Page 1

L I V E T HE L IF E ST YLE

V OLUME 1. 2 - AUG / S E P T 201 4

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / SEPT 20 14

|

1


2

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVES MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / SEPT 20 14

|

3


“The ocean humbles you and makes you feel almost like you’ve been baptized. I feel born again when I get out of the ocean.” ‒ Beyoncé Knowles Photo: PaulTopp.com

4

|

SANTA CRU Z WAVES MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / SEPT 20 14

|

5


From 4x6’s to MetalPrints, Bay Photo has the products you need to make your images shine.

Proud to be the Locals’ Choice Bay Photo Lab is the #1 choice in Santa Cruz County for all your photo finishing and photography supply needs. Our stores provide great prints and expert, friendly service, as well as a large selection of frames, albums, and other photographic accessories. Voted the Best Local Photography Shop in Good Times “Best of Santa Cruz” Annual Readers’ Poll for 20 consecutive years, we are proud to be the locals’ choice.

Learn more at bayphoto.com/local High Quality Prints

6

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVES MAGAZ I N E


Shoebox Scans

Camera & iPhone Accessories

Digital Artwork & Design

MetalPrints

Framed & Matted Prints

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / SEPT 20 14

|

7


Featuring the Tepui AYER The perfect roof top tent when space and weight are critical. - Compact footprint of 42” x 48” closed - Spacious interior 4’ x 7’ open - Light weight at only 95lbs - Same tough ripstop waterproof material 8

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVES MAGAZ INE www.tepuitents.com

Where Will

Take You ?


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / SEPT 20 14

|

9


PLAY LOCAL SHOP LOCAL EAT LOCAL

Photo: Jake Thomas

Think Local First – County of Santa Cruz is a network of independent and locally owned businesses and community organizations joining together to promote economic vitality and preserve the unique character of our community.

m

S ANTA C RUZ WAVES MAGAZ I N E

sign

|

pa c De

10

Im

t

a xi m u m

SC Waves Ad Sponsored by TLF members: Cardamom Tuesday • Caffe Pergolesi Coffeehouse • Saucy Wench BBQ Sauce • Legs • Mr. Toots Coffee Socksmith.com • Lenz Arts • Metastyle Films • Maximum Impact Design • IP Society


t s e b d e vot

y t r a p e c dan

y t n u o c z u r c a t by san

best night club best dJ’s best bar Inspired culture (831) 429-8070 • www.motivsc.com 1209 pacific ave. santa cruz, ca 95060

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

11


S AN TA CR UZ WAV E S MAGAZ I N E Publisher Tyler Fox Editor Elizabeth Limbach Photo Editor Paul Topp Proofreader Josie Cowden

SCW Staff Photographers Patrick Bremser, Kenan Chan, T. Fox,

VOL UME 1.2 - AUG / S EP T 2 0 14

Jeff “Kookson” Gideon, Dave “Nelly” Nelson, Yvonne Rew-Falk, Neil Simmons, Jake Thomas, Paul Topp

Contributing Photographers

Word on the Street

18

Surfing with a Smile: Autumn Hays

20

What’s Your Deal?

22

Saving our Shores

26

Understanding Great Whites

30

Jaimi Ellison, Tyler Fox, Julia Gaudinski, Joel Hersch,

Surfer on Acid

38

Yvonne Rew-Falk, Paul Topp

Subtlety & Motion: Patrick Trefz

48

When Groms Attack

58

SUP Your Way to Fitness

61

A Star is Born: Nic H'Dez

64

A Bird's Eye View

70

All Grown Up: The Santa Cruz Wharf & Harbor

74

Local Eats: Breakfast

80

Santa Cruz Wine Guide

82

Founder Tyler Fox

Hangin' with a Local: Jeni Baer

84

On the Cover

Old Wood, New Tricks: Alibi Interiors

90

SCW Magazine Launch Party

92

Nikki Brooks, Ryan “Chachi” Craig, Callaghan Fritz-Cope, Caterina Gennaro, Archer Koch, David Levy, Les Long, Sean Van Sommeran, Giancarlo Thomae, Patrick Trefz, Billy Watts

Contributing Writers Neal Kearney, April Martin-Hansen, Jessica M. Pasko,

Design Design nomBat Brand Development Creative Director Julie Henry Ad Design Julie Rovegno, Alicia Woulfe

Sales Director of Sales Stephanie Lutz Account Executives Julia Cunningham, Jack Neenan Distribution Mick Freeman

Santa Cruz Waves, LLC President Jon Free

Noah Wegrich spreads his wings and flies into a Santa Cruz sunset. Photo: Ryan Craig / @chachfiles The content of Santa Cruz Waves Magazine is Copyright © 2014 by Santa Cruz Waves, LLC. No part may be reproduced in any fashion without written consent of the

F I ND US ONLINE

publisher. Santa Cruz Waves Magazine is free of charge, available at more than 100 local distribution points. Anyone inserting, tampering with or diverting circulation will be

www.SantaCruzWaves.com

prosecuted. Santa Cruz Waves assumes no responsibility for content of advertisements.

@SantaCruzWaves

12

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

To order a paid subscription, visit santacruzwaves.com.


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

13


1520 Mission St. Santa Cruz 95060 burgersantacruz.com | 831.425.5300 7941 soquel drive, aptos 95003 burgeraptos.com | 831.662.2811

Open seven days a week.

14

|

Japanese Grill and Sustainable Sushi Bar Open every day 11 to late for lunch and dinner S ANTA C RUZ WAVES MAGAZ INE Saturday night jams with DJ Sparkle

8017 Soquel Drive Aptos, California 95003 kauboigrillandsushi.com 831.661.0449


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

15


L ET T ER FROM THE FOU ND ER : BIG WAVES & BUSINESS Surfing waves of consequence or surf over the 20-foot range has taught me some important lessons over the years that I try to apply to my personal life as well as my business. Here are five that have helped me steer my ship through some rough waters.

1. You're going to be scared. Whether it's paddling out into massive open-ocean swells or leaving your 9-to-5 to start your dream breakfast joint, venturing into the unknown can be a frightening experience. The key is to face your fears and go for it. You never know until you go.

2. Do your homework. Before I surf a new big-wave spot, I'll watch multiple videos of the break and chat with other surfers who are familiar with the wave. The same goes for starting a new business—you want to get as familiar with that type of industry as possible before you take the leap.

3. Preparation. One of the main reasons new businesses fail is because they aren't prepared. This ties back to doing your homework. You won't have a clue about what to prepare for if you haven't thoroughly studied the ins and outs of that industry. There's nothing worse than doing the splits on a 30 footer because you forgot your booties.

4. Perseverance. I'd say the No. 2 reason people fail at any new venture is because they throw in the towel when things get too tough. No matter how much homework and preparation you put in, you are still going to come across unexpected roadblocks. People might try to shoot down your ideas and tell you it won't work—even your close friends and family. Listen to everyone but make sure you are deciding your own destiny.

5. Enjoy the ride. Life, as well as business, is a journey. Try and find things that you are passionate about. When you enjoy what you are doing, you usually do a better job and find more success. When you're riding that wave called life, don't forget to enjoy the ride!

Tyler Fox

Founder of Santa Cruz Waves and Big Wave World Tour competitor

Tyler makes his descent at the Pico Alto Big Wave Event in Peru. Photo: Nikki Brooks

16

|

SANTA C RUZ WAVES MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

17


→ AT ST E AM E R LAN E ←

W H AT W I L L S U R F I N G B E L I K E I N 5 0 Y E A R S ? By Yvonne Rew-Falk

I think in 50 years surfing will be more corporate and more professional—in a good way, not in a sell-out way like most sports these days. I think it’s going to be more mainstream. There will be a lot more

Fifty years from now there won’t even be

I think it’ll be like it is now but there will be

one human on the World Tour. The aliens

more places to surf as we get into building

are going to come down and take over the

artificial reefs in beach break areas. We’ll

surfing scene. Their anti-gravity crafts will

have more rideable waves in areas where

put everyone to shame in the human race.

right now there are closeouts. Maybe those

Chad Underhill-Meras

areas will charge to surf because they’re

sponsors in surfing.

man made. There will be more money

Shaun Burns

at the professional level. I can’t imagine how incredible big-wave surfing will be in the tow-in and paddle-in arenas.  Hopefully more companies get into investing and bringing kids up, instead of just cherry picking off the top. Doug Banks

I think that there’s going to be soft-top, Surfing in 50 years will be kinda scary. I

motor-propelled wave storms for every-

cringe to think about the crowds. As far as

body to use.

equipment? I can’t even fathom. … Motor-

Tyler Conroy

ized boards, which are already around, will probably be lighter weight. I think one of the positive things in 50 years will be less environmentally harmful surfboard mate-

I think in 50 years surfing will show some

rials, hopefully moving away from petro-

progression but it won’t be as progressive

leum-based products into more ecologi-

as the last 50 years. Surfing will fall under

cally sound products. As far as wetsuits,

the law of diminishing returns. Maneu-

I wish I had a wetsuit from 50 years from

vers are going to be a lot more progressive

now today! Night surfing will boom.  The

and bigger, but there won’t be as much

crowds will push people into surfing at

change as in the last 50 years. The limitations of the human body and building ma-

night with good lighting technology. That

18

|

could open up another 12 hours of surfing.

