Santa Barbara Independent 12/9/21

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Santa Barbara

DEC. 9-16, 2021 VOL. 36 ✦ NO. 830

Mike Eliason’s Hometown Homage Photography from Santa Barbara and Beyond by Nick Welsh

Also inside

Hit ’n’ Miss Gaucho B-Ball Lil Bams’ Hip-Hop Posada Rent Cap Moves Forward Iconic Vineyards Sold


Plant-based deliciousness.

Get $35 off your first box at simplefeast.com with code INDEPENDENT* *Offer valid for new customers only. Limited to one per new customer. Cannot be combined with another promo code. Expires December 31, 2021.

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Wrap up your holiday shopping with something memorable for everyone on your list. Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

with special guest Shawn Colvin Feb 26 / Arlington Theatre

An Evening with

Colson Whitehead

Apr 28 / Granada Th

eatre

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Apr 13 & 14 / Granada Theatre

Joshua Bell, violin Peter Dugan, piano Feb 3 / Granada Theatre

h ing wit n e v o E An uizam

ll g e ell Ha L b p n m h a Jo CSB C Feb 2

/U

oln Jazz at Linc estra Center Orch n Marsalis o with Wynt da Theatre r Feb 4 / G

ana

Roxane Gay

Roxane with One N Feb 25 / Granada Theatre

Ballet Hispánico Noche de Oro: A Celebration of 50 Years Jan 21 / Granada Theatre

Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour Feb 22 & 23 Arlington Theatre

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

Gift certificates available online!

DECEMBER 9, 2021

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3


Thank you for voting

Bicycle Bob’s the Best Bike Shop in Santa Barbara for 30 consecutive years

We are so grateful for the support from this amazing bicycling community! Ride in soon! Our store is full of exciting bicycles and fun and useful gifts for the cyclists on your list!

30 YEARS

Wishing everyone a happy, healthy Holiday Season, from FromThank all of us atyou Bicycle Bob’s, all

of us here at the Ann, Ann,shop: Craig, Daniel, Devin,Craig, Hunter, Davis, Devin, James, Joe C., Joe N., Johnny, Jonathan, Kim, Joe C., Joe N., Johnny, Jonathan, Luis, Marco, Mike, Nick, Rafa, Roger, Julia G,Bob Julia Tommy, Tucker, & JuliaZ, Kim, Luis, Matt, Nick, Noah, Rafa, Riley, Roger, and

in a row!

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Join Team Sansum Clinic Sansum Clinic, the region’s premier healthcare provider, has many different opportunities open for a rewarding career for you. Come and feel what it is like to be part of helping your community members live their healthiest lives!

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WE’RE HIRING FOR MANY OPEN CLINICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE POSITIONS

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DECEMBER 9, 2021

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email:

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volume 36, # 830, Dec 9-16, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci

COVER STORY 24 Mike Eliason’s Hometown Homage

Photography from Santa Barbara and Beyond by Nick Welsh

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 OPINIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Distribution Scott Kaufman

News Commentary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Editorial Interns Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy

OBITUARIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 THE WEEK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 LIVING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 FOOD & DRINK . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

ARTS LIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

ASTROLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 CLASSIFIEDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 ON THE COVER: Photos by Mike Eliason. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

MY LIFE TO YOU Meet Cynthia Carbone Ward, the author of a series of “My Life” personal pieces that have been appearing in our Living section, including another installment this week on page 32.

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

The Indy Indy’s readers have heard some of your most intimate thoughts, but they may not know much about you. How would you describe yourself? I’m constantly amazed, a little befuddled, and I try my best. (Or, as my husband would say, I am very trying.) When my daughter was a teenager, she stole a peek into my diary and concluded that there was nothing in there I wouldn’t have said out loud anyway. It’s still true. I’m an open book, a verbose pilgrim, and I earnestly want to connect with others because, as William Stafford wrote, “The darkness around us is deep”. Where do you live? What do you do? I’m originally from New York but have lived for 30 years at the Hollister Ranch, where my family has citrus trees and a macadamia orchard, and I am delighted by the implausibility of that. I’m retired now but was a middle school teacher, which was great, because I am about 12 years old inside. We always like to know how writers write. What’s your process? I am constantly documenting and writing in my head, especially when I am walking, and I walk a lot. Random memories come to me that often lead to stories, or details of the landscape, or the angle of the light. It starts with something tangible. The morning is my writing time, and I need to be in my own space. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

New beginnings, endless possibilities.

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Springtoday 2022 classes start January 10! Visit sbcc.edu/classes Register for classes! SBCC.EDU/CLASSES INDEPENDENT.COM

DECEMBER 9, 2021

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W I N T E R GIFT-MAKING

WORKSHOP:

SEA AND SNOW December 11, 9 am – 3 pm During this one-day holiday workshop, participants can create unique gifts using resist painting, weaving, and foil relief techniques inspired by snow scenes and seascapes in the Museum’s collection. Ages 5 – 12 $130 SBMA Members $150 Non-Members Location: Ridley-Tree Education Center, 1600 Santa Barbara Street

For more information or to register, call 805.884.6457 or visit www.sbma.net/kidsfamilies. Follow us on

Thank you to our Walk sponsors:

We are so grateful for your support in our Walk to End Alzheimer's - in Santa Maria on Oct. 2, 2021 and Santa Barbara on Nov. 6, 2021.

NATIONAL PRESENTING SPONSORS

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Collectively, these Walks have raised a total of $290,484. The commitment of our sponsors, volunteers and participants furthers the Alzheimer's Association mission to lead the way to end Alzheimer's and all other dementia — by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support.

SILVER SPONSORS

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DECEMBER 9, 2021

BRONZE SPONSORS

BrightStar Care | Casa Dorinda | Central Coast Home Health and Hospice | Covenant Living | First American Title | Hennessy International | SIMA | State Farm, Paul Cashman | Swell - Santa Barbara Athletic Club | Valle Verde | Vista del Monte

INDEPENDENT.COM


NEWS of the WEEK

DEC 2-9, 2021

by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

CITY

Murillo’s Swan Song Ends on High Note

COMMUNITY Two years in the making, a new report from the Fund for Santa Barbara takes an ambitious first look at the people and circumstances in S.B. and Ventura counties that form their economies, political classes, social conditions, and value. Aired at a meeting on 12/7 that avoided being a “weeping party,” as one speaker said, the conversation was about closing the wage gap through education and a lack of discrimination; that would bring value to the economy which was losing billions due to a racial income gap. Full story at independent.com/ equalitystudy.

A

bold gambit by Cathy Murillo in one of her last acts as mayor paid off this Tuesday with the Santa Barbara City Council supporting a controversial proposal she put forth alongside Councilmember Oscar Gutierrez to cap annual residential rent increases at two percent, plus a yearly consumer price index (CPI) adjustment. The pending ordinance, which still must be researched, drafted, and adopted by a later vote, goes above and beyond the current state law that caps rents at five percent plus CPI. It would apply specifically to apartments, and not to duplexes or single-family homes. “It just feels so critical right now,” Murillo said, pointing to reports of dramatic rent increases exacerbated by Santa Barbara’s chronic housing shortage. “People are really feeling the crunch.” “We’re bringing this forward at a time when our city and our state are experiencing a housing shortage, we’re seeing an increase in homelessness, and we have many residents living with very high rental rates,” Murillo continued. “Some of these residents are low-income earners, or they are working class, and they struggle to live here.” New South Coast data shows that from 2012 to 2021, the average price of a twobedroom apartment increased from $2,000 a month to $2,800. One-bedroom units jumped from $1,470 to $2,000. “This is intended to make the city more livable for everyone,” said Gutierrez, explaining “record numbers of families, particularly families of color” are being forced out of their neighborhoods by rising rents. Both he and Murillo also pushed for a comprehensive registry of city rentals to track rates and vacancies and to protect, they said, against illegal conversions to vacation rentals. Gutierrez also presented a recent statement by the Santa Barbara Association of Realtors that celebrated the city’s meteoric housing market. The report lauded the South Coast’s “exciting real estate ride” and thanked the “COVID Bump” for big returns. This was evidence, Gutierrez said, that government intervention is needed. The vote was close, however. While Councilmembers Kristen Sneddon and Meagan

COURTS & CRIME COU RTESY

by Tyler Hayden

CAR L PER RY

Council Moves Forward with 2 Percent Rent Cap

Harmon supported the motion — the two had previously floated their own rent stabilization proposal — Councilmembers Eric Friedman, Michael Jordan, and Alejandra Gutierrez voted against it. The ordinance’s ultimate fate also remains unclear as incoming mayor Randy Rowse, who is more politically conservative than Murillo, has expressed hesitation over rent stabilization laws. In explaining her “aye” vote, Sneddon noted how Santa Barbara’s wages are lower compared to similar communities yet rents are markedly higher. Wages are also remaining stagnant while living costs are going up. “This is impacting every segment of our community,” she said, referencing a long-running exodus of teachers, nurses, and first responders. “It’s reached a crisis point, and it’s not just anecdotal anymore. It’s pervasive. We are losing really good people.” Sneddon insisted rent stabilization models work and referenced a new positive report on ordinance adopted by Beverly Hills. But Sneddon also pushed for more data, workshops, and community buy-in before Santa Barbara’s own law is passed. She was adamant that property owners and landlords be brought into the conversation and acknowledged the challenges they face, including rising insurance costs. “This is a symbiotic relationship,” she said. “We need both sides to hum.” Gutierrez said she felt the rent cap didn’t get to the root of Santa Barbara’s housing problem. Large, greedy property management companies are to blame for the woe out there, she said, and the city ought

to crack down on them and their illegal practices, she said. “We need to hold them accountable,” she demanded, also expressing concern that a cap would unfairly affect small mom-and-pop landlords. “We need to protect them,” she said. “They’re vulnerable too.” Friedman echoed that sentiment, and said he feared small property owners worried about their bottom line might be tempted to sell their units to outside investors or be converted into vacation rentals. Friedman also said he’s seeing more and more evidence of rentals being converted and sold as time-shares. “Every unit off the market lowers the supply and increases rents,” he said. Even more significantly, Friedman explained the cap could have a chilling effect on the production of new housing, particularly downtown and, in the future, at La Cumbre Plaza, which is zoned for a whopping 1,800 units. “How will the two percent ceiling affect developers?” he asked, pushing for more data before the ordinance is moved forward. “We need to know.” Friedman finished by offering a handful of other strategies for addressing the crisis, including applying pressure to Santa Barbara City College to build student housing and creating a partnership between the business community, philanthropic organizations, and the city to pool funds to offer rental assistance, similar to a section 8 program. For his part, Jordan said he sees the housing crisis as an issue of supply, not cost. He referenced a recent report in the CONT’D ON PAGE 9 

The Sheriff-Coroner has identified the woman and man found dead on Thanksgiving at the Best Western in Goleta as Mayra Uriarte (pictured), 36, of West Valley City, Utah; and Hector Manuel Altamirano Martinez, 37, of Mexico. Terming the incident a “homicide/suicide,” the Sheriff’s Office stated the two, who each died of a single gunshot wound, had been in a relationship previously and had a child. Uriarte’s sister, Cristina Ayala-Arriaga, has set up a GoFundMe page to help with funeral and other expenses. Uriarte was a single mother raising three children and had graduated from San Marcos High School in 2003 before moving to Utah. The S.B. Police Department has received so many vehicle burglary reports that officers believe outof-town thieves are watching popular recreational areas around the city for people who leave their purses, wallets, or backpacks in the trunk of their car. “These criminals have burglary tools that allow them to gain access discreetly and quickly to the vehicle’s trunk,” Sgt. Ethan Ragsdale stated. The victim’s credit or debit cards are then taken, and the purse or wallet left behind, a pattern detectives have seen up and down the coast. Report suspicious activity to 9-1-1 or SBPD dispatch at (805) 882-8900.

PUBLIC SAFETY Los Padres National Forest officials announced 12/3 that the Alisal Fire has been declared officially out. No smoke, flames, or hot spots have been observed for more than 30 days. Suppression repair on fire lines has been completed, and Burned Area Emergency Response repair work will continue over the next few months. The Alisal Fire began 10/11 and burned a total of 16,970 acres before being fully contained on 11/20. The cause of the fire remains under investigation. n

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

DECEMBER 9, 2021

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DEC 2-9, 2021

POLITICS

Lieutenant Faces Off with Sheriff Bill Brown Challenger Juan Camarena to Run Against Four-Term Sheriff

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unning for his fifth term, Brown has emphasized his experience and record as a top-level law enforcement executive. “[Camarena] is a lieutenant in the department, and to go all the way from lieutenCONT’D ON PAGE 12 


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COURTS & CRIME

State Bar Seizes Unauthorized Law Practice

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

2022 SEASON

Photo Courtesy of Los Angeles Philharmonic Association

international series at the Granada Theatre SEASON SPONSOR:

JANUARY

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Vasily Petrenko, Music Director Olga Kern, piano

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC Elim Chan, conductor Igor Levit, piano

FRI, 7:30PM

Returning to the Granada stage for the first time since the historic CAMA+LA Phil 100th Anniversary concert back on March 6, 2020, the venerated orchestra will be performing two of the great masterpieces of the classical canon: Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No.3 and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No.4. CAMA and Music Academy of the West co-present the London Symphony Orchestra in concert in celebration of the Music Academy’s 75th anniversary

24

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THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2022, 7:30PM

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Sir Simon Rattle, Music Director

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ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Long time CAMA favorite, London’s Royal Philharmonic Orchestra returns celebrating its 75th anniversary with the ever popular Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No.1 and the exquisite Elgar Enigma Variations.

MARCH

can get protection and power is from the government. That is your job — to protect the vulnerable people of the community.” Blackerby went on to recount her own troubles with a property management company whose name rhymes with “Shmeridian,” she said, and described the reality for renters as “really, really scary and bad. I’m way better off than most renters in this town, and it’s still terrifying, and it keeps me from moving on with my life and family.” Don’t waste any more time, she told the council. “You know the facts. It’s simple math. Please, please have compassion for people who have no power.” The council ultimately directed staff to conduct a comprehensive needs assessment and begin drafting the ordinance. The final vote will come sometime next year, after Rowse assumes the mayor’s seat.

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—Tyler Hayden

Give the gift of music this Holiday Season!

2022

does he reply to my emails. He stated that he would email me the documents I needed to serve the other party, which he never sent. Now here I am 4 months later and still I have no knowledge of how I’m supposed to get my daughter back.” On November 16, Santa Barbara’s Judge Thomas Anderle allowed the State Bar to take control of National Family Solutions’ operations. The state agency froze business-related bank accounts, redirected telephone calls and mail to the State Bar, and seized more than 4,000 client files dating back to 2008. National Family Solutions had ignored earlier warnings in 2018 by the State Bar that its practices were illegal, the agency also said. The company, run as an LLC, also apparently continued operating despite a pending investigation by the Santa Barbara County District Attorney’s Office, which said last Thursday it is still working with the State Bar on the inquiry but has thus far not filed any criminal charges. Attempts to reach owners Campbell and Youabian were not successful. In 2020, the State Bar opened more than 600 cases in which a non-attorney was alleged to have engaged in the unauthorized practice of law. The agency has since referred more than 300 of those cases to local law enforcement officials.

RENT CAP CONT’D FROM P. 7 Independent that stated, in the past 10 years, the City of Santa Barbara saw the construction of 388 new housing units within city limits. In that same time, however, 454 units of housing were taken off the housing market — either for sale or for rent — thus generating a net reduction in actual housing units of 66. Jordan called the cap “premature” before more study could be done. Tuesday’s meeting, which ran into the late hours of the night, attracted more than 40 public speakers, many of whom urged the council to act. One of the most compelling statements came from Hillary Blackerby, who is the market manager for Santa Barbara MTD but spoke as a citizen and renter. “It is not an equal relationship between landlords and tenants,” she argued. “They have all the cards, and the tenants have none. The only way tenants

Welcome Back to Live Classical Music with CAMA!

CALI FOR N IA DEPARTMENT OF J USTIC E

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he State Bar of California announced last Wednesday it has seized an “unauthorized law practice” operating as National Family Solutions out of offices in Santa Barbara, Goleta, and Los Angeles. Neither of the firm’s owners, Eric Campbell and Anita Youabian, has a license to practice law in California, the Bar said, and the company’s contracted lawyers and legal document assistants had repeatedly tried to evade the state’s regulatory system governing attorneys, “including requirements for the use of client trust accounts and prohibitions on taking unearned fees.” “National Family Solutions sought to profit by promising vulnerable victims legal services it was not authorized to provide,” said George Cardona, chief trial counsel for the agency. “The State Bar is committed to shutting down businesses that persist in such practices.” National Family Solutions claimed to offer “low-cost” legal services to self-represented clients in the midst of divorces, child custody cases, and other family law matters. The company solicited business through its website and charged clients flat fees of approximately $1,000 or more depending on the case type, plus monthly service charges for access to “case managers” and “legal staff.” Dozens of complaints filed with the Better Business Bureau, however, indicate those services were rarely rendered. “I contacted National Family Solutions for help with a custody battle against my daughter’s grandmother,” reads one of the complaints lodged May 12, 2021, which omits specific names or exact dollar figures. “[T]he guy who chose to help with my case charged me nearly $****, which I paid in full. Now he doesn’t answer the phone nor

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AN DY DAVIS PHOTOS

Handel’s Messiah

BIG MOVES: Dignity Moves’ Elizabeth Funk wields a big pair of scissors at a ceremonial ribbon cutting for the tiny-home village slated for a parking lot on the 1000 block of Santa Barbara Street. To her right is Sylvia Barnard of Good Samaritan, the nonprofit homeless shelter provider charged with running the community of 33 temporary homes. To Funk’s immediate left are supervisors Gregg Hart and Das Williams.

Big Plans, Tiny Homes

DignityMoves Unveils Prototype for Downtown Homeless Cabins by Nick Welsh o counter mounting public despair, fatigue, and frustration over the seeming intractability of homelessness, movers and shakers with DignityMoves—a statewide nonprofit made up of entrepreneurs working in conjunction with the County of Santa Barbara—held their second grand unveiling gala in one month for a new village of 33 tiny homes slated to house people experiencing homelessness on what’s now a parking lot on the 1000 block of Santa Barbara Street. On hand Sunday for this event was a prototype of one of the custom-designed, custom-made tiny homes. By any reckoning, it’s a far cry from the glorified toolsheds many earlier tiny-home models have been. Efforts were made to fit into Santa Barbara’s s demanding architectural standards; an arch-

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way will span the entrance to the site, and the homes themselves will offer terra-cotta roofs. The aim, explained DignityMoves founder Elizabeth Funk, was to find a solution that was quick to build, cost-effective, temporary, well-run, moveable, and replicable elsewhere. Funk is an impact investor from the Bay Area who got her start with Yahoo; she lives in a neighborhood where the sale price of homes is north of $2 million, yet she has a homeless person living in a tent across the

street from her house. As an entrepreneur, Funk said, she hoped to bring a business mind and fresh set of eyes—perhaps even naïveté, she said—to a problem that appears to be getting worse, not better. She primed herself by holding 300 Zoom interviews with people already working the field. “We think scale,” she said. “We don’t want to be chipping away at the edges of the problem.” The capital costs of the project are roughly $800,000. Of that, $450,000 has yet to be raised. That’s for the homes, the restrooms, the kitchen, and the showers. The cost of services will be borne by the County of Santa Barbara for three years using federal emergency dollars. Running the show will be the Good Samaritan shelter organization out of Santa Maria, which currently has 500 shelter beds under its control and runs the largest detox and rehab program in the county. “In three years, we can get 200 people off the streets,” Funk said. She cited a recent survey indicating that 83 percent of people experiencing homelessness in Santa Barbara don’t want to stay in shelters. They all want privacy, Funk said. “What’s fundamental is a door that locks,” she said. But that door, she said, is only a lure to connect residents with the services necessary to get them able to transition from the streets into some form of housing. Most homelessness funding, she said, is spent trying to build long-term supportive housing. In Santa Barbara, that translates to $700,000 per unit and typically takes five years. With 72 percent of the county’s homeless population living outside of shelters, she said, “Our streets have literally become our waiting room.” Construction and installation for the projects is slated to start in December and be ready for occupancy in a couple of months.

