting to unload their freight at the Oakland Port.

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“Bixby Bling” (above) Walker gave this shot of Big Sur’s Bixby Bridge beneath the Milky Way this name “because the car lights glowing along Highway 1 put some bling, or flashiness, on the image.” “Under the Moonlight” (left) Walker nabbed this image of a 40-percent-full moon setting while waiting for the Milky Way to appear.

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“San Francisco Blues” (above) While it’s illegal to be under the Bay Bridge (the position from which this photo was taken), “it’s not really enforced,” says Walker. “Soul Session” (right) A few lucky surfers enjoy mostly empty waters as a new swell rolls in just before sunrise last winter.

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BEHIND THE LENS

I stressfully drove around in circles, desperate for a place to park my car. I finally found a small space and parked, but within a minute another semi-truck without a trailer pulled up and said, “You can’t park here! This is for cargo trucks.” The clock was ticking, and the moon was descending faster than I wanted. Eventually I said, “Screw it!” and parked illegally in a gutter drain cutout. I had waited too long for this shot, and decided a parking ticket was worth it. I grabbed my gear, began walking toward the park, and noticed a security patrol car cruising around with headlights and a searchlight. “You have got to be kidding me!” I thought. Another

quick decision had to be made, and as the security car drove down the road toward the location I wanted to shoot from, I walked through the side of the gate and hid in the bushes. Yep, I hid in the bushes. The security car just sat exactly where I needed to be as I watched the full moon get lower and lower. Sitting in the bushes, I thought about what I was doing to get this shot, and I wasn’t feeling very good about myself. This was something I would have done in high school, but not today as a husband and father to three boys. By now it was blue hour and 20 minutes to show time. I told myself, “It’s either meant to be or not.” I stood up from out

of the bushes, and walked down the long road straight toward the security car. I heard the car start up, and watched it speed toward me with flashing lights. I stopped walking and waited for him as his approaching headlights blinded me. He stopped, rolled down his window, and asked, “This park is closed, what are you doing here?” I stood there with all my gear, and said, “I have been waiting many years to shoot the full moon setting over the Transamerica Building, and I was wondering if you had it in your heart to let me photograph this rare event during these perfect weather conditions?” He looked me in the eyes, and then at his watch, and said, “Well


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“Milky Way Airglow” (above) This photograph was named Best Nature and Landscape Image of 2013 in Popular Photography Magazine and can also be seen in a book recently published by the magazine titled How to Shoot Everything. “Pfeiffer Revisited” (right) Big Sur’s Pfeiffer Beach beneath a Milky Way sky.

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BEHIND THE LENS

"Always look behind you when you are shooting. Even though there might be a crazy sunset in front of you, there just might be a rainbow or something awesome behind you." it’s almost dawn, so just this one time.” I almost started crying with joy. After thanking him 15 times, I ran as fast I could to the location. My heart was pounding while trying to get my gear together, and eventually everything fell into place. I took a few deep breaths and began shooting. This was by far the most spectacular moon shoot I have ever done. The crystal-clear sky with the moon setting over the city was beyond surreal. I was truly grateful for everything coming together like it did considering all the uncertainty that preceded it, and knowing I will probably never have this opportunity again.

How have you evolved as a photographer since your early days with this craft? My first days didn’t have a lot of thought behind the photo. I just pointed the camera and took the photo, but today a lot of thought goes into my shots—[like] looking for an interesting composition. Many of my shots start with a vision, and then making plans on how to make it happen, and then waiting for conditions to fall into place, like with some of my moon or Milky Way shots. Catching the moment is only one step in making a great photo. Do you use any specialized software or techniques to

create these finished images? All of my photos go directly into a folder Lightroom, where I’ll make some minor corrections before exporting the image into Photoshop CS6. I do most of my post-processing in Photoshop using the curves tool. There are several different techniques I use depending on what I shot. I do exposure blending and focus stacking, and I also use a technique using luminosity masks that allows you to focus on specific areas of your image. I also use NIK software on some of my images. Any advice for up-and-coming photographers? Always look behind you when you are shooting. Even though there might be a crazy sunset in front of you, there just might be a rainbow or something awesome behind you.

Find Matt Walker online at rootswalker.com and @rootswalker on Instagram.


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TRAVEL

IN SEARCH OF EMPTY WAVES Mention California in the ’60s and ’70s to any surfer and their eyes will glaze over as they relay tales of a simpler time: endless, un-crowded surf, free camping on the beach, camaraderie in the water, and an unexplored coastline. They’ll likely also tell you how much things have changed. Like many surfers who daydream of that time long gone, my friends and I sometimes use our vacation

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CHASING LONG-GONE CALIFORNIA DREAMS IN PORTUGAL STORY & PHOTOS BY PETER GREGG

time to search for greener pastures. However, it wasn’t exactly with this in mind that a friend and I sought out Portugal as a surf destination. “If it goes flat, we’ll check out some castles in the countryside,” we thought. We rented a campervan so we could move freely and not worry about finding accommodations. Portugal was on our radar for occasionally producing

skyscraper-sized waves at the beaches of Nazaré, and throaty, hollow beach-break waves in Peniche, which are showcased each year by a stop on the World Surf League tour. We paid pilgrimage to these famous spots but, most unexpectedly, we also found our home-state’s nostalgic dream is thriving along the coast of the Atlantic—with some reinterpretation. As we cruised south in our


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van, we were met with empty waves, hassle-free oceanfront camping and seemingly endless pristine coastline. The surfers who lived out of their vans spent their afternoons drinking espresso on the beach, and instead of sprawling cites, we found a shoreline dotted with traditional fishing villages. Surf sessions were capped off with a few slices of prosciutto and a glass of port. Was it a taste of the old California dream? I’m still not sure, but I know I’ll be back.

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Santa Cruz's iconic lighthouses silhouetted by a fiery sunset. Photo: Nelly / SPL

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SPORTS ACHIEVEMENT

THE MAN BEHIND THE

MASK Playing hardball with Major League Baseball umpire Bill Miller BY NEIL PEARLBERG

PHOTO: BRAD MANGIN

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hat man in sports is required to have the patience of a saint, the trained eye of a surgeon, and the thickness of skin to withstand the abuse of a grandstand of hostile fans? Just ask current Major League Baseball umpire and Aptos resident Bill Miller, who spoke with Santa Cruz Waves about what it takes to officiate over America’s favorite pastime. To start, umpires must be fair and firm with an unusual knack for selfcontrol, he says. Perhaps above all else, umps must always be on point—after all, there are millions of eyes watching, ready to critique his calls. Now, instant replay means that his boss, Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations Joe Torre, is also watching more closely than ever. His career as a baseball umpire began at Branciforte Junior High, where he took a sports officiating class offered by the school. “A dream come true for a teenage boy, I first thought,” says Miller. “I later figured out it was a racket, as we had to give

up our lunchtime to referee volleyball or basketball games.” Later, in the rookie league, A-Ball, Double A, and then Triple A baseball, Miller labored around the backroads of the United States, stopping in towns like Medford, Ore., Jackson, Miss., and Shreveport, La., to call balls and strikes. He wondered if he was going to succumb to the stress of a baseball umpire or grow into one who could take control, put people in their place and keep them from yelling at him time and time again. “The minor league stadiums are small, and the raucous crowds sit right on top of you,” Miller says. “It was my time there where I learned to deal with the heckling, all the while developing a thick skin.” It got easier, he adds: “I suffer far less abuse at the major league stadiums, because the crowd sits much farther away from the field of play.” The year was 1997 when he received the call from the Commissioner’s Office that he was headed to “The Show” to umpire his first Major

League game. Growing up in Santa Cruz, Miller is an A’s fan and it was at the Oakland Coliseum where he ejected his first Major League player, standing toe to toe with another imposing figure, “Bash Brother” Jose Canseco. “I punched out Jose on strike three—he wasn’t happy. He turned to me and said that if I admitted I was wrong, he would turn around and walk away,” says Miller, who replied to Canseco, “Jose, I am not telling you I am wrong, so go sit down.” Canseco then head butted Miller on the forehead with the beak of his helmet, and was consequently tossed from the game.

Jose Canseco once head butted Miller on the forehead with the beak of his helmet and was tossed from the game.