Surfing will be really crowded.

terials will keep the changes less drastic.

Tom Powers

Anthony Ruffo

Jesse Farris

SANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

19


Surfing with a Smile

By Neal Kearney

Up-and-comer Autumn Hays carves out her place with notable skills and a killer attitude

“Whether she wins or not, she still looks just as happy and congratulates those who have placed above her.” — Savannah Shaughnessy on Autumn Hays

Photo: Kookson 2 0 | S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


Photo: @KenanChan

Surfing can be a very selfish sport. Good waves come only in sets,

It’s refreshing to see a glimmer of goodness and selflessness in

and with alpha males pounding their chests like gorillas in the mist,

the often-hostile waters of Santa Cruz. To be this upbeat and still

average Joes, groms and gals can sometimes only hope to get the

rip is even more impressive, and it seems that Hays will continue

scraps. With all of the frustrations of being at the bottom of the

to spread spray and stoke for many years to come.

food chain, you would think many would give up trying altogether.

In Her Own Words:

For 14-year-old Steamer Lane local Autumn Hays, however, forfeit is not an option. In fact, there seems to be little to keep this ripping wahine from wiping the smile off her face. This perseverance hasn’t been overlooked by the Lane’s top dogs. World-renowned big-wave rider and upstanding citizen Ken “Skindog” Collins, for one, is impressed. “Autumn is an amazing kid—super positive and supportive of the younger surfers,” Collins says of the good-natured grommette.

Age/DOB: 14 years old/Aug. 14, 1999 Stance: Regular Sponsors: O’Neill Surf Shop, Smith Optics Education: Entering 10th grade at Santa Cruz High School. Favorite move: Power carves

“Her surfing has been progressing a lot over the last couple years. Her family is awesome and very supportive of her surfing, so there is a lot of potential for her to keep [growing].” The praise doesn’t stop there. Savannah Shaughnessy, Lane local and one of the world’s most talented female big-wave riders, has also taken note of Hays’ surfing savvy. “I've been watching her surf for the last two years, mostly while judging the [Santa Cruz Scholastic Surf League] contests,” says Shaughnessy. “She is very sweet and bubbly. Whenever I see her she has a smile on her face. She stands out from her peers because even though she is very competitive, she is a really positive person. Whether she wins or not, she still looks just as happy and congratulates those who have placed above her.”

Favorite surfer: Nat Young Inspiration: All of the amazing surfers at The Lane inspire me in the water. Favorite person to surf with: Any of my friends. Best contest result: First Place in the Surfing America Prime Contest at Uppers, and First Place overall in the county for High School Girls Short Boarding during my freshman year. If you could go anywhere to surf, where would it be? Pavones, in Costa Rica. Goals: To keep improving my surfing.

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

21


Toeing the line with slackliner

By Jessica M. Pasko | Photos: Yvonne Rew-Falk

Sara Kaiser

When Sara Kaiser first tried slacklining during a family vacation in eighth grade, she hated it. But the 22-year-old recent UC Santa Cruz graduate says she had a change of heart while, as a senior in high school, she was reviewing photos from that fateful trip. She recalls suddenly feeling as though slacklining was something she could get into. Slacklining is a cousin to tightrope walking that, instead of a rope, uses a type of polyester or nylon webbing that has some bounce and—hence the name—slack. The stretchy cord is strung between two structures, be they rocks or trees or buildings, and then walked across. (Kaiser describes it as a cross between tightrope walking and trampolining.) The lengths and heights vary, and that’s a major part of the fun.

cation has paid off: although she’s modest when asked about it, Kaiser is notably talented. “I’d say the conventional definition of a good slackliner is someone who can walk a long slackline without falling or who can, say, juggle while on a slackline,” Kaiser says. By any definition, her ability to journey across slacklines that stretch for nearly 500 feet places her squarely in the category of skilled slackliners. Her personal record includes having tackled a 180-foot-long slackline poised 70 feet in the air.

“It took a while to get used to standing up,” says Kaiser. “You get to a point where you’re a little nervous at first, but you eventually get comfortable and relax.” Born in Vancouver, Kaiser grew up in Moraga in the East Bay and eventually moved to Santa Cruz to attend college. She started out as a geology major, which led to a job she still has working with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Eventually, the self-described voracious reader and writer

“But it’s the process itself that’s rewarding—the rest doesn’t really matter,” she adds. Getting on the line and relaxing to the point where one is actually able to stand up is the first and most important hurdle when it comes to slacklining, she says. It’s largely a mental thing—you have to allow your mind to stop worrying about other things and find that physical connection, she explains. Her yoga experience and training comes in handy with this aspect, helping her slacklining

She can journey along

moved on to a cultural an-

slacklines that stretch for

the way, became very serious

Falling is always a concern, of course, but Kaiser says the trick is to

about slacklining, honing her

nearly 500 feet and has

craft several times a week.

accept this fact so that you can move past it. Even skilled slacklin-

made it across a 180-foot-

lucky if she makes it slacklin-

long slackline poised 70 feet in the air. 22

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

thropology major, and, along

These days, she says she is ing once a week. (In addition to her job with the USGS., she

practice become a sort of meditative experience.

ers fall sometimes, though Kaiser says she’s been lucky enough to avoid any major injuries. Part of that has to do with the number of safety measures in slacklining. She uses harnesses and a leash when practicing highlining, for instance.

is finishing her training as a

Her prowess has landed her a sponsorship with Balance Commu-

yoga teacher.) Still, her dedi-

nity, a Yosemite-based company specializing in slacklining supplies

Continued on Page 25 ▶


FROM THE HEART PLEASURE POINT

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Voted TOP RESTAURANT in Santa Cruz 2012, 2013 & 2014 Voted BEST COCKTAILS 2013 & 2014

Voted BEST BARTENDER 2014

600-7068 • 3910 Portola Dr. Santa Cruz 95062 Sun – Wed 11:30am – 9pm, drink ‘til late • Thurs – Sat 11:30am – 10pm, late V O Ldrinks 1 .2 - AU G /’til S E PT 20 14

|

23


S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

41st Ave

38th Ave

l

Soque

Reposa Melton

41st Ave

cart

Cath

Jade

Brommer

Front St

Ave Pacific

Cedar

Swift

Ingalls Fair

|

Lincoln

Ingalls

Jeter

24

Fair

McPherson

t Walnu

Ave Pacific

reet

St ion Miss 1

Nova


◀ Continued from Page 22

What's Your Deal? Sara Kaiser

and gear. As part of her sponsorship, she will be keeping a blog about slacklining on the company website (balancecommunity.com) and will also represent it at various events. But, for Kaiser, successes in the sport will always take a back seat to her love for it. “It doesn’t matter necessarily how high or long [the line] is,” says Kaiser. “You get in touch with your body—you relax— [and] it becomes harder to allow the stress of your day get to you. It’s a great way to clear your head and really feel that connection with your mind

“It’s the process itself that’s rewarding—the rest doesn’t really matter.”—Slackliner Sara Kaiser

and body.”

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

25


By Joel Hersch Santa Cruz's marine conservation organization, Save Our Shores

SOS had 3,061 volunteers cleanup 17,147 pounds of garbage. The

(SOS), has mobilized thousands of volunteers for beach cleanups

most interesting items to be recovered included an alligator boot

over its 30-year history, as well as advocated for policies that help

and three mailboxes, says Kippen. Learn more at

protect the ocean. This summer, it coordinated more than 300 vol-

saveourshores.org/volunteer/annual-coast-cleanup-day.

unteers in the removal of 2,034 pounds of garbage off of 16 beaches in Santa Cruz and Monterey counties following the Fourth of July weekend. One hundred pounds of that weight came off of Santa Cruz's Cowell and Main beaches, which was actually good

PLASTIC: A TOXIC LOVE STORY On Wednesday, Oct. 8, SOS, which was a key player in banning the plastic bag from Santa Cruz supermarkets, will co-host a lecture

news: it was a decrease from last year, when volunteers cleared

with San Francisco-based science writer Susan Freinkel, the au-

out more than 330 pounds from the same two stretches of beach.

thor of Plastic: A Toxic Love Story. “Her book on plastic is the most fascinating I have read on the subject,” Kippen says. The lecture,

While the nonprofit remains a steady fixture in the community, get-

which is free and open to the public, will be held at the Sanctuary

ting the word out about its mission, providing environmental edu-

Exploration Center, located at 35 Pacific Ave. in Santa Cruz. The

cation opportunities, and bringing in new volunteers is as important

talk will begin at 6:45 p.m., but doors will open early for exhibit

as ever, says program manager Rachel Kippen, who led the cleanup

viewing and light appetizers. Learn more about Freinkel at

efforts at Main and Cowell beaches during the July cleanup.

susanfreinkel.com/books_Plastic.html.

