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Concerts for Young People 2018

Where in the world is Pablo Sรกinz Villegas?

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Concerts for Young People 2018 Where in the world is Pablo Sรกinz Villegas? Thursday January 18, 2018 | 9:45am & 11:15am Friday January 19, 2018 | 9:45am & 11:15am Maestro Nir Kabaretti Music & Artistic Director Dr. Amy Williams Director of Artistic Administration & Education (805) 898.8785 | awilliams@thesymphony.org Katie Blakey Education Assistant (805) 898.9526 | kblakey@thesymphony.org 1330 State Street, Suite 102 โ€ข Santa Barbara, CA 93101

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Important Note to Teachers • On concert day, please arrive at The Granada either by 9:30 AM or 11:00 AM, depending on which performance you will be attending. You are responsible for your own transportation to and from the performance. • Discuss the basics of concert etiquette with your class. Tell your students that the conductor will signal the end of a piece by putting his arms down at his side and turning to face the audience. Quiet listening and applause at the appropriate times are the best ways to show appreciation. • Explain that the Granada is built to naturally amplify sound and that quiet listening will be very important. • Teachers and chaperones should sit among the students rather than next to other adults. We recommend one chaperone for every ten students. • Trips to the bathroom during the concert are STRONGLY DISCOURAGED. Encourage your students to visit the restrooms before or after the concert, as it will be extremely difficult and disruptive for them and a chaperone to get up during the performance. • No food, drink, or gum is permitted in the Granada Theatre. Please leave all lunches on busses. • When the concert ends, students should remain seated. There will be someone on stage who will announce when each school will leave. •Prepare your students for Concerts for Young People by familiarizing them with concert etiquette, vocabulary words, and the instruments found within an orchestra. In addition, you and your students can complete any or all of the lesson plans that are included in this guide.

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Preparing for the Concert Curriculum goal: Teachers utilize these lessons to help students gain an understanding of music and how its structure ties to stories and the language arts. The optional 6-week curriculum utilizes 6 lesson plans that can be divided by individual teachers for proper use of classroom time. Each lesson plan addresses standards for students in grades 4, 5, and 6, and should be adapted by teachers as necessary. The goal of the curriculum is to assist the student in preparing for the Santa Barbara Symphony Concerts for Young People program on January 18 & 19, 2018. Students are encouraged to send the Symphony’s education staff questions and what they have learned. Findings and questions can be sent to Katie Blakey at the Symphony at either the address or email below: Katie Blakey Santa Barbara Symphony 1330 State St., Suite 102 Santa Barbara, CA 93110 kblakey@thesymphony.org Timeline: Teachers may structure the timing of the lesson plans to suit each individual class and are encouraged to split up the lesson plans if there is a concern over shortage of classroom time.

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Concerts for Young People The following lesson plans will assist teachers in preparing students for the concert. All lesson plans can be adapted to accommodate the class level and focus around the following key elements of core curriculum learning: 1. Research/evidence based 2. Clear, understandable, consistent 3. Application of knowledge through critical thinking

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Lesson Plan Guide Grade 4

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Instruments of the Orchestra Grade 4 Music Standards 1.4 Describe music according to its elements, using the terminology of music General Goal(s): Students will be able to recognize the different instruments of a standard orchestra and their placement onstage. Specific Objectives:  Students will be able to recognize by name and sound the instruments of the orchestra. Required Materials:  Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra [with narration] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0ltoiU8KEU  Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra [without narration] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vbvhU22uAM  The Symphony Orchestra Handout pg 27  Instruments of the Orchestra Handouts pgs 28-31 Anticipatory Set: Discuss with students what a symphony orchestra is, where they usually perform, and what kind of music they usually play. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Students will listen to the Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra with narration. 2. As they listen, they will reference their handouts to familiarize themselves with the instruments and sections of the orchestra; the narration will guide them. 3. Once the piece is finished, you may discuss with the students which sections/instruments they enjoyed most and why. 4. Students will listen to the Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra without narration. 5. As they listen, have students hold up the picture of the solo instrument that is playing. Plan for Independent Practice: Students can look up pieces on YouTube written for specific instruments they like or large orchestra pieces and reference the handouts to further familiarize themselves with the sections and instruments of the orchestra. Closure: Students will listen to both versions of Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra and familiarize themselves with the sections and instruments of a standard symphony orchestra. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will accurately choose which instruments are playing during the piece without narration. Adaptations: Students can work together in small groups to recognize the instruments and sections of the orchestra. Extensions: Students can write written responses about their favorite section/instrument of the orchestra individually or in small groups. Students can also peer edit each other’s writing.