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SPORTS ACHIEVEMENT

PHOTO: BRAD MANGIN

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Miller's favorite stadiums are New York’s old Yankee Stadium, Wrigley Field in Chicago and Boston’s Fenway Park.

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The life of a baseball umpire goes beyond the love of the game. For Miller it is driven by a deep appreciation for what he is doing. “I have a clear understanding of how the game is supposed to be played and how players and managers are supposed to behave,” says Miller. His position of impartiality is evident even off the field. When asked which are the best pitchers and hitters he’s seen, and who his favorite managers are to argue with, were met with a glaring look of disdain. He is, however, willing to share his favorite stadiums. He calls New York’s old Yankee Stadium, Wrigley Field in Chicago and Boston’s Fenway Park the “meccas of the game” and his favorite “fields of dreams,” because

every single fan is truly passionate about the game. Miller might be adding Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City to his list. “I was behind the plate working the 2014 American League Wild Card game between the Kansas City Royals and the Oakland A’s,” he says. “The crowd, even in an openair arena, was so totally deafening, it gave me chills.” Miller’s thoughts turn to the future of the sport he loves and his hopes for its longevity with generations to come. “Baseball is very concerned about its future, and I know that our new commissioner Rob Manfred has brought in social media experts to attack a new younger audience,” says Miller. “It is imperative that we continue to see kids playing baseball on every diamond across the country.”

There are only 70 umpires within Major League Baseball; it is among those few that Miller has the even more rare supervisory position of Crew Chief, which means he acts as a liaison between his crew and the league office. Does the man behind the mask possess the dream job? It’s not a clear-cut answer for Miller, who shares his life with his long-time girlfriend Michelle and his two daughters, Emily and Maggie, whom he misses while on the road for eight months out of the year. “I love what I do, yet with so many years on the road, it is still extremely tough on my family,” he says. But baseball needs him, too, and so it is that each spring, he leaves his life in Santa Cruz County and hits the road once again.


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Dogs

GETTING TO KNOW TWO OF SANTA CRUZ'S GREATEST CANINE/ HUMAN SURF DUOS BY NEAL KEARNEY PHOTOS: NELLY / SPL

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Homer Henard and his pup Skyler (above) and Sean Peterson and his black lab/pitbull mix Josie (opposite right) have taken canine surfing to new heights.

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ADVENTURE

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uring a Pleasure Point surf session in April, I watched as Homer Henard paddled a huge stand-up paddle board into a congested lineup. Perched precariously on the nose of his board, which was bedecked in traction pads, was Skyler, his 3-year-old Queensland Heeler. She was shivering and looked a little spooked. I greeted the two in the waters at Second Peak and asked if they’d caught anything yet. “I’m over this crowd. We’re going to go sit out the back at First Peak and catch a bomb,” Henard said nonchalantly. I looked at the seemingly frightened pooch and rolled my eyes. From the looks of the crowd, head-high waves, and shaking hound, I had my doubts

as to the achievability of this goal. As Henard and Skyler waited for a wave far out to sea, I took a wave in and clambered up the cliff to see how this potentially sketchy scenario would play out. Sure enough, that bomb wave came through. Henard whipped the SUP around and paddled frantically as Skyler braced herself. He stroked in and made his way down the steep drop. Like a seasoned vet, Skyler scooted back on the board to avoid pearling, and they were off. They raced down the line on a head-high wave, both making subtle adjustments in weight distribution in order to maneuver through the thick crowd. The lip pitched and all of a sudden man and his best friend were getting a legitimate

tube ride. I couldn’t believe my eyes. I’d seen people surf with dogs on mellow waves, but this was a level of bravado I’d yet to behold. It could be said that surfing can bring these cross-species friends even closer, and Henard and Skyler are the perfect example of this extreme bonding experience. Along with Henard, another local ripper, Sean Peterson, can often be spotted catching waves with his pup, Josie (named, with a different spelling, after The Outlaw Josey Wales), a 10-year-old black lab/pitbull mix. Santa Cruz Waves caught up with the two men to learn what it takes to turn a furry friend into a seasoned surfing companion.


ADVENTURE

Sean Peterson & Josie How did begin surfing with Josie? I would bring Josie to run around on the beach while I surfed. My board washed up on shore and she jumped on it. So I ended up pushing her in on a whitewash wave that day and she rode it to the beach. That was the beginning of her froth. Has she always been an ocean/ beach loving dog? Josie has been a dedicated water dog from the start. What is her favorite place to shred? Josie enjoys hanging paws at 38th Avenue, and Pleasure Point.

How would you describe Josie’s style in the water? Natural and cruise-y. Any sketchy experiences in the water? Only when she is preoccupied chasing birds (Josie loves birds). But other than that it’s been all good. How long does a session with Josie usually last? We usually catch a handful of solid rides and call it good. What is the trick to surfing with a dog? Having a water dog and beach lover helps. For us, I have to make sure to tire her out and sap some of her energy before sessions; otherwise she’ll be more focused on scanning the horizon for birds!

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They raced down the line on a head-high wave ... all of a sudden man and his best friend were getting a legitimate tube ride. I couldn’t believe my eyes. I’d seen people surf with dogs on mellow waves, but this was a level of bravado I had yet to behold.

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ADVENTURE

Homer Henard & Skyler How long has Skyler been surfing? Skyler has been surfing for about two years. It all started when she jumped on a paddleboard at the Harbor. Right then I knew it was on. What is her favorite spot? Skyler has only surfed The Murph Bar, Pleasure Point, and Cowell’s. As of late she’s been lovin’ the Cowell’s Sand Bar.

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What is her favorite maneuver? Her favorite maneuver is hanging 10 with her tongue out. How does she deal with kooks in the water? Kooks don’t faze her. She just goes. Sky doesn’t mind a party wave. I saw you get a tube ride together the other day. What is Skyler’s next big move? I just put traction on the nose of her board, which is a full game changer. Now she’s hanging 10 and feeling a lot more comfortable on the board. We have a couple of new top-secret maneuvers up our sleeves that you’ll

be able to see this summer. Skyler’s next goal is to catch a big wave at Middle Peak Steamer’s when the next swell hits. Who knows, maybe we’ll snag a Guinness World Record or two for biggest and longest dog ride. Sky(ler) is the limit!

Follow @SkylerTheSurfingDog on Instagram to stay updated on Skyler's latest exploits.


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ART THAT ENDURES LOCAL TATTOO ARTISTS REVEAL THE BEST PIECES IN THEIR PORTFOLIO BY LINDA KOFFMAN

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hen summer comes, the clothes come off. That means tattoos— the good, the bad and the ugly—come into plain view. With so many colors, fonts and images in heavy rotation on bare beach bodies these days, we decided to go straight to the source, local tattoo artists themselves, to see which of their own works of skin art stand out to them and why.

TIM BUONAGURIO GOOD OMEN TATTOO

Years of experience: 25 “I learned from a portrait artist back in Atlanta and I like old movies, so I do a lot of portrait work. And I do a lot of black and gray because it has more of a vintage look and it’s the way I learned. Black and gray also stays a lot better through the years down the road. It just kinda flows out of me.” PORTRAIT BY SEAN MCLEAN

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ARTIST PROFILE

JESSICA MCDERMOTT ILLUMINATI TATTOO

Years of experience: 8 “I chose this photo because I love tattooing animals of all kinds but I found this brindle pattern to be particularly challenging. I’m pleased with the way it came out.” PORTRAIT BY SEAN MCLEAN

SKAN ARTS COAST 2 COAST INK

Years of experience: 5 “I chose this tattoo because not all tattoos have to be big to be complementary to the body. And although I enjoy doing black and gray work, my origins always lead me back to color.” PORTRAIT BY SEAN MCLEAN

DEREK PRATT F U TATTOO

Years of experience: 2 “I really enjoy doing things on the fantastical, magical, spacey side. This is a pretty good representation of some of those things.” PORTRAIT BY MICHAEL PEGRAM

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ARTIST PROFILE

MISTY GALVAN

CORRALITOS TATTOO Years of experience: 15 “I chose this tattoo as one of my recent favorites because it is simple yet beautiful. I like the placement—and the client put a lot of thought into the design and I put my own twist on it. I also chose this tattoo because most of my clients seek out my color work but I like to be versatile in my craft.” PORTRAIT BY MICHAEL PEGRAM