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D CORONAVIRUS

Post-Holiday COVID Rebound

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mid the clashes of information over the course of the pandemic, two reliable facts emerged: Hospitalizations accurately measure the spread of disease, and vaccinated people are less likely to be in a hospital. Though the medical community is bracing for the cold North American winter and an explosion of the new Omicron variant, it’s the highly contagious Delta variant that’s raising infection levels around the world, and in Santa Barbara. Two weeks after Thanksgiving festivities brought groups of people into close contact with one another, often indoors, the active number of cases in Santa Barbara rose by 58 percent to 493 from 313. That’s according to County Public Health’s COVID-19 dashboard update for December 7. Hospitalizations were up 16 percent, and the case rate — which needs to drop to 6 for three weeks before masks can come off — bounced up to 14.3 from a low of 9.2. The virus that causes COVID-19 has the ability to reinfect people who had already recovered from the disease, as well as infecting people who have received the vaccine. However, the symptoms in both cases are often mild. State numbers for November compared test results,

hospitalizations, and deaths among vaccinated and unvaccinated people. Unvaccinated people were hit several times more frequently than those who had been vaccinated. In Santa Barbara County — which only collects vaccination information for positive test results — of the roughly 1,200 cases in November, 75 percent were unvaccinated. The county has lost 550 people to COVID-19, 25 of them in November and two already in December. Nearly all were elderly or had an underlying medical condition. South Africa, which was the first to sequence the Omicron variant, is struggling to vaccinate its populace, which is at about 25 percent fully vaccinated. By comparison, the least vaccinated state in the U.S., Wyoming, is at 58 percent; the most vaccinated, California, is at nearly 69 percent, as is Santa Barbara County. Though Omicron is two to three times more contagious than Delta — it’s been found to have adopted some of the common cold virus’s genes — so far, nine Omicron cases have been sequenced in the state. No cases have been found in Santa Barbara County yet.

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BUSINESS

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he Hotel Santa Barbara has been sold to the Geronimo Hospitality Group — a Wisconsin-based company that owns several award-winning boutique hotels, eateries, clubs, fitness centers, and co-working spaces throughout Wisconsin and Indiana — for $41.9 million. The Hotel Santa Barbara, Hotel Santa Barbara located on State Street in the heart of downtown Santa Barbara, has been owned by Rolland Jacks One of the listing agents representing since he purchased the building in 1975. Jacks in this sale, J.J. Gobbell of Berkshire The 75-room hotel sits in the newly cre- Hathaway HomeServices, said Jacks purated promenade on State Street, just steps chased the hotel during a critical period from shopping, cafés, and restaurants, and for downtown, and the revitalization of the within walking distance of the Funk Zone, hotel was lucrative in bringing more business downtown. “When he bought it, downthe beach, and Stearns Wharf. Geronimo Hospitality Group and its town was in rough shape,” Gobbell said. “He sister company, commercial real estate was instrumental in not only turning the developer Hendricks Commercial Prop- property around but also bringing more erties, plan to begin renovations on the business owners together.” As to why Jacks property in 2022. “We are excited to wel- had decided to sell the property, Gobbell come Hotel Santa Barbara to the Geron- said it was simply time to let the property imo Hospitality Group family of brands go. “He’s owned it for a long time; it’s just a and can’t wait for locals and travelers alike life decision.” to experience our unique spin on hospitalGeronimo Hospitality Group properties ity,” said Jeff Whiteman, chief operating include Bottleworks Hotel and Ironworks officer at Geronimo Hospitality Group. Hotel Indy in Indianapolis; Delafield Hotel “Santa Barbara is a very special place, and in Delafield, Wisconsin; and Ironworks we look forward to providing guests with Hotel and Hotel Goodwin in Beloit, Wismemorable experiences for years to come.” consin. —Jun Starkey

COU RTE SY

Hotel S.B. Sells for $41.9 Million

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CAMARENA CONT’D FROM P. 8

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a whole were not common due to rigorous screening by his office. Other times, Brown ran afoul of the DSA on officer hiring practices. Brown also emphasized, however, that he and the DSA have many shared interests and recently worked together in opposing the separation of a new fire dispatch center from the Sheriff ’s Office. That hasn’t stopped the DSA from using their political muscle against him. But their punches have not been landing. In the 2018 Sheriff ’s election, they endorsed, organized, and donated $45,000 to Olmstead’s campaign, only for Brown to drub him and Lieutenant Eddie Hsueh with more than 57 percent of the vote. Another recent highprofile electoral action by the DSA came in 2016, when the union deployed $40,000 for Bruce Porter in his failed bid to become 3rd District Supervisor. (He lost in both 2016 and 2020 to Joan Hartmann.) The DSA has endorsed other candidates who won their races, but the union’s investment in those campaigns were relatively meager and/or the races fairly straightforward. After Olmstead, the next-largest DSA beneficiary in the 2018 cycle was 2nd District Supervisor Gregg Hart, who received $5,000 and ran unopposed. But with or without effective DSA support, Camarena may prove a more formidable opponent than Brown experienced in the last election as police departments have come under increased public scrutiny. “Many things have changed since 2018,” said Spencer Brandt. “I think Lieutenant Camarena’s message and record of collaboration and reform will resonate with voters n in this election cycle.”

COUNTY

Farewell to Fayram

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ou know what they say: Old fishermen never die; they just smell that way,” quipped Tom Fayram—ardent fisherman; Green Bay Packers football fan; and, for the past 27 years, the county’s resident Wizard of Oz when it’s come to flood control and water policy. As of December 10, however, Fayram will no longer be holding down the top spot at the County’s Water Resource Agency. At 61, Fayram will be joining the ranks of the recently retired. Even in the best of times, Fayram’s position is both technically and politically grueling. And the past four years—when fire, flood, drought, debris flows, death, and more drought have rained down upon Santa Barbara County—have been anything but the best. “I’m ready to let go,” he said. “I’m ready to take a break.” During the supervisors’ daytime tribute — the real stories would be told later at a gathering at Harry’s that evening — Fayram got choked up. The real praise, he insisted, belonged to the people in his department who did all the heavy lifting: the ones, for example, who managed to scrape out all of Montecito’s debris basins just seconds — or so

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ant to sheriff would be a quantum leap in management experience,” he said, adding that the two ranks were separated by those of commander, chief deputy, and undersheriff. “Police departments everywhere are under enormous pressure. Do officers here need a junior pilot to fly them across stormy weather, or a senior pilot who has made the journey a hundred times?” Brown added that these journeys included several promises delivered, such as the formation of mental health co-response teams and the recent opening of a new North County Jail with improved conditions. Brown rejected Camarena’s charge that the Sheriff ’s Office was not as proactive and engaged as it should be. “Under my tenure, we have been collaborating with community stakeholders on many important issues like addressing mental illness and substance abuse. Our force is one of the most professional and well-trained in the country, and even then, we have been able to adapt.” As for his challenger’s endorsement from the Deputy Sheriff ’s Association, Brown acknowledged that his relationship with the union was sometimes adversarial in nature. “There have been disagreements with the DSA on some issues, particularly those involving disciplinary action.” Throughout his tenure as sheriff, Brown had terminated some officers for misconduct “unbecoming of our values”; the DSA generally supported its member officers, primarily through providing legal representation. Such instances of misconduct included excessive force, dishonesty, and driving under the influence, though Brown clarified that terminations as

Tom Fayram

it seemed — before the torrential rains descended on the heels of the Thomas Fire. “They’re the best,” he declared. “And I know this.” In his farewell remarks, Fayram also cited the work done by his daughter-in-law, a nurse who has worked nights on the front lines in the fight against COVID these past 18 months. “I think you got the wrong Fayram here today,” he said. —Nick Welsh


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COU RTESY PHOTOS

CARPINTERIA

ROAD WORK AHEAD: The 0.8-mile path would stretch along the southern edge of Highway 101 from the intersection of Sand Point Road and Santa Claus Lane in Santa Barbara County to Estero Way.

Multi-Use Path to Connect Dots

Missing Link in 1,200-Mile California Coastal Trail to Run Along Highway 101, Santa Claus Lane by Ryan P. Cruz

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he Carpinteria Planning Commission unanimously approved a new multi-use path connecting Carpinteria Avenue and Santa Claus Lane, and filling a missing link in the 1,200-mile California Coastal Trail. The 0.8-mile path would stretch along the southern edge of Highway 101 from the intersection of Sand Point Road and Santa Claus Lane in Santa Barbara County to Estero Way in Carpinteria, and it will include a “dedicated bike and pedestrian path” scheduled to be completed in 2023. The plan was approved 5-0 in a public hearing on Monday. “I think it’s a great project, and I’m really proud I’ve been part of it since the beginning,” said Commissioner John Moyer. “I’m eager to see it come to fruition.” Moyer mentioned that he used to commute to work by bike through the same area, which he said was a “boring,” at times “dangerous,” ride and commended the project for making the spaces more easily accessible for the public. One of these safety measures was the redesign of the Carpinteria Avenue off-ramp, which was updated from a “straightaway” to a “double-curve,” which forces drivers to slow down, something that several commissioners mentioned made the area safer for pedestrians and cyclists. Chair Jane Benefield praised the team effort between the City of Carpinteria, County of Santa Barbara, and Caltrans

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for working together to make the new path a reality. “I’m impressed with the coordination efforts that have been going on for a very long time,” Benefield said. “It’s always nice when there’s no conflict.” Carpinteria has already approved the project through the Architectural Board of Review, and the Planning Commission granted a Conditional Use Permit and a Coastal Development Permit, greenlighting the construction process to begin next year and the project to be unveiled in 2023. Design elements suggested throughout the process include the sandstone walkway, concrete bike path, and several protective walls and railings along the wetlands, railroad, and highways. All landscaping and building materials were selected to match the coast’s aesthetics and other elements in the area. Santa Barbara County is currently in the process of approving its section of the trail, which extends about 820 feet on the Santa Claus Lane side, but the project planners expect that the path will be approved. As part of the agreement, Carpinteria and the county will be responsible for maintaining the pathway and Caltrans will maintain the walls and sections near the highway and railroads.

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DEC 2-9, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

DECEMBER 2-19, 2021

ENVIRONMENT

What Will Gaviota Wildlife Crossing Look Like? Large Stakeholder Group Meets to Start Study Process

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CALTR AN S

BY

by Jean Yamamura

ide bridges that mimic grasslands and tall tunnels of corrugated steel have saved countless wild animals in places where their habitat is bisected by highways and the 3,500pound vehicles that use them. California’s first wildlife crossing, along DEER XING: A roadside camera caught a deer in 2012 as it leapt from an Tahoe National Forest’s animal crossing built at San Luis Obispo’s Cuesta Grade. Caltrans is working Highway 89, lowered with nonprofits and agencies in Santa Barbara County toward a habitat the number of animals bridge — though the shape of it is yet unknown — at the Gaviota Pass. killed there from 29 in one decade to five in the following seven years. Caltrans and a large the most. Mule deer led the list, followed by group of stakeholders hope to do the same the California vole, gray fox, raccoon, and in the Gaviota Pass area of Santa Barbara mountain lion. Three places in particular County. stood out: Mariposa Reina, the highway rest About 29 people from nonprofits and areas and the Gaviota Tunnel, and the interstate and county agencies met on Decem- section of highways 101 and 1. The last two ber 2 to discuss the start of a year-long study are where two mountain lions and a bear of a six-mile area from the Nojoqui Grade were hit by cars and died last summer. As well as the horror of hitting a large to Mariposa Reina. Among the stakeholders was Joan Hartmann, supervisor for animal, drivers face personal and finanthe county’s 3rd District, where the Gavi- cial injuries: Hitting a deer cost more than ota Coast is found. She recalled thinking $8,000 on average, a University of Montana a freeway structure made for wildlife was study found, and in the more than one milsuch a strange thing but said of the meet- lion such incidents every year, 200 people ing: “There really is a science of road ecol- die nationwide. Though Caltrans is footing the study cost, ogy, and there really are a whole variety of interventions that work to better protect and funding to build whatever the study and guide animals.” stakeholders recommend is an open quesAn independent scientific consultant tion. The largest animal bridge in the world unaffiliated with Caltrans was being hired, is being built in the Agoura Hills, an $87 project planner John Olejnik emphasized, million overpass that will span 10 lanes of who are experts in wildlife-corridor stud- the 101 to provide a 200-foot-long, 165-footies: ICF/Jones & Stokes. “We’re paying for wide passage for endangered mountain it,” Olejnik said, of the $327,000 the study lions and other species of the Santa Monica will cost Caltrans, “and we’ll be really glad Mountains. The National Wildlife Fedto take the results. We’ll use that to decide, eration raised $72 million for the overpass collectively as a group, how to work together in a near-decade of fundraising. In Santa to implement the results.” Cruz County, Caltrans is building a 60-foot Landowners in the area are an impor- bridge and tunnel for large animals along a tant part of the stakeholders, Olejnik said, deadly part of Highway 17. The $12 million because an animal crossing might require Laurel Curve project included $2 million land Caltrans doesn’t control. “It’s not always raised by the county’s Land Trust, which a fence or a bear culvert or a ramp,” he said. gained conservation easements for 460 “It might be land preservation that accom- acres in the nearby mountains, $4.5 milplishes this. Or, if things are built too close lion from the state, and $4 million in a local to the highway, that may constrain what we transportation tax. Supervisor Joan Hartmann gave the can do.” One of the groups involved, the Coastal Coastal Ranches Conservancy and the Ranches Conservancy, has a good idea of Gaviota Coast Conservancy full credit for where crossings should be built. The non- appealing the original 101 culvert project profit funded a study by UC Santa Barbara’s that got this ball rolling. “As in everything Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Eco- for Caltrans, they have to study it, follow a logical Restoration that looked at the past 60 sequence of steps, and go through the proyears of data for that same six-mile stretch. cess,” she said. But in a year’s time, “there Finalized in January 2020, the Gaviota study will be so much money for infrastructure,” showed that cars took their toll on amphib- Hartmann noted of the new federal act, ians, reptiles, birds, and insects, but it was which holds $350 million for exactly this mammals that were either recorded or killed purpose. n

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OPINIONS CONT’D

obituaries STEVE SACK

Letters

Dr. Larry E. Nordgaarden

7/7/1956 - 11/17/2021

Cartoon goes here!

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e had expected the County to be fair with our town. Instead, Planning & Development and its director have been anything but. This is the latest update concerning a poorly conceived development project in Los Alamos. It is an issue that will have health and safety consequences for our town, especially because of a one-lane section of private road to which the developer has been given access. With all the additional traffic generated by 12 homes, only six of which would have garages, P&D chose not to do a traffic study, and yet they fault our more realistic estimates of traffic hazards because we did not perform a formal study. Next, P&D found a way, on technical grounds, to keep our local Los Alamos Planning Advisory Committee from meeting on this issue. Until now, LAPAC had customarily met with townsfolk to vote on significant developments here. Lastly, although not required to recuse on purely legal grounds, wouldn’t it have been morally and ethically preferable if two Planning Commissioners had done so, as one admitted to years of financial connections with the developer and the other told of having a house built by him? More than 200 Los Alamos residents signed a petition to have Mr. Ruffino’s development reconsidered to make it safer. His agent, from TW Land Planning, disdained and dismissed our community’s concerns by saying that people usually sign petitions without understanding the issues. This lack of appreciation and respect for our town is, regrettably, typical also of the developer and of P&D.

benefit will go to the 10 percent paying the most in taxes. Others to receive breaks will be trial lawyers and the 6 percent of private sector workers who are nonunion, as expressed in the Wall Street Journal. Mr. Carbajal’s claim that the bill will pay for itself assumes the extra $44 billion to the IRS budget will wring out the $367 billion needed to overcome the deficit cited in the CBO report. If we are to believe the House’s sales pitch, spending will be in the range of $2 trillion over the decade, so at best revenue would match that. Independent analysts project the true cost of the bill to be up to $4.8 trillion. An example of one provision cited in one study that will increase the cost is the Child Tax Credit. It is proposed to terminate after one year at a cost of $130 billion. If continued for the 10 years of the CBO report, costs could hit $1 trillion. That other $2.8 trillion will end up on the bottom line. Also, another study concludes more than 100,000 jobs will be lost, rather than rosy projections of job creation. We, and especially Mr. Carbajal, should be honest about what the consequences may be. —Gerald Rounds, Santa Ynez

For the Record

FRITZ OLENBERGER

Fair and Balanced?

—Seth Steiner, Los Alamos

Really Huge

T

he Congressional Budget Office cost estimates for HR 5376, a k a the Build Back Better Act, rely upon information supplied by the House. That information is engineered to deceive. New entitlements will not sunset in short order, so years of these costs are ignored. The bill also includes tax breaks the Democrats pretend will eventually raise revenue. One provision is to raise the state tax deduction on the federal return for which 88 percent of the

¶ The photo on last week’s cover was of the Santa Barbara Festival Ballet’s Nutcracker, as were the photos inside the cover story. We inadvertently omitted the company’s performances from that list. They take place December 11 and 12 at the Arlington Theatre and feature Alexandra Hutchinson and Kouadio Davis of the Dance Theatre of Harlem, and Emily Fugett and Colin Ellis of the St. Louis Ballet.

Much loved husband, brother, brother-in-law, nephew, uncle, friend, and well-respected doctor of optometry, Larry was born in Cut Bank, Montana, in 1956 and died in Goleta, CA on Nov. 17, 2021 after a year of declining health. He was an honorable man who kept his word and lived and died on his own terms. He knew when to “fold ‘em.” He graduated from the University of Montana, Bozeman in 1978, earned his O.D. degree from the Southern California College of Optometry in 1982, and practiced optometry in Santa Barbara, CA until retirement in 2018. Larry is already missed by his devoted wife of 39 years Carol, sister Shirley (Brent), Carol’s siblings: Marcia (Mike) and Greg, three nephews and their families, uncle Dr. John Taylor (Marianne,) his cousins, and his beloved cats Haiku and Raven. He was pre-deceased by his parents and grandparents, his parents-in-law, his sister-in-law Judy, and

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cats Ninja, Murphy, and Darby. A man of multiple nicknames (Nord, Nordie, Dr. No, Lar Bear, Sumo Viking, and CatsPa) and multitudes of friends who loved him, Larry found his biggest joy in life was making others laugh. To make a donation to honor Larry, please contact RESQCATS at www.resqcats.org or any animal charity of your choice. Sleep well; sweet dreams.