“There aren't many environmental projects as rewarding as a

XSTREAM CLEANUP PROGRAM

cleanup,” she says. “You get to actively enjoy our beautiful coast-

Due to illegal camping, bonfires and people partying in the hidden

line, perhaps in a new location you've never been to before. [And]

coves in the cliffs along North County's beaches, SOS has had to

once you start noticing garbage on the beach, you will likely have

focus much of its recent cleanup efforts in that area. Dubbed the

difficulty passing it by without wanting to throw it away.”

“XStream Cleanup Program,” volunteers deploy at Davenport Main

As the summer comes to a close and fall settles in, Kippen points to several events for people looking to do their part to help our gorgeous coastline.

Beach the first Sunday of every month from 9-11 a.m., and at Panther State Beach on the fourth Sunday of every month during the same time, Kippen says. “These cleanups typically yield hundreds of pounds of garbage per event,” she says. “We have only had one

COASTAL CLEANUP DAY

cleanup in Davenport where we removed less than 100 pounds.”

Coastal Cleanup Day, taking place Saturday, Sept. 20 from 9 a.m.

There will also be a Holiday Relief cleanup at Panther on Sept. 2,

to noon, is one of the largest international volunteer events on

the morning after Labor Day, from 9 -11 a.m. SOS provides all nec-

the planet and is coordinated locally by Save Our Shores. “We

essary cleanup materials including bags, buckets, gloves and data

clean pretty much every beach and river from as far north as Wad-

cards, though they encourage volunteers to bring a filled, reusable

dell Creek to as far south as Big Sur,” Kippen says. This year will be

water bottle and to dress in layers. They also encourage volunteers

the 30th anniversary of the event and is expected to cover more

to bring old buckets and work gloves, if possible. For more informa-

than 75 locations along the Central California coast. Last year,

tion on Save Our Shores events, visit saveourshores.org.

Continued on Page 29 ▶

26

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

27


28

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


◀ Continued from Page 26

Stewards of Our Shores

SAVE OUR SHORES: BY THE NUMBERS

Amount of trash collected locally after the Fourth of July.

Number of volunteers who participated in Save Our Shores’ 2013 Coastal Cleanup Day.

Number of mailboxes found during the 2013 Coastal Cleanup Day.

Amount of garbage regularly found at cleanups of Santa Cruz County’s northern beaches.

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

29


The quest among researchers to better understand the Pacific's great white shark population stirs debate

By Joel Hersch |

For surfers in California, there is a feeling of deep rever-

While their numbers were very low in the past due to fish-

ence that comes with knowing that one of the ocean's top

ing and habitat infringement, George Burgess, director

predators, the great white shark, is liable to be patrolling

for the Florida Program for Shark Research, says that the

the waters beneath some of their favorite breaks. And

animals have made a major recovery in the last 100 years.

with that reverence, there is also a huge relief in not know-

The Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 helped by al-

ing it when they are—treating the shark's presence as a kind of abstraction is a saving grace. Professional surfer and Santa Cruz Waves founder Tyler Fox has knowingly surfed sharky breaks his whole life, but after watching a tall, dark triangular fin cut through the water 30 feet away at Davenport Landing 10 years

whites’ food source. Additionally, it became illegal in California waters to hunt great white sharks in 1994 and illegal by federal law in 1997. Due to these and other factors, “We've seen a slow and steady increase,” Burgess says. However, until three years ago there was no comprehensive

spot again.

data on the species’ population, and when population re-

shark attack are extremely low feeds an out-of-sight,

|

lowing the seal population to grow, bolstering the great

ago, he says he hasn't been able to surf that particular

A surfer's knowledge that the odds of experiencing a

30

Photos courtesy of Pelagic Shark Research Foundation

search was first published in 2011, it sparked more questions than it answered. In the three years since, a series of scientific assessments and re-assessments on the white

out-of-mind mentality. But, according to white shark

shark in the North East Pacific has fueled a heated debate

researchers, the fact that there is a very low probability

around their true population size and whether the animal,

of getting chomped does not necessarily correlate with

which is already listed as a “protected” species, warrants

a small population.

further protection under the Endangered Species Act.

Photo: Callaghan Fritz-Cope

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

Continued on Page 32 ▶


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

31


The Great White Count

◀ Continued from Page 30

The data that began it all was in a 2011 paper by Taylor Chapple, a

Grimmer, the resource protection coordinator for the Monterey Bay

post-doctoral scholar at Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove (a

National Marine Sanctuary. Following the population reviews, both

Stanford University lab), that recounted a three-year study on adult

of which came out in June, state and federal researchers deter-

and “sub-adult” white sharks at three Central California aggrega-

mined white shark numbers along the California Coast were closer

tion sites: Año Nuevo, Tomales Point, and the Farallon Islands. Us-

to 3,000 and did not warrant endangered species status.

ing a mark and recapture approach and a variety of statistical methods, Chapple's team determined the Central California white shark population of their study group to be 219. The team calculated that the whole North East Pacific, which spans from Alaska, south to Mexico and west to Hawaii, has a population of 438 adults and sub-adults, though Chapple

New assesments have started a heated

says that the North East Pacific's entire population is likely much larger than this.

“They determined that there wasn't enough [of an] issue with the abundance of white sharks to list them as endangered,” Grimmer says. One of the reviews was led by Burgess and his 10-member team of scientists, who started their re-assessment of the white shark population in 2013 using Chapple's data and a different statistical method to calculate the population for a larger area, and published their findings in the journal PLOS ONE on June 16. They

debate around great

However, about a year af-

found that the North East Pacific is populated with approximately 2,400 white sharks.

whites' true population

ter his findings came out, Chapple’s paper spurred en-

size and whether the

vironmental groups Oceana, Shark Stewards, and the Cen-

animal, which is already

ter for Biological Diversity to

listed as a “protected”

Fisheries Service (NMFS) and

species, warrants further

Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) to

protection under the

endangered species status.

Endangered Species Act.

petition the National Marine the California Department of evaluate the white shark for

Their research was based exclusively on Chapple's aggregation sites and did not include habitats in Mexico and other parts of the West Coast and migration between various sites, says Gregor Cailliet, a scientist and professor emeritus with Moss Landing Marine Laboratory and co-director of the Pacific Shark Research Center, who worked on the study alongside Burgess. This means that the entire North East Pacific population, across all size classes, could be closer to 10,000, he says. Although, Burgess says that this number is not rooted in their scientific findings.

This prompted an extensive

Meanwhile, Chapple feels that the media and his fellow research-

18-month study, says Karen

ers have heavily misconstrued the scope of his team’s 2011 data. “Our data is very specific to Central California and our specific

Photo: Sean Van Sommeran

size class,” he says. “They're talking about all of California and all size classes, which we don't have data for. It's an inappropriate comparison.” One of Cailliet and Burgess’ key issues with the original data was how conservation groups leveraged it. Cailliet believes some conservation groups possess ulterior motives in their push for new endangered species classifications. “It brings them attention and more money,” he says. “As a result, people who are running these organizations can be overly aggressive … I think it's unnecessary for an organization to use data that are not 100 percent convincing and costs the government millions of dollars to write reports that deny [a] petition.” While he does see value in the research papers that ultimately came from the petitions, Cailliet says the problem becomes a “bio-political or socio-economic issue—a waste of money.”

32

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

Continued on Page 34 ▶


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

33


The Great White Count

◀ Continued from Page 32

Photos (from left to right): Caterina Gennaro, Sean Van Sommeran

Once the conservation groups submitted the Endangered Spe-

There have been 44 shark attacks on humans along the California

cies Act (ESA) petitions, backed with Chapple’s research, the state

coast in the last seven years, according to sharkattacksurvivors.

and federal governments were required to allocate substantial

com, four of which were fatal. As of press time, there had been

resources and time, which means those resources and time were re-directed from other, possibly more deserving, areas.

just one this year, the July 5 nonfatal attack on swimmer Steve Robles at Manhattan Beach in Los Angeles. In that case, a 7-foot

“Certain species that are in need of recovery and endangered spe-

white shark was hooked on a wharf fisherman’s line and thrash-

cies status have lost the funding, so there's a very explicit loss that

ing in distress as Robles swam by.

occurs when a species is petitioned unnecessarily,” says Burgess. “We have to be very careful in the biological world not to overstate

But Chapple says to exercise caution when interpreting attacks as

the severity of a problem because there are ramifications.”

an indication of white shark numbers.