LALO PEÑA INK BY PEÑA

Years of experience: 4 “[This is my favorite] because Al Capone was an interesting character in the turn-of-the-century, and he was a fine gentleman in an organized mob.” PORTRAIT BY SEAN MCLEAN

CHERI LOVEDOG

LOVEDOG TATTOO STUDIO Years of experience: 20 “What makes this tattoo endearing to me is that it is one of my favorite quotes by one of my favorite writers. I also like the choice of old school carbon typewriter font with its imperfections and round edges, which makes it feel like words, as opposed to just looking like words, thus doing the quote justice.” PORTRAIT BY MICHAEL PEGRAM

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CATCH OF THE DAY Ocean2Table steers local fishing toward sustainability BY KYLE RIVERA

PHOTO: NELLY / SPL

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he rich bounty of the Monterey Bay has lured creatures both great and small to the region for millennia, from the pods of dolphins which swim close to shore in their quest for squid to the team of sandpipers who comb the wet sand for tasty morsels of midges and sand crabs. While the native Ohlone population was able to fish the Bay for generations without impacting the marine environment, the rise of industrial fishing in the 19th and 20th centuries depleted local fish stocks, the most spectacular example being the collapse of Monterey’s once-thriving sardine industry in the 1950s. The issue of overfishing is not just a local one. The United Nations estimates that 75 percent of the world’s fisheries are overfished, a sobering fact considering that worldwide about a billion people rely on fish as their main source of protein. In recent years, the concept of sustainable fishing— fishing from sources (fished or farmed) that can exist over the long-term without compromising species, as defined by the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program—has taken hold, inspiring a new crop of fishermen to do things a bit differently. Enter Ocean2Table, a local outfit founded in 2012 by Ian Cole, a UC Santa Cruz alumnus and former fisheries observer for the National Marine Fisheries Service. Seeing the impact of overfishing firsthand, Cole wanted to address the issue via a business model that connects consumers directly with local, sustainable fisheries. “It becomes apparent really quickly when you are in this field that you can get fish from all over the world shipped to you very cheaply and you can make a fair amount of money doing so,” says Cole. “But it is not fresh and it is not sustainable.” Borrowing a concept that has found great success in agriculture, Ocean2Table is run as a community-supported fishery, or CSF. Subscribers to the service receive fish

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alerts from Ocean2Table informing them of the day’s catch, including information about the species, the status of the stock and some recipes and ways to enjoy the fish. Orders are then placed and the fish is processed and delivered within 24 hours. All fish is derived from sustainable sources within a hundred miles of Santa Cruz. When Cole started the business, the fish mainly went to friends and family. But as word spread, momentum grew and he brought in friend and fellow UCSC alumnus Charles Lambert. An avid fisherman, Lambert’s love for fishing was fostered as a little boy on his great-grandfather’s homestead in Glenn County, which included a trout pond. Before joining Cole at Ocean2Table last year, Lambert worked as a field biologist for the Department of Fish and Game. During the May to September fishing season, when the duo is not fishing the waters themselves in their small, economical, 17-foot Boston Whaler, they support captains who adhere to the same values of sustainability. “Throughout the week we are in contact with local captains,” explains Lambert. “Part of Ocean2Table is supporting those local, artisanal fisherman that are using sus-

tainable practices,” Cole adds. “We pay them a very fair price for their fish to support the fishing methods they use.” When Lambert and Cole are out on the water, they fish by hook and line—“low impact,” explains Cole. Looking ahead to the start of the season, Cole says they are keeping their fingers crossed that it is a good season for halibut and sea bass, as every year it fluctuates drastically. “Fish don’t always come back to the same place,” says Lambert. “Sea bass migrate, so if they don’t come into the Monterey Bay, you are not going to get them. The last best season for sea bass was in 2011.” Factor in climate change and rising ocean temperatures and the job gets even trickier. “The whole ocean is changing, and it is changing the nature of the fish, so it is tough as a fisherman to try to predict what is going to happen,” says Lambert. “Last year we saw the water was warmer than we had seen here before. So we try to keep up with these changes as the fish move to different areas.” While the fortunes of fishermen can vary with the tide, the two friends would not have it any other way. “We both enjoy being outdoors, being out in the water, especially out here in the Mon-

terey Bay,” says Lambert. The duo are keen surfers, too. “Charlie and I both love to surf whenever we’re not fishing or working on Ocean2Table,” says Cole. “Mitchell’s Cove and Steamer Lane are right down the street so we end up there a lot. If the wind is down you’ll most likely find us surfing up north near Scott’s Creek.” Ocean2Table is headquartered in the Food Lounge in downtown Santa Cruz. The guys process all the fish in the venue’s commercial kitchen space and host pescetarian pop-up dinners. Their first dinner in April drew more than 50 people. The multi-course meal featured sablefish straight from the Monterey Bay and organic vegetables grown by their friends at Crescent Farm in Scotts Valley, which also composts their fish waste. “We appreciate the entrepreneurial spirit and vision of the place,” says Cole of the Food Lounge, a nascent food hub that also houses Mutari Hot Chocolate (see page 108 for the lowdown on them) and hosts regular events with the LionFish SupperClub and Mortal Dumpling. “It is great to be surrounded by people interested in bringing something different to the Santa Cruz food scene,” he adds.

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Ocean2Table's Ian Cole and Charles Lambert are hoping for plentiful sea bass and halibut this fishing season. Other seasonal catches include Pacific sanddabs, rockfish, sablefish, Petrale sole, and spot prawns.

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DRINK UP

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THE

MAGIC BEAN

PHOTO: JOSH BECKER

Forget what you thought you knew about hot chocolate. Mutari has brought authentic, cacao-forward drinking chocolate to Santa Cruz BY LINDA KOFFMAN Cacao beans were once used as currency in Mesoamerica. The Mayans and Aztecs believed them to be magical. That may be far from here and many a century ago, but Mutari Chocolate House and Factory is bringing that same idolatry of the little cacao bean back. How? In finely procured, rich organic sipping form. “Not all chocolate is created equal,” says Adam Armstrong. The founder of Mutari, who spent two years in the Peace Corps helping cacao farmers in Panama, was on a search for authentic hot chocolate upon his return in 2013. Coming up empty handed, the 35 year old started making batches of the good stuff, in trialand-error style, out of his personal Santa Cruz kitchen. Today Mutari Chocolate House and Factory is churning out gourmet hot chocolate at The Food Lounge, a new gastronomical hub at 1001 Center St. in downtown Santa Cruz, and prides itself on ethically traded beans and fair business practices that help rural farmers abroad.

“Sourcing fine-flavor cacao from small-scale farmers and co-ops can lead to increased revenue for the farmer and put a smile on people’s faces when they taste the resulting hot chocolate or sipping chocolate made from those beans,” Armstrong says of the company’s sustainably minded bean-to-bottle methodology. “As a consumer, I think knowing that the cacao used to make the chocolate is ethically sourced makes it just that much better, too.” These days when Armstrong visits Panama (where he was given the name Mutarikobo—“one that comes from the clouds”—by the local Ngobe people he had worked closely with while in the Peace Corps), he flies down with one small backpack but returns home with two 50-pound bags of cacao beans. Armstrong’s brother Matthew transforms those beans as chief chocolatier, operating in the back of Mutari’s combined production space and storefront, which opened this March.