Merrill Tilghman

10/24/1934 - 9/9/2021

Merrill Tilghman – Celebration of Life Merrill was a resident of Santa Barbara for over 40 years. Her kind heart and creative spirit will be greatly missed. All who knew Merrill are welcome to come remember her with stories, music, and art. Saturday January 8th from 1:00pm – 2:30 pm Alice Keck Park You’ll find the event in the Arbor Area of the park, entering on Garden Street between Arrellaga and Micheltorena

DECEMBER 9, 2021

Continued on p. 18 THE INDEPENDENT

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Streiff, Joseph John 1/5/1930 - 11/14/2021

Joe passed away November 14, 2021 at his home in Santa Barbara. Joe was born January 5, 1930 in Wasco, CA. Joe moved to Santa Barbara in 1964. He began his career as a printing pressman with the Wasco News. After coming to Santa Barbara Joe worked for Rood’s Associates, the Santa Barbara News Press, Channel Lithograph, and finally retiring from Santa Barbara City College, as well as “moonlighting” in many other print shops in town. Joe never had just one job. When he first arrived in Santa Barbara he wasn’t sure if he would like it. He liked flat ground. Once settled he knew he never wanted to leave. He appreciated the climate that allowed him to enjoy being outside most of the day. Joe & his wife, Jane, had many years of square dancing, round dancing, country western dancing, and later bowling with the Santa Barbara Lawn Bowls Club. He was a long time member of the Elks Caravaneers. He and Jane enjoyed several International RV trips to Mexico and Baja on the train, Russia and Eastern Europe, Australia and New Zealand, as well as the Maritime Provinces. Joe & Jane were just one month short of being married 47 years as a blended family. Surviving Joe are his first wife and the mother of his children, Betty Sue Holland, his remaining sibling Anna Rastall, his daughter Charlotte Sell (Larry), Eric 18

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Streiff (Kim), and grandson Chase Streiff as well as Jane’s children Dale Irwin, Mark Irwin, grandsons, Jeremy Irwin, and Andrew Irwin. Joe will be missed but never forgotten. He loved his family and enjoyed catching up on their daily lives. Laughter was always mixed in the conversation with Joe. He had a wonderful fun loving sense of humor. Joe was a regular attendee at Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church. A memorial service in Joe’s honor will be held December 17 at l p.m. McDermott Chapel 2020 Chapala Street. RSVP jstreiff@gmail.com for details if you would like to attend.

Robert C. and Margaret E. Edgar

Robert C. Edgar (Bob) and Margaret E. Edgar (Peggy) had a 76-year love affair. They met at a dance on Balboa Island right as Bob returned from serving in the Army Air Force in World War II. They were married two years later on June 12, 1947 and would have celebrated their 75th wedding anniversary in 2022. Their dream was to die together holding hands. At 97 and 98 years old their dream came true as they spent the last couple of weeks of their lives in Hospice at their daughter’s home in Santa Barbara, California. They were surrounded with family and love as Bob made his transition on November 15, 2021,

DECEMBER 9, 2021

and Peggy followed 4 days later on November 19, 2021. Bob was born March 30, 1924, in Santa Ana, California, to Carl and Lillian Edgar. He had one sister, Shirley, and they were raised in Santa Ana. Peggy was born February 9, 1923, in Pueblo, Colorado, to Frank and Margaret Myers. She was the oldest of 4 girls and they were raised in Costa Mesa, California. Once they were married, they lived in many different places including Maracaibo, Venezuela, where Bob worked for Brown Drilling Oil Co, and Singapore for 6 years in the early 1970’s where Bob ran Sea Supply for Oceaneering International. Bob’s career was as an Executive in the Oil and Diving Industries. Peggy was the consummate wife and homemaker. They lived in 37 different homes during their 76 years together and had friends all over the world. They spent the last 20 years living in Paso Robles, California, living independently thanks to the care and assistance of their good friend and neighbors, Betsy Hardy and Matthew and Ginny Reid. They made their final move to Santa Barbara, CA, on October 9, 2021. They are survived by their 3 children: Julie (Peter) Newendorp of Santa Barbara, CA; Jake (Kwang) Edgar of Pai, Thailand; Joan (Lloyd) Gay of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. They are also survived by their 7 grandchildren and 9 greatgrandchildren. They are loved and will be missed.

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Audrey Murray Terry 6/11/1931 - 12/1/2021

Audrey Murray Terry passed peacefully on the morning of December 1, 2021, in Grand Junction, CO. Born June 11, 1931, in Burnaby, B.C., Canada, she was the daughter of the late M.K. and Ivy Murray. Audrey was raised in Burnaby and South Westminster until the family moved to Los Angeles in 1949. She married William “Bill” Terry Sr. in 1953 and lived in the San Fernando Valley until moving to Santa Barbara, CA in 1970. She and Bill established Santa Barbara Movers in 1972 and retired in 1994. Audrey was a devoted animal lover. People brought injured animals and birds to her for care. Some left animals in her yard when they could no longer keep them. As a longtime member of Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, many children and adults have heard her beautiful voice. Audrey was also an avid lawn bowler from her 70s to mid-80s and won or placed in several coed Over 80’s tournaments. Audrey was preceded in death by her parents and her husband of 50 years. Audrey is survived by her sister, Valerie Hendlin of Santa Barbara; daughter, Suzon Bishop of Grants Pass, OR; sons, Patrick (Shona) Terry and William “Bill” Terry Jr. (Barbara) of Grand Junction, CO; grandson, Jordan Terry, granddaughters, Adelle,

Dayna & Kelly Bishop and Samantha Abeyta (Lance); great-grandchildren, Brycen & Berkley Abeyta and several nieces and nephews. A Celebration of Life will be held during the summer in Santa Barbara, CA. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a memorial contribution to the Alzheimer Assn or your local pet rescue.

James F. Rodriguez 7/10/1947 - 11/14/2021

James F. Rodriguez died Sunday, November 14, 2021 at his home in Santa Maria. James was born in Santa Barbara, July 10, 1947. James grew up in Santa Barbara and graduated from Santa Barbara High School. He was drafted into the Vietnam War, which he proudly served 2 years and was honorably discharged from the Army. James was an Appliance Technician for over 30 years. What he enjoyed most was his grandchildren, going fishing, and camping with family and friends. James is preceded in death by his grandson Oscar Reyes Jr. and his granddaughter Kayla Rodriguez. He is survived by his son Larry Rodriguez, daughter Renee Rodriguez, grandson Gaberial Rodriguez, granddaughter Angelina Reyes, grandson Anthony Reyes, and sister Elizabeth Sincavage. Services will be held Saturday 1:00pm, December 11th. at Dudley Hoffman mortuary, 1003 E. Stowell Road, in Santa Maria.


obituaries Patrick Treman

12/16/1979 - 10/8/2021

On October 8, 2021, Patrick Treman unexpectedly died of heart failure at age 41 in Ramona, CA. He is survived by his mother Patricia Nedry, his stepfather, James Nedry, stepmother Maury Treman, and brothers Christopher and Kevin Treman. He was preceded in death by his father, Michael Treman. Born on December 16, 1979 he was raised in Santa Barbara by his parents and stepparents. As a child Patrick spent most of his free time on sports fields or at the beach. By age four he was on his first swim team, started surfing at five and sailing at seven. He was competing in surf contests with a local surf shop sponsorship at age ten. Patrick attended Santa Barbara High School. During his sophomore year water sports really changed for him when All American Brad Kittridge suggested Patrick go out for water polo. Although he never liked the “wall tag” of lap swimming for training, he loved the game and took to it with effortless abandonment and dedication. By his senior year in 1998, he was making a name for himself not only locally but in the SoCAL world of the sport. He played on two Junior Olympic teams and in Europe for Santa Barbara’s Water Polo Club. In his senior year, Patrick led the Dons to their first CIF water polo championship title. He was unanimously named CIF Player

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

of the year by the coaches for their division. Patrick was named an All American and recruited by the U.S. Junior National Water Polo team. Choosing to remain in Santa Barbara for college, he played water polo for UCSB for four years. Taking his skills in the water to the next level Patrick joined the Navy as a rescue swimmer and broke numerous existing swimming records during his training. He served as a Navy air-crewman, rescue swimmer and door gunner for ten years. He proudly served with the Combat Land and Sea Rescue team of the HSC-85 Golden Falcons. On a tour of duty in the Middle East on the USS Lincoln Aircraft Carrier in 2007 Patrick received a naval award for his participation in a nighttime sea rescue of seven of his shipmates in a downed helicopter. He was honorably discharged in 2013. After his naval service, Patrick attended Arizona State University, graduating cum laude in 2018 with a B.S. in Aeronautical Management and Technology for Remote Piloted Aircraft – the first university level program of its kind in the country. In 2018, Patrick joined a startup company on the East Coast that is developing personal security drone applications. Returning to California in 2020, Patrick joined Adorama where he was involved with establishing drone programs for fire prevention, management, and surveillance for municipal, state and non-defense federal agencies. Patrick most enjoyed spending many weekends with other veterans and their families off-roading at the sand dunes in Glamis,

CA. He is described as a big teddy bear, a wonderful friend, a fierce competitor, a gentle soul and giver of the best hugs ever. He will be forever in the hearts of his family and friends and exceedingly missed by his black lab, Riley. The family will hold a private life celebration in December in Santa Barbara. In memoriam, the family asks in lieu of flowers that donations to The Wounded Warrior Project be made.

Robert Cooper Brown 8/17/1939 - 11/15/2021

Robert Cooper Brown, Jr., 82, passed away peacefully on November 15, 2021. Cooper was born at Saint Francis Hospital in Evanston, Illinois on August 17, 1939, to parents Robert Cooper and Anita (von Buelow) Brown. He spent his early years in Park Ridge, Illinois, attending Park Ridge Military Academy and Maine Township High School, and then went on to St. Mary’s University in Winona, Minnesota. After his schooling, he went to work for his father in the family owned business, von Buelow Jewelers in Park Ridge. He excelled in his work and joined the American Gem Society, in which he served as president for a year. He was a top notch salesman and a great asset to the family business. When the family business was sold in 1963, he and his new bride, Linda LaVerne (nee Lansdon) Brown loaded up a UHaul and moved west to California. They eventually settled in Pasadena where he worked

for many years with J. Herbert Hall Jewelers, where he and Mr. Hall enjoyed a close and mutually honoring friendship. When the business was sold to outside interests, Cooper gathered up his family and chose to take a different path. He held a variety of jobs, but the one he enjoyed the most was bartending at Fess Parker’s Red Lion Inn in Santa Barbara, California. He was the “king” of the piano bar, and his charisma charmed all the customers. When Cooper’s father passed away in 1993, Cooper moved down to Desert Hot Springs, California to live with and care for his mother. By the time his mother passed away in 2010, he found that he really loved living in the desert and decided to continue to make that his home. He enjoyed living at the Caliente Springs Resort, in the same mobile home that his parents had brought to the resort back in 1985, being the first residents of the newly opened resort. Cooper is survived by his son Cooper (Laura) Brown, III of Carson City, Nevada; daughter Ramona (Chris) Higley of Grass Valley, California; son Michael Brown of Sherwood, Oregon; and eight grandchildren – Travis, Caitlin and Nicole Brown; Austin, Erika and Vance Higley; Michael and Anna Brown. He is also survived by his three sisters, Valerie Stevens of Grants Pass, Oregon; Pat (Don) Darling of Dillon, Montana; and Judy Sarena of Goleta, California. The family wishes to thank the wonderful and caring staff of Banning Health Care. We could not have asked for a better place to entrust Cooper’s care. And thanks also to VITAS Hospice Healthcare for their consistent and faithful caring. God bless each and every one of you.

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Richard A. Nelson 9/6/1922 - 11/7/2021

Richard Austin Nelson, a kind, gentle soul, known for his infectious laughter and compassionate heart passed away peacefully at Serenity House at 99 years of age after a long bout with heart failure. Born to Roy & Ruth Nelson and raised in the Swedish community of Chicago, IL, he joined the U.S. Army at the age of 18 and served in WWII in Germany. After the war he attended college on the GI Bill, becoming a practicing podiatrist in Chicago for 28 years. Always a seeker, he went on pilgrimage to India in 1979 and met his kindred spirit, Terry, where they were married by their spiritual teacher, Sri Sathya Sai Baba at his ashram near Bangalore. The following years were magical, full of unforgettable adventures of extended travels in India, Sri Lanka, and Portugal. Settling in Santa Barbara, a city he deeply loved, he enjoyed living on the Mesa where he took daily walks at Shoreline Park and the harbor. Richard was Dad to Kris Bihler and Craig Nelson, Gramps to Erin Johnson and Britney Huff, and great-grandchildren Wyatt, Willow, Travis, & Camden, and Uncle to Ric Wood and Erika Isaly. The family especially thank niece Erika, friends Mary, Max, and Mike, the VNA Hospice Team, Alex, Lynda, and Karen for their help and caring support. In honor of Richard donations may be made to The Braille Institute and VNA Hospice.

DECEMBER 9, 2021

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Leila Drake, State Street Ballet. Photo: ASAP Cats 20

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DECEMBER 9, 2021

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In Memoriam

Michael Summers 1969–2021

M

The Luckiest Man

BY TYLER BLUE ike Summers had only

COURTESY

getaways with the dogs to places like the Kern River or Bishop, where they been gone for a few sought out petroglyphs and waterfalls. She remembered, “He could tell days, and he already appeared to have comme what kind of tree it was, what kind of bird it was, how this mounmandeered the control room upstairs. While rivers of tears still flowed among tain got folded beneath the other his extensive family of friends in Santa one millions of years ago. He was Barbara, they stopped to marvel at a so excited about the future, getting weather anomaly unlike any they had a Sprinter van and doing remote ever witnessed. Amid intermittent work while we explored every facet rain, the sky was suddenly transformed of nature.” into an impressionist painting — casSailing was another pursuit Mike cading with pink and purple clouds, was extremely passionate about. a glowing orange orb, a breathtaking Having earned his captain’s license, lightning show, and a few rainbows for he once sailed a group of friends good measure. They coined it “Tropito the Channel Islands, where they cal Storm Summers,” and it was easy swam in bioluminescence under a to imagine him cackling with glee as meteor shower. He intended to sail he pushed all the buttons. to Hawai‘i within the next year. Summers couldn’t have been a more Mike was a unicorn. He was appropriate name for such a man. It equally comfortable directing his always felt like summer when you were team of 60 employees, leading the in his orbit. Anyone in his voluminous way in environmentalist think tanks, network would agree that he was the or producing music festivals — as he sun in our solar system. Whenever did in 2016 and 2018 — at the Live he greeted a friend, he bellowed their Oak Campground in Santa Ynez. name with gusto and then wrapped He was a romantic intellectual — a them up in an enormous bear hug. voracious reader on subjects of There was never a doubt as to how quantum physics and cosmology. much he cared about you. The sincerHe was a cooking enthusiast who had recently tapped in to the secrets ity in all his actions was as steadfast as of authentic paella and drew praise the tides. Mike would have found it poetic for his smoked brisket. He loved that he died on September 30 — the sharing inspiring quotes in his daily birthday of one of his musical heroes, work emails and for years included a favorite Jack Kerouac quote in Trey Anastasio. He was 52 years young emails to friends. Ultimately though, when he suffered a heart attack while vacationing in Colorado with his parthe didn’t even need to try. The man ner of almost 10 years, Heather Smith. effortlessly embodied inspiration just by being unabashedly who he The two were getting away to process the grief of losing their dog, Ziggy. was. THE WILD: Mike Summers embraced motivating his team of employees as enthusiastically as he sailed, sang, Mike was a huge dog person who had a A Mike Summers memoriam held legendary parties, and immersed himself in nature, including his work to preserve the Central Coast. particular affection for chocolate Labs. wouldn’t be complete without menHe is survived by Rhythm and joins his tioning the legendary parties he longtime companion, Max. was a rock-climbing vegan who’d ascended Yosemite’s used to throw at his former West Camino Cielo resiA few days before his passing, he enjoyed the best fish- crown jewel, El Capitan. “He always had the deepest dence — “The Mountain House.” People still talk about ing trip of his life on the Colorado River. He had become care for people, the environment, and community. That the New Year’s Eve celebration in 2005 with music until an avid fly-fisherman in recent years and gotten very was a thread that ran through his entire life,” Studarus dawn by Santa Barbara’s favorite sons, ALO. The celebragood at it. “He gave everything 110 percent,” his longtime reflected. “He was a dreamer. He had grand visions. He tion was coined “The Divine Ball,” and Mike shimmered friend Ian Zellet attested. “Whether it was throwing a didn’t like hearing ‘no’ for an answer. He wanted to go big the brightest as a sun god, decked head-to-toe in golden party, going on an adventure in nature, or just being with with everything he did.” sequins. He was never accused of holding back when it his friends, he was all in.” He was both notoriously outgoWhile Mike was working in sales for Patagonia, the came to dressing for a special occasion. On that night ing and soulfully introspective. He was a big kid at heart two cofounded the Conception Coast Project. They and many others, he treated the crowd to what became who owned a marshmallow crossbow launcher and once collaborated for seven years on this endeavor, seek- his signature song, “Loving Cup” by the Rolling Stones. signed off an email to his team at work, “Check ya later!” ing protection for an extensive network of landscapes. He was and will always be “the man from the mountain.” Michael Shawn Summers was born in Canoga Park According to Jeff Kuyper — executive director of Los His longtime housemate Sean Marnane summed him and later moved to the Bay Area. According to his Padres Forest Watch — “Mike Summers was an icon in up: “If he was a comic book villain, his name would have mother, Lynda, his affinity for music began at the age the local wilderness conservation movement, working been ‘Superlator.’ His whole life was based on superof 4, when he picked up a Casio keyboard on a trip to for nearly two decades to protect pristine landscapes latives. Everything was the best — the best show, the Hong Kong. He was a self-taught guitarist with a beauti- across California’s Central Coast region.” His efforts cul- best party, or the best camping trip.” Over the past year, ful voice. There was nothing better than sitting around a minated in what is now the Central Coast Heritage Pro- his favorite song was “The Luckiest Man” by the Wood campfire and listening to Mike go into human jukebox tection Act. On the verge of passing through the Senate, Brothers. He had become obsessed with the lyrics and the mode. He took great joy in playing for his family on trips the bill envisions wilderness protection for more than message behind them. Heather recalled, “He would belt to the Bay Area, where he cherished being an uncle to the 250,000 acres of land and 180 miles of streams and rivers. it out in the car like he was performing onstage.” Mike’s four daughters of his brother John and fiancée Renee. “Mike’s enduring legacy is stamped into the bedrock of existence encapsulated that song title, and those of us Following a family tradition, Mike enlisted in the local, grassroots wilderness preservation.” who loved him will carry the gratitude for his friendship Navy straight out of high school and served four years as No matter how busy Mike became as the senior sales into the wild blue yonder. an electronics technician. From there, he went to UCSB manager at Inogen, he and Heather always found the A memorial for Mike Summers will be held at SOhO in a move that would shape the course of the rest of his time to immerse in nature. They gravitated to the annual from noon-5 p.m. on Saturday, December 11. Tickets life. When James Studarus met him there, Summers wildflower bloom on the Carrizo Plain. They prioritized available at sohosb.com. n INDEPENDENT.COM