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Elements of Melody Grade 4 Music Standards 1.4 Describe music according to its elements, using the terminology of music. General Goal(s): Students will understand the components of melody. Specific Objectives: Students will be able to describe melodies using nonmusical and musical terms. Required Materials:  Paper  Pencil  Handout pg 32 Anticipatory Set: Explain to students that a melody is a tune, voice, or line of musical tones in linear succession that the listener perceives as a single entity. The melody is normally the most singable or playable part of a song or piece. Discuss examples of melodies with students, and explain that in musical terms, melodic components are normally described using Italian words. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Hand out pg 32 to each student 2. Students will listen to the first piece listed on pg 33 3. As they listen, students will write down the elements of melody they hear using the descriptors on their handout 4. Students will then translate the descriptor words they used to describe the melody into the musical terminology after the piece is finished 5. Compare student answers in a short class discussion 6. Repeat steps 1-5 for the remaining listed on pg 33 as time allows Plan for Independent Practice: Students can use the handout to describe melodic elements of their favorite songs using musical terminology at home. Closure: Students will have written out descriptions of the different melodies provided using musical terms. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will have accurately translated the descriptors they used to describe the melodies into musical vocabulary. Adaptations: Students can work in small groups to describe the melodies they hear using musical terms. Extensions: Students can create an artistic depiction using crayons, markers, colored pencils, etc based on the linear description of their favorite melody.

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Respond to Music by Writing Grade 4 Writing Standards Addressed: 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. 5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. General Goal(s): Students will understand and know how to respond to music in a verbal format and express their response in short paragraph written form. Specific Objectives:  Students will listen to Beethoven Symphony No. 9, Movement 4  Students will write a 2 paragraph response about the music and how it makes them feel Required Materials:  Beethoven Symphony No. 9, Movement 4 | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEmTDIVq7qE  Pencil  Paper Anticipatory Set: Students will discuss as a class how music can depict an emotion. How do different songs on the radio make them feel? What type of songs to they like to listen to when they are happy or sad? Discuss how different students can listen to the same song and experience different emotions. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Students will listen to Beethoven Symphony No. 9, Movement 4. 2. Students will discuss as a class the mood of the piece and their emotional reactions to it. 3. Students will write a descriptive paragraph of how the music made them feel. 4. Students will write a second paragraph about why the music made them feel that way, referencing specific sections of the piece using non-musical terms. Plan for Independent Practice: Students can look up classical music pieces on YouTube and listen to a variety of examples, then write written responses accordingly. Closure: Students will be cognitively aware of the emotional response that music creates and what elements might prompt a specific feeling. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will produce 2 short paragraphs using proper grammar and writing technique that depict how the music makes them feel and why. Adaptations: Students can work in small groups rather than individually to write a paragraph or list of emotions to the piece of music. Extensions: Students can explore and discuss other pieces of music. 9


Music and Storytelling Grade 4 Writing Standards 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. 5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. General Goal(s): Students will understand the narrative aspect of music and write a story based on what they hear. Specific Objectives: Students will write a story using narrative and characters based on the music they hear. Required Materials:  Mussorgsky’s Night on Bald Mountain | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyR-poMsSWI  Paper  Pencil Anticipatory Set: Discuss themes and characters within a story and explain that music can do the same through sound. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Students will listen to Night on Bald Mountain 2. While they listen, students will write a story based on what they hear – characters, themes, mood changes etc 3. Students can present their stories to the class and compare and contrast how students can creatively express different stories hearing the same piece of music Plan for Independent Practice: Students can listen to symphonic music at home and write stories based on symphonies as opposed to programmatic music. Closure: Students will be able to correlate the narrative aspect of music with the narrative aspect of creative writing. Assessment Based on Objectives: Students will have written a story based on what they hear. Adaptations: Students can listen to movie soundtracks such as Star Wars to better correlate how music portrays themes and characters. Extensions: Students can peer edit each other’s stories individually or in groups.