Here, beans from Ecuador, Venezuela, Guatemala, and Panama are hand sorted, roasted in small batches, cracked and winnowed, ground and conched, then poured out on sheets to be broken up and shredded. The end product is either bottled for retail or made into cups of hot chocolate served at the Mutari chocolate bar. Even the bohemian packaging (also done in-house) reflects Mutari’s devotion to handcrafted artistry. Glass bottles with corks are carefully topped off with hand-tied hemp string. “We really wanted people to know that this was something special as soon as they saw it on the shelf,” Armstrong says. The Mutari storefront welcomes locals with intimate indoor and outdoor sitting areas where hot chocolate and thick sipping chocolates are made authentically enough to lure repeat customers originally from South America and Spain in search of a taste of home. Mutari products are also on shelves in San Diego, South Lake Tahoe, Oakland,

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PHOTO: JOSH BECKER

NOT ALL CHOCOLATE IS CREATED EQUAL —Adam Armstrong, founder of Mutari Santa Maria, and Berkeley. Most goods on the menu are vegan and gluten-free. Armstrong, who grew up, like most of us, drinking those pouches of instant hot chocolate—which he calls “cacaoflavored sugar”—now finds his life dedicated to hot chocolate in a way that parallels purveyors of fine wine or microbrewed beers. “We highlight the origin of the chocolate, and people definitely have their favorites,” Armstrong says. “Each bean from each origin is different and exceptional in its own way. I would say it’s similar to drinking wine.” Like its products, Mutari is small but making a sweet mark. So, what’s on the menu? Single drinks run $4.50, flights of sipping chocolate or hot chocolate

run about $10, and there are alternatives like brewed cacao for a tea-like option or frozen hot chocolate when the summer heat is in full effect. Mutari’s most popular drink is the Himalayan Pink Salt Hot Chocolate, which features Guatemalan Cahabon cacao, pure cane sugar and a touch of Himalayan Pink Salt. In addition to the cacao bean’s history, Mutari’s mission is inspired by the Armstrong family history. Great-greatgrandfather Jerome Boneypart Armstrong, an Iowa corn farmer in the 1800s, authored a book about the importance of being mindful about healthy eating and farming. It’s a principle the younger Armstrongs channel in every cup of chocolate.

“The book was mostly about how if we all leave the farms we will start forgetting where our food comes from and that we will start eating unhealthily,” Armstrong begins. “We believe that not only is knowing where your food comes from important, but also that creating something to the best of your ability makes a difference. We really do go out of our way to make sure we have created the best hot chocolate or sipping chocolate anyone has ever tasted.” Learn more at mutarichocolate. com.

Brothers Adam and Matthew Armstrong (pictured far left) are the chocolate whizzes behind Mutari Chocolate House and Factory. Photos: Mike Santaella.

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377 Santana Row Suite 1105 San Jose, CA 408.753.9115 STORE, WINE BAR, ORGANIC FARMSTAND & STUDIO TOURS

310 Harvest Drive Watsonville, CA 831.761.2041 x21

annieglass.com

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G E T YO U R PA N T I E S I N A BUNCH! Join Our Panty Club ~ buy 12 panties @ $15 or more and get 1 free*

Adult Store Lingerie Store 1329 Pacific Avenue Santa Cruz CA 831.423.7613 Open til 9 pm Mon-Thurs Open till 10 pm Fri-Sat Open til 7pm Sun *get 1 free up to $15 value.

www.ShopCamouflage.com

facebook.com/CamouflageSC

instagram.com/CamouflageSantaCruz

CruzBrand.com

positively sexy since 1980

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The only brewery in town with a FULL BAR!

Join us for a pint on the patio ...

The Original Dog-Friendly Patio

We have the MLB Extra Innings Package! Established 1988

Your Home Base for Bay Area Baseball •

Located between the Boardwalk & the Yacht Harbor • 2 Blocks from Seabright Beach

519 Seabright Avenue, Santa Cruz | 831.426.2739 | SeabrightBrewery.com Open Daily: 11:30am - 11:30pm 11 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


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COMPANY SPOTLIGHT

Style Transformer One local company's multi-functional cloak | BY EVELYN SHAFER MAVARI's Kickstarter campaign was so successful (the company surpassed its $30,000 goal by more than $12,000) that the crowd-sourcing website chose it as a Kickstarter "staff pick."

Photo: Neil Simmons

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I

f Optimus Prime wore a cloak, he just might don a MAVARI. Keeping in mind the importance of function when creating style, the local Santa Cruz brand of the same name has stitched together a fashionable origamilike piece ready for myriad uses by the active wearer. Yes, it transforms more than a few times. The MAVARI attempts to combine the concerns of the rugged outdoor enthusiast with urban city sleekness. A Batmanlike waterproof cloak that comes in men’s and women’s sizes, it can double as a towel, roll down for compact packing, and fold out into a striking backpack with arm straps. Plus the hooded innovation is reversible, so it boasts two color options in one. The brainchild of three friends from Caracas, Venezuela—Juan Carlos (Juanco) Viso, Bryan Capriles and Oscar Solorzano, MAVARI was formed

between Santa Cruz and Milan, Italy, where the creators have a second design studio, in 2014. Utilizing a successful Kickstarter campaign (honored as an official Kickstarter Staff Pick) that raised $42,647 to exceed its goal of $30,000 when it ended in December, the label is now banking on its signature namesake product to pique your curiosity and warm your surfsoaked bones. For MAVARI, it’s all about attention to details. Seemingly modeled after the sciencedriven feats of wetsuit materials, the cloak features a high-tech triple-layer material touted as having “waterproof, windproof, absorbent, wicking, breathable, and antibacterial properties.” Dubbed “MAVARI skin,” the staydry material is patent pending. Rust-free zippers and buttons accent throughout, and there’s also a microfiber lens cleaning cloth built into the jacket for

whatever matching shades you wear to complete your look. Here, waterproof polypropylene meets microfiber in simple, angular lines that give it a futuristic feel. Taking the itch for modernity to a whole new level, the cloak even goes so far as to have a QR code patch sewn onto its sleeve, meaning wearers can share social networking and “discounts, cash and rewards” with friends who want to scan the MAVARI code off this latest fashion find with the wave of a smartphone wand. Ultimately, MAVARI is hoping that when your raggedbut-beloved beach towel needs a rest from endless post-surf use, you’ll give its cutting-edge cloak a try. Anticipated to retail at $215, could this be your goto from the beach to the next outdoor adventure or night out? We’ll let you decide. Learn more info at mavaricode.com.


LET’S GIVE THE SUN A LITTLE SOMETHING TO WORSHIP

FIRST WAX FREE offer expires 7/27/15

CAPITOLA / 831 477 9331 1955 41st Avenue

waxcenter.com

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5/22/15 10:57 AM


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PRODUCT REVIEW

Moved by Bikes

A versatile product for those who choose to pedal before they paddle By Neal Kearney

L

iving about two blocks from the ocean, I’m accustomed to the convenience of a five-minute walk to the waters of Pleasure Point. Sometimes, however, when I’m in a rush or need to travel a little farther to a different surf spot, I’ll jump on my bike and take off with surfboard under my arm. I can’t count how many dings I’ve put in my board, not to mention the perilous situations I’ve put myself in riding one-handed like this. I always told myself I’d get racks someday, but never followed through. After testing the Moved by Bikes Surfboard Racks, however, I’m considering changing my ways. The Basics—The Moved by Bikes Surfboard Racks come in two variations: the longboard and shortboard models. They are both very straightforward

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Photos courtesy of Moved by Bikes.

and user-friendly. They utilize quick release bars that allow you to remove the rack component from the base with a push of a button. Along with freeing up the bike for non-surfing activities such as errands or beach rides, it allowed me to maneuver my bike through my cluttered garage and side gate without getting hung up—a common occurrence when the waves are firing and my froth level is on high alert. This feature also comes in handy if and when you need to fit your bike into your car. Material wise, both longboard and shortboard setups use rust-resistant anodized aluminum and stainless steel. While the materials for the long/ shortboard models are the same, the mounting system is different. For the longboard

racks, the front tubes are mounted on the head tube, which happens to be the strongest place on any bike frame. The rear surfboard rack will mount to either the rear seat post or to the rear bike rack. The shortboard rack has the same seatpost clamp as the other rack, but utilizes a “twin tube” clamp that includes a second mounted tube. This allows you to mount both tubes to your seat post—perfect for shortboards. The mounts are designed to be fairly universal, but owners of lightweight racing bikes should use caution during installation and carbon fiber bike owners should steer clear. Both set-ups securely held my boards when I tested them, and the foam padding on the tubes prevented any damage to my boards.


PRODUCT REVIEW

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Installation—The instructions for mounting that came with the racks seemed pretty straightforward. The company has also put installation videos on its website. But if you’re mechanically challenged like me, heed the advice of the Moved by Bikes website and take the racks and your bike down to your local bike shop. Bottom Line—Once I got the racks mounted, they were a user-friendly, convenient and versatile product for those who choose to pedal before they paddle. And since they’re made out of rust-resistant materials, they should last a long time, even when constantly exposed to the salty air. The racks are priced at $105 for the shortboard model and $135 for the longboard version. Learn more about Moved by Bikes and their products at movedbybikes.com.