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Opinions

NEWS COMMENTARY

CONT’D

S.B. County Version 2021 Isla Vista, Cuyama, Guadalupe, and Santa Maria Major Points in Supervisor District Debates

E

BY L E E H E L L E R very 10 years, Santa Barbara County joins count-

less other cities, counties, and states in redrawing election district boundaries, based on updated Census data. This year was no different—except where it was. The first difference happened in 2018, when county voters passed Measure G, which created a Citizens Independent Redistricting Commission (CIRC). The CIRC removes decisions about county supervisorial district boundaries from the self-interested votes of the supervisors themselves, placing them instead in the hands of 11 appointed commissioners representing all five districts (plus an at-large position). All were supposed to be appointed in fall of 2020, get updated Census data by April 2021, and finish the job by early autumn, with a rock-hard deadline of December 15, 2021. Which leads to the second difference: COVID-19. The pandemic delayed the release of Census data by more than six months, pushing the work of the CIRC perilously close to that December 15 to adopt a final map. Commissioners who expected to serve and be done in a matter of months found themselves looking at a year-plus process. That meant, ultimately, five resignations and a death. By the time the Redistricting Commission was ready to look at maps, there were more new commissioners than original appointees. The public was encouraged to participate in a plethora of in-person and online workshops, and to submit maps. The hiccup: The mapping tools used by the CIRC’s consulting demographer, National Demographics Corporation (NDC), failed to update their Census data until early November, after the first deadline to submit maps. Maps submitted by that deadline had to be redrawn and resubmitted. Ultimately, the commission received more than 100 maps from the public, from which it first chose 10, then three, and finally one. To no one’s surprise, Isla Vista was again at the center of controversy, as some Santa Ynez Valley voters objected to its continued inclusion in what they claim is a rural district—one that should not have to share its supervisor with transient, supposedly non-tax-paying university students. There was also extensive discussion of where to locate Cuyama, whose residents testified to their critical need for assistance with groundwater issues. To everyone’s surprise, Guadalupe became the other key point of focus and conflict. Guadalupe has been moved around in each of the past three redistricting cycles, bouncing between the 4th, 5th,

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and 3rd districts (where it was placed in 2011). CAUSE (full name: Central Coast United for a Sustainable Economy) fielded hundreds of speakers arguing passionately to combine Guadalupe’s low-income, agricultural, and immigrant residents with most of Santa Maria as a community of interest. Other speakers, led by former Guadalupe mayor Frances Romero, argued that this would pack Latinos into a single district and deprive them of representation elsewhere. The Guadalupe City Council weighed in for the former, asking to be placed with Santa Maria, not Orcutt and the 4th District, where Guadalupe would have little in common except for students attending the same high school. By the end of the day on Saturday, the former viewpoint had won. The commissioners winnowed down their list to three finalist maps, then held a marathon session on December 4, choosing to start with a map submitted by longtime Republican activist Lanny Ebenstein. It was clear that the commissioners were trying to be responsive to the voices of various communities of interest. Over a four-hour period, they worked at a granular level, moving boundaries from street to street, changing the district position of whole chunks of cities, and ultimately voting unanimously to move forward with a kind of Frankenstein’s monster of changes. The creature is set to be formally adopted on Wednesday, December 8, at 6 p.m. in what is presumably the CIRC’s final meeting. [This meeting takes place after the Indy’s print deadline.] Bell Rd

Stat e Hwy

ma Cuya

NEW VOTER DISTRICTS: The latest supervisors map, as of press time (top), and the current map (below), put together by county residents and the Redistricting Commission

Throughout all the tweaking (some of which seemed pretty haphazard as the meeting went into evening hours), the issue was always population balance. By law, there may not be more than a 10 percent deviation in size between districts, so for every population-moving change made, another adjustment had to follow to restore the lost balance. Commissioners repeatedly asked staff for updates on the population deviation, number of split places (a consideration required by law), and most important, the Latinx Citizen Voting Age Population, or CVAP. (The CVAP is supposed to be high enough—a healthy majority—in any district that can be drawn that way, but not so high as to seem to “pack” minority voters all into a single district.) They then voted unanimously to move forward with the resulting hybrid. As for what this means for the next 10 years in Santa Barbara County: The 1st District has the fewest changes, other than some boundary shifts to the west (including Tucker’s Grove Park and part of the Eastern Goleta Valley). As those more conservative Santa Ynez Valley voters had hoped for, the 2nd District now includes Isla Vista and UCSB but not big sections of Goleta that had been in the 2nd District—a swap that some speakers saw as gerrymandering, since this required sacrificing “compactness” by going around nearer populations to get to farther ones. The 3rd District underwent the most change, with I.V. removed, most of Goleta moved in, Lompoc moved almost entirely into the 3rd District from the 4th, and the Lompoc Valley swapped into the 4th from the 3rd. The big surprise of the evening: after lengthy street-by-street tweaking of the 5th District boundary at the direction of At-Large Commissioner Jannet Rios, three-term Supervisor Steve Lavagnino found himself drawn out of his own supervisorial district. Given that he clearly intended to run for a fourth term, it remains unknown what his next step will be. For more detail and to see which supervisorial district you now live in, visit tinyurl.com/newsupervisorialmaps and look at the Commission’s Final Preferred Plan. n

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DECEMBER 9, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

23


Mike Eliason's Hometown Homage

M

ike Eliason is a world-class photojour-

nalist and artist who just happens to have spent his whole life living in Santa Barbara. Most (but not all) of his first and only book — Santa Barbara and Beyond: The Photography of Mike Eliason — is a passionately requited love story between Eliason and his hometown. Eliason takes you places you think you’ve seen so many times that you stopped seeing them. But he shows them to you in ways you never could have imagined. At a time when Santa Barbara’s housing prices, both for sale and for rent, are among the most excruciating in the country, Eliason’s photos remind us — without trying to make any socioeconomic point at all — of the underlying forces driving this inevitably painful reality. With the release of his book, our socioeconomic reality will get only more painful. Truly and ridiculously, Santa Barbara is a beautiful place to live. The people who get to live here, truly and ridiculously, are lucky to do so. In person, Eliason is notoriously low-key and self-effacing. Even so, he betrays the quietly subversive intelligence of a man who knows too much. And that’s because he does. For 25 years, Eliason has consistently stolen the show while shooting for three of Santa Barbara’s local newspapers. Since then — for the past 10 years — he’s functioned as staff photographer for the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, a human Swiss Army knife assigned to the department’s public information detail. That one of the most accomplished photojournalists ever to shoot in Santa Barbara is not working for a news publication also happens to be ridiculous, almost criminally so. That he is shooting for a fire department instead is akin to Leonardo da Vinci drawing composite sketches for the Tuscan police department. This too, in its own Santa Barbara way, is ridiculous, but wonderfully so for the community at large, as well as for Eliason himself. This book was made largely due to the initiative of the husband-and-wife team who created a small but thriving publishing company, Shoreline Press — publisher Jim Buckley and graphic designer Patty Kelley. Eliason and Buckley first got to know each other during the late 1990s. Buckley — a certified sports nut who was the Independent’s first sports editor — was working for

24

THE INDEPENDENT

DECEMBER 9, 2021

Photography from Santa Barbara and Beyond by Nick Welsh Don’t try to get this shot at home. Eliason stood on Stearns Wharf in a puddle of water while using a metal tripod to get this shot, which went instantly viral.

Drones have become an essential tool in Eliason’s toolbox, stretching what had been strictly two-dimensional planes into the realm of the 3-D. But be sure to read the instructions, Eliason warns; because he didn’t, there’s now a drone at the bottom of the ocean where he was photographing whales. the National Football League when he hired Eliason to shoot games. On most Sundays for many years, Mike could be found prowling the sidelines of NFL stadiums and everywhere else the pro sport is played, including an aircraft carrier in the middle of nowhere. When Eliason moved to the Mesa in 2014, he would often bump into Buckley, who also lives there. About two years ago, Eliason began posting his images — mostly natural and urban landscapes crackling with drama and drenched in color — on social media. At that time, discourse on the World Wide Web was consumed almost entirely by rants for and against Donald Trump. The noise was overwhelming; it was also depressing. In an act of gentle rebellion, Eliason decided the world was in desperate need of something to go “Wow!” over; while Eliason himself would never say so, his photographs exactly fit the bill. Maybe the whole world didn’t pay attention, but Santa Barbara certainly did. People wanted more. And more. Eliason found himself racing in a gerbil wheel of getting up one new image a day. Soon, he had 22,000 followers.

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Out of this, the book idea was hatched. Buckley would take care of all the publishing logistics, Kelley would cull the photos and design the book, and Eliason would provide an avalanche of images from which to choose. Notably not present are any fire or natural disaster photographs. As either firefighter or reporter, Eliason reckons he responded to every single fire to hit Santa Barbara since 1985. One of the worst was the debris flow that attacked Montecito with such violent abandon in 2018. He was one of the first to respond in the morning. At first, he said, it was so dark you couldn’t see anything. But by the time it was over, he’d seen things he could never unsee. This is not that book. Maybe that book will one day be published. It should be. It could tell the story of Santa Barbara’s shifting ecology of fire in the time of climate change, amazingly, without being preachy or ideological. But Santa Barbara and Beyond is a book of celebration, of hope, of reverberation and rejuvenation. Ask Buckley what his favorite picture is, and he doesn’t pause. It’s a shot taken from the bluffs overlooking Leadbetter Beach — not far, incidentally, from Eliason’s home. A black-suited paddle boarder rides a gentle swell into an unseen shore as dusk begins its descent. The man is in the immediate foreground against a sweeping background of ocean and towering sky illuminated by a warm wash of mingling tone.


C OV E R S T O R Y After driving through the Gaviota Tunnel nearly twice a day during the 14 years Eliason lived in the Santa Ynez Valley, he got a yen to see what it looked like from above.

Eliason knew State Street’s freeway underpass offered stark lighting contrasts; all he had to do was wait for a light-colored horse to prance by with someone wearing a dark-colored outfit on its back to get the shot that doesn’t look like just another Fiesta photo. The only interruption is a horizontal sliver of indigo where the sky and the sea converge far in the distance at the blur of our offshore islands. The image induces a palpable sense of vastness and serenity. For a moment there, it’s just you and the sea.

E

liason was born in 1967, just two years after his parents moved here. His father had been a cop in Torrance and moved to Carpinteria just after it was incorporated as a city. He was one of the first seven officers to serve as the fledgling police force. When Eliason was a kid — one of three — his father would roll up in his patrol car to watch Mike play baseball. It was that kind of time and that kind of family. His mom had been a cop, too, in Ventura. She transferred the skills she learned on the beat maintaining order and sanity at a high-powered, high-pressured CPA firm in Santa Barbara where tempers were known to flare more than occasionally. Burly, sturdy, and strong, Eliason gravitated to sports. He played football and baseball. But he was into drama too. In 9th grade, Eliason got his first real whiff of photography. He’d enrolled in a high school photography class — one of only three he would take — but what really did it was getting to shoot the Blue Angels at an aerial acrobatics show. His father borrowed a friend’s camera so Mike would have something to shoot. That, he said, “opened my eyes to the world of photography.” It was obvious he had something special. In his senior year, Eliason’s high school principal pulled Mike aside and asked him to tell the story of Santa Barbara County for an exhibit — documenting all of California’s 58 counties — that

Eliason is an unapologetic sucker for dramatic cloud formations, as this oak with a backdrop of riffled clouds attests.

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DECEMBER 9, 2021

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would be shown in the State Capitol in Sacramento. go, they’re putting others at risk,” he said. “I try to keep After graduating high school, Eliason enrolled at it simple and straight and not overburden people with City College and signed up at the firefighters’ acad- what sounds like cop talk and gibberish.” But as an experienced reporter steeped in Santa emy at Allan Hancock College. His classmates there have either retired, he said, or become fire chiefs. Barbara traditions, Eliason was comfortable expressMike served as a reservist in the Carpinteria Fire Dis- ing historical perspectives unusual—if not unheard trict for eight years. At the same time, he shot photos of—among public safety officers. As a reporter coverfor the Carpinteria and Montecito newspapers, then ing the response to the 1/9 Debris Flow, I encountered owned by Jesse Roth. Later, he would be hired at a Eliason in the field one day, knee-deep in muck. “This long-ago version of the News-Press. His editor there is Montecito’s Pearl Chase moment,” he commented. I remember wondering how many public informawas Dave McCumber, a quick-twitch guy endowed with a sense of adventure and play. Eliason worked tion officers on the job today could riff so precisely there for 25 years, routinely producing eye-popping on the role played by Pearl Chase—Santa Barbara’s photographs even when given the most mundane of strong-willed, strong-armed civic matriarch—who leveraged the 1925 earthquake into a transformation assignments. Looking back, Eliason ruminates over the forks of a dusty Santa Barbara’s downtown into the red-tiled in his road; should he have stayed with firefighting? white-stucco style we have today. Eliason is a photojournalist who happens to be Did he take the right path? Ultimately, however, Eliason was given the opportunity few people get—to an artist; he’s also an artist who happens to be a phogo back and wander both sides of the fork. When tojournalist. What he captures — even in a coffeeSanta Barbara’s daily newspaper imploded 15 years ago, table book featuring stunning photos of beautiful Eliason was offered a part-time gig with the county’s places—is not so much the image, but the moment fire department by then-chief Mike Dyer. His job was out of which images spring. to help out with public information, which by then He knows, for example, when the fog burns off had emerged as an essential component to any public Lake Cachuma and what kind of curtains of mist that safety emergency-response effort. After all his years as a working photojournalist, Eliason knew what the media needed, and when they needed it; he spoke their language. When it came to using photography to tell the story and explain where the fire was, no one could do it better. Critically, he could also harness social media to reach the public quickly. “When it comes to evacuations, we’re not doing this because we want to. It’s about This aerial shot — courtesy of a drone — shows the almost psychedelic visual effects of keeping people safe. When having Carpinteria’s salt marsh inundated with water from a king tide. people resist and refuse to

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C OV E R S T O C ORVYE R S T O R Y

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Ring in the season with live music and cheer

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“Whales,” Eliason said, “are such divas.” Here he catches one such diva in the act of fluking its tail in front of three offshore oil platforms. generates. Cruising the waterfront one fog-drenched night, Eliason quickly figured out that the downtown train station was the place to be. He planted himself on the platform between the tracks and waited. “I don’t fish. I never have. I don’t have the patience,” he said. “But I can wait 30 minutes, 90 minutes for a photo.” In this case, it would not take that long before a young man wearing a white shirt and dark pants would walk, head down, into Eliason’s frame. The resulting photo is an arresting meditation of mood and mist with multiple lines of lights and tracks converging in a drama of compositional magic. Without any human presence, it would have been a great image, but empty and sterile. With just one person, however, it was perfect. Or, as Eliason described it, “Edward Hopper-y.” Eliason talks about preparation, planning, and practice. He also talks about luck. His book abounds with the photographic equivalent of inside straights Eliason was “lucky” enough to draw because of preparation. By far, the most spectacular example of this is Eliason’s photo of the lightning storm over Stearns Wharf that was published on the front page of the Los Angeles Times and shown on Good Morning America, CBS News, and a host of other media outlets. Eliason jokes about being out on the wharf with a metal tripod standing in a puddle of water during a storm that let loose no less than 1,000 strikes throughout Southern California. “The only thing I was missing was a nine iron,” he laughed. The real story is that Eliason has two apps that allow him to track weather. One specifically tracks lightning. He knew exactly where the lightning was coming from and where it was going. And to maximize the effect, he set his camera for a 60-second exposure. Translated, that means his photograph captured every bolt of lightning to explode within his frame in a 60-second span of time. Little wonder it went viral. But sometimes, it’s more improvisational. There’s a startlingly simple but mysterious photo in which Eliason riffs on grass and sand and a Queen Anne’s palm set against a cotton-ball-white sky. At first, you don’t know what it is. “I got stuck in the sand trap at Sandpiper Golf Course,” Eliason said, explaining how the shot came to be. From this perspective, he saw the possibility of something that not everyone would. By tilting the camera just so, he could keep the ocean—lurking so scenically in the background—out of the frame. And that would effectively make the sky seem much lower than it was—a big heavy rectangle of uninterrupted white on top of the green of the grass and the yellow of the sand. “If I landed the ball in the green,” he laughed, “I would never have seen it.” The book is being sold only at local bookstores—which Eliason will be hitting for a meet-and-greet marketing tour beginning this week. It most emphatically will not, however, be sold on Amazon. Eliason is gratified by the warmth with which his work has been received over the years. “There’s nothing like a mom telling me she still has one of my photos of her kids on her refrigerator,” he said. n

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DEC.

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

9-15

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA COURTESY

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

12/10:

Solvang Fine Art Grand Opening Reception This

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event. COURTESY

gallery will showcase etchings by Rembrandt and original prints by Salvador Dalí and Joan Miró as well as a select group of prominent contemporary California artists. This ribboncutting ceremony and reception will offer refreshments and the opportunity to meet some of the artists. 4-8pm. Solvang Fine Art, 482 First St., Solvang. Free. Call (805) 691-9702 or email julie@solvangfineart.com.

solvangfineart.com

ber will sign copies of her recently released book, Bedtrick, about Alexander Cooke, born female, who successfully passes as male to play Shakespeare’s principal female roles during the reign of Queen Elizabeth. 5:30pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email events@chaucersbooks.com.

chaucersbooks.com/event

THURSDAY 12/9 12/9-12/10: A History of Comedy by Ritch Shydner American stand-up comedian and comic writer Ritch Shydner will explain the history of comedy from the Wild West and vaudeville to early radio and TV in his signature humor. 7-8:30pm. Brasil Arts Café, 1230 State St. $15-$20.

tinyurl.com/RitchShydner

12/9: The S.B. Contractors Association Presents Building to a Higher Standard Come meet other builders and learn the best way to evolve your business, ways to optimize choices for incorporation innovation, the right size HVAC system, window requirements, Title 24 changes, and more with presenter Mark LaLiberte. 5:30-7pm. Hayward Design Ctr., 417 Rose Ave. Free. Email marketing@ sbcontractors.org.

tinyurl.com/BuildHigherStd

FRIDAY 12/10 12/10: Comedy Is a Drag December Show Take in a night of A-list comics and drag queen performances with happy hour pricing on drinks and dinner from The Little Kitchen. 6:30-8pm. Wildcat Lounge, 15 W. Ortega St. $10-$20. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/ComedyDrag

will brief business members on the latest business trends, economic development, and other relevant issues that will affect the S.B. South Coast. Speakers will include Congressmember Salud Carbajal, State Senator Monique Limón, and S.B. County and 2nd District Supervisor Gregg Hart. 9-10am. Free.

tinyurl.com/LegislativeUpdate2021

SATURDAY 12/11 12/11: 23rd Annual TRAP Benefit: Pockets The band Pockets is made up of studio players and vocalists who have contributed to the albums of more than 100 artists such as Madonna, Elton John, The Beach Boys, and more. Enjoy an evening of top performers all in support of The Rhythmic Arts Project (TRAP), a program to benefit those with cognitive, emotional, and physical disabilities. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $65; student: $30. Call (805) 963-0761.