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Folk Music of the World Grade 4 Music Standards 3.0 Historical and Cultural Context 3.2 Identify music from diverse cultures and time periods. 3.3 Sing and play music from diverse culture and time periods. 3.5 Recognize the influence of various cultures on music in California. General Goal(s): Expose students to folk music from around the world. Specific Objectives: Students will be able to recognize which countries the folk songs came from. Required Materials:  YouTube recordings – see pg 34  Paper  Pencil Anticipatory Set: Discuss with students what folk songs are and if they can name any themselves. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Write the names of the countries on pg 34 in a random order on the board 2. Play each YouTube link in an order only you know 3. Have students write down which country they think the song is from 4. Announce the countries in your order 5. Discuss similarities and differences between folk songs and how countries influence each other and the music they produce, especially what songs sound like Californian songs they already know Plan for Independent Practice: Students can research different folk songs from the countries listed in this curriculum, or they can research folk songs from countries not listed. Closure: Students will listen to the folk songs listed and familiarize themselves with the sounds of that country. Assessment Based On Objectives: If time allows, repeat steps 1-4 to allow students to improve their accuracy in hearing which country the song comes from. Adaptations: Students can pick countries they are interested in hearing folk songs from not listed here, and all can listen as a class to YouTube recordings of folk songs from those countries. Extensions: Students can discuss as a class the similar sounds they hear (sounds, instruments, words, themes, etc) across the collections of folk songs just played. Students can also individually or in groups write a paragraph about what they hear and how cultures can sound similar.

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Music and Culture Grade 4 Music Standards 3.0 Historical and Cultural Context 3.2 Identify music from diverse cultures and time periods. 3.3 Sing and play music from diverse culture and time periods. 3.5 Recognize the influence of various cultures on music in California. General Goal(s): Students will identify cultural aspects within their own state and country. Specific Objectives: Students will understand the integral role music plays in culture. Required Materials:  Handout pg 35  Pencil Anticipatory Set: Discuss the role that culture plays within a country, and how their can be different cultures within the same society or country, like the different regions of the United States (i.e. the South, Midwest, East Coast, West, etc). Refer back to the previous lesson Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Give each student a copy of the handout from pg 35 2. Have students complete handout, giving cultural answers for the state of California 3. Option to show and tell or simply discuss student answers 4. Repeat steps 1-3 with answers for the United States as a whole instead of California Plan for Independent Practice: Students can look online or go to a local museum to learn about the cultural history of Santa Barbara and California. Closure: Students will understand different aspects of culture and how music plays a major role in cultural identification. Students will also understand that each country or even regions within countries have their own cultures as well. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will show answers to demonstrate their understanding of culture and how music fits as an aspect of culture. Adaptations: Students can give their answers for different states or regions of the United States to show how different regions have their own cultures. Extensions: Students can use the folk music from pg 34 to expand upon their handout and determine cultural answers for the countries listed there for a more global perspective.

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Lesson Plan Guide Grade 5

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Instruments of the Orchestra Grade 5 Music Standards 1.4 Analyze the use of music elements in aural examples from various genres and cultures. General Goal(s): Students will be able to recognize the different instruments of a standard orchestra and their placement onstage. Specific Objectives:  Students will be able to recognize by name and sound the instruments of the orchestra. Required Materials:  Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra [with narration] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0ltoiU8KEU  Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra [without narration] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vbvhU22uAM  The Symphony Orchestra Handout [can also be projected]  Instruments of the Orchestra Handouts [can also be projected] Anticipatory Set: Discuss with students what a symphony orchestra is, where they usually perform, and what kind of music they usually play. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Students will listen to the Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra with narration. 2. As they listen, they will reference their handouts to familiarize themselves with the instruments and sections of the orchestra; the narration will guide them. 3. Once the piece is finished, you may discuss with the students which sections/instruments they enjoyed most and why. 4. Students will listen to the Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra without narration. 5. As they listen, have students hold up the picture of the solo instrument that is playing. Plan for Independent Practice: Students can look up pieces on YouTube written for specific instruments they like or large orchestra pieces and reference the handouts to further familiarize themselves with the sections and instruments of the orchestra. Closure: Students will listen to both versions of Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra and familiarize themselves with the sections and instruments of a standard symphony orchestra. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will accurately choose which instruments are playing during the piece without narration. Adaptations: Students can work together in small groups to recognize the instruments and sections of the orchestra. Extensions: Students can write written responses about their favorite section/instrument of the orchestra individually or in small groups. Students can also peer edit each other’s writing.