I am Kristen Valenza

founder of Living Roots Food and Floral. I am honored to share my experience and want to provide the best culinary experience as possible. I would like to create everlasting memories and travel through taste. It is my passion to create the perfect event, with perfect quality food. I truly believe in supporting our local community as well, and work close with local farmers, cheese artisans, and local fisherman. I would be honored to bring into existence and dream up any event.

831.325.5498 Kristen@livingrootsfoodandfloral.com

livingrootsfoodandfloral.com Living Roots Food and Floral

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r e m m u S Yo u r

t a c w Slo

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n o ti

Need to get away? Head north for some Slowcoast vibes BY APRIL MARTIN-HANSEN

T

here is a magical place just north of Santa Cruz, nestled between the mountains and the sea. As you drive up Highway 1—away from the city and the chaos of summer traffic—the road get less crowded with every minute of the journey. You know you’ve entered the Slowcoast when you see fog gently curling through the treetops on your right and, behind verdant farmland, the sparkling ocean to your left. Physically, the Slowcoast is the region between Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay, but it is more than the land; it is a way of thinking and a way of life. The Slowcoast movement, started by bestselling author and scientist Wallace J. Nichols, urges people to slow down and take a step back from their hectic lives, support local, artisan-made goods, and appreciate the surroundings. If a more far-flung vacation isn’t on your agenda this summer, consider heading north for a “slowcation.” Here’s a taste of what the ribbon of pastoral coastline has in store:

PHOTO: JOHNKAEMMERLING.COM

What to Do

The Slowcoast area includes a seemingly endless stretch of coastline with stunning beaches where you can spend the day basking in the sun, or, depending on the weather, enjoy the wind whipping against your face while you embrace the cold from within many layers of warm clothing. One of the most popular beaches is Davenport Main Beach, which you can access from a parking lot across from Whale City Bakery. This beach has a really special, secluded feel to it, but its exquisite beauty is sometimes marred by careless beachgoers who leave their trash. Save Our Shores conducts a regular beach cleanup on many Sunday mornings, but you can do your part anytime. No matter which beach you visit, this kind of stewardship can help you

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Above: Dee Harley of Harley Farms Goat Dairy. Photo courtesy of Harley Farms. Above Right: This vintage yellow truck greets visitors to Swanton Berry Farm. Photo: Paul Topp Opposite Page Top: Picturesque accommodations at Costanoa. Photo: Paul Topp Opposite Page Bottom: Slowcoast's Wallace J. Nichols. Photo: Jeff Lipsky

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STAYCATION

connect and give back to nature in a way that slows you down and fosters a closer relationship to the beauty around you. The great thing about this expanse of Highway 1 is that you can pull over practically anywhere and fi nd your way to an equally special, quiet strip of sand. You can also get one of the best views in Santa Cruz by hiking, biking or riding your horse up the hills of Wilder Ranch State Park. It is a great place for outdoor sports, and is also a fun place for young kids to see an old-fashioned farm and farm animals fi rsthand. The barn dances and potlucks held at Pie Ranch in Pescadero are festive events for people of all ages. Local musicians play upbeat music in their picturesque barn while families and friends dance the night away under the soft glow of the strings of lights strung between wooden beams. Check their website, pieranch.org for event dates and more information.

“Get near, in, on or under water more. Any water. Our devices don’t work as well there, so we leave them behind and it gives us a break. Privacy and solitude is enhanced, and we need that more than ever. Awe and wonder happen there, and they are known to boost empathy, stoke creativity and promote healing.” —Wallace J. Nichols

Where to Shop

Slowcoast Made provides its customers with a large variety of locally made artisan goods. The second you step into their shop, which is located in an Airstream trailer by the Davenport Roadhouse, the comforting smells of fragrantly laundered flannel shirts and dried lavender wash over you. Slowcoast Made employee Shonti Burke says, “If you’re visiting an area, shopping local there gives you insight into the culture of the place and is a nice thank you to the local economy. Shopping local keeps money

in the hands of the artists and producers.” The shop’s most popular items are the Farm Shirts, which support the local school with a portion of the proceeds, and the art tiles by Steve Barnonowski.

Where to Eat

If you’re in the mood for some delicious, fresh strawberries, tayberry cheesecake, blackberry or strawberry shortcake, locally roasted coffee, or cider, head over to Swanton Berry Farm. You can either pick the berries yourself or try some of their delicious baked goods


STAYCATION at their farm stand, located at 25 Swanton Road. For a special occasion, or if you’re in the mood to splurge on a truly unique dining experience, drive on up to Harley Farms in Pescadero for a tour of their goat farm and a five-course meal made from seasonal, local ingredients. The lunches and dinners are held in their restored Victorian hayloft. Lunch is $95 per person and dinner is $150 per person. More information is available at harleyfarms.com.

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Where to Sleep

Costanoa Lodge in Pescadero is a picturesque place to stay for a weekend getaway. The ecoadventure resort has a variety of accommodations and an abundance of outdoor activities. There is truly something for everyone. There are many comfortable rooms in the lodge, as well as personal cabins, charming tent bungalows, and places to pitch a tent or park an RV. Keep busy with whale watching tours, bird watching, hikes, kids tiedye, and arts and crafts classes, yoga and live music. Visit costanoa.com for more information.

THE GODFATHER The art of slowing down with Wallace J. Nichols, founder of Slowcoast and author of Blue Mind, a book that discusses the effects of being near water on the human brain and emotional well-being. Age: 47 years old How do you define Slowcoast? Slowcoast is the name used for the region between Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay, from the ocean to the ridgeline of the Santa Cruz Mountains, but not including Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay (they are just a little too fast). The Santa Cruz part of this region is traditionally known as the North Coast, but that name didn’t travel well (i.e. it’s not the North Coast to the majority of people in the region who live to the north and east). We named it the Slowcast in 2003 after walking the coastal trail from Oregon to Mexico and deciding to put down roots here. The name stuck. Why go slow? Life is speeding up and becoming much more connected and information-rich. That’s not a bad thing, but it’s important to pause, disconnect and reconnect—with yourself, your loved ones, your place, trees, water, the ocean, your food, the farms, and even wine. Get your “Blue Mind” on the Slowcoast! What is one thing a person can do to try and go “slower”? Get near, in, on or under water more. Any

water. Our devices don’t work as well there, so we leave them behind and it gives us a break. Privacy and solitude is enhanced, and we need that more than ever. Awe and wonder happen there, and they are known to boost empathy, stoke creativity and promote healing (really, check out the research). What is your favorite Slowcoast … Food: Anything made from berries! View: Looking out on the entire Monterey Bay from Schoolhouse Ridge or the view from the beach right before/after getting wet. Activity: Taking the whole family to Greyhound Rock to walk, swim, surf, tide pool, climb, and picnic. Product: Alta Organic Slowcoast Mountain Blend coffee in a big-wave mug made by Dark Horse Pottery.

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Dining Guide Downtown ASSEMBLY Seasonal rustic California cuisine. 1108 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 824-6100, www.assembleforfood.com

CAFE MARE Authentic Italian dining, fresh, organic, local ingredients. 740 Front St., Santa Cruz, (831) 458-1211, www.cafemare.com

EL PALOMAR Unique and fresh Mexican cuisine, family recipes. 1336 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-7575, www.elpalomarsantacruz.com

HULA'S ISLAND GRILL California twist on Hawaiian island grill and tiki bar. 221 Cathcart St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-4852, www.hulastiki.com

LAILI Santa Cruz's answer to highquality organic Mediterranean / Indian / Pakistani / Afghan food. 101 Cooper St., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-4545, www. lailirestaurant.com

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PACIFIC THAI

ZOCCOLI’S

JOHNNY’S HARBORSIDE

Authentic Thai Cuisine and boba teas in a modern and casual dining atmosphere. 1319 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 420-1700, www.pacificthaisantacruz.com

Iconic delicatessen, sandwiches, salads, sides. 1534 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-1711, www.zoccolis.com

Fresh seafood with stunning view of the harbor.493 Lake Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 479-3430, www.johnnysharborside.com

The Boardwalk/ Harbor/Wharf

Midtown

PLEASURE PIZZA Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures. 1415 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7859, www.pleasurepizzasc.com