While the white shark population appears to be much larger

“With attacks on pinnipeds or human interactions or fisheries

than what it was interpreted to be back in 2011, Chapple says a

catches, the causality of those things is not a direct result of pop-

subsequent misunderstanding occurred when media portrayed

ulation changes,” Chapple says. “It can be behavior, water tem-

Chapple's initial assessment of 219 and Burgess' re-assessment of 2,400 this year to mean the white shark population had skyrocketed by almost 2,200 animals. “Thinking those two things were related whatsoever was completely inappropriate,” he says. “That's probably been the most

peratures, the number of people and seals in the water, time of year, or the observations.” Cailliet explains that, because data on the population did not even exist until three years ago, what researchers do have is still immersed in murky waters.

frustrating part.” Chapple says there is no hard

Grimmer points out that the white shark is an exceptionally diffi-

data on whether the popula-

cult creature to study: “It's very elusive, they don't come up to the

beginning to scratch the

tion has gone up or down.

surface all the time, they're fast, and they travel incredibly long

surface of understanding

“Our paper in 2011 is pretty

the great white shark.

lected are a single point, and

Researchers are just

clear that the data we colwe have to build on that—you have to start somewhere with

a baseline,” he says. "You can't tell a trend in three years, [but] as you get more data you can start to build that trend, and that's what we're doing.” Cailliet, however, says that while there is not enough numerical data to say if the population is rising, white shark activity does

34

|

distances in short amounts of time.” She says researchers are just beginning to scratch the surface of understanding the white shark. “From what we do know,” she says, “there are probably white sharks in the water [around people] quite often, but attacks are still extremely rare.” Of attacks on humans, Burgess says surfers pay the highest price. But he marvels at the way surfers think about the ocean and its

indicate a slow population rise. Those assessments are based on

dangers. Of the hundreds of shark-attack surfer victims he has in-

incidental by-catch in fishermen's gillnets off Southern California,

terviewed, he says almost every one of them has retained a posi-

and the number of white shark attacks, which have both increased.

tive attitude about sharks and returning to the water.

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

35


36

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

37


CJ Nelson. Photo: PaulTopp.com

38

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


SURF PHOTOGRAPHY & THE ART OF MAX EHRMAN View more of Max's work @maxehrman

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

39


Photo: Nelly / SPLwaterhousing

40

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

41


Nic H'Dez. Photo: @KenanChan

42

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

43


44

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


Glen AKA 3B. Photo: Kookson

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

45


46

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


WE ARE A LEADING ECO-AWARE ESTABLISHMENT THAT PROVIDES COMPLETE SERVICES FOR MEN, WOMEN, AND CHILDREN OF ALL AGES.

SALON AND DAY SPA

SPONTANEOUS VISITS ENCOURAGED MAKE AN APPOINTMENT AND EXPERIENCE OUR FRESH APPROACH TO SERVICE AND STYLE!

20

% off MENTION THIS AD AND RECEIVE YOUR FIRST EXPERIENCE WITH US...

or if we haven't seen you in 6 months or more

TWO LOCATIONS 114 PEARL ALLEY - SALON 304 LINCOLN STREET - DAY SPA 7.24.14_OG_Pleasure_SCW_Ad_v2.pdf 1 7/28/14

9:13 AM

LATELIERSALON.COM RESERVE ONLINE! 831.469.7546

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

47


SUBTLETY & MOTION

Patrick Trefz is a unique cinematographer-slash-photographer-

BEHIND THE LENS WITH PHOTOGRAPHER PATRICK TREFZ

art. His work has been exhibited across the nation over the last

slash-author whose focus is the blending of surf, surf lifestyle and 15 years, from the Los Angeles Film Festival to the New York City Film Festival. As a filmmaker, Trefz has produced three critically

Interview by Paul Topp

48

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

acclaimed films—Bicycle Trip, Thread and, most recently, Idiosyn-


Moody swell lines rear their heads as they march into Santa Cruz.

crasies. He has also published a number of books of his work. In his continuing quest to merge surf culture and art, Trefz cites numerous influences from each side of those worlds, from Rick Griffin, Jim Phillips and Keith Herring, to Marcel Duchamp, Alberto Giacometti, Ansel Adams and Art Brewer. Santa Cruz Waves probed the artist’s mind for more biographical details. Can you give us a short bio? I am German born, was raised around the globe, and have been in Santa Cruz for 20 years. How did you get into photography and filmmaking? My dad, a photographer as well, got me an old SLR when I was 13. I shot every-

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

49


Ken "Skindog" Collins in the zone at Mavericks.

50

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


thing and haven’t stopped since: travel, people, skate, surf, all that. I was digging ditches and airbrushing surfboards at Pearson Arrow to make a living, and shot some photos on the side. With the discovery of Mavericks and the Santa Cruz scene blowing up, I ended up with a retainer staff photographer position at SURFER Magazine. Tell us about your experience shooting surf in Santa Cruz and the Central Coast. Our coastal area is mystical: cliffs and redwoods, the proximity of the mountains jutting out of the sea, tons of wildlife—seeing boars, bobcats and deer on the way to the water. Surrounded by kelp bulbs, jumping seals and the occasional sighting of a shark, the fog and the storm systems that pelt the area. The amazing light and epic full-moon surfs. A great sense of adventure lurks in our backyard. On top of that, the rich culture in close reach adds to it. You could be surfing up north around Pescadero, then getting a beer and some cioppino at Duarte’s, a bar/ restaurant founded in 1894 by Portuguese whalers. Or down in the Monterey Bay, after a cold winter surf, having an authentic Mexican home-cooked meal at Castroville’s Michoacan Market. The richness in the area makes me want to shoot much more than just the surf. On stormy days I like to drive down into the Salinas Valley to photograph old farms, abandoned gas stations, or scraggily trees—[John] Steinbeck on my mind as I navigate the narrow roads. Who or what influenced your photography? I was hanging out with [legendary surf photographer] Art Brewer on the North Shore of Oahu when I first started out. He made me realize that shooting surfing is not just going for the in-your-face action shot. A lot of subtleties within the surf culture deserve more [attention]. Just look at Brewer’s portraits of Bunker Spreckels. On a trip to Alaska in 2000, I met Andrew Kidman [director of Litmus]. He talked to me about taking my photography into motion. It’s been enriching to combine motion and stills—his encouragement challenged and changed my work and got me into filmmaking.How would you

Inventor of Doc's Pro Plugs and all-around legend Doc Scott keeps it fresh.

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

51


How would you describe your personal style of photography? Just taking single images gets boring. I’m interested in telling the story and creating a study on a particular subject, whether it’s shooting a short film on big-wave surfer Greg Long or San Diegan surf historian Richard Kenvin, taking black and white, medium-format portraits post-surfing of Harbor Bill, or chasing the nostalgia of Santa Cruz County in the old barns and haunted redwoods. That approach pushed me into creating my own books and films. [Whereas] SURFER Magazine might have only used a single image, it all gave me the freedom to tell the story that I wanted to, [and] made me more independent from surf industry politics. That’s when the real creative work gets started. I collaborate with artists from all sorts of different fields to produce the final outcome: book designers, film editors, musicians, writers, muralists, shapers, etc., and that makes for an environment where free-thinking minds challenge and push each other. Tell us about Surfers’ Blood. How did it come about? I self-published my first book in 2002, on Santa Cruz and its surroundings, entitled Visions of Surf City. After that, a publisher from back east, powerHouse Books, contacted me to do a book based on my surf documentary Thread. Recently we teamed up again to do my third book, a two-decade surfing retrospective shot around the world. Surfer’s Blood captures the people, places and waves of the international surf tribe: from world champions to underground heroes to Santa Cruz’s Westside crew; from Hawaiian legend Buffalo Keaulana to unknown shapers in the Basque country and the 100-foot Wednesday at Mavericks. It covers a lot of territory.

52

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


Central Coast seclusion.

We are pretty deep into the digital age of photography now, yet you still shoot a lot on film. Do you shoot more film than digital? Sometimes film is better, sometimes digital. It’s a tool of choice depending on what I want to accomplish—sort of the same reason why handsaws never went out of style. Are you active on the web and social media? Yes, you [have to] be active on social media and the Internet if you are working as a professional visual artist. Otherwise you do not exist, at least on the Internet grid. It reminds me of the time when answering machines and faxes got popular. Businesses needed them in order to survive. I’ve never had either. I was talking to my friend Boogie Bill the other day while he helped me fix my leaky toilet. He is an artist but has no interest in being on the [web]. So he was telling me that some people have a really hard time finding him and getting a hold of him, which suits him just fine. It gives him more time to surf.