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Elements of Melody Grade 5 Music Standards 1.4 Analyze the use of music elements in aural examples from various genres and cultures. General Goal(s): Students will understand the components of melody. Specific Objectives: Students will be able to describe melodies using nonmusical and musical terms. Required Materials:  Paper  Pencil  Handout pg 32 Anticipatory Set: Explain to students that a melody is a tune, voice, or line of musical tones in linear succession that the listener perceives as a single entity. The melody is normally the most singable or playable part of a song or piece. Discuss examples of melodies with students, and explain that in musical terms, melodic components are normally described using Italian words. Step-By-Step Procedures: 7. Hand out pg 32 to each student 8. Students will listen to the first piece listed on pg 33 9. As they listen, students will write down the elements of melody they hear using the descriptors on their handout 10. Students will then translate the descriptor words they used to describe the melody into the musical terminology after the piece is finished 11. Compare student answers in a short class discussion 12. Repeat steps 1-5 for the remaining listed on pg 33 as time allows Plan for Independent Practice: Students can use the handout to describe melodic elements of their favorite songs using musical terminology at home. Closure: Students will have written out descriptions of the different melodies provided using musical terms. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will have accurately translated the descriptors they used to describe the melodies into musical vocabulary. Adaptations: Students can work in small groups to describe the melodies they hear using musical terms. Extensions: Students can create an artistic depiction using crayons, markers, colored pencils, etc based on the linear description of their favorite melody.

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Respond to Music by Writing Grade 5 Writing Standards 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. c. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events. d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. 5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. Specific Objectives:  Students will listen to Beethoven Symphony No. 9, Movement 4  Students will write a 2 paragraph response about the music and how it makes them feel Required Materials:  Beethoven Symphony No. 9, Movement 4 | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEmTDIVq7qE  Pencil  Paper Anticipatory Set: Students will discuss as a class how music can depict an emotion. How do different songs on the radio make them feel? What type of songs to they like to listen to when they are happy or sad? Discuss how different students can listen to the same song and experience different emotions. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Students will listen to Beethoven Symphony No. 9, Movement 4. 2. Students will discuss as a class the mood of the piece and their emotional reactions to it. 3. Students will write a descriptive paragraph of how the music made them feel. 4. Students will write a second paragraph about why the music made them feel that way, referencing specific sections of the piece using non-musical terms. Plan for Independent Practice: Students can look up classical music pieces on YouTube and listen to a variety of examples, then write written responses accordingly. Closure: Students will be cognitively aware of the emotional response that music creates and what elements might prompt a specific feeling. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will produce 2 short paragraphs using proper grammar and writing technique that depict how the music makes them feel and why. Adaptations: Students can work in small groups rather than individually to write a paragraph or list of emotions to the piece of music. Extensions: Students can explore and discuss other pieces of music.