PONO HAWAIIAN GRILL AND THE REEF Traditional Hawaiian grill, poke bar, fresh ingredients, full bar. 120 Union St., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-7666, www.ponohawaiiangrill.com

RIVER CAFE Local, organic, farm-fresh gourmet. 415 River St., Santa Cruz, (831) 420-1280, www.rivercafesantacruz.com

ZACHARY’S Diner-style American cuisine in a casual family-friendly atmosphere. 819 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 427-0646, www.zacharyssantacruz.com

HARBOR CAFE Voted best breakfast in Santa Cruz. Known for its outdoor patio and being dog friendly. Open daily for lunch and dinner. 535 7th Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 475-4948

THE CROW’S NEST Iconic restaurant and bar located at the harbor. 2218 E. Cliff Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 476-4560, www.crowsnest-santacruz.com

DEKE’S MARKET Complete mini-market and the “In Mah’ Belly Deli.” 334 7th Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 476-5897, www.dekesmarket.com

AKIRA Sushi made with fresh-caught seafood and locally grown produce. 1222 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7093, www.akirasantacruz.com

ALOHA ISLAND GRILLE Authentic Hawaiian-style plate lunches. 1700 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 479-3299, www.alohaislandgrille.com

CHAMINADE Indulge in decadent culinary choices and fine dining in Santa Cruz. 1 Chaminade Lane, Santa Cruz, (831) 475-5600, www.chaminade.com

CHARLIE HONG KONG IDEAL BAR & GRILL Located by the wharf, fun atmosphere. 106 Beach St., Santa Cruz, (831) 423-5271, www.idealbarandgrill.com

Offering healthy, flavorful Asian street cusine. 1141 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-5664, www.charliehongkong.com


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COOL OFF THE CRÊPE PLACE Array of savory and sweet crêpes, French food and live music. 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 429-6994, www.thecrepeplace.com

THE JERK HOUSE Santa Cruz's first Jamaican restaurant. Coming soon! 2525 Soquel Drive, Ste. B, Santa Cruz

RISTORANTE ITALIANO Vintage venue featuring fish and Italian entrees. 555 Soquel Ave., Ste 150, Santa Cruz, (831) 458-2321, www.ristoranteitalianosc.com

SEABRIGHT BREWERY Rotating beer selection, with dogfriendly outdoor patio. 519 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 426-2739, www.seabrightbrewery.com

DINING GUIDE

Westside/Scotts Valley BURGER. Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, and a great beer menu. 1520 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 425-5300, www.burgersantacruz.com

HOLLINS HOUSE At Pasatiempo. Magnificent views, award-winning cuisine, and outstanding wine list. 20 Clubhouse Road, Santa Cruz, (831) 459-9177, www.pasatiempo.com/hollins-house

HOP HEAD American tavern serving craft beer and sustainable pub fare in a relaxed space with shuffleboard. 18 Victor Square, Scotts Valley, (831) 3466945, beahophead.com

MISSION ST. BBQ Serving up smoked barbecue, craft beer and live music. 1618 Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 458-2222, www.facebook.com/missionstbbq

“in Mah’ Belly Deli”

Cold Beer • Wine Soft Drinks • Bagels Java Bob’s Coffee Deli Fresh Sandwiches Beach Supplies Friendly Service!

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PARISH PUBLICK HOUSE British-influenced pub food with full bar. 841 Almar Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 421-0507, www.parishpublickhouse.com

VASILI’S Authentic and fresh, with vegetarianfriendly Greek food. 1501A Mission St., Santa Cruz, (831) 458-9808, www.vasilisgreekrestaurant.com

WEST END TAP & KITCHEN Traditional pub flavors with a California twist. 334 Ingalls St., Santa Cruz, (831) 471-8115, www.westendtap.com

Eastside/Capitola

EAST SIDE EATERY, PLEASURE PIZZA Offering traditional pizza, as well as new and exciting tastes and textures. 800 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 431-6058, www.pleasurepizzasc.com

THE SAND BAR Capitola's new hot spot for great food, cocktails, and weekly live music. 211 Esplanade, Capitola, (831) 462-1881

SHADOWBROOK Fine dining with a romantic setting, cable car lift. A Capitola tradition since 1947. 1750 Wharf Road, Capitola, (831) 475-1511, www.shadowbrook-capitola.com

CHILL OUT CAFE

SÜDA

Breakfast burritos, espresso drinks, beautiful garden. 2860 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, (831) 477-0543, www.chilloutcafesantacruz.com

Contemporary cuisine in retromodern restaurant. Voted best new restaurant 2013. 3910 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 600-7068, www.eatsuda.com

Deke’s Market

Complete Mini-Market 831-476-5897 334 7th Ave. Santa Cruz, Ca


SAKE TO ME TUESDAYS Sushi Rolls and Sake $9.25

WEDNESDAY NIGHT

bar is open 4pm-late dinner 4-10pm

$1~Oyster Night

8017 Soquel Drive, Aptos, CA 95003 | kauboigrillandsushi.com | 831.661.0449

OPEN 11 AM TO LATE

1520 Mission St., Santa Cruz 95060 • burgersantacruz.com • 831.425.5300 7941 Soquel Dr., Aptos 95003 • burgeraptos.com • 831.662.2811 SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 13 1


Santa Cruz

WE ROLL THE FATTIES 22 DIFFERENT TYPES OF BREAKFAST BURRITOS Steel Cut Oatmeal • Hot Sandwiches • Homemade Chai Beer Garden • Dog-friendly • Beautiful Backyard Mon-Fri 6:30am-3pm • Sat-Sun 7am-4pm ChillOutCafeSantaCruz.com • 860 41st Ave

The craft beer pioneers of Scotts Valley!

• For the Pursuit of Hoppyness • JOIN US FOR HAPPY HOUR!

Monday–Friday 3–6pm • $5 Craft Beers • 20 Beers on Tap! • Live Music!

18B Victory Square, Scotts Valley • 831.346.6945 • beahophead.com 13 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


OPENE! LAT

LI A C O UV E S MUSI TIC 7 day C s

d -We Sun r-Sat m p u 10 m Th 11p

ALOHA SERVED DAILY!

PONO

HAWAIIAN GRILL • SANTA CRUZ Over 20 different types of poke all made to order!

Traditional Hawaiian plates and recipes from Hawai’i...

Amazing wraps & salads Vegetarian and gluten free items!

PUPUS | POKE | PLATE LUNCHES & MORE 120 UNION STREET 831.426.PONO WWW.PONOHAWAIIANGRILL.COM

Catering available! Check it out online and email us for more info!

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Lively Local since 1995

DINING GUIDE

SURF CITY SANDWICH

CILANTROS

Gourmet sandwiches, homemade soup, salads, beer and wine. Now open.4101 Soquel Drive, Santa Cruz, (831) 239-5801, www.surfcitysandwich.com

Authentic Mexican cuisine with fresh ingredients, high-quality meat and seafood. 1934 Main St., Watsonville, (831) 761-2161, www.elpalomarcilantros.com

ZIZZO’S COFFEEHOUSE & WINE BAR Full-service coffeehouse and excellent wine selection. 3555 Clares St., Capitola, (831) 477-0680, www.zizzoscoffee.com

THE HIDEOUT Fill your plate with good grub, pour a good drink, enjoy attentive and friendly service. 9051 Soquel Dr, Aptos, (831) 688-5566, www.thehideoutaptos.com

KAUBOI

CAFE CRUZ

Seasonal organic ingredients, traditional Japanese. 8017 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 661-0449, www.kauboigrillandsushi.com

Rosticceria and bar, nice atmosphere, fresh and local. 2621 41st Ave., Soquel, (831) 476-3801, www.cafecruz.com

MANUEL'S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Soquel

MICHAEL’S ON MAIN Serving cutting-edge California comfort cuisine, small plates, and salads. 2591 S. Main St., Soquel, (831) 479-9777, www.michaelsonmain.net

Aptos/Watsonville APTOS ST. BBQ Santa Cruz County's best smoked barbecue, craft brews and live blues every night. 8059 Aptos St., Aptos, (831) 662-1721, www.aptosstbbq.com

2621 41st Ave, Soquel • 831.476.3801 CafeCruz.com

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PALAPAS RESTAURANT & CANTINA Coastal Mexican Cuisine. Extensive tequila selection. Happy Hour, and dinner specials. 21 Seascape Blvd, Aptos, (831) 662-9000, www.palapasrestaurant.com

SANDERLINGS IN THE SEASCAPE

Grass-fed beef, fun atmosphere, great beer menu. 7941 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 662-2811, www.burgeraptos.com

Where your dining experience is as spectacular as the view. 1 Seacscape Resort Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-7120, www.sanderlingsrestaurant.com

BURGER.