12/12: Met Live in HD Encore Screening, Matthew Aucoin’s Eurydice Soprano Erin Morley will sing the title role about the Greek myth of Orpheus, who attempts to harness the power of music to rescue his wife, Eurydice, from the underworld. 2pm. Hahn Hall, Music Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway Rd. Free-$28. Call (805) 969-4726. musicacademy.org

MONDAY 12/13

12/14:

Lobero Live Presents the Robert Cray Band Take in an evening of the unique blend of blues, soul, and R&B of five-time Grammy Award winner Robert Cray and his band featuring Richard Cousins (bass), Dover Weinberg (keyboards), Terence F. Clark (drums), and Steve Jordan (drums, percussion). 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $51-$61; VIP: $106. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/events

12/13: Book Talk and Signing: Roger Durling Executive Director of the S.B. Film Festival Roger Durling will talk about and sign copies of his new book, Cinema in Flux: A Year of Connecting Through Film, his insights and reflections of more than 100 films that he curated as a result of the lockdown due to COVID. 5:30pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email events@ chaucersbooks.com.

TUESDAY 12/14

chaucersbooks.com/event

lobero.org/events/trap

12/14: Book Talk and Signing: Mike Eliason Renowned photographer and S.B. local Mike Eliason will share insight and sign copies of his book, Santa Barbara and Beyond: The Photography of Mike Eliason, which is filled with images centered on the sun, sand, surf, and sea of S.B. 5:30pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email events@chaucersbooks.com. Read more on p. 24. chaucersbooks.com/event

5

/1 AY 12 D S E EDN

12/11: Virtual Talk: Art Meets Science in the Study of Bronze Sculpture Francesca G. Bewer, research curator for conservation and technical studies programs at the Harvard Art Museums, will closely examine artworks from across the ages and cultures and a series of unexpected discoveries about the almost alchemical processes of transformation essential to bronze. 11amnoon. Free.

sbma.net/events

SUNDAY 12/12 12/12: Three Dreamers Farmstand Find a variety of products hand-made by local farmers and artisans. Visit again December 19. 11am-4pm. Three Dreamers Farmstand, 8640 Santa Rosa Rd., Buellton. Free.

threedreamersfarm.com

W

12/13:

Science Pub from Home: Buzzing About S.B.’s Bee Diversity. Did you know that S.B. is home to more than 100 different species of bees and that most of them do not live in hives or make honey but instead play a key role in the ecosystem? Join the fun and fascinating conversation with bee researcher and alum of the Museum of Natural History’s Quasars to Sea Stars intern program Charlie Thrift. 6:30-7:30pm. Free. Email jrolle@sbnature2.org.

sbnature.org/visit/calendar

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event.

COURTESY

Webber Area author Jinny Web-

12/10: S.B. South Coast Chamber of Commerce Legislative Virtual Update This information-packed program

COURTESY

12/9:

Book Signing: Jinny

12/15:

UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents My Bluegrass Heart

Americana supergroup banjo legend Béla Fleck, along with Sam Bush (mandolin), Stuart Duncan (fiddle), Jerry Douglas (dobro), Edgar Meyer (bass), and Bryan Sutton (guitar) will play music from Fleck’s new album, My Bluegrass Heart, in his first bluegrass tour in more than 20 years. 8pm. Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. GA: $38.50-$103.50; student: $16. Call (805) 893-3535. Or email info@artsandlectures.ucsb.edu. tinyurl.com/BluegrassHeart

Volunteer Opportunity INDEPENDENT.COM

Fundraiser DECEMBER 9, 2021

Continued > THE INDEPENDENT

29


The Goleta Valley Art Association invites you to their

11th Annual

Picassos 4 Peanuts Show & Sale Outdoors at La Cumbre Plaza Saturday, December 11, 2021 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

GVAA members will sell their original art for $300 or less along with their craftworks. Live music by Tom Henderson and The Summerland Band.

TheGoletaValleyArtAssociation.org

Sponsors:

Winter Gardening & Cooking Classes 12/9 - 8:30 PM

SPECTRE JONES / THE FRAMERS / STRANGE CASE 12/10 - 8:30 PM

CHEYENNE SKYE & THE TASTY CAKES WITH SPOONFUL & NATALIA ALYSE

Holiday Treats Make-n-Take Class for Kids Sun. December 12 10am-noon

12/11- 12:00 PM

atozcookingschool.org

8:30 PM FUNK IT UP WITH AREA 51

Follow us @atozcookingschool

A CELEBRATION OF LIFE FOR MICHAEL S. SUMMERS

DEBBIE DENKE & KIM COLLINS ONE HUNDRED PACES WITH EASY BEAR 12/14 - 8:00 PM

NICK SEFAKIS // EUREKA SOUND 12/15 - 5:00 PM

PRIVATE EVENT 12/16 - 7:00 PM 14TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY SWEATER PARTY FEAT.

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1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 30

THE INDEPENDENT

See the 'Tis the Season guide at Independent.com for a full list of holiday happenings!

12/11-12/12:

S.B. Festival Ballet Presents The Nutcracker This enchanting production will feature acclaimed guest artists Alexandra Hutchinson and Kouadio Davis from Dance Theater of Harlem joined by Evelyn Mills as Clara and a gifted ensemble of students from UCSB and SBFB with Elise Unruh to conduct the live orchestra. Sat.: 2:30 and 7pm; Sun.: 2:30pm. Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. $30-$58. santabarbarafestivalballet.com 12/9: Emmet Cahill’s Christmas in Ireland Acclaimed Irish tenor Emmet Cahill will return to S.B. for a concert that will feature “Danny Boy,”“O Holy Night,” and other holiday classics. 7:30-9pm. Trinity Episcopal Church, 1500 State St. GA: $35; meet and greet: $50 (6:15pm). Call (805) 965-7419.

tinyurl.com/EmmetCahillSB

12/12 - 1:00 PM SANTA BARBARA JAZZ SOCIETY FEAT. 6:45 PM

HolidaY HappeningS

DECEMBER 9, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

12/10-12/12: The Ojai Art Center Theater Presents Our Home for the Holidays: A Celebration of Intergenerational Community Talent Come early for special pre-show performances by Dianne Miller on Friday and the Ojai Madrigali showcase on Saturday at 6:30pm with the Humane Society highlighting pets in need of a forever home on Sunday. Please bring a couple of canned goods for Help of Ojai. Fri.-Sat.: 7pm; Sun.: 2pm. The Ojai ACT, 113 S. Montgomery St., Ojai. Suggested donation: $10. Call (805) 640-8797. ojaiact.org

12/9-12/12, 12/15: Ensemble Theatre Company Presents The Wickhams: Christmas at Pemberley The play shows through December 19. Thu., Wed.: 7:30pm (Wed. pre-show talk at 6:45pm); Fri.: 8pm; Sat.: 4 and 8pm. Sun.: 2pm. The New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. $25-$77. Call (805) 965-5400 or email boxoffice@etcsb.org.

etcsb.org/whats-on/season

12/10: Una Noche de Las Posadas (The Inns) This reenactment of Joseph and Mary’s search for shelter in Bethlehem

will begin at the Presidio Chapel and continue to Casa de la Guerra. 7-10pm. El Presidio de Santa Bárbara State Historic Park, 123 E. Canon Perdido St. Free. Call (805) 965-0093.

sbthp.org/lasposadas

12/11: Goleta Holiday Parade 2021 This parade will be on Hollister Ave. from Orange Ave. to Kinman Ave. 6pm. Free.

goletaholidayparade.org

12/11: 67th Milpas Holiday Parade This parade will be on Milpas St. from De la Guerra St. to Mason St. 5:30-7:30pm.

Free. sbeastside.org/holiday-parade

12/11: Goleta Valley Art Association Picassos4Peanuts View and purchase artwork that includes oil, acrylic, watercolor, collage, stained glass, and jewelry by area artists for $300 with music by Tom Henderson’s Summerland Band (noon3pm). 10am-4pm. La Cumbre Plaza, 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call (805) 451-6919 or email terre.sanitate@gmail.com.

thegoletavalleyartassociation.org 12/12: The Polar Express: A Special Christmas Event Children are invited to write letters to Santa, take photos with Santa’s helper, make tree decorations, enjoy cookies and milk, and take home their own copy of The Polar Express. 2-3:30pm. S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. $10/child; $5/additional child. Email tettrazini@cox.net. friends-sblibrary.org/events

FRITZ OLENBERGER

T HE


Shows on Tap

MAR 1

Richard Thompson

COURTESY

Cheyenne Sky & The Tasty Cakes

Just Announced!

One of Britain’s most astonishing guitarists – with two Lifetime Achievement Awards (Americana Music Association & BBC Awards) and a coveted spot on Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time.”

12/9-12/12, 12/14:

SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Spectre Jones, The Framers, Strange Case. 8:30pm. $10-$15. Ages 21+. Fri.: Cheyenne Sky & The Tasty Cakes, special guests. 8pm. $15-$18. Ages 21+. Sat.: Area 51, 8:30pm. $10. Ages 21+. Sun.:

DEC 14

S.B. Jazz Society featuring Debbie Denke and Kim Collins, 1-4pm. $10-$35.

Tue.: Nick Sefakis, Eureka Sound, Dread Kennedy. 8pm. $15-$18. Ages 21+. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events 12/9-12/11: Eos Lounge Thu.: Chris Stussy, 8pm-1:30am. $5. Fri.: TSHA, Chadilliac, 9pm-1:30am. $7. Sat.: David

Mitchell, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

Hohme, 6pm-2am. $30. Ages 21+. 500 Anacapa St. eoslounge.com

mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

12/10-12/11: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Colonel Angus. Sat.: Cydways Music. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

12/10: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

12/10-12/11: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Fri.: Cliffhangers, 6-8pm. Sat.: Spencer the Gardener, 7-9pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com 12/10-12/12: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Michael Monroe Goodman, 5-8pm; Farm Truck, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Deanna

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

12/11-12/12: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: The Reserve. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

The Robert Cray Band

The five-time GRAMMY® Award winner has created a sound that rises from American roots and arrives today both fresh and familiar. “After nearly 40 years, Robert Cray remains as viable as ever. In a world turned upside down, his music continues to serve as comfort food for the soul.” - Something Else!

DEC 23

coldspringtavern.com

12/11: Topa Topa Brewing Co. (S.B) The Girl Austyn. 4-6pm. 120 Santa Barbara St. Free. Call (805) 324-4150. topatopa.beer/pages/happenings

D’Amico-White, 2-6pm; Michael Monroe Goodman, 8:30-11:30pm. Sun.: Sam

Men At Work

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6pm

GRAMMY® Award winning, multi-platinum selling act, with numerous dearly loved songs, such as “Down Under,” “Who Can It Be Now,” and “Overkill.”

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-6pm

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

WEDNESDAY

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org •

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

DEC 11

DEC 18/19

Visit Lobero.org or call 805.963.0761 LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

INDEPENDENT.COM

The Bentson Foundation John C. Mithun Foundation

DECEMBER 9, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

31


My Life

Optimism in Troubled Times

Can We Have Good Outcomes if We Fail to Imagine They Are Possible?

The Arlington Theatre

­

­

‘Tis the Season to Give the Gift of Movies

e-gift cards available!

to everyone on your list!

ENTERTAINMENT GIFT CARD

Available at MetroTheatres.com & at theatre locations

Metro 4

Fiesta 5

Hitchcock • Camino

Metro 4 • Camino

Fiesta 5

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Dec 10 - 16, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

West Side Story* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:00, 3:20, 4:25, 6:40, 7:45. Mon-Thur: 3:20, 4:24, 6:40, 7:45. Encanto (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 2:20, 4:55, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 12:45, 2:20, 4:55, 7:30.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Don’t Look Up(R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:05, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 1:55, 5:05, 8:15. Being the Ricardos (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:55, 7:45. Sat/Sun, Thur: 2:05, 4;55, 7:45. House of Gucci (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:30, 8:00. 1:00, 4:30, 8:00. Ghostbusters: Afterlife (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:40, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 4:40, 7:30. Thur: 2:20. Eternals (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:10, 7:40 Sat/Sun: 12:40, 4:10, 7:40. Thur: 2:00. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Wed: 4:20. Dune (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 7:50. Sat/Sun: 12:50, 7:50. Spider-Man: No Way Home* (PG13): Thur: 3:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:30, 10:30.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

Don’t Look Up(R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:35, 7:35. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 4:35, 7:35. The French Dispatch (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 7:45. Belfast (PG13): Fri-Sun, Tue-Thur: 5:00.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

No Shows Scheduled 32

THE INDEPENDENT

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

National Champions (R)): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:40(LP), 8:20(LP). Sat: 12:20, 3:00, 5:40, 8:20. Sun: 12:20(LP), 3:00(LP), 5:40(LP), 8:20(LP). Thur: 3:00, 5:40, 8:20. Dune (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:20, 7:45. Sat: 4:20(LP), 7:45(LP). Sun: 1:00, 4:20, 7:45. Eternals (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:40, 8:00. Sat: 1:20, 4:40, 8:00. Sun: 1:20, 4:40, 8:00. Thur: 3:10. MET OPERA: The Magic Flute*: Sat: 12:55. Spider-Man: No Way Home* (PG13): 3:30, 4:40(LP), 5:30, 6:45, 7:45(LP), 8:45, 10:00.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Being the Ricardos (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:10, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 2:20, 5:10, 8:00. Encanto (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:05. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 4:30, 7:05. Ghostbusters: Afterlife (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:55, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:55, 4:40, 7:15. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Thur: 4:05, 7:35. Christmas w/the Chosen:The Messengers (NR): Fri:, Mon-Wed: 4:40, 7:15. Sat/Sun: 1:55, 4:40, 7:15. Thur: 4:40. Nightmare Alley (R): Thur: 7:15.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

West Side Story* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:10, 3:00, 4:30, 6:30, 8:00. House of Gucci (R): Fri-Thur: 1:20, 4:45, 8:15. C’Mon C’Mon (R): Fri-Thur: 5:15. King Richard (PG13): Fri/Sat, Mon-Thur: 2:00, 7:45. Sun: 7:45

DECEMBER 9, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

by Cynthia Carbone Ward

I

was outside pruning the branches of the tangled, woody honeysuckle, whose bright-orange flowers draw hummingbirds, and planting new treasures from the nursery in the sandy, rocky dirt near the house, patting the ground hopefully. The sky had begun its procession from pastel periwinkle into blue dazzle, a wren performed its little cascade of notes, and I felt pretty good. Not so far away, fires were raging, viral variants were spreading, and in so many ways, we seemed to be on the cusp of doom. Jack Gilbert summed it up nicely in his “Brief for the Defense”: Sorrow everywhere. Slaughter everywhere. If babies are not starving someplace, they are starving somewhere else. With flies in their nostrils. But we enjoy our lives because that’s what God wants.

I am enjoying my life, in delicate coexistence with ominous truths and tragedy. I even believe that things will get better. I hold hope in my heart, tenaciously, and I suppose it’s a kind of luxury, maybe a manifestation of privilege, possibly self-delusion … but I cling to it. And if it’s illusory, I will do whatever I can to render its premise valid. My late friend Mark Haunfelner wrote about hope in a beautiful essay that was published in the Los Angeles Times in 1987. He was 32 years old then (how strange to imagine that he would now be in his sixties) and living with a diagnosis of terminal cancer. He was a conscientious and involved young citizen, active in political and humanitarian causes, and just as he chose to imagine that he might be cured, despite dire verdicts to the contrary, he also chose to have faith that our planet might someday be healed. “If I chose resignation,” he wrote, “I know it would be impossible to live whatever time remained to me in a meaningful and worthwhile way.” He decided to live and act “as if ” an opportunity existed for healing and health, on a personal and collective level. He channeled this resolve into a plea: And so I appeal to you my fellow citizens—I appeal to you with whom I have so proudly shared in the life-affirming work of free people. Know that the hour grows late and that the life of the human race hangs in the balance. I appeal to you because I cannot control the course of the cancer that threatens my life, but I know as never before that life is better than death, and that we must not squander the miraculous gift of life existing on this planet. I hear Mark’s plea, even now, and I accept the challenge. My life is small, my rickety little platform virtually unseen, my influence insignificant, and yet I know that there is a snowball effect in cumulative individual deeds, that light shines when truth is spoken, and new channels for change open up when we refuse to acquiesce to despair. It’s tough being human, even for a woman who lives in a land of enchantment and whose primary

tasks today consist of puttering with plants, packaging macadamia nuts from our orchard, making pesto, and preparing a Zoom presentation for earnest teacher-writers like herself. To be honest, I have a lot of anxiety. But I’ve discovered that the anxiety is useless. In fact, it’s worse than useless. It depletes me. It siphons energy that might have been used doing something constructive or kind or beautifying. I feel the same way about sorrow and regret, and although God knows I haul a lot of it around, I’ve mastered the trick of keeping it at bay most of the time. “We must risk delight,” Jack Gilbert said. I’m big on delight. He also said: We must have the stubbornness to accept our gladness in the ruthless furnace of this world. Yes, it takes a kind of stubbornness. Defiance. A willingness to hear music, and savor the shifting light, and breathe in a sense of gratitude that you are, for the moment, safe. It isn’t selfish to acknowledge that much is beyond your control, and none of it is made better by your weeping. We must admit there will be music despite everything. We stand at the prow again of a small ship anchored late at night in the tiny port looking over to the sleeping island: the waterfront is three shuttered cafés and one naked light burning. To hear the faint sound of oars in the silence as a rowboat comes slowly out and then goes back is truly worth all the years of sorrow that are to come. Can we have good outcomes if we fail to imagine they are possible? Despair is a gate drawn shut and locked, a denial before a step is taken, a self-fulfilling prophecy. Doesn’t optimism fuel activism? And isn’t joy a kind of rebellion? I just came inside with mud on my shoes and dirt beneath my fingernails, and my husband handed me a slice of buttered toast, and a tiny hummingbird flashed its magenta throat as it hovered about those honeysuckle flowers, and I would be most ungracious if I didn’t accept and say thank you n


living

HOLIDAY HOURS 9:00-5:00 Monday-Sunday

Noble Fir Trees Living Trees Poinsettias Wreaths Garland Cyclamen Table Decor Ornaments Christmas Cactus Gift Certificates Great Gifts!

New Gaucho Guards Search for Their Rhythm R

eplacing the backcourt tandem of JaQuori McLaughlin and Devearl Ramsey was always going to be a tall task for the UCSB men’s basketball team coming into the 2021-22 season. After seven games and a 5-2 record, the backcourt questions still linger, despite promising flashes from several current players. McLaughlin was named Big West Player of the year last season as well as Big West Tournament MVP. He nearly led the Gauchos to a first-round upset of Creighton in the NCAA tournament and later signed a two-way contract with the Dallas Mavericks, splitting time between the Mavericks and G-League Texas Legends. Ramsey was a threeyear starter and a steadying presence with a knack

Steady Progress Meets Lofty Hopes for Big Season by Victor Bryant for clutch shooting and playmaking. He is currently playing for the G-League Stockton Kings. “We have new guards, and they’re trying really hard to learn our system,” said UCSB Coach Joe Pasternack following a victory over Pepperdine this week. “I had Calvin [Wishart] up to my office, and we had an intense meeting face-to-face. He said, ‘Coach, I’m only five games in,’ and I said, ‘You’re right; it takes time, but this is what we need you to do.’” Wishart, a Georgia Southern transfer, was a revelation against Pepperdine as he came off the bench and lifted the Gauchos out of an offensive malaise with hot shooting, including 5-of-6 from the field with four three-pointers and 9-of-9 from the freethrow line on his way to 23 first-half points. Perhaps even more remarkably, Wishart did not score a single point in the second half and missed his only shot attempt with just over a minute to play. The awareness to not force his individual offense after such a hot start is a sign of maturity from the redshirt junior, and his teammates responded with a dominant second half. “I’m just trying to play more freely and take what they give me,” Wishart said. “If I’m going out and forcing things because I have a hot first half, then it’s going to undermine our team.” Wishart started the first four games of the season but since then has embraced his role coming off the bench. Freshman point guard Ajay Mitchell out of Belgium replaced Wishart in the starting lineup.