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Music and Storytelling Grade 5 Writing Standards 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. c. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events. d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. 5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. General Goal(s): Students will understand the narrative aspect of music and write a story based on what they hear. Specific Objectives: Students will write a story using narrative and characters based on the music they hear. Required Materials:  Mussorgsky’s Night on Bald Mountain | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyR-poMsSWI  Paper  Pencil Anticipatory Set: Discuss themes and characters within a story and explain that music can do the same through sound. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Students will listen to Night on Bald Mountain 2. While they listen, students will write a story based on what they hear – characters, themes, mood changes etc 3. Students can present their stories to the class and compare and contrast how students can creatively express different stories hearing the same piece of music Plan for Independent Practice: Students can listen to symphonic music at home and write stories based on symphonies as opposed to programmatic music. Closure: Students will be able to correlate the narrative aspect of music with the narrative aspect of creative writing. Assessment Based on Objectives: Students will have written a story based on what they hear. Adaptations: Students can listen to movie soundtracks such as Star Wars to better correlate how music portrays themes and characters. Extensions: Students can peer edit each other’s stories individually or in groups.

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Folk Music of the World Grade 5 Music Standards 3.0 Historical and Cultural Context 3.2 Identify different or similar uses of musical elements in music from diverse cultures. 3.3 Sing and play music from diverse cultures and time periods. 3.4 Compare musical styles from two or more cultures. 3.5 Describe the influences of various cultures on the music of the United States General Goal(s): Expose students to folk music from around the world. Specific Objectives: Students will be able to recognize which countries the folk songs came from. Required Materials:  YouTube recordings – see pg 34  Paper  Pencil Anticipatory Set: Discuss with students what folk songs are and if they can name any themselves. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Write the names of the countries on pg 34 in a random order on the board 2. Play each YouTube link in an order only you know 3. Have students write down which country they think the song is from 4. Announce the countries in your order 5. Discuss similarities and differences between folk songs and how countries influence each other and the music they produce, especially what songs sound like Californian songs they already know Plan for Independent Practice: Students can research different folk songs from the countries listed in this curriculum, or they can research folk songs from countries not listed. Closure: Students will listen to the folk songs listed and familiarize themselves with the sounds of that country. Assessment Based On Objectives: If time allows, repeat steps 1-4 to allow students to improve their accuracy in hearing which country the song comes from. Adaptations: Students can pick countries they are interested in hearing folk songs from not listed here, and all can listen as a class to YouTube recordings of folk songs from those countries. Extensions: Students can discuss as a class the similar sounds they hear (sounds, instruments, words, themes, etc) across the collection of folk songs just played. Students can also individually or in groups write a paragraph about what they hear and how cultures can sound similar.

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Music and Culture Grade 5 Music Standards 3.0 Historical and Cultural Context 3.2 Identify different or similar uses of musical elements in music from diverse cultures. 3.3 Sing and play music from diverse cultures and time periods. 3.5 Describe the influences of various cultures on the music of the United States General Goal(s): Students will identify cultural aspects within their own state and country. Specific Objectives: Students will understand the integral role music plays in culture. Required Materials:  Handout pg 35  Pencil Anticipatory Set: Discuss the role that culture plays within a country, and how their can be different cultures within the same society or country, like the different regions of the United States (i.e. the South, Midwest, East Coast, West, etc). Refer back to the previous lesson Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Give each student a copy of the handout from pg 34 2. Have students complete handout, giving cultural answers for the state of California 3. Option to show and tell or simply discuss student answers 4. Repeat steps 1-3 with answers for the United States as a whole instead of California 5. Discuss the influences of other countries on United States culture Plan for Independent Practice: Students can look online or go to a local museum to learn about the cultural history of Santa Barbara and California. Closure: Students will understand different aspects of culture and how music plays a major role in cultural identification. Students will also understand that each country or even regions within countries have their own cultures as well. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will show answers to demonstrate their understanding of culture and how music fits as an aspect of culture. Adaptations: Students can give their answers for different states or regions of the United States to show how different regions have their own cultures. Extensions: Students can use the folk music from pg 34 to expand upon their handout and determine cultural answers for the countries listed there for a more global perspective.