• Sustainable Seafood Specials Nightly • • Heated Patio Dining & Full Bar • • Fresh, Local & Organic Produce • • Natural Source-Verified Meats •

Traditional, delicious recipes, cooked fresh daily, served with a genuine smile. 261 Center Ave., Aptos, (831) 688-4848, www.manuelsrestaurant.com

CAFE RIO

SEVERINO’S BAR & GRILL

Enjoy ocean-front dining with breathtaking views. 131 Esplanade, Aptos, (831) 688-8917, www.caferioaptos.com

Award-winning chowders, locally sourced ingredients. 7500 Old Dominion Court, Aptos, (831) 6888987, www.severinosbarandgrill.com

CANTINE WINE PUB

ZAMEEN MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE

Extensive selection of wine & beer. Eat, drink, savor. 8050 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 612-6191, www.cantinewinepub.com

FLATS BISTRO Pizza by the slice, espresso coffee, pastries and desserts. 113 Esplanade, Rio Del Mar, (831) 661-5763, www.flatsbistro.com

Flavorful meals in a casual dining setting. 7528 Soquel Drive, Aptos, (831) 688-4465, www.zameencuisine.com

Los Gatos FORBES MILL STEAKHOUSE Upmarket chophouse purveys Kobe beef and other prime cuts in a stylish, fireplace-equipped setting. 206 N Santa Cruz Ave, Los Gatos, (408) 395-6434, forbesmillsteakhouse.com


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NEW

THING EVERY ! TO GO

COME TO THE BEACH AND TAKE TO GO....

Pizza by the slice and whole Pizza Expresso Coffee, Pastries & Desserts! OPEN: 7am - 7pm Everyday!

Heated Dog Friendly Patio Happy Hour Sunset Views of The Monterey Bay 151 Esp l anade, Aptos CA 95003 (831) 688-8917 • CafeRi o Aptos.co m Hours: Dinner: 5pm - 9pm • Patio: 3pm - close Happy Hour: 3pm - 6pm

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Go Fresh or Go Home

SANDWICHES • SALADS • SOUPS • SMALL BITES LOCAL BEERS • WINE • ICE CREAM SANDOS

4101 Soquel Dr. 95073 | 831.346.6952 | surfcitysandwich.com Photo Courtesy: The Harry Mayo Collection & The Santa Cruz Surfing Club Preservation Society

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Happy Hour • Mon–Thurs, 3–6pm 1/2 off apps, $2 Off wine & beer specials

Lunch specials $10.95

lunch - dinner - takeout Take Out Orders of ANY Size - open seven days a week 1501-A Mission St. Santa Cruz, CA (831) 458-9808 VasilisGreekRestaurant.com

Gyros - Souvlaki - Moussaka - Tzatziki Gy Vegetarian Dishes & MORE!

10% off for UCSC students

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Voted Best Greek Restaurant - by Good Times readers


DINING GUIDE DOUBLE D'S SPORTS GRILLE Burgers, draft beers and more served in a lively space with sports memorabilia and lots of TVs. 354 N Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos, (408) 395-6882, www.doubleds.com

PALACIO Upscale Latin restaurant offers a variety of classic entrees, plus tapas and a big tequila menu. 115 N Santa Cruz Ave, Los Gatos, (408) 402-3811, www.palaciorestaurant.com

OAK & RYE Wood-fired pies, small plates & craft cocktails are the draw at this sophisticated Italian bistro. 303 N Santa Cruz Ave, Los Gatos. (408) 395-4441, www.oakandryepizza.com

GARDINOS RISTORANTE ITALIANO 51 N Santa Cruz Ave, Los Gatos, (408) 354-8788

Saratoga STILETTO'S WINE BAR Indulge in an evening of delicious drinks and designer shoes. 14527 Big Basin Way, Saratoga, (408) 647-2303, www.stilettoswinebar.com

LA FONDUE Diners choose the cheese or chocolate for fondue and grill meats tableside in an eclectic atmosphere. 14550 Big Basin Way #3, Saratoga, (408) 867-3332, www.lafondue.com

THE BASIN Upscale but relaxed American eatery with a patio and a focus on organic, sustainable ingredients. 14572 Big Basin Way, Saratoga, (408) 867-1906, www.thebasin.com

COOL OFF

PLUMED HORSE

RENDEVOUS WINE BAR

This special-occasion spot serves California fare in an elegant setting with various dining rooms. 14555 Big Basin Way, Saratoga, (408) 867-4711, www.plumedhorse.com

New hip and trendy place for great wine and food. 394 E Campbell Ave, Campbell, (408) 680-0401, www.rendevouscampbell.com

Campbell SUSHI CONFIDENTIAL Modern sushi house lures locals with its creative rolls and Japanese fare served in a warm atmosphere. 247 E Campbell Ave, Campbell, (408) 596-5554, www.sushiconfidential.com

WILLARD HICKS Steaks and other wood-fired entrees plus beer & cocktails served in a clubby, masculine space. 280 E Campbell Ave, Campbell, (408) 374-5000, www.willardhicksgrill.com

TESSORA'S BARRA DI VINO Wines by the glass or by the bottle and eclectic eats in a relaxed cafe and shop with a patio. 234 E Campbell Ave, Campbell, (408) 626-7711, www.tessoras.com

BROWN CHICKEN BROWN COW Burgers, sandwiches, salads and beers. 397 E Campbell Ave, Campbell,(408) 340-5916, www.brownchicken-browncow.com

BLUE LINE PIZZA Sleek offshoot of Little Star Pizza serving thin-crust and Chicago-style deep-dish pies plus salads. 415 E Campbell Ave, Campbell, (408) 378-2800, www.bluelinepizza.com

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 13 9


For Reservations: (831) 459-9177 www.opentable.com

HOURS: Open to the public 4pm – 5pm for HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS & DINNER 5pm – 9pm Tuesday through Friday

20 Clubhouse Road at the Pasatiempo Golf Club

Happy Hour

MON–FRI 3–6PM

MON–FRI 3–6PM

• Weekend Brunch Sat & Sun 10AM-3PM •

• Patio Dining & Friday Night Mariachi •

1336 Pacific Ave Santa Cruz | 831.425.7575

1934 Main St Watsonville | 831.761.2161

Elpalomarsantacruz.com

Cilantroswatsonville.com

14 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


THINK GLOBAL. DINE LOCAL.

MONTEREY BAY'S PEAK DINING EXPERIENCE • OFFICIAL CATERER'S OF SANTA CRUZ WAVES •

LIONFISHSC.COM • (831) 508-0123

M E X I C A N

F O O D

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

10am-10pm

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner • Local Organic Produce • Organic Rice & Beans • All-Natural Meats • Dine-In or To-Go

15-05 VIvas SC Waves ad_3.indd 1

831.425.8482 1201 Soquel Avenue Santa Cruz, CA 95062 (adjacent to Rio Theater)

5/26/15 8:37 PM

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 14 1


CHERRY BLOSSOM FACIAL SPECIAL $90 A BRIGHTENING & HYDRATING FACIAL complete with a relaxing neck, shoulder, face & hand massage.

Add Microdermabrasion or Oxygen Infusion $15

PACIFIC SKIN CARE ANTI AGING & ACNE SOLUTIONS

831.476.1060 Book Online: pacificskin.com

2628 Soquel Drive Santa Cruz CA 95065 Facials • Acne Treatments • Waxing • Massage

14 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


SKIP THE WAIT. ORDER @ wingstop.com

SANTA CRUZ 845 ALMAR AVENUE / ( 831) 454-9464 / CORNER OF MISSION AND ALMAR, IN THE SAFEWAY SHOPPING CENTER

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 14 3


Wine Directory

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wine.beer.tapas tapas local wines, beers & ciders on tap

Try Us For Your Party or Special Event

Bottle & Flight Specials Mid-week

Enjoy The View From Our Outdoor Patio

Aptos Village

8050 Soquel Dr 831- 612-6191

cantinewinepub.com

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 14 5


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Just in time for summer… We are offering a unique opportunity to call the Jewel Box of Capitola home. Properties in this condition and location tend to stay in families for generations. Let’s make this your beach house! Give Ben a call at 831.247.0922 for more information.