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

53


54

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


Josh Mulcoy has provided the perfect muse for Patrick's uncanny creativity.

What’s next for you? Besides doing a few commercial short-film projects, I am currently in production on two feature-length movies. The first one is based on Surfers’ Blood in partnership with RedBull Media House. I don’t want to give away too much, but it is based on the DNA of six characters from the book: from shapers to directors, designers, artists, war vets, pro-surfers, etc. … The second one, Outstanding in the Field, is a documentary on local surfer/chef/artist Jim Denevan, with a farm-to-table business by the same name. I’m in the editing phase of the film right now, putting together a trailer to secure the second round of funding. Last year, I travelled all across the country with Jim and his dinner tour team in his big red Greyhound tourbus. Legend has it that it was formerly owned by Elvis. Denevan’s leadership in the reinvention of food culture and his unique massive-scale land/art installations are part of the decade-long documentation that tells the story. Learn more at patricktrefz.com.

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

55


56

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

57


58

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


School’s out and you're 12 years old ... What do you do? You have your mom shuttle you and your pals on a surf safari looking for waves, of course. On this sunny summer afternoon, the Santa Cruz Waves junior surf team took a little adventure and found just what they were looking for. Groms include: Santiago Hart, Zealand Hunter, and Sean Winterburn.

Photos: T. Fox

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

59


60

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


Trying something new can be both exciting and potentially terrifying. When the opportunity arises, it’s not unusual for the fear of failure to cross the mind. Enter stand-up paddleboarding (or SUPing), in which a newbie might fall or struggle. Even I, a self-professed athletic adventurer, was nervous when I first gave the trendy water sport a try. I arrived at my first lesson with Club Ed Surf School and was immediately put at ease with some land training, in which the instructor went over the dos and don’ts. As soon as I got into the water and stood on my board, I fell. Not only was it humbling, it also allowed all of the unnecessary anxiety to dissipate: the worst was over. I climbed back on board, bent my knees, centered my balance and, soon enough, I was stand-up paddleboarding in the calmness of the water with no care in the world. There was no feeling of failure or stress—just me, my stand-up paddleboard and the sea.   The chief requirement for paddleboarding is a passion for paddling. Though two working legs and two working arms also helps, people with lower extremity orthopedic limitations can paddle seated. Knowing how to swim isn’t necessarily a prerequisite, though it helps one feel more secure on the open ocean or body of water. According to Club Ed owner and operator Ed Guzman, SUP can be done with as little as one-foot of water. The equipment needed is a paddle and, of course, a paddleboard. (See the sidebar on page 62 for local SUP stores.) As a Pro-Elite Personal Trainer and the owner of Santa Cruz CORE

SUP YOUR WAY TO FITNESS Why stand-up paddleboarding is good for the body and the soul By Jaimi Ellison | Photos: Patrick Bremser

Fitness + Rehab, I’m always interested in the physiology of a workout. After analyzing a paddler’s stroke, I determined which muscles are used and just how rigorous of a workout this fun recreational activity can be. Here are some tips for getting your workout on with SUP.

BALAN C E SUP uses almost all of the muscles in the body, starting with the feet. The foot and ankle stabilizers are hard at work to maintain balance on the board. The lateral stabilizers of the legs that are used for lateral movements as well as for balancing can help prevent knee pain because the stabilizer muscles support the joints just as much as the primary movers do.

ROTATION As the paddle reaches to touch the water, the torso rotates. Use of the external and internal obliques, multifidus, erector spinae, quadratus lumborum, and rectus abdominis allow the body to rotate and crunch, driving the paddle into the water. This reaching and twisting motion can work to whittle down your waist and give you the nice T-shape so many athletes have. It will also work to tone your core, thereby protecting your back and building strength.

Continued on Page 62 ▶

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

61


SUP Your Way to Fitness

◀ Continued from Page 61

UPPE R BOD Y Deltoids, latissimus, biceps and triceps—all muscles of the upper body—are worked as you drive the paddle and pull it through the water toward the back of the board. The smaller rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor) are also activated with the rotation of the shoulder that occurs during the paddle stroke. The ball and socket joint of the shoulder is one of the least

THE SUP PROS:

stable joints in the body, and

Kayak Connection

attained through paddling.

Santa Cruz Harbor 413 Lake Ave. #3 (831) 479-1121

Club Ed Surf School 101 Beach St. (831) 459-6664

SUP Shack Santa Cruz 2214 East Cliff Drive (831) 464-7467

Whether you are a novice to water sports or a seasoned veteran, SUPing can be fun and challenging. The workout is harder (and the board goes faster) with more power output in the paddle drive into the water and more strength behind the pull. A cruise is also nice. With a shallower drive of the paddle and a slower, softer pull, SUPing

726 Water St.

can be used as a great cross-

WHILE YOU’RE AT IT, TRY KAYAKING WITH: Kayak Connection (See info above)

Venture Quest Kayaking 2 Municipal Wharf (831) 425-8445

Blue Water Ventures 127 Mason St. (831) 459-8548

|

FUN FO R E VE RYONE

Covewater (831) 600-7230

62

strength and stability can be

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

training or recovery tool.

W H ERE TO GO Guzman recommends that stand-up paddling is best done away from any surfers. The easiest entry is at the Santa Cruz Harbor. Familiarize yourself with the harbor rules and be aware of boat crossings. Though there is a fee to use the harbor, nothing can beat the calm, serene waters for beginners. SUP is a great way to explore marine life and the Santa Cruz coastline. Cowell Beach is a good place to launch to

go tour the kelp beds off of Indicators and Steamer Lane on the Westside, where sea otters can often be found. Observe them from a safe distance and be very careful not to bother them. Another fun spot to paddle is the end of the Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf, where you can see the sea lions and check out the colors of the Boardwalk reflecting off of the water.

GETTI NG STARTED Lessons are always best for beginners to learn proper paddling techniques, safety and SUP etiquette. When taking a lesson, the guide will not only educate you on how to SUP but also where to go and what board and paddles are best for you. Touring outside of the break is the easiest way to get familiar with SUP. Riding boards in the surf is more challenging and more dangerous for you and others who may be unfortunate enough to be in your path. It is best to try it where there is no one else around. Paddle up and down the coast to find your own space and to keep the peace. The rule above all else: Have fun!


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

63


Fresh off a U.S. championship win, Nic H’Dez is ready to take on the world

By Neal Kearney | Photos: Billy Watts Santa Cruz has a knack for churning out world-class surf talent. Groomed on the juicy right-hand point breaks, fellows such as Adam Replogle, Chris Gallagher and, just recently, Nat Young have all stamped their distinctly powerful and graceful Santa Cruz-influenced styles on the elite Association of Surfing Professionals (ASP) World Tour. Looking ahead, another young star is entering supernova status: Nic H’Dez. The 18-year-old Pleasure Point native has dedicated almost his entire life to becoming a top-level athlete. And, with a recent win in the under 18 division at the 2014 Surfing America USA Championships at Lower Trestles in San Onofre, H’Dez moves closer to joining his mentor Nat Young on the world stage. Santa Cruz Waves cornered the globe-trotting teen to talk about his monumental win.

64

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

Continued on Page 67 ▶


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

65


66

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


A Star is Born: Nic H'Dez

◀ Continued from Page 64

Congrats, dude. How does it feel to be the new U.S. champion?

Go through the competition for me. At what point did you

Thank you! It sort of feels surreal. I'm so psyched.

feel like you could win?

Describe the preparation you have undergone this year to get into top form. I've been training over at Paradigm Sport with [owner] Joey Wolfe a lot and putting in work over there. My coach Erik Kramer has been super helpful and making things easier for me at these contests. And I've just been surfing my brains out—having fun and putting in a lot of time in the water.

My first round heat was probably the gnarliest heat I had the whole competition. I squeaked it. Liam McTigue came out of the gates swinging with a couple of high eights, and Josh Moniz dropped a 9.1 on his first wave. I was sitting there, hadn't caught a wave yet, just like, “Whoa, this is nuts!” I ended up getting a seven and, like, 6.8 to just edge out Josh in such a nail biter. After that it was just heat-by-heat, trying to be on the best waves and not fall. I felt like I could win it after my first wave in the final. It had been

Talk me through your year so far. Any ups and downs?

a pretty slow one so far and I had just got the highest score of the

This year I've competed a lot. [I] probably have done the most

heat. On the paddle back out from that wave I was so fired up I

events I have ever done in a year. I feel like I was sort of struggling

thought, “Here we go!”

to find my feet toward the beginning of the season, but all those events were good practice and sort of kept me in a contest state of mind throughout the season. I also got on some bigger boards just before summer and I definitely think that helped. Who was your biggest threat coming into this event? Was the event stacked?