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Lesson Plan Guide Grade 6

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Instruments of the Orchestra Grade 6 Music Standards 1.5 Analyze and compare the use of musical elements representing various genres and cultures, emphasizing meter and rhythm General Goal(s): Students will be able to recognize the different instruments of a standard orchestra and their placement onstage. Specific Objectives:  Students will be able to recognize by name and sound the instruments of the orchestra. Required Materials:  Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra [with narration] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0ltoiU8KEU  Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra [without narration] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4vbvhU22uAM  The Symphony Orchestra Handout pg 27  Instruments of the Orchestra Handouts pgs 28-31 Anticipatory Set: Discuss with students what a symphony orchestra is, where they usually perform, and what kind of music they usually play. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Students will listen to the Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra with narration. 2. As they listen, they will reference their handouts/projection to familiarize themselves with the instruments and sections of the orchestra; the narration will guide them. 3. Once the piece is finished, you may discuss with the students which sections/instruments they enjoyed most and why. 4. Students will listen to the Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra without narration. 5. As they listen, have them hold up the picture of the solo instrument that is playing. Plan for Independent Practice: Students can look up pieces on YouTube written for specific instruments they like or large orchestra pieces and reference the handouts to further familiarize themselves with the sections and instruments of the orchestra. Closure: Students will listen to both versions of Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra and familiarize themselves with the sections and instruments of a standard symphony orchestra. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will accurately choose which instruments are playing during the piece without narration. Adaptations: Students can work together in small groups to recognize the instruments and sections of the orchestra. Extensions: Students can write written responses about their favorite section/instrument of the orchestra individually or in small groups. Students can also peer edit each other’s writing.

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Elements of Melody Grade 6 Music Standards 1.5 Analyze and compare the use of musical elements representing various genres and cultures, emphasizing meter and rhythm. General Goal(s): Students will understand the components of melody. Specific Objectives: Students will be able to describe melodies using nonmusical and musical terms. Required Materials:  Paper  Pencil  Handout pg 32 Anticipatory Set: Explain to students that a melody is a tune, voice, or line of musical tones in linear succession that the listener perceives as a single entity. The melody is normally the most singable or playable part of a song or piece. Discuss examples of melodies with students, and explain that in musical terms, melodic components are normally described using Italian words. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Hand out pg 32 to each student 2. Students will listen to the first piece listed on pg 33 3. As they listen, students will write down the elements of melody they hear using the descriptors on their handout 4. Students will then translate the descriptor words they used to describe the melody into the musical terminology after the piece is finished 5. Compare student answers in a short class discussion 6. Repeat steps 1-5 for the remaining listed on pg 33 as time allows Plan for Independent Practice: Students can use the handout to describe melodic elements of their favorite songs using musical terminology at home. Closure: Students will have written out descriptions of the different melodies provided using musical terms. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will have accurately translated the descriptors they used to describe the melodies into musical vocabulary. Adaptations: Students can work in small groups to describe the melodies they hear using musical terms. Extensions: Students can create an artistic depiction using crayons, markers, colored pencils, etc based on the linear description of their favorite melody. Students can also write a paragraph about the melodic descriptions and students can peer edit each other’s works.

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Respond to Music by Writing Grade 6 Writing Standards 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. 5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. Specific Objectives:  Students will listen to Beethoven Symphony No. 9, Movement 4  Students will write a 2 paragraph response about the music and how it makes them feel Required Materials:  Beethoven Symphony No. 9, Movement 4 | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEmTDIVq7qE  Pencil  Paper Anticipatory Set: Students will discuss as a class how music can depict an emotion. How do different songs on the radio make them feel? What type of songs to they like to listen to when they are happy or sad? Discuss how different students can listen to the same song and experience different emotions. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Students will listen to Beethoven Symphony No. 9, Movement 4. 2. Students will discuss as a class the mood of the piece and their emotional reactions to it. 3. Students will write a descriptive paragraph of how the music made them feel. 4. Students will write a second paragraph about why the music made them feel that way, referencing specific sections of the piece using non-musical terms. Plan for Independent Practice: Students can look up classical music pieces on YouTube and listen to a variety of examples, then write written responses accordingly. Closure: Students will be cognitively aware of the emotional response that music creates and what elements might prompt a specific feeling. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will produce 2 short paragraphs using proper grammar and writing technique that depict how the music makes them feel and why. Adaptations: Students can work in small groups rather than individually to write a paragraph or list of emotions to the piece of music. Extensions: Students can explore and discuss other pieces of music. 23