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SLIGHT TURBULENCE: Ajay Mitchell, scoring here on Pepperdine, has struggled somewhat with turnovers.

“I thought Calvin responded well to not starting,” Pasternack said following a loss to UT Arlington on November 29. “He had a little fire in his belly. I thought he played better.” Mitchell does a nice job of picking his spots offensively and has been extremely efficient shooting the ball. He boasts a 62.5 field goal percentage, while shooting 41.7 percent from three-point range. Mitchell has a high ceiling and the potential to blossom into a star, but like the rest of the UCSB guards, turnovers have been an issue, and the question remains how far along he will have come by the Big West Conference schedule and ultimately the postseason. Junior guard Ajare Sanni is coming off a Big West Sixth Man of the Year recognition, posting 12 doubledigit scoring outings in 21 games played last season. He is now a fixture in this year’s starting lineup but has yet to rediscover his shooting touch. The Gauchos will have ample firepower on the perimeter when all their weapons are in rhythm. “In practice, those guys shoot really well, but we’re not clicking on all cylinders right now,” said Pasternack of UCSB’s hit-and-miss three-point shooting. With a dominant presence in the interior with senior Amadou Sow, achieving balance is key for UCSB to reach the lofty expectations that many onlookers have for the program this season. But Pasternack is quick to remind his team that success is earned, not given. “People take winning for granted,” Pasternack said. “Winning is hard. You must be competitive. You must have every detail — I’s dotted and T’s crossed—in every phase of an athletic department and a basketball program.” The Gauchos will travel to Saint Mary’s for a nonconference contest on Saturday, December 11. The game will be livestreamed on the WCC network. FIGUEROA TIES RECORD: Despite a 44-22 loss to Palomar college in the 2021 Chick-fil-A Winter Festi-Bowl, SBCC kicker Jorge Figueroa put three points on the board from 21 yards out to open the scoring for the Vaqueros. With his 12th successful field goal of the season, he tied Jeremy Ybarra (2017) for the SBCC all-time single-season record. Figueroa, a freshman from Las Cruces, New Mexico, connected on 12-of-16 kicks this year, including a long of 46 yards. He was also a firstteam all-American Pacific Conference selection. n

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Historic Wine Country Properties Change Hands New Owners Embrace Fiddlestix Vineyard and Buttonwood Farm

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wo of the Santa Ynez Valley’s most historic and

impactful wine properties — Fiddlestix Vineyard, an early hotbed for pinot noir in the Sta. Rita Hills, and Buttonwood Farm Winery & Vineyard, a pioneer in organic farming just north of Solvang — changed hands last month, and the new owners for both are excited about furthering their respective legacies for the long haul. Founded by sustainability visionary and land conservationist Betty Williams in 1968, Buttonwood was sold by her heirs to Gleason Family Vineyards, owners of the Refugio Ranch and Roblar brands. And Fiddlestix’s founder Kathy Joseph — the owner of Fiddlehead Cellars who planted her property in 1998 when very few other vines existed on Santa Rosa Road — sold the 100-acre vineyard to a group led by Tyler Winery owner Justin Willett and viticulturist Erik Mallea. The pair owns a vineyard management company together, and Mallea also works for Sanford Winery across the road, home to the legendary Sanford & Benedict Vineyard. Prices for each deal were not disclosed. Meanwhile, the more recently developed Hilliard Bruce Vineyard — which had been on the market for nearly three years, initially listed at nearly $15 million — also sold recently for $10,550,000. The new owner is Michael Mente, who is CEO of the e-commerce fashion company Revolve, which went public in 2019 and is valued at more than $2 billion today.

wood’s managing partner until the sale, working alongside his wife, Barry Zorthian, and her sister, the artist Seyburn Zorthian, the daughters of Williams. He was pleased to find that the Gleasons shared many of their same values. “Many conversations over a glass of wine have convinced us that there could be no better solution,” said Davenport. “Their vision matches what & N we’ve always strived to do here with our KETTMAN BY MATT farm-to-table focus. We feel the next phase is in good hands.” Bieszard said that longtime Buttonwood winemaker Karen Steinwachs will remain, and they will continue to use the estate winery. “We intend to keep Buttonwood Buttonwood, and we’ll slowly creep our Gleason family touch on things,” he said. “There’s only so much wine we can currently make out of the Roblar facility, so I’m confident that the Buttonwood winery will remain an active site for us.” Beyond the vines, the Gleasons plan to integrate Buttonwood’s other crops — including the famous peaches as well as vegetables, pears, pomegranates, olives, hops, heirloom tomatoes, and more — into their growing hos-

BOTTLRESRELS BA

SHARED VALUES AT BUTTONWOOD The Gleasons, who founded Refugio Ranch in 2004 and purchased Roblar Farm & Winery in 2017, learned that Buttonwood was for sale through their assistant winemaker, Kat Gaffney, a friend of Buttonwood’s assistant winemaker, Brett Reeves. “We’re always focused on growth and development, whether that’s internally or in our pursuit of better wine, better vineyards, and better hospitality,” said Matthew Bieszard, the general manager of Gleason Family Wines and the son-in-law of proprietor Kevin Gleason. “That mesa vineyard SHINING NEW LIGHT: Justin Willett of Tyler Winery is ready to move Fiddlestix Vineyard is right in the heart of the Santa Ynez Valley with into the future. 360-degree views. It’s very enchanting. When you learn about the history with Betty Williams, it becomes even more compelling.” pitality offerings at Roblar Williams developed Buttonwood as an organic farm Farm. On a strategic front, in 1968, cofounded what became Land Trust for Santa Buttonwood holds one of Barbara County, and planted vines in 1983 in partner- the county’s first winery ship with her son-in-law Bret Davenport and with some permits, meaning that there guidance by Michael Benedict of Sanford & Benedict are many potential uses for Vineyard fame. (Buttonwood also served as a nursery for the property, such as food that seminal vineyard.) The own-rooted vines are mostly service and events, that Bordeaux varieties, but there are also blocks of grenache aren’t hampered by the strict regulations that emerged blanc, chenin blanc, grenache, and syrah. “Buttonwood Farm is personal and important to many more recently. “It’s a natural addition to in the community, and we hoped to find a family to carry on the legacy,” said Davenport, who served as Button- everything that we’re doing,”

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FIDDLE FORCE: Kathy Joseph, sitting on her porch at Fiddlestix Vineyard, is relieved and energized at selling the property.

said Bieszard. “Revitalizing this property and pushing it in a direction that’s in line with our core values is going to be the goal in 2022.”

FIDDLESTIX VINEYARD’S PINOT POWER In 1996, when Kathy Joseph purchased the land for Fiddlestix Vineyard, only a few vines existed along Santa Rosa Road in what would become the Sta. Rita Hills appellation. She was seeking a stable source for high-quality pinot noir to fuel her brand, Fiddlehead Cellars. “I found this unbelievable property that, in a sense, minimized my risk, because it was across from a famous vineyard that had been making great pinot noir,” she said, referring to Sanford & Benedict, which proved in the 1970s that pinot noir could thrive in this stretch between Buellton and Lompoc. She only needed 15 acres of pinot herself, but she had to plant 100 acres and sell grapes to make the purchase pencil out. Joseph partnered with Beringer Vineyards to take half of the fruit, and that split-ownership continued when Treasury Wine Estates bought Beringer.


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“The journey has been making it work,” said Joseph, who’s sold her pinot noir and, later, grüner veltliner grapes to nearly two dozen brands over the years. Among other challenges she never envisioned, Joseph publicly battled with neighboring cannabis farmers in recent years, though they eventually reached a “mutually beneficial agreement.” Today, said Joseph, “I want to spend less time farming for other people and more time making decisions for Fiddlehead.” She’d been quietly seeking a buyer for some time, but she didn’t want to sell to a large corporation. “I’ve been looking for someone who had local experience and mutual respect and commitment to the region and the community,” she said. “It was a good opportunity for me to transition.” Viticulturist Erik Mallea and winemaker Justin Willett became interested earlier this year. Together, under Willett-Mallea Farming, they farm a number of properties around the Sta. Rita Hills, including Willett’s Mae Vineyard, Rancho La Vina, and a few sites for French winemakers. Willett actually launched his Tyler Winery with Fiddlestix grapes back in 2005 and 2006. “It’s pretty cool to own it now 15 years later,” said Willett, who once again sourced grapes from Fiddlestix this year. “The wines are smoking. There’s no re-creating vine age in the cellar.” He sees the property’s quarter-century-old vines as a smart addition to the five-year-old vines he has at the Mae Vineyard — which is on the Highway 246 side of the appellation — and the 50-year-old vines he uses from Sanford & Benedict. “It’s a really cool cross section of the history of the region,” said Willett, whose other partners in the deal are longtime advisor/accountant Todd Gray and wine collector/friend William Borgers. “It’s really special to have a foothold in both corridors of the Sta. Rita Hills.” They plan to adopt more organic farming practices and will continue selling grapes. “The goal is to support the producers who have been part of the vineyard for a while and hopefully bring in some other high-quality producers as well,” said Willett. “I feel like we are inheriting something that we feel we can add value to, with Erik’s prowess on the wine-growing side and me in the cellar. We’re really excited about the future ahead.” Joseph sounds relieved and energized about the future. “This was my decision, and it worked well for me, so people should know that,” said Joseph, who will continue to make pinot noir, sauvignon blanc, and grüner veltliner from Santa Barbara and Oregon in her Lompoc winery. “Now the size of the farming is going to be more synchronous with the size of the winery. That makes my life just a little bit easier and more efficient. I can do more of the things that I really set out to do, which is about Fiddlehead Cellars.” n

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SUBS OF SUPPORT: The new Jersey Mike’s on Fairview Avenue, which is one of more than 2,000 nationwide and the seventh of this franchise’s owners, is raising money for Goleta Valley Junior High during its grand opening this weekend.

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Jersey Mike’s Opens on Fairview

new franchise of Jersey Mike’s Subs, which now includes more than 2,000 locations nationwide, opened in Goleta this week at 163 North Fairview Avenue, next to Santa Barbara Chicken Ranch. Franchise owners Steve Youlios and Kyanna Isaacson are holding a grand opening until Sunday, December 12, to support Goleta Valley Junior High School. Customers with a special fundraising coupon can make a minimum $3 contribution in exchange for a regular sub. Customers must have a coupon to be eligible. “Steve and I are very excited to be opening our seventh Jersey Mike’s location, our first here in the Santa Barbara area,” said Isaacson. “We look forward to growing relationships and partnerships, and having the opporoppor tunity to give back. Please help kick off our grand opening by helping us raise money for Goleta Valley Junior High.” Since 2010, Jersey Mike’s locations throughout the country have raised more than $65 million for charities. They are looking for individuindividu als interested in career opportuniopportuni ties with growth potential to join their team. Apply by emailing kyanna@jmscv .com. The restaurant’s hours are 10 a.m.-9 p.m., seven days a week. Call (805) 695-2002 or visit jerseymikes.com. TIMBERS CUTS WHISKEY JOE’S: When the family behind the recently shuttered Woody’s BBQ opened Timbers Roadhouse in October at 10 Winchester Canyon Road in an iconic 1952 building on the western outskirts of Goleta, the location featured two restaurants under one roof: the Roadhouse in the main dining room and Whiskey Joe’s in the bar area. But that’s already changed. “We like to remain proactive with the needs and concerns of the community that we all share

and have lowered our prices and are continuing to improve our menus,” said co-owner Gino Stabile. “Timbers Roadhouse no longer refers to its bar as Whiskey Joe’s. Now the bar area is part of Timbers Roadhouse and offers the same menu as the dining room, which has an updated menu with lower-priced options.” The new steakhouse menu—which is overseen by Executive Chef Andrew Crawley, who is in his 33rd year in the industry—features a range of meat and seafood, with entrée prices ranging from $16 for fish and chips to $46 for a New York strip. CAVA AS JAVA? Reader CVR Intel says “The old Cava

restaurant [on Coast Village Road that closed last September] is being tented today. A sign the building has sold?” Reader Oxmyx says that they heard a coffee shop was on the way, but that is a totally unconfirmed rumor. When I was growing up a few blocks away, the Cava building was a terrific restaurant called Pelican’s Wharf. Someone should bring back that brand.

DUNE ON CALLE REAL: Last May, I broke the news that

Dune coffee shop is coming to 5915 Calle Real, Suite A, in the former home of Pizza Hut across the parking lot from Zodo’s Bowling. Management says the opening is just around the corner, and jobs are available. “This new and magic coffee shop is coming very soon to the very magical Good Land,” says their announcement on Instagram. “Do you love coffee and making days? We do too! Email felix@ dunecoffee.com or hop into one of our coffee shops and let’s talk about getting you a job. This opportunity to make you all incredible coffees is one we don’t ever take for granted. Thank you SB & GOLETA for trusting us. The coffee is going to taste incredible in this window box.”

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. DECEMBER 9, 2021

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SMILES & SAVINGS: Meal Pass cofounder Kim Graham-Nye with an app user named Tom

would have otherwise been thrown away,” said Graham-Nye. “On average, every month participating restaurants are generating $4,000 in tax deductions.” They chose Santa Barbara as a launch point because they have friends here who’ve invested in the company, and find it similar to their home in Bombay Beach, outside of Sydney. “It’s very beautiful, but also struggling with a lot of inequality,” he said. “If there are ways we can address that inequality, we’d love to be part of it.” The basic way Meal Pass works is “quite elegant,” said Graham-Nye. After every lunch

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and dinner, restaurant managers can enter the amount of meals they have to give away after that shift. The app then accesses a database of hungry clients from the participating charities and puts the available meals on a map. Those in search of meals claim them via the app and go pick it up for themselves at the restaurant. The donation is tallied for the restaurant’s tax records. “Meals” range from unserved entrées and sandwiches in deli cases to unused foods that a chef whips up into a meal at the end of a shift. “We access that food and put it directly in the hands of people who need it,” he said. The need for a service like this will only increase, as a new California law that goes into effect next month demands that supermarkets do more to cut down on their waste. Large restaurants will fall under the same rules in a couple of years. New York is considering similar laws, and other states are sure to follow. That increasing volume is where Meal Pass, which is a for-profit business, sees room for growth. The company charges 5 percent of a restaurant’s tax savings, but there is no fee to sign up. Graham-Nye has not found a direct competitor yet. “There is clear air where we are,” he said. While feeding the hungry and fighting food waste are the most environmentally and socially impactful goals of Meal Pass, Graham-Nye believes it can be a critical tool in helping restaurants survive and thrive into the future. “Restaurants are coming out of a hellacious time, and now their operating expenses are soaring and it’s difficult to get staff in,” he said. “If there is a way we can help them build back better, we would love it.”

See mealpass.org or email jason@mealpass.org to learn more.

FOOD & DRINK

tion: According to census data, one out of every six Americans lacks stable access to nutritious food, and yet 30 to 40 percent of the food supply from restaurants and supermarkets winds up in landfills every year. Meanwhile, countless charities offer direct access to those hungry people, but they lack steady, efficient partnerships with the restaurants and markets that have extra food at the end of each day. Even the government stands ready to help, offering significant tax deductions for donated food, albeit requiring cumbersome paperwork to realize those benefits. Leave it to Aussies with tech backgrounds to solve this puzzle. Jason and Kim Graham-Nye are the cofounders of Meal Pass, a new app that connects the above dots, thereby cutting down food waste, directly feeding the hungry, saving restaurants money with ease, and dramatically boosting the impact of participating nonprofits. Said Jason Graham-Nye, “It never paid so well to do so good.” Last month, the couple—who are dedicated to developing more sustainable, circular economies and also founded the successful gDiapers company — launched the app with Santa Barbara as the test market. They’ve so far enlisted 15 restaurants and numerous nonprofits to donate more than 6,000 meals, “that

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LIL BAMS THROWING POSADA AT LA CASA Santa Barbara Hip-Hop Star Hosts Fundraiser Concert

L I F E

L

ife wasn’t easy for a young Lil Bams. Raised primarily on Santa Barbara’s Eastside to parents who were in and out of prison, Ramon Cardenas grew up primarily on the streets. “I was one of those kids who always wanted to be outside,” said the 26-year-old hip hop artist, who’s since dropped numerous albums and singles, starred in more than a dozen music videos, and opened for two nationwide tours. “I didn’t really like to be at home too much. We saw a lot of stuff out there as kids.” He often lived with his grandma, sometimes in Carpinteria, which is where he started rapping in middle school. The format was rap battles with friends, with lyrics that poked fun at each other. Things got more serious when he started attending Santa Barbara High. “When I was 13, I found music,” said Cardenas, who met the renowned, Santa Barbara–raised rap producer Damion “Damizza” Young around that time. “It started to keep me a little more out of the streets. It just kept me busy.” They connected through a mutual friend known as Wino, and when Wino committed suicide in 2009, their musical clique got tighter. Before ever making any music, Young tasked Cardenas and his cousin with alphabetically arranging a bunch of his old digital audio tapes, and they diligently stacked recordings of folks like Mariah Carey, Nate Dogg, and Jennifer Love Hewitt. Once Young realized that Cardenas was serious and responsible — despite having already been arrested for cannabis possession and expelled from high school his sophomore year—the eventual reward was studio time. Cardenas wasted no time learning how to make beats, lay down tracks, and write songs. Lil Bams was born. When Young found Cardenas sleeping in

JOE WOODARD,

GOLETA ELECTRIC Santa Barbara hip-hop artist Ramon “Lil Bams” Cardenas launched Granny’s Kids as a youth mentorship nonprofit and is hosting Posada at La Casa on December 18.

his car because his house was too crowded, the producer invited the rapper to stay with him. “He brought me in, and we became really close,” said Cardenas, who now spends much of the year with Young in Shreveport, Louisiana. “He’s been a big brother to me.” Cardenas wasn’t the only one. Encouraged by his beloved grandmother—whom whom every everyone knows as Granny—Young has helped numerous otherwise wayward Santa Barbara kids find a way into music. He’s bought suits for teens getting out of boys’ camp so they could look sharp at graduation, and used the carrot of music to lure others away from lives of crime. In one case, Young made a deal with one young rapper named Kidd, who’d been picked up by the cops for having a gun: If Kidd didn’t get in trouble for six months, he’d be able to rap on an album and get stage time during a show. “He’s never been in trouble since,” said Cardenas, who was inspired to start mentoring juvenile offenders with the UCSB-affiliated program Freedom 4 Youth. In that spirit, Cardenas and Young recently founded a mentorship nonprofit called Granny’s Kids, whose public launch is on December 18, when Posada at La Casa happens at La Casa de la Raza. Featuring more than a dozen musical acts, food and drink vendors, a toy drive, and merchants, the free event will raise publicity and money for the new char-

ity while giving young musicians a rare place to perform. Said Cardenas, “We’re trying to showcase some talent that maybe never would be seen.” The Lil Bams story, meanwhile, continues to unfold. Cardenas earned his high school degree and is trying to be a role model to his four much-younger sisters, the oldest of which is a San Marcos High student. Both of his parents are in better places as well. After some studio drama that followed his first official album release in 2016—which resulted in a lot of his early music being taken down from the web—Cardenas focused on rebuilding the Lil Bams brand. He’s dropping new singles and music videos regularly on YouTube, many of which feature Santa Barbara scenes. He frequently collaborates with other upand-coming artists, like Azjah from Compton and Bravo the Bagchaser from L.A., with a forthcoming project alongside Peysoh from Mayflower. “I’ve also been an A&R to the street,” he said. “I know who the new upand-coming rappers and singers are. I always catch them before they blow up.” Expect much more from this artist, who’s striving to put Santa Barbara on the hip-hop map. “I do okay,” said Lil Bams of his current status. “But it could still get better. There’s still a lot of room to grow.” —Matt Kettmann

Prolific ar ts writer and longtime musical collaborator Joe Woodard steps out as a neofolk songwriter on Goleta Electric. The album, which was recorded at the artist’s home studio during the pandemic, features musicians Jim Connolly, Zach Gill, Chris Symer, Brian Mann, and Bill Flores along with backing vocals by Ellen Turner, Allegra Heidelinde, Julie Christensen, and Shelly Rudolph. Quirky, literate, and uncompromising, Woodard’s tunes will appeal to listeners who favor the dry end of the 21st-century folk scene. Recalling similar intimate solo efforts by such artists as Jay Farrar and Jim O’Rourke, this is music for winter nights by the fire with a glass of something equally precious and well distilled. Credit Jim Connolly in particular for enhancing the album’s gorgeous sonic palette. Listen at joewoodard.bandcamp.com. —Charles Donelan

Posada at La Casa, a concert and community event to support Granny’s Kids, is on Sat., Dec. 13, 2-7pm, at La Casa de la Raza, 601 E. Montecito St. See grannyskidscharity.com for more information. To follow Lil Bams, check him out on Instagram @lilbamsbr.