What did you eat for breakfast the day of the finals? Popeye's spinach? I had a breakfast burrito from Pipes [Café, in San Clemente]. The No. 1 with cilantro. Talk to me about getting carried up the beach in a chair by

Yeah. It was a stacked event for sure. For the U.S. champs, kids

your friends. That must have been quite a feeling.

come from all over the country in the under 18 division to com-

I actually didn't get a proper chair [ride] up the beach. Due to a

pete at Lowers. I'd have to say a couple of threats coming into the

crazy last exchange, it wasn't [certain] that I had won, so when

competition were the Moniz brothers and Kanoa Igarashi.

my friends lifted me up I jumped out after a few seconds because I didn't want to jinx anything.

Surfing rippable Lowers, did you enjoy your advantage of growing up surfing a point break?

What are some of your goals for next year?

For sure. Growing up in Santa Cruz has been a huge benefit to my

To keep getting better and have fun, to qualify for [the] ASP World

surfing … It’s the best place on Earth.

Juniors [event], and to build my WQS [World Qualifying Series]

Describe the blade that got the job done.

seed and get into as many events as possible.

The blade that got the job done was a Channel Islands remix

Any thank yous or shout outs?

model epoxy. 5'10.5" x 18" 3/4 x 2" 5/16. Swallow tail.

My Mom and Dad.

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

67


Natalia rockin' our Deep-V women's tee. Order online today at SantaCruzWaves.com.

68

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

Photo: Jake Thomas


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

69


LE G AN T N RE FE IF D A M O FR Z U CR TA N SA G N EI SE 70

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

Pleasure Point paddle out. Photo: multirotorcam.com


Golden rays. Photo: Nelly / SPLwaterhousing

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14 Cement ship, Aptos. Photo: David Levy

|

71

The Point. Photo: Neil Simmons


72

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

73


- All Grown Up By Julia Gaudinski, mobileranger.com

The Santa Cruz Wharf & Harbor

Photo: multirotorcam.com

CEL EB R ATE BI G M I LE ST O NES T HI S YE A R

The Pacific Ocean is at the heart of Santa Cruz. Its ancient sea

The Municipal Wharf, built in 1914, was much longer than any of

floor lifted over the eons to form our picturesque cliffs and hill-

the three previous wharfs. In fact, it is the longest wooden-pile

sides. The redwoods depend on the fog that condenses over its

wharf on the West Coast. The idea was to serve deep-water ves-

chilly waters, and we all draw from the ocean’s cornucopia of re-

sels that might still compete with rail, but it didn’t work. By the

sources: open water, crashing waves, fish below and fowl above,

time it opened, it was too late—railroads had officially become

and sheltered beaches for families to enjoy into the warm fall.

king and Santa Cruz's run as an important port city was already

The Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf and the Santa Cruz Small Craft Harbor have been helping people get into or onto the ocean for decades—10 decades, in fact, for the wharf, and five for the harbor. In light of the local landmarks’ 100th and 50th birthdays, respectively, we take a look back at how they came to be.

THE G L O RY DAYS

|

S OMETHING FIS HY Chinese immigrants were the area’s earliest commercial fishers. Due to widespread prejudice and anti-Chinese legislation, they were relegated to squid fishing by the 1880s and, by the 1890s, were driven out of the fishing business completely.

In the late 1800s, Santa Cruz was a thriving port city exporting

Italian families came to dominate local fishing by the early 1900s.

lumber, lime, leather, and agricultural goods. Between 1849 and

Cottardo Stagnaro, who hailed from the village of Riva Trigoso

1875, three privately funded wharfs were built to handle the ship-

near Genoa, is purported to have been the first Italian fisherman

ping traffic, and ambitious plans were made for a large harbor to

to move to Santa Cruz. It is said that he recruited 60 fishing families

protect the wharfs and ships from fierce winter storms.

from his village to emigrate to the area. Thus began the legacy of

However, by the turn of the century, the railroads were surpassing ship-

74

over. Fishing businesses became the mainstay for the new wharf.

families with names like Stagnaro, Ghio, Faraola, and Carniglia.

ping for the transportation of goods. The large harbor was never built,

In its heyday, 75 to 100 boats unloaded catches of salmon, sea

and, by 1910, the only wharf that remained was the Railroad Wharf.

bass, rock cod, and sole every day, and the Municipal Wharf was

SANTA C RUZ WAVES MAGAZ I N E

Continued on Page 77 ▶


Real Local Banking Apply for a loan, credit card, or an account anytime, anywhere at www.bayfed.com.

Federally Insured by NCUA. Equal Housing Lender.

831.479.6000 • www.bayfed.com • 888.4BAYFED V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

75


76

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


◀ Continued from Page 74

All Grown Up: The Santa Cruz Wharf & Harbor Santa Cruz Small Craft Harbor groundbreaking ceremony with Governor Edmund G. Brown Sr. May 6, 1962.

known for its fun and lively atmosphere. Proud fisherman would

Photo: Les Long. Harbor Collection. Courtesy of the Santa Cruz Port District.

display large or unusual catches for all to see. Then, in 1964, the Small Craft Harbor opened, and most of the fishing businesses relocated to the harbor. Old-timers say they took the wharf’s lifeblood with them and left only a parking lot for their family-owned restaurants. But the wharf’s best years are not necessarily behind it. Current city leaders envision a new future for the wharf as a landmark destination that showcases the Monterey Bay’s natural riches. The draft Wharf Master Plan seeks to change the way people think about the waterfront locale. It has a lot going for it, after all: it is a gateway into the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, a special nexus of land and water resources, and a platform for worldclass marine research and education. It’s also a beautiful place to stroll, eat, shop, rent a boat, or take a whale-watching tour.

B I G H ARBO R D RE A M S, SMALL HA RBO R RE A L I T Y The harbor that opened in 1964 was a much smaller safe anchorage than the big harbor envisioned in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. After World War II, recreational boating began gaining popularity and Santa Cruz shifted its focus to building a small craft harbor. Congress approved a harbor study for Santa Cruz in 1946. It took years of wrangling over location and funding, but a Santa Cruz Port District formed by 1958. In 1962, financed in roughly equal amounts by federal, state and local funds, construction of the harbor began. Its opening in 1964 was a boost for the commercial fishing, recreation, and tourist industries. In recent years it has also become home to many nonprofits, such as O’Neill Sea Odyssey, the Coastal Watershed Commission, Save Our Shores, and Sea Scouts,

- Time to Celebrate! ON THE WATERFRONT Celebrating 100 Years of Wharf History with Geoffrey Dunn, Saturday, Sept. 13, 20 and 27 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Santa Cruz Wharf Stage. Pre-register at santacruzparksandrec.com.

all of which foster environmental awareness and stewardship.

SAY NO T O SURF I NG IT In Santa Cruz, as along most of the California coast, waves from the northwest drive sediment and sand southward—a process known

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION Saturday, Oct. 4 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Santa Cruz Wharf Stage.

as littoral drift. It’s like a river of sand flowing south, just offshore. If an obstacle is placed across this river of sand, its flow is blocked.

FIREWORKS SPECTACULAR

That’s why the two harbor jetties (east and west) cause sand to

Sunday, Oct. 4 at 9 p.m. at Santa Cruz Main Beach with great

settle out or “shoal” at the harbor entrance. It takes a huge dredg-

views from the Santa Cruz Wharf.

ing operation to keep the entrance clear. Since it opened, the harbor has dredged this sand and pumped it back offshore just down coast of the east jetty. Each year, the dredging operation moves 200,000 to 250,000 cubic yards of sand at a cost of about $1 million. Shoaling sand can produce surfable waves at the harbor mouth,

Continued on Page 79 ▶

100TH ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATION CEREMONY Friday, Dec. 5 at 11 a.m. at the Santa Cruz Wharf Stage.

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

77


78

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


◀ Continued from Page 77

All Grown Up: The Santa Cruz Wharf & Harbor Making of the big cement tetrapods, circa 1963. Photo by Les Long. Harbor Collection. Courtesy of the

but it is illegal and quite dangerous to surf them. They are in a narrow and busy naviga-

Santa Cruz Port District.

tion channel and are very close to the jetty, where surfers can get smashed on the huge cement "tetrapods." However, this being “Surf City,” some surfers have been known to take the risk—and eat the fine.