Learn more about this spectacular home & all other others we have on the market here:

www.searchcapitolahomes.com SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 147


14 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


The Healing Courtyards Initiative The Healing Courtyards Initiative redesigns several courtyards on the Dominican Hospital campus to enhance the patient, staff, and visitor experience. Gardens in a hospital setting can reduce the need for pain medication and shorten the time a patient requires hospitalization. This project relies on donations from those in our community who share our dream of compassionate, visionary health care. You can help. RECOGNITION OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE. FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT US PHONE: 831.462.7712

E-MAIL: givingtodominican@dignityhealth.org

www.supportdominican.org SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 14 9


s o t a G Los H A P P Y

Stilettos

Monday-Friday, 4-6 p.m $2.00 off all pints and glasses of wine

LG Lodge 5-7 p.m. $3.00 draft beers, $3.50 well drinks, $5.50 Guinness

Gardino’s Monday-Sunday, 3-6 p.m. $5 well drinks, $3 Coors and Budweiser, $5 house wines, $7 Sauvignon Blanc. Appetizers range from $5-$7

Pedro’s Restaurant & Cantina

Monday-Friday, 4-7 p.m. Half off appetizers, half off house drinks

Double D’s Sports Grille Monday-Friday, 3-6 p.m.: Half off all appetizers, draft beer and well drinks, $2.00 off wine, bottled beers and call liquor. Monday-Friday, 9-11 p.m.: Half off draft beer and well drinks, $2.00 off wine, bottled beers and call liquor (no food)

Forbes Mill Steakhouse

Daily from 5-6:30 p.m. at the bar and on the patio. Discounted appetizers, specialty cocktails, beers, wine by the glass. Half off well drinks, $3 off call drinks

Oak & Rye Tuesday-Friday, 3-5 p.m., $2 draft and $4 quartinos

Verge Restaurant & Lounge Sunday-Thursday, 4-7 p.m. $5 craft beers, tap wine and well cocktails

HOUR

Palacios

Tuesday-Friday, 4-6 p.m., SaturdaySunday, 3-6 p.m. $6 margaritas, sangria and cocktail of the day. Draft beer $4. Taco Tuesday: $2 tacos and shots of tequila. Wine Wednesday: half off glass or bottle of wine

CB Hannegan’s Monday-Friday, 3-6 p.m. $2 off beers, $3.50 well drinks, rib tips and edamame $5

Stilettos SHOES & BOOZE

BEER & WINE BAR

Available for Private Events Parties • Showers • Meet ups Located in Downtown Saratoga 408.647.2303 | 14527 Big Basin Way

www.stilettoswinebar.com 1 5 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


Los Gatos W Artiood F san ired Piz za

San Francisco Bay Area & Beyond Private Parties • Corporate Catering • Festivals

Book Now 408.766.4778 @theHpizzeria

www.HoundstoothPizzeria.com

Voted Silicon Valley’s

“SPORTS BAR HALL OF FAME”

Voted BEST STEAKHOUSE, Silicon Valley!

Prime Certified Angus Beef Tajima Black Waygu Fresh Seafood Monthly 3-Course Prix Fixe Menu Patio Dining Private Banquet Rooms

22 HD TVs including

2 BIG SCREENS & ALL DIRECTV SPORTS PACKAGES CRAFT BEERS Full Bar • Extensive Menu Happy Hour Mon-Fri

354 N. Santa Cruz Ave., Los Gatos 408.395.6882 • www.doubleds.com

206 n. Santa Cruz Ave. lOS GATOS • 408.395.6434

Dinner: Sun-Thurs, 5-9; Fri-Sat, 5-10

200 Sycamore Valley Rd. West DAnVillE • 925.552.0505 lunch: Mon-Fri, 11:30 Dinner: Sun-Thurs, 5-9; Fri-Sat, 5-10

www.ForbesMillSteakHouse.com SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 5 1


l l e b p m Ca O W N D O W N T

2 0 1 5

First Fridays 6-9 p.m. Live entertainment on the avenue

Second Saturdays

2-6 p.m. Live art and music on the avenue

Farmers' Market

Sundays 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Sidewalk Sale

Second Saturday of June through September

1 5 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

E V E N T S

C A L E N D A R

R E M M SU T R E C N CO S E I R E S DOWNTOWN • EVERY THURSDAY 6:30 – 8PM

Bring a lawn chair and support the Campbell Museum Foundation by purchasing food and drinks at the event. Concerts take place on the Orchard City Green located right in front of the historic Ainsley House and adjacent to Campbell City Hall. 6/18

TSUNAMI BAND

7/23

THE CROCODILES

6/ 25

LONG TRAIN RUNNIN'

7/30

LYIN I'S

7/ 2

THE JOINT CHIEFS

8/6

7/ 9

THE HOUSEROCKERS

7/16

COCKTAIL MONKEYS

8/13

THE JESSE CHARLES BAND SAGE


Campbell

SUSHICONFIDENTIAL.COM

247 E. Campbell Ave. Campbell 408.596.5554

Wine Bar • Craft Beers Seasonal Bistro Menu •••

Check out our events

Winemaker Dinners Wine Club • Live Music • Dog Friendly Patio •

••• 408.626.7711

234 E. Campbell Ave Downtown Campbell

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 5 3


COOL OFF

1 5 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

IN THE BUBBLE


116 Stockton Avenue, Capitola Village (831) 515-7009

XandraSwimwear.com

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 5 5


COOL OFF

MAKING

WAVES N ex t ies Awa r d C e re mo ny 2015 P h o to s by Yvo n n e Fa l k

1 5 6 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


VIEW MORE GALLERIES @

SANTACRUZWAVE S .C OM SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 57


Sometimes the journey is as rewarding as the destination. Ben Coffey and Tyler Fox soaking it all in. Photo: @chachfiles

1 5 8 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 5 9


413 Seabright Ave. 10am – 2am Daily • 21+

40+ BEERS

FULLY STOCKED BAR #1 Seller of Jameson in Northern CA C

Pool, Pinball Big Screen TV Jukebox, Free WiFi

NEW PHOTO BOOTH

HAPPY HOUR

Mon – Fri 10am – 6pm $1 OFF most drinks

1 6 0 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES

FREE POOL TABLE & JUKEBOX BIG SCREEN TVs & FREE WI-FI

– HAPPY HOUR

Mon – Fri Noon – 6pm All day Wednesday $2.50 Well and Draft Beer

712 Ocean Street 6am-2am daily • 21+


Fres seasonhal items ar rivi daily ng

Best Grocery Store Best Wine Selection • Santa Cruz Sentinel

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 6 1


craft tap room & seasonal eatery

334 d Ingalls Street Santa Cruz, CA - 831.471.8115 - westendtap.com 1 6 2 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


MIntAereI-stTyAouI In a trip to

HSauntla Caru'sz? Tiki Tuesday GHT! Happy Hour ALL NI

2pm–close

e

Close to th

Boardwalk

Happy30H-o6pumr

Mon: 4: Wed–Sun: 2–6pm

Hula’s Island Grill & Tiki Room offers an amazing tro

pical dining experience with a menu infused with Asian, Laan and Caribbean touches all with a Hawaiian inspiraaon in an island-style seeng. Enjoy favorites like Coconut Shrimp Rolls, Ceviche & Bali Hai BBQ Ribs … AND DON 'T FORGET THE

TIKI DRINKS!

Experience Aloha in Santa Cruz.

831-426-HULA . 221 Cathcart Street,

Santa Cruz, CA . HulasTiki.com

Monday: 4:30pm–10:00pm Tues, Wed, Thurs & Sun: 11:30am–10 :00pm Friday & Saturday: 11:30am–11:00pm SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 6 3


1 6 4 | SANTA CRUZ WAVES


SAN TA CRUZ WAVES MAGA ZINE | JUNE / JULY 2015

LIVE T HE LIF EST YLE

VOLUME 2.1 | W W W.SAN TACRUZ WAVES.COM

SANTA CRUZ WAVES | 1 6 5

SCW JUNE/JULY 2015 2. 1  
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