SECRETS AND LIES BY SELENA MONTGOMERY (STACEY ABRAMS) In this romance-meets-thriller, Selena Montgomery — pen name for Georgia politician and voting-rights activist Stacey Abrams — tells an action-packed African-American love story set in South America. When professional thief Sebastian Caine breaks into Felix Estrada’s home to steal a mysterious and ancient relic for a client, he finds the security system breached and Felix Estrada dying on the floor at the hands of another. Sebastian Caine hates murder. He tracks who he thinks is the killer into the wilderness, but finds himself face to face with the clever and beautiful botanist Dr. Katelyn Lyda. The two develop an unexpected, sometimes wavering partnership in order to find the enigmatic ancient relic, but they stumble upon true love along the way — all while fighting some bad guys. At the Indy Book Club, we are closing out 2021 with this title to celebrate romance novels, a genre that is historically “for women” and which enjoys some of the highest sales in the publishing industry. Join us for a joyful discussion of Secrets and Lies at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, December 22, on the patio at Municipal Winemakers (22 Anacapa St.). A note for those who don’t usually read romance: Just give it a try! I suggest leaving your literary expectations at the door and just enjoying the story. Romance novels are supposed to be cheesy, sexy, and tied up with a nice happy ending — Secrets and Lies checks all those boxes! —Caitlin Fitch

GAGE SKIDMORE / COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA FOUNDATION

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REVIEWS

The Great

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he Wickhams: Christmas at Pemberley offers, among other things, a test of Fitzwilliam Darcy’s home security system. While it would be poor form to reveal many of the show’s plot twists, it’s fair to say that Pemberley’s intruder alarms fail. George Wickham (Kyle T. Hester) is at the top of Elizabeth and Darcy’s “do not admit” list, but he shows up regardless and turns out to be the family’s most lively holiday visitor. As the second installment in a projected trilogy of plays based on Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, The Wickhams is less stand-alone than Miss Bennet, the first of the Christmas at Pemberley Bennet Kyle T. Hester (left) and Adam Poss plays. Where Miss Bennet enjoyed the advantage of focusing on Mary, Pride’s only underwritten With the action taking place on the lower floor sister, The Wickhams must reconcile the playwrights’ invention with of Pemberley (or occasionally on the staircase or the Presented by two of Austen’s most memorable kitchen table), we are far from the scene of either the Ensemble Theatre characters, Lydia Bennet (Chelsea first installment of the trilogy or the original novel. Company. At the New Vic, Sat., Kurtz) and the rake George Wick- Whether or not this shift succeeds in capturing Austen’s Dec. 4. Shows ham. While Kurtz delivers a splen- romantic comedy magic and transferring it to the lower through Dec. 19. did performance as the spirited orders will depend to an extent on how audience memLydia, it’s Hester’s Wickham that bers receive the resolution. For those who take Austen had the audience riveted. Whether he’s receiving the to be a conservative supporter of firm boundaries ministrations of Mrs. Reynolds (Nike Doukas), flirting between the social classes, there will be one sense of the with Cassie (Kodi Jackman), or crossing verbal swords ending, and for those who believe she was a progressive with either Darcy (Adam Poss) or Brian (Will Block), before her time, there will be another. One thing is sure, we can’t take our eyes off him. It’s quite a feat, given the however—the saga of Christmas at Pemberley is not pride of place usually accorded to Elizabeth Bennet over yet. Various cliffhangers leave plenty of room for Darcy (Rebecca Mozo) in the Austen universe. further developments in Part Three. —Charles Donelan

ZACH MENDEZ

THE WICKHAMS: CHRISTMAS AT PEMBERLEY

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his performance was the first show of the Very She & Him Christmas Party tour and the first UCSB Arts & Lectures event at the Arlington in 21 months—both great reasons to celebrate. Zooey Deschanel and Matt Ward have crafted a fun evening of music and comedy that’s an up-to-date version of the holiday variety shows that once ran on network television. The focus is not so much on Zooey Deschanel, the movie star, as it is on Zooey Deschanel, the singer, whose big, clear, confident voice M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel filled the Arlington and the songs with sophisticated dividends of nuance and emotion. The now-controversial “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” Comedian Pete Lee’s warm-up set and brief mid- which was on the first She & Him Christmas album, show guest appearance made him a good foil for the came with a trigger warning from Deschanel about hip pair. He played up his Wisconsin-nice background consent and was done, as on their record, with genders while still tossing some sharp reversed. Suffice it to say that She & Him did “Baby, It’s cracks at Santa Barbara’s posh Cold Outside” with plenty of implicit self-awareness Presented by image. long before the song became the occasion for a public UCSB Arts & Lectures. At The Deschanel, Ward, and their conversation. Arlington Theatre, quartet of musicians (plus two Highlights included some brilliant three-part harThu., Dec. 2. terrific backup singers) mostly monies a capella and an excellent encore duet on “You stuck to the holiday program. Really Got a Hold on Me.” Another high point came However, there was an interval set aside for some after Deschanel shared that while she was vacationof She & Him’s original material. The setlist covered ing in Montecito last week, she heard the She & Him a lot of ground, all the way from “Have Yourself a version of Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas Merry Little Christmas” and “Winter Wonderland” Is You” in the Country Mart. It made her day, and to the Beach Boys’ “Little Saint Nick” and Brenda Lee’s then she sang it live, making ours. That’s some great “Rocking Around the Christmas Tree.” Christmas spirit right there. —CD

DAVID BAZEMORE

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF DECEMBER 9

ARIES

Join us in reading December’s book of the month! DECEMBER’S THEME: ROMANCE

DI S CU SS I O N :

Wednesday, December 22, 6pm Location: Municipal Winemakers on the patio BO O K O F T H E M O N T H :

Secrets and Lies

by Selena Montgomery independent.com/indybookclub

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Aries filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky (19321986) was experimental and innovative and influential. His imagery was often dreamlike, and his themes were metaphysical. He felt that the most crucial aspect of his creative process was his faith. If he could genuinely believe in the work he was doing, he was sure he’d succeed at even the most improbable projects. But that was a challenge for him. “There is nothing more difficult to achieve than a passionate, sincere, quiet faith,” he said. In accordance with your astrological omens during the next 12 months, Aries, I suggest you draw inspiration from his approach. Cultivating a passionate, sincere, quiet faith will be more attainable than it has ever been.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): “All journeys have secret destinations of which the traveler is unaware,” said philosopher Martin Buber. How true! I would add that the traveler is wise to prepare for the challenges and opportunities of those secret destinations … and be alert for them if they appear … and treat them with welcome and respect, not resistance and avoidance. When travelers follow those protocols, they are far more likely to be delightfully surprised than disappointingly surprised. Everything I just said will apply to you in the coming weeks, Taurus.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Gemini sleight-of-hand artist Apollo Robbins may be the best and most famous pickpocket in the world. Fortunately, he uses his skill for entertainment purposes only. He doesn’t steal strangers’ money and valuables from their pockets and purses and jackets. On one occasion, while in the company of former U.S. President Jimmy Carter, he pilfered multiple items from a Secret Service agent assigned to protect Carter. He gave the items back, of course. It was an amusing and humbling lesson that inspired many law-enforcement officials to seek him out as a consultant. I suspect that in the coming weeks, you may have comparable abilities to trick, fool, beguile, and enchant. I hope you will use your superpowers exclusively to carry out good deeds and attract inviting possibilities.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Many sportswriters regard Michael Jordan as the greatest basketball player ever. He was the Most Valuable Player five times and had a higher scoring average than anyone else who has ever played. And yet he confesses, “I have missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I have lost almost 300 games. And I have failed over and over and over again in my life.” He says the keys to his success are his familiarity with bungles and his determination to keep going despite his bungles. I invite you to meditate on Jordan’s example in the coming days.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): In his poem “Song of Poplars,” Leo author Aldous Huxley speaks to a stand of poplar trees. He asks them if they are an “agony of undefined desires.” Now I will pose the same question to you, Leo. Are you an agony of undefined desires? Or are you a treasury of well-defined desires? I hope it’s the latter. But if it’s not, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to fix the problem. Learning to be precise about the nature of your longings is your growing edge, your frontier. Find out more about what you want, please.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Black is your lucky color for the foreseeable future. I invite you to delve further than ever before into its mysteries and meanings and powers. I encourage you to celebrate blackness and honor blackness and nurture blackness in every way you can imagine. For inspiration, meditate on how, in art, black is the presence of all colors. In printing, black is a color needed to produce other colors. In mythology, blackness is the primal source of all life and possibility. In psychology, blackness symbolizes the rich unconscious core from which all vitality emerges.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the 10th season of the animated TV series South Park, its two creators produced an episode called “Make Love, Not Warcraft.” The story lovingly mocked nerds and the culture of online gaming. Soon after sending his handiwork to executive producers, Libran co-creator Trey Parker decided it was a terrible episode that would wreck his career. He begged for it to be withheld from broadcast. But the producers ignored his pleas. That turned out to be a lucky break. The episode ultimately won an Emmy Award and became popular with fans. I foresee the possibility of comparable events in your life, Libra. Don’t be too sure you know which of your efforts will work best.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Nobel Prize–winning Scorpio author André Gide (1869-1951) had an unusual relationship with his wife, Madeleine Rondeaux. Although married for 43 years, they never had sex. As long as she was alive, he never mentioned her in his extensive writings. But after she died, he wrote a book about their complex relationship. Here’s the best thing he ever said about her: “I believe it was through her that I drew the need for truthfulness and sincerity.” I’d love for you to be lit up by an influence like Madeleine Rondeaux, Scorpio. I’d be excited for you to cultivate a bond with a person who will inspire your longing to be disarmingly candid and refreshingly genuine. If there are no such characters in your life, go looking for them. If there are, deepen your connection.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): A fashion company called Tibi sells a silver mini dress that features thousands of sequins. It’s also available in gold. I wonder if the designers were inspired by poet Mark Doty’s line: “No such thing, the queen said, as too many sequins.” In my astrological estimation, the coming weeks will be a fun time to make this one of your mottoes. You will have a poetic license to be flashy, shiny, bold, swanky, glittery, splashy, sparkling, and extravagant. If expressing such themes in the way you dress isn’t appealing, embody more metaphorical versions.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I have pasts inside me I did not bury properly,” writes Nigerian poet Ijeoma Umebinyuo. Isn’t that true for each of us? Don’t we all carry around painful memories as if they were still fresh and current? With a little work, we could de-potentize at least some of them and consign them to a final resting place where they wouldn’t nag and sting us anymore. The good news, Capricorn, is that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to do just that: bury any pasts that you have not properly buried before now.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In February 1967, the Beatles recorded their album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band in London. A man claiming to be Jesus Christ convinced Paul McCartney to let him weasel his way into the studio. McCartney later said that he was pretty sure it wasn’t the real Jesus. But if by some remote chance it was, he said, he didn’t want to make a big mistake. I bring this to your attention, Aquarius, because I suspect that comparable events may be brewing in your vicinity. My advice: Don’t assume you already know who your teachers and helpers are. Here’s the relevant verse from the Bible: “Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have entertained angels without knowing it.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): According to Professor of Classics Anne Carson, ancient Greek author Homer “suggested we stand in time with our backs to the future, face to the past.” And why would we do that? To “search for the meaning of the present—scanning history and myth for a precedent.” I bring this to your attention, Pisces, because I think you should avoid such an approach in the coming months. In my view, the next chapter of your life story will be so new, so unpredicted, that it will have no antecedents, no precursory roots that might illuminate its plot and meaning. Your future is unprecedented.

HOMEWORK: Send your predictions for the New Year — both for yourself and the world. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 42

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GENERAL FULL-TIME FOOD PURCHASING Agent (Santa Barbara) – Evaluate suppliers on the basis of the price, quality, and speed of delivery of their products and services. Analyze product and market information to determine reasonable prices. Negotiate, evaluate and monitor agreements with suppliers. Maintain records of items bought, costs, deliveries and inventory. Must have 24 months of experience as Food Purchasing Agent, Restaurant Operator or Restaurant Manager. Mail CV to Mike Mashoon, Mashoon’s Foodland Inc., 1501 San Andres St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101.

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT

CAMPUS STORE Responsible for supporting all functions of the Accounting Department. Responsible for total expenditures of $11,000,000 annually to the stock ledger, processing the Campus Store credit card and BARC accounts, preparing bi‑monthly check‑runs, and for the leadership of the department. Assists with month‑end closing procedures and year‑end physical inventory and fiscal closing. Processes and approves invoices for multiple departments through the Missouri Book Service merchandise module, ensuring accurate updates of the stock ledger and inventory. Researches and resolves discrepancies with vendors and the Receiving Department and maintains the purchase order files for each fiscal year. Invoices purchase orders to key recs and receives generated to post to the stock ledger. Must be able to multitask due to the complexity of knowing the two different modules of the MBS System. Assures accuracy of Emblematic Clothing & Gifts and Supply Inventory input which consists of proper cost, retail prices and margins, maintaining purchase order files for MBS merchandise. Sends all PLU’s and Rebuilds for proper scanning at registers. Trains and supervises student staff to assist with purchase orders, invoices and other functions. Helps reconciliation of the Campus Store Visa credit card bills for payment. Helps with Gateway department campus order processing. Helps receive, process and input other departments PO’s as needed. Reqs: Previous accounting background. Solid communication and interpersonal skills to communicate effectively with all levels of staff verbally and in writing. Solid organizational skills and ability to multitask in a high‑volume environment with demanding timeframes. Ability to use discretion and maintain confidentiality. Must be able to work some evenings and weekends and be a key holder for open or closing as needed. $24.61‑ $26.98/hr. Notes: Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory criminal history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application Review begins 12/08/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu. Job # 27437

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BUDGET AND . FINANCE MANAGER

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Responsible for the overall coordination of the fiscal operation of the Dean’s Office, including seven distinct units (Building Construction and Space Management, Corporation

Affiliates Program, Engineering Computing Infrastructure, Events, Machine Shop, Marketing and Communications, and Undergraduate Studies) in accordance with university policies and procedures. Supervises the finance unit. Ensures that all day‑to‑day and monthly financial activities are completed to the highest quality. Collects financial data, provides analyses and recommends courses of action to the Assistant Dean of Budget and Administration for all Dean’s Office fiscal activities. Reconciles sub‑0 and sub‑1 staffing lists for College, including five departments and one program. Analyzes, recommends, and implements changes in existing administrative policies and procedures for more efficient and effective operations. Ensures high standard of customer service and professionalism. Develops and upgrades systems to track college‑wide budgetary information and coordinates data for college‑wide tracking and analysis. Is a point of contact for questions from staff in CoE regarding UC, campus, and CoE policies and procedures for all financial matters. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience. Thorough knowledge of financial processes, policies and procedures. Thorough knowledge of financial data management and reporting systems. Strong proficiency in the use of spreadsheet and database software. Strong interpersonal and analytical skills. Effective verbal and written communication skills. Ability to function effectively as a member of a team. Ability to multi‑task in a high‑volume environment. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $55,600 ‑ $83,400/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/16/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 27727

CAREER SERVICES SPECIALIST 3

Technology Management Program Oversees student and alumni job placement, as well as employer and corporate relations, and a hybrid work schedule could be considered. Reqs: BS or BA, in social science, science, or engineering discipline preferred or equivalent experience. Ability to work with people from diverse cultures. Ability to design and modify computer application to meet program needs, problem identification presentation skills, verbal communication, written communication, and organizational skills. Experience with University policy and procedures. Excellent oral and written communications skills. Excellent organizational skills. Excellent people skills. Strong computer skills, including experience with spreadsheet and database applications. Able to work well independently and collaboratively as part of a team. Experience with or demonstrated ability to learn new software and technology (e.g. social media platforms, content management systems, image editing

software, etc). Ability to effectively solve problems and demonstrate sound reasoning and judgment. Able to work confidently with diverse student populations and committed to practicing and promoting inclusivity. Ability to establish and maintain cooperative working relationships within the department, and with the broader campus community. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Some travel may be required. $52,200 ‑ $69,900/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 12/16/2021. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #26744

DIRECTOR, HUMANITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER

HUMANITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Responsible for the full range of management functions for the departments of History, Classics, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies, and Religious Studies. Management responsibilities encompass academic administration and academic support services; departmental computer/ technical support services; contract, grant, and gift/ donation administration; purchasing, financial management, and payroll; staff and academic personnel; and space management and safety programs. Reqs: BA/BS or equivalent combination of education and experience. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills including the ability to professionally interact with students, staff, and faculty on the phone, virtually, via email, and in person. Excellent analytical and problem‑solving skills. Strong computer and organizational skills. Ability to work independently under general supervision and prioritize tasks in conjunction with multiple deadlines. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $79,400‑$92,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/14/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 27472

ledgers, providing timely reporting, identifying and initiating corrective actions, and ensuring compliance with University, Federal, and State accounting policies and procedures on all transactions. In collaboration with management, establishes best practices for procurement, payroll, record retention, and accounts payable functions. Funds administered include a variety of state operating funds, gifts, endowments, fellowships, and grants. Requires considerable initiative, multitasking, communication, attention to detail, and problem‑solving abilities. Must possess a strong knowledge of UC and departmental policies and procedures as they relate to financial services. Advises faculty on policies and procedures that govern the full range of accounting processes, gift and award administration, and academic and staff payroll. Processes gifts and monitors endowment accounts. Responsible for assisting faculty with logistical arrangements and all financial aspects of conferences, colloquiums, seminars, and events. Reqs: Excellent written and verbal communication skills. Ability to work independently to perform details and accurate work while meeting critical deadlines. Must be customer service‑oriented and able to work with interruptions. Ability to perform within a diverse work environment. Strong computer experience using Word and Excel. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/14/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 27146.