H A RBO R L I G HT: A TR ANS FORMATION To prevent boats from crashing into the jetties, there has been a harbor light and fog horn at the west jetty since the harbor opened. Prior to the current lighthouse, however, the structures housing them have been unattractive and low budget, to put it mildly. For the first 32 years there was a boxy structure known as the "Lunar Lander." It was replaced by a cylinder nicknamed “The Water Heater” in 1996. Then, in 1999, The Water Heater was replaced by a simple pole and basket edifice. The 1996 structure was apparently so unpleasant to the eye that locals Bill Simpkins and Jim Thoits couldn't bear it any longer. Beginning in 1998, they spearheaded a campaign to replace the unsightly harbor light with a classic lighthouse. Funds were raised from the community and Charles Walton, of Los Gatos, made a large donation in honor of his late brother, Derek, who served in the merchant marines and was lost at sea during World War II. On June 9, 2002, the Walton Lighthouse was officially opened and dedicated, and has been illuminating the surrounding waters ever since.

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

79


Locals’ Favorite Eats B R E A KF A ST

By April Martin-Hansen Photos: Yvonne Rew-Falk

These Santa Cruz County eateries make the most important meal of the day the most delicious, too. Whether your morning is actionpacked or unfolding at a relaxed, weekend pace, breakfast is an essential ingredient. Nutritious smoothies before a morning surf session, hearty meals after an early bike ride, and casual brunches with friends—Santa Cruz has it all. Follow the locals and you’ll find these restaurants are the best bets for breakfast.

Linda’s Seabreeze Café

This busy Seabright favorite is known for filling breakfasts and a cheerful atmosphere. Breakfast

is served all day and comes in the form of tasty omelets, French toast, pancakes, and much more. They also have intriguing specials, like the Hearts Ahoy, made with a flour tortilla with black olives, artichoke hearts, tomatoes, green onions and cheese. Most breakfast items cost around $8 to $10. 542 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, 427-9713, seabreezecafe.com. Breakfast served all day. Restaurant open from 6 a.m. - 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 7 a.m. - 1 p.m. on Sunday.

Amazon Juices

Santa Cruzans know the importance of fueling their bodies with healthy foods, which is where health-conscious

hubs like Amazon Juices come in. This café is a great choice for a smoothie, juice, açai bowl, or breakfast sandwich. It’s affordable, to boot, with the most popular breakfast item—the breakfast sandwiches—available for only $3.25. 1066 41st Ave., Capitola, 854-2225, amazonjuices.net. Breakfast served all day. Restaurant open every day from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

The Silver Spur Restaurant

The Silver Spur Restaurant may not be near the waves, but many a

surfer knows it’s worth the trip to Soquel Drive for their home-style food with fresh ingredients and a diverse menu. The restaurant has cultivated a strong sense of community and a loyal fan base with its friendly staff and a line-up that includes scrumptiously satisfying homemade muffins, fluffy pancakes, French toast, omelets and more. 2650 Soquel Drive, Santa Cruz, 475-2725, scsilverspur.com. Breakfast served all day. Restaurant open Monday through Saturday 6 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Paula’s

Just a short jaunt from Pleasure Point, Paula’s is a longtime favorite among locals. Its excellent prices

and hearty food will make both your stomach and wallet happy. One of their most popular breakfast items is the simple and substantial Basic Breakfast: potatoes, toast, and two eggs cooked however you want, for only $2.95. The unique and fun décor is another reason to stop in. Not only is the cafe surf themed, complete with old surfing photos and boards, there is also a renovated van out front where diners can enjoy breakfast in a rather unconventional setting. 3500 Portola Drive, Santa Cruz, 464-074. Breakfast served all day. Restaurant open Monday through Friday 7 a.m. - 1:45 p.m. and from 8 a.m. - 1:45 p.m. on weekends.

Café Brasil

This Westside staple is best known for its deliciously refreshing and healthy açai bowls.

Açai bowls have become popular because of their yumminess and health benefits; the berries, known as Brazil’s “superfood” are a great source of vital antioxidants. However, Café Brasil goes far beyond just açai bowls and smoothies—they also have many types of omelets, scrambles, pancakes and authentic Brazilian food, most of which is available for between $8 and $10. Its popularity means a sizeable wait on weekend mornings, but it’s well worth it if you have the time to spare. If you are looking for a quick breakfast on the way to surf, try ordering ahead of time from their online menu or by calling. 1410 Mission St., Santa Cruz, 429-1855, cafebrasil.us. Breakfast served all day. Restaurant open every day from 8 a.m. - 2:45 p.m.

80

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


New Leaf Community Markets

What-

ever vitamins or nutrients your body is craving, New Leaf’s Juice and Smoothie Bar has you covered. The market’s juices and smoothies are satisfying and nutritious and are always made with fresh, local, organic produce. The 41st Avenue location’s New Beet Café also dishes up egg sandwiches, bagels, breakfast burritos, organic oatmeal and—the most popular item on their breakfast menu—the açai bowl. The New Beet Café opens at 7:30 a.m., making it a perfect pit stop for some delicious and healthy grub before your morning surf sesh. New Beet Café, 1210 41st Ave., Capitola, 479-7987. Breakfast served until noon. Smoothie bar open from 7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. every day. Visit newleaf.com for other New Leaf locations.

DeLaveaga Golf Course Lodge

When the surf is flat, as it often is in Santa Cruz during the summer, some people turn to

more terrestrial sports to get their workout. Golf appeals to a wide variety of people, and can be a fun social sport like surfing is for many. If you are looking to get a bite to eat before or after your tee time, DeLaveaga has an excellent restaurant in a prime location. It utilizes local farmers’ markets for fresh, local produce, creating specials based on what’s in season locally. 401 Upper Park Road, Santa Cruz, 423-7214, delaveagagolf.com. Breakfast served from 7 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. weekdays and until 2:30 p.m. on weekends.

Walnut Avenue Café

Conveniently located in the heart of Downtown Santa Cruz, Walnut Avenue Café is a favorite setting

for relaxed mornings with friends or family. The food is robust and delectable, earning it the title of the “City’s Best Breakfast” by Sunset Magazine. It has both classic breakfast items like pancakes, French toast, omelets and various forms of egg and scrambles, as well as huevos rancheros and vegetarian options. 106 Walnut Ave., Santa Cruz, 457-2307, walnutavenuecafe.com. Breakfast served all day. Restaurant open Monday - Friday from 7 a.m. - 3 p.m. and from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekends.

Chill Out Cafe

Chill Out Cafe embodies all that is Santa Cruz. Located a hop, skip and a jump away from

the break at Pleasure Point, it is a frequent stop for surfers looking for a quick, quality breakfast. They’re known for breakfast burritos, of which they offer 22 different varieties, including some vegetarian and vegan options. Their most popular is the Bacon and Avocado Burrito, comprised of scrambled eggs, cheese, hash browns, bacon, and avocado. All breakfast burritos cost around $7. They also have a range of hot drinks, including a wonderful chai that’s a perfect, mildly spicy blend. The atmosphere is fun, with large street-facing windows that flip open, providing an open dining experience. A beer garden is nestled out back—a relaxing little escape from the busy outside world. 860 41st Ave., Santa Cruz, 477-0543, chilloutcafesantacruz.com. Breakfast served all day. Restaurant open Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. - 3 p.m. and from 7 a.m. – 4 p.m. on weekends.

Dharma’s

Omnivores and herbivores alike flock to this veg-

etarian restaurant in Capitola. Their breakfast items are vegetarian plays on classic foods such as scrambles (made with tofu in varieties like curry, Thai, Greek and pesto), tofu rancheros, breakfast burritos, oatmeal, and hefty pancakes that can be dressed up with bananas, blueberries, or walnuts. 4250 Capitola Road, Capitola, 462-1717, dharmasrestraunt.com. Breakfast served until noon. Restaurant open every day from 6 a.m. – 9 p.m.

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

81


A Taste of Santa Cruz

Experience Santa Cruz County, one wine at a time

By Elizabeth Limbach

Illustration by Julie Henry

Pacific Avenue Downtown Santa Cruz has it all—

Bonny Doon Vineyard

Surf City Vintners You can’t go wrong with a whirl around

live music, and, yes, great wine. Try

Enter the eclectic, taste-bud-tickling

this buzzing Westside wine-tasting hub.

a glass at the recommendation of a

universe of heralded vintner Randall

Not only does the Surf City Vintners

knowledgeable sommelier at downtown’s

Grahm

of

cluster include tasting rooms for a dozen

sophisticated wine bar, Soif Restaurant

Davenport. A sinfully enjoyable red blend

delicious boutique wineries (including

Wine Bar & Merchants (soifwine.

called Le Cigare Volant reigns king among

MJA Vineyards, Equinox Wines, Sones

com). Just down the street, choose from

the repertoire, which is sprinkled with

Cellars, and Santa Cruz Mountain

more than 150 local wines at Vinocruz

many a fine wine, including a notable

Vineyard), it’s mere blocks from the sea

(vinocruz.com), a retailer dedicated to

Nebbiolo, sparkling Riesling, Syrah, and

and surrounded by other tasty offerings,

supporting wineries from the Santa Cruz

Moscato, and much more.

such as Santa Cruz Mountain Brewing,

Mountain appellation.