Music and Storytelling Grade 6 Writing Standards 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. 5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. General Goal(s): Students will understand the narrative aspect of music and write a story based on what they hear. Specific Objectives: Students will write a story using narrative and characters based on the music they hear. Required Materials:  Mussorgsky’s Night on Bald Mountain | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyR-poMsSWI  Paper  Pencil Anticipatory Set: Discuss themes and characters within a story and explain that music can do the same through sound. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Students will listen to Night on Bald Mountain 2. While they listen, students will write a story based on what they hear – characters, themes, mood changes etc 3. Students can present their stories to the class and compare and contrast how students can creatively express different stories hearing the same piece of music Plan for Independent Practice: Students can listen to symphonic music at home and write stories based on symphonies as opposed to programmatic music. Closure: Students will be able to correlate the narrative aspect of music with the narrative aspect of creative writing. Assessment Based on Objectives: Students will have written a story based on what they hear. Adaptations: Students can listen to movie soundtracks such as Star Wars to better correlate how music portrays themes and characters. Extensions: Students can peer edit each other’s stories individually or in groups.

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Folk Music of the World Grade 6 Music Standards 3.0 Historical and Cultural Context 3.2 Listen to and describe the role of music in ancient civilizations. 3.3 Describe distinguishing characteristics of representative musical genres and styles from two or more cultures. 3.4 Listen to, describe, and perform music of various styles from a variety of cultures. 3.5 Classify by style and genre a number of exemplary musical works and explain the characteristics that make each work exemplary. General Goal(s): Expose students to folk music from around the world. Specific Objectives: Students will be able to recognize which countries the folk songs came from. Required Materials:  YouTube recordings – see pg 34  Paper  Pencil Anticipatory Set: Discuss with students what folk songs are, how they derived historically from oral tradition, and if they can name any themselves. Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Write the names of the countries on pg 34 in a random order on the board 2. Play each YouTube link in an order only you know 3. Have students write down which country they think the song is from 4. Announce the countries in your order 5. Discuss similarities and differences between folk songs and how countries influence each other and the music they produce, especially what songs sound like Californian songs they already know Plan for Independent Practice: Students can research different folk songs from the countries listed in this curriculum, or they can research folk songs from countries not listed. Closure: Students will listen to the folk songs listed and familiarize themselves with the sounds of that country. Assessment Based On Objectives: If time allows, repeat steps 1-4 to allow students to improve their accuracy in hearing which country the song comes from. Adaptations: Students can pick countries they are interested in hearing folk songs from not listed here, and all can listen as a class to YouTube recordings of folk songs from those countries. Extensions: Students can discuss as a class the similar sounds they hear (sounds, instruments, words, themes, etc) across the folk songs just played. Students can also individually or in groups write a paragraph about what they hear and how cultures can sound similar. 25


Music and Culture Grade 6 Music Standards 3.0 Historical and Cultural Context 3.2 Listen to and describe the role of music in ancient civilizations. 3.3 Describe distinguishing characteristics of representative musical genres and styles from two or more cultures. 3.4 Listen to, describe, and perform music of various styles from a variety of cultures. 3.5 Classify by style and genre a number of exemplary musical works and explain the characteristics that make each work exemplary. General Goal(s): Students will identify cultural aspects within their own country and other countries. Specific Objectives: Students will understand the integral role music plays in culture. Required Materials:  Handout pg 34  Pencil Anticipatory Set: Discuss the role that culture plays within a country, and how their can be different cultures within the same society or country, like the different regions of the United States (i.e. the South, Midwest, East Coast, West, etc). Refer back to the previous lesson Step-By-Step Procedures: 1. Give each student a copy of the handout from pg 35 2. Have students complete handout, giving cultural answers for the United States 3. Discuss student answers 4. Repeat steps 1-3 with answers for the countries listed on pg 34 instead of the United States 5. Discuss how the musical examples from the countries listed on pg 34 influenced student answers for those cultures Plan for Independent Practice: Students can look online or go to a local museum to learn about the cultural history of Santa Barbara and California. Closure: Students will understand different aspects of culture and how music plays a major role in cultural identification. Students will also understand that each country or even regions within countries have their own cultures as well. Assessment Based On Objectives: Students will show answers to demonstrate their understanding of culture and how music fits as an aspect of culture. Adaptations: Students can give their answers for other countries not listed on pg 34. Extensions: Students can work in groups and create presentations for a country assigned to their group to describe that specific country’s culture.