(Bonnydoonvineyard.com)

Kelly’s French Bakery, Venus Spirits,

in

the

seaside

hamlet

shopping, galleries, cafes, restaurants,

and New Leaf Community Market. Once you’ve sampled the vintners’ creations, choose a few bottles of your new favorites and cap the day off with an ocean-view picnic at nearby Lighthouse Field or Natural Bridges State Beach. (Surfcityvintners.com)

»» When it comes to wine events and information, Santa Cruz Mountains Winegrowers Association is the organization to know. Among its memorable happenings is Passport Day, when one pass buys participants tastes at more than 30 local wineries. The next Passport Day takes place Nov. 15. Visit scmwa.com for more information. »»No DD? No idea where to start? No problem. Book a wine tasting tour through The Santa Cruz Experience and sit back and enjoy the ride. (Thesantacruzexperience.com)

82

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


Move over, Napa—there’s a new world-class wine destination stealing the California spotlight. Santa Cruz County boasts more than 70 wineries, with tasting rooms tucked into happening urban neighborhoods, pastoral vineyards, and redwood-encrusted mountaintops. The appellation’s unique climate—with its mountain terrain and abundant ocean fog—gives the wines (Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, most notably) a distinct character not to be missed. With so many options, it’s easy to leisurely drop by a tasting room any day of the week or to make a day of it by touring a number of these vino suppliers. Our suggestion? Take note of neighboring wineries (see below for a few ideas) and plan a tasting excursion accordingly.

Silver Mountain Vineyards This certified organic winery takes being “green” to the next level with one of the largest solar arrays in the Santa Cruz Mountains and a sustainably designed operation. (Silvermtn.com)

Bargetto Winery, Hunter Hill Vineyard & Winery, and Soquel Vineyards In production since 1933, Bargetto Winery dishes up a dose of history with its award-winning wines. Nearby, also nestled in the scenic Soquel hills, find Soquel Vineyards and Hunter Hill Vineyard & Winery. (Bargetto.com; Hunterhillwines.com; Soquelvineyards.com)

Corralitos Wine Trail Head for the pastures of Corralitos, where some of the area’s best wines await at Alfaro Family Vineyards, Nicholson Vineyards, Pleasant Valley Vineyards and Windy Oaks Estate Vineyards & Winery. (Corralitoswinetrail.com)

Capitola Village Sip by the seaside at one of the village’s wine portals, It’s Wine Tyme and Cava

Winemakers’ Studio

Wine Bar. Or, peruse the hefty wine list

This up-and-coming joint tasting

in a romantic, picturesque setting at the nearby Shadowbrook Restaurant.

room—shared by many burgeoning wineries—is a must-see for wine lovers and novices, alike. (Watsonvillewinemakerstudios.com)

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

83


Hangin’ Local WITH A

What does a day in the life of a local look like? To find out, Santa Cruz Waves spent the day tagging along with Pleasure Point’s Jeni Baer as she enjoyed some of her favorite activities.

Photos by Paul Topp | Words by Jeni Baer

▲ Surf

Check

In the morning, I ride my scooter to grab some coffee, then give the waves a look and decide if I want to go out.

84

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

Continued on Page 86 ▶


Garmo

Photo: Poppy de

“Practicing yoga at Village Yoga is transformative. A consistent practice at Village Yoga has improved my balance, strength, and flexibility, and keeps me in my favorite place, the surf.” —Sarah Gerhardt (Big Wave Surfer, Mom, Professor)

(831) 425-9642 1106 Pacific Avenue, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 www.villageyogasantacruz.com

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

85


Hangin' with a Local: Jeni Baer

◀ Continued from Page 84

▲ Home

Sweet Home

I love traveling and seeing new places, but I am so thankful to call Santa Cruz home. Pleasure Point is my favorite spot in the area.

◀ Beauty

Pro

I work as a stylist at Urban Groove Hair Salon. [My coworkers and I] have such a fun time working together. I absolutely love what I do.

86

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

Continued on Page 88 ▶


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

87


Hangin' with a Local: Jeni Baer

▼ Farm

◀ Continued from Page 86

to Table

The farmers’ market is a great place to buy locally grown produce and support the community. I like to come here for fresh flowers that I’ll use to decorate my house or to brighten up the salon.

▲ Boat

Life

My friend Kalina and I decided we wanted a boat. We searched high and low and found this little gem. We like to invite our friends Annie and Noelle to “yacht” with us and enjoy the sunset on the water. It’s been such a blast this summer.

◀ Keeping it

Chill

Smoothies are a great way to renew your energy after a summer surf session. I’ll make them at home when I have enough fruit on hand, but it’s also fun to ride our scooters over to Chill Out Café to just chill out.

88

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


120 Union Street, Santa

Cruz, CA HAPPY HOUR

TEL: (831) 459-9876

live music daily

WWW.REEFBARSANTACRUZ.COM

Tropical outdoor patio

Family dining

Traditional Hawaiian food

(Pet friendly)

ALL DAY mONDAY 3pm to 6pm daily

power HOUR (thu - fri - sat) 10pm - 11pm

Island specialty drinks

Wine down Wednesdays

(wine tasting)

 V O LOpen micG / S E PT 20 14 | 89 1 .2 - AU  Aloha Fridays

(traditional Hawaiian music)


Old Wood, New Tricks Reclaimed wood is the star in Alibi Interiors’ unique handmade décor By Jessica M. Pasko

Alibi Interiors is all about giving second chances. The company, run by Santa Cruz County natives Chris Curtis and Paige Lea, uses reclaimed wood to create entirely new items of home décor, from frames of all sizes to tables and large installations. Curtis, then a paramedic, started out making frames from wood he found at a house he was renting. Soon, people started asking him about making other things—mostly benches, planter boxes and tables, says Lea. Now, much of the wood Alibi Interiors uses comes from a neighbor who runs a fencing company who provides Alibi with replaced fencing that would likely wind up in a landfill otherwise. Since their start, in 2012, Alibi Interiors has expanded into a full-on business. Lea has a background in interior design, and has worked in that capacity for the Downtown Santa Cruz boutique Stripe. That’s helped them make connections that have led to other projects, she says. “At any given point, we’re working on about 10 to 15 projects,” says Curtis, adding that the definition of a project varies wildly. One commissioned project could be as many as 1,800 flower boxes, for instance.

Much of the company’s business has been in San Francisco, but a notable local endeavor was their creation of furniture for Bonny Doon Vineyard’s new Davenport tasting room. Here are a few other Alibi projects worth noting:

An exciting development for the couple has been their work with Peet’s Coffee and Tea. The company recently gave its The couple has paired up with a company

90

|

flagship Bay Area store a makeover that

called Printstagram (printstagr.am), an

Lea and Curtis sell a number of planter

included frames by Alibi. Customers loved

online app that prints Instagram pictures.

boxes on a wholesale scale to a business

the redesign so much that the coffee chain

Instead of getting your photos in a boring

called Bloom That in San Francisco. It’s

has been renovating stores all over, Curtis

old matte or a run-of-the-mill frame, us-

an on-demand floral delivery service (by

says. Alibi’s frames now hang in stores in

ers can order their prints in one-of-a-kind,

bicycle) and many of their arrangements

Washington, D.C. San Francisco and Vir-

handmade Alibi frames.

now come in Alibi’s planters.

ginia, among others, with more to come.

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

91


SCW MAGAZINE LAUNCH PARTY Hotel Paradox & S端da, June 20, 2014

92

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E

To celebrate the launch of our first magazine we threw not one, but two parties. Photos: Yvonne Rew-Falk


- AU G / S E PT 20 14 V IEW OUR EVEN T GALLE R I E S @ S AN TACR U Z WAVV OEL S1 .2.CO M

|

93


S H AMA N ISM

Ex p lo re . L ea rn. Di sco v e r.

Brant Secunda 94

|

SANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

95


96

|

S ANTA C RUZ WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


“We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea, whether it is to sail or to watch, we are going back from whence we came.” ‒ John F. Kennedy Photo: Giancarlo Thomae

V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S EPT 20 14

|

97


98

|

334 d Ingalls Street Santa Cruz, CA - 831.471.8115 - westendtap.com

S ANTA CRU Z WAVE S MAGAZ I N E


V O L 1 .2 - AU G / S E PT 20 14

|

99


ASSEMBLEforFOOD.COM • 1108 Pacific Avenue, Santa Cruz, CA • (831) 824-6100

1 00

|

S ANTA CRU Z WAV E S MAGAZ I N E

Santa Cruz Waves Magazine Vol 1.2  
Santa Cruz Waves Magazine Vol 1.2  

Aug / Sept 2014

Advertisement