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Sections of the Orchestra

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Woodwinds

Piccolo

Flute

Oboe Clarinet

Bassoon

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Strings

Viola Cello Double Bass

Harp

29

Violin


Brass

Trumpet

French Horn

Trombone

Tuba

30


Percussion

Bongos

Snare Drum

Bass Drum

Timpani

Castanets

Gong

Tambourine

Triangle

Xylophone

Cymbal

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Elements of Melody

Descriptors

Musical Terms

loud soft, going up going down fast moderate slow slow to fast fast to slow getting louder getting softer sustained short smooth ragged lightly heavily one player/singer two players/singers

forte piano ascending scale descending scale presto andante largo accelerando ritardando crescendo decrescendo sostenuto staccato conjunct disjunct leggiero pesante solo duet

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Elements of Melody George Gershwin | Rhapsody in Blue [Opening only] (3:20) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fns2WuzhAbA

Igor Stravinsky | Rite of Spring [Opening only] (7:47) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rhXX4KzztdA Felix Mendelssohn | Scherzo from A Midsummer Night’s Dream (4:51) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHTV3GFyHfM Antionio Vivaldi | Violin Concerto in a minor movement 1 (6:50) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPba-i26YNA Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart | Requiem, Tuba Mirum (4:00) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-i5S4uXlNg Léo Delibes | Lakmé, Duo des fleurs (5:05) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Qx2lMaMsl8

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Folk Music of the World

1. Scotland a. Mairi’s Wedding | Peter McLeod b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=---aL9TdeI4 2. England a. Greensleeves | Traditional b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ak85S5KZoKE 3. China a. Purple Bamboo Melody | Traditional b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6e1okKM4Sio 4. Italy a. Fandango | Luigi Boccherini b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QrdeD8LLoCM 5. Russia a. Russian Sailor’s Dance | Reinhold Glíere b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YohoOzkRiY 6. Germany a. Neue Pizzicato Polka | Johann Strauss b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMzLX6KHPz0 7. Argentina a. Libertango | Alastor Piazzolla b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPu1om4WZsQ 8. America a. America from West Side Story | Leonard Bernstein b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhSKk-cvblc 9. Mexico a. De Colores | Traditional b. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDuN_geBA4A

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Music and Culture Culture: the set of beliefs, traditions, foods, attire, and other distinctive traits of a specific group of people.

Fill in each box with your favorite Californian answer for each category. You may draw, write, use a bullet point, or add an image in each box below to show your personal choice for the displayed cultural labels.

Celebrity

Work of Art

Music

Building

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Santa Barbara Symphony Personnel Santa Barbara Symphony Staff Kevin Marvin, Executive Director Lacy Wynant, Executive Assistant Dr. Amy Williams, Director of Artistic Administration & Education Ryan Sweeny, Personnel Manager Brent Anderson, Orchestra Librarian Amy Marshall, Director of Development Eleanor Linton, Donor Services Associate Gabriel Ortega, Development Assistant Kristine Pacheco, Education Programs Manager Katie Blakey, Education Assistant Margaret Williams, Interim Director of Marketing Stephanie Kao, Marketing Manager Estrella Fierroz, Patron Services Associate

Board of Directors 2017-2018 Executive Committee Don Gilman, Ed.D., President Jon W. Greenleaf, Vice President Christopher D. Harris, Treasurer Stephen Erickson, Counsel Pam Johnston, Secretary Kate Parker, Member-at-Large Arthur G. Swalley, Immediate Past President

2017-2018 Directors Mikki Andina Mashey Bernstein, Ph.D. David Chernof, M.D. Daniel Hochman George Konstantinow, Ph.D. Art Kvaas Brett C. Moore Michelle Richardson Stefan Riesenfeld* Peter Schlueer Howard Jay Smith Robert Weinman

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2018 Concerts for Young People  

Teacher's Guide