FIRE SPRINKLER TECHNICIAN ‑ PLUMBER

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Maintains and repairs fire sprinkler systems and fire hydrants in on‑campus and off‑campus UCSB facilities. Designs, redesigns, and assembles from working drawings and blueprints various systems including water, steam, sanitary and storm drains, irrigation and sprinkler systems, and compressed airlines. These installations require a thorough knowledge of all building and safety codes, the ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings, and the ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow; performs welding, soldering, and brazing as required; installs and repairs plumbing fixtures, air compressors, pumps, steam and hot water boilers. Reqs: Must possess the skills, knowledge and abilities essential to the successful performance of Journey Level Plumber duties as evidenced by a journeyman plumber certificate or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Substantial journey‑level experience in institutional, industrial and commercial plumbing installation and maintenance. Thorough knowledge of all building and safety codes. Ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings. Ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Preferred Qualifications: C16 license or 3 years experience installing, repairing or maintaining commercial fire sprinkler systems. Note: Maintain a valid CA driver’s

license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $37.56/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26306

GROUNDSKEEPER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Maintains grounds and landscape duties around eight residence halls, four dining commons and five residential apartment complexes. May be assigned other duties (including those in other areas) to accomplish the operational needs of the department. May be required to work schedules other than Monday through Friday, to meet the operational needs of the department. May be required to perform other duties as assigned to meet the operational need of the department. Complies with department safety and illness programs as implemented by supervisor and/or co‑workers. Reqs: Minimum of 3 years experience in grounds maintenance. Must be able to follow oral/written instructions. Ability to perform minor repairs on small equipment. Some knowledge of irrigation and drip systems. Experience with the use of tractors, small lawnmowers, edgers, power sweepers, roto‑tillers, and chainsaws. Will be working with a diverse student

Continued on p. 44

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT

HUMANITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Financial Assistant administers all financial activities for the Departments of Classics and East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies, and HASC. Processes monthly review and reconciliation of

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EMPLOYMENT body and staff. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. $18.38‑ $21.55/hr.The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/17/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 27749

LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long‑term social services, including long‑term counseling and case management support. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of California. Master’s degree in Social Work. Notes: Credentials verification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job #25943

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurses. Assists with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/ out patients, filling out the necessary paperwork, taking phone messages, and following directives from the clinicians. Acts as a resource for non‑licensed staff. Utilizes nursing knowledge in these tasks as well as but not limited to providing patient education, administering immunizations, and functioning within the scope of practice. Reqs: Licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must be CPR certified/Basic Life Support (BLS) certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Must be organized, detailed oriented, confidential and dependable. Strong oral/written communication, organizational and customer service skills. Proficient in Microsoft and Google suite. Notes: Credentials verification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse and Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory criminal history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of

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annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must be licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must have a current license at all times during employment. Must be CPR certified/ Basic Life Support (BLS) certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11month position, M‑F 7:30am – 4:30pm. 4 weeks of furlough is taken during quarter breaks and summer months. May include Thurs. evenings from 10am‑7pm. $30.42‑ $37.83/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 21751

NETWORK SERVICES ENGINEER

Office of Information Technology Leading technical member of the UCSB Network Operations Center (NOC) provides network and internet connectivity to campus academic and business operations. Duties include the design, implementation, evaluation and administration of wired and wireless network systems, including routers, switches, wireless controllers, authentication and accounting systems, and virtual private network (VPN) servers. Develops scripts and processes for system integration, data collection and reporting, and network monitoring for cloud‑hosted and local environments. Serves as a technical consultant in the planning, design, and operation of network services. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area or equivalent experience/training. Demonstrated thorough knowledge of professional communications and network concepts necessary to resolve issues using established parameters, creativity, and independent judgment. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $79,315‑ 104,600/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/14/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #12087.

RESEARCH ADMINISTRATOR 3

CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Responsible for the pre‑award thru post‑award administration as part of a Contracts & Grants Team, and management of research gift funds made to the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Duties include, but are not limited to, the budget development, university, and agency form preparation for all new, continuing, supplemental awards and renewed contracts, coordinating proposal submission and managing strict deadlines. In addition, the Research Administrator is responsible for all post‑award management currently totaling ~25 million annually. Duties include setting up new awards in financial shadow system (GUS) and analyzing award terms and conditions; coordination with Office of Research and Business Services to establish and administer sub‑awards and business service contracts: preparing and processing all paperwork related to incremental, continuation, and or

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DECEMBER 9, 2021

option period funding; advise faculty, staff and students of proper University and agency policies regarding extramural funding policies and procedures. Maintains knowledge of policies and procedures associated to Academic Personnel, Staff Personnel, Graduate Division, Accounting, Travel Accounting, Purchasing, and Business Services. Demonstrates flexibility in learning, interpreting, and adapting to new policies, procedures, and computer applications. Analyzes, interprets, and implements new and frequently changing campus, federal, and funding agency policies and procedures. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combinations of education and experience. Administrative experience working in a higher education setting. Strong web‑based computer application program skills (Microsoft Suite, Google Web Applications, etc). Must be able to work effectively under the pressure of deadlines. Ability to adapt to changing priorities and multi‑task in high‑volume environment. Excellent written and verbal communications skills. Strong analytical, critical thinking and organizational skills. Knowledge of Fund Accounting principles and practices. Familiarity with government agencies, such as NSF, NIH, DOE, etc. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $55,600‑$68,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 27142

SR. PARKING REPRESENTATIVE

TRANSPORTATION & PARKING SERVICES Enforces University parking regulations by issuing citations and courtesy warnings to vehicles illegally parked. Identifies vehicles to be “booted” and processes them according to California Vehicle Code. Keeps current off‑campus events and their locations. Directs traffic and escort vehicles including semi‑trucks and buses. Informs supervisor of problems as they arise. Provides parking instructions and gives directions. Perform other duties as required. Reqs: Demonstrated exceptional customer service by providing and delivering professional, helpful, high‑quality service and assistance. Ability to work as part of a team, maintain a positive attitude, and work together to achieve a common goal of providing world‑class customer service. Excellent interpersonal skills, including the ability to collaborate with students, staff, faculty, and the general public. Ability to grasp new concepts. Ability to maintain professionalism and composure under high customer demand and challenging customer interactions. Excellent written and verbal communication. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Ability to work nights and weekends. $22.17/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/17/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 27933

STUDENT HEALTH PHYSICIAN

STUDENT HEALTH Provides direct clinical services in Primary Care Family Medicine OR Primary Care Internal Medicine and Immediate Care for all eligible patients at UCSB Student Health. Also provides consultation on a per case basis if needed, for all members of the professional staff to assist them with diagnosis and treatment of their patients. Provides supervision for the Physician Assistants when the Primary Supervisor is unavailable as assigned by the UCSB SHS Executive Director and/or Medical Director. Reqs: Must have a current CA Medical, DEA License, and Board Certification at all times during employment in order to practice and function in this clinical role; credentials are renewed periodically. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioners. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Criminal history background check. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA/FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 23923

STUDENT SERVICES ADVISOR 2

SUMMER SESSIONS Support and advise new, continuing, and returning UCSB students, and visit high school students regarding Summer Sessions’ programs, courses, policies, deadlines, and fees. Serves as a primary point of contact for phone inquiries, email inquiries, and in‑person visitors, and triages registration and fee issues in collaboration with BARC, Financial Aid, Office of the Registrar, College Advising offices, and academic departments. Assists with Summer Sessions outreach, promotion, and training, review of summer program applications, and maintenance of student records. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree and/or equivalent experience in academic advising or customer service‑related fields. Ability to understand and inform students about campus policies, procedures, and requirements. Basic knowledge of working with a diverse student population, and sensitivity to culture, race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and socio‑economic status. Strong interpersonal skills, with a proven ability to communicate professionally and effectively, both verbally and in writing. Skills in problem solving, judgment, and decision‑making. Solid organizational skills and proven detail orientation. Basic knowledge of the UC system, student information systems, and Summer Sessions operations. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. No extended vacations may be taken during spring or while programs are in session. Must work occasional weekend and/ or evening hours while programs are in session, as needed. $23.66‑$26.82/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26613.

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SYSTEMS AND DATA MANAGER

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL SERVICES Supports multiple financial system integrations, provisioning of access to campus financial systems, and assisting with long‑term financial system process development. Documents complex business processes and systems; prepares plans and proposals for the improvement of systems, procedures, and processes. Handles identifying and resolving complex issues with BFS system integrations. Oversees UCSB’s person index maintenance. Possesses solid operational and accounting skills, data reconciliation experience, and system support skills. Possesses the ability to work under deadline pressure, handle multiple projects concurrently, and dealing with sensitive and confidential issues. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Thorough knowledge of business and process analysis functions. Thorough Knowledge of related areas of IT. Strong skills and knowledge of methodologies associated with the analysis of processes and problems, information flow and architecture. In‑depth understanding and skill in process and systems requirement documentation standards. Demonstrated ability to work with others from diverse backgrounds. Self‑motivated and works independently and as part of a team. Able to learn effectively and meet deadlines. Demonstrates problem‑solving skills. Broad knowledge relating to software design. Thorough knowledge of business processes and procedures. Demonstrated testing and test planning skills. Demonstrated effective communication and interpersonal skills. Demonstrated ability to communicate technical information to technical and non‑technical personnel at various levels in the organization. Interpersonal and communications skills to work with both technical and non‑technical personnel at various levels in the organization. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $70,815‑ $85,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/14/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 27520

existing College infrastructure and with UCSB campus IT professional organizations to ensure integration with campus serving architectures. Under the direction of the Marketing Team, identifies and improves the online needs for students, faculty, staff, alumni, the media, industry, and other college affiliated audiences. Performs creative layout, graphics creation, and design tasks, and advises the College on web development decisions. Reqs: Good knowledge of Drupal 7 and Drupal 8, and staying current on future versions. Proficient with HTML 5. Experience in CSS. Experience in Adobe Photoshop. Problem solver, quick learner, detail‑oriented and able to meet deadlines. Good communication skills and very reliable. Good understanding of accessibility and SEO best practices. Experience with media and social media integration. Experience with coding in all browsers. Eye for the details (pixel‑perfect coding). Positive attitude and love working with a team. Desire to create best‑in‑class products and stay on top of the latest web technologies. Ability to work independently and as a member of a team. Demonstrates initiative and flexibility. Possess excellent oral, written, and interpersonal communication skills. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/16/21. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 27768

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RENTAL PROPERTIES APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT $1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610

WEBMASTER

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING The College of Engineering Webmaster develops and maintains the web presence for the College of Engineering (CoE) and its departments, institutes, centers, programs, and faculty. Under the direction of the Marketing and Publications Director, the position has primary responsibility for the development and maintenance of the college’s websites, content management systems, and web applications. Provides web development, planning, search engine optimization, database architecture, analytics, training, and consultation to other college‑affiliated units on a recharge basis. Implements new tools, user interfaces, and applications on the web in a variety of programming languages. Adheres to laws and policies regarding accessibility, security, and data protection. Coordinates with server provider to ensure software upgrades and maintenance are current. Provides technical support to users as needed. Performs website‑related duties in a Linux environment and configures the webserver and databases. Works collaboratively with the ECI team to ensure efficient integration with

1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915 1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549 STUDIOS $1320+ & 1BDs $1440+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

HOUSES/DUPLEXES FOR RENT HOUSE FOR RENT two bedrooms,1 bath, ref, dishwasher, wash/dryer machine outdoor yard, patio, two car garage. Hope Ranch annex. 1/2 mile from Mira Mesa beach. Pets ok/No smoke/No vape. La Cumbre School district. Charming single family cottage, very clean 246 Puente Dr. SB 93110; (DO NOT DISTURB OCCUPANTS) $4250 per mo. (805) 618‑8433 8am‑3pm pst.

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DOMESTIC CARS DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT OR RV TO HELP HOMELESS PETS. PETS ALIVE IS A CALIFORNIA, 501‑C‑3 NONPROFIT. GUARANTEED TAX DEDUCTIONS. PAPERWORK EXPERTS, FREE QUOTE AND PICK UP. ASK ABOUT FREE 7 DAY VACATION OR $200 VISA GIFT CARD. LAPETSALIVE. ORG 1‑833‑772‑2632 (Cal‑SCAN)

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SERVICE

DIRECTORY HOME SERVICES AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/ month w/12‑mo agmt. Includes 1 TB of data per month. Get More For Your High‑Speed Internet Thing. Ask us how to bundle and SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. Call us today 1‑855‑397‑7909. (SCAN) DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21.1‑833‑872‑2545 ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule free LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑995‑2490 UPDATE YOUR home with beautiful new blinds & shades. Free in‑homeestimates make it convenient to shop from home. Professional installation. Top quality ‑ Made in the USA. Free consultation: 877‑212‑7578. Ask about our specials!

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MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS !!OLD GUITARS WANTED!! GIBSON, FENDER, MARTIN, Etc. 1930’s to 1980’s. TOP DOLLAR PAID. CALL TOLL FREE 1‑866‑433‑8277 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1‑888‑519‑0171 (AAN CAN) AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/ month w/12‑mo agmt. 1 TB of data/ mo. Ask how to bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1‑888‑796‑8850 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 855‑761‑1725 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 1‑877‑649‑5043 (AAN CAN) BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844‑511‑1836. (AAN CAN) BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance Publishing‑Trusted by Authors Since 1920 Book manuscript submissions currently being reviewed. Comprehensive Services, Consultation, Production, Promotion and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or visit http:// dorranceinfo.com/Cali (Cal‑SCAN) CABLE PRICE Increase Again? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877‑693‑0625 (AAN CAN) DIRECTV ‑ Watch your favorite live sports, news and entertainment anywhere. More top premium channels than DISH. Restrictions apply. Call IVS ‑ 1‑888‑641‑ 5762. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV NOW. No Satellite Needed. $40/month. 65 Channels. Stream Breaking News, Live Events, Sports & On Demand Titles. No Annual Contract. No Commitment. CALL 1‑866‑825‑6523 DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Thu 9 Fri 10

2:55 am 3.8

7:14 am 2.9

1:04 pm 4.8

8:32 pm -0.2

3:56 am 4.1

9:07 am 2.6

2:25 pm 4.2

Sat 11

9:30 pm 0.2

4:45 am 4.4

10:46 am 2.2

3:56 pm 3.7

10:24 pm 0.6

High

Sun 12

5:26 am 4.7

11:56 am 2.0

5:21 pm 3.5

11:12 pm 1.0

Mon 13

6:01 am 5.0

12:48 pm 0.9

6:35 pm 3.4

11:52 pm 1.4

Tue 14

6:31 am 5.2

Wed 15 Thu 16

Sunrise 6:56 Sunset 4:49

1:30 pm 0.4

7:37 pm 3.4

12:27 am 1.8

6:58 am 5.4

2:06 pm 0.0

8:30 pm 3.4

12:58 am 2.1

7:24 am 5.5

2:39 pm -0.3

9:17 pm 3.3

10 H

18 D

26

2D source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle crossword puzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“Uncommon Bonds” -- spy thrillers with something missing.

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES LOCAL ARTIST Pottery/Ceramics yard sale. Mugs, bowls, vases, more and seconds. 468 Camino Laguna Vista, Goleta. Saturday, Dec 11 10AM‑4PM

PETS/ANIMALS USE HAPPY Jack® DD 33 to kill fleas & ticks on dogs & cats on contact. At Tractor Supply® (www.fleabeacon.com) (Cal‑SCAN)

WANT TO BUY WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

44 The physics of a Spanish bear tying its shoes? 1 Wheat byproduct 48 Figures on some Valentine’s 6 Australian boots Day cards 49 Pantone selection 10 Ensemble 50 Added color to white canvas 14 Burj Khalifa locale shoes, maybe 15 It comes before a fall? 16 Italian volcano that has been 51 Lounges around 52 Formidable erupting through most of 54 Leaning type (abbr.) 2021 55 Request for Garfield’s 17 Opinion that the ordinal canine pal to hurry up? suffix from 4 onward is the 59 Self-referential worst of the group? 19 They may rehabilitate injured 60 Actor Steve of “Superstore” 61 Person from Malmo animals 62 Maverick of “Maverick” 20 Turn into 63 Plays like Diz 21 Songs to Wear ___ To 64 Garden creeper (early 2000s website with humorous music) 22 Jason’s mythical vessel 1 It ends in Chicago in Nov. 25 Drive into hard 2 “Wait, what?” 26 Highly decorated 3 “Aladdin” monkey 27 Personal notification that 4 Some Comic-Con attendees nothing but dense, flavorful 5 Bona ___ bread is available? 6 Hoo-ha 30 A little off 7 23 so far for Jay-Z, e.g. 31 Soothing ointment 8 7 to 10, on the Beaufort Scale 32 The color of money (if that 9 2011 World Series winners, for short money is a Brazilian 10 real 10 Degas contemporary note) 11 Like many group renditions 33 “___ Doubtfire” (movie of “Happy Birthday,” to turned into an upcoming music students? Broadway musical) 12 Condescending 36 Louis XVI, once 13 Cup, in France 37 Sunscreen letters 18 Beige-like shade 40 South American mammal 21 Qualifying clause that looks like a raccoon 22 Distant 42 Like some roof panels 23 Capital on the Tiber

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

24 Graph paper pattern 26 World capital where parts of “Tenet” were filmed 28 Pop music family from Utah 29 Daith piercing locale 34 “Peanuts” expletive 35 Poker Hall of Famer Ungar 37 Kill it on the runway 38 Treasure hunter’s step 39 Mister Rogers 40 “Try” singer Colbie 41 Egyptian considered to be history’s first architect 43 “___ Road” (Lil Nas X song) 44 One making citations 45 Still awake 46 They might not retain lint as well 47 Give the appearance of 48 Reach new heights? 52 Walt Kelly comic strip 53 Mike of Social Distortion 55 Apprehend 56 “Breaking Bad” org. 57 Despot Amin 58 Migratory swimmer ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1061

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

DECEMBER 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 9,9, 2021

45 45


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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PHONE 805-965-5205

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACE FLOOR COVERING at 7409 San Bergamo Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Daniel J Condron (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual

Signed: Daniel J. Condron Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0003265. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SPRAGUE PEST SOLUTIONS at 3003 Petrol Road Bakersfield, CA 93308; TMC Pest Management (same address) This business

is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Ross A. Treleven, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0003197. Published: Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RLT PICTURES at 1612 Juniper Ave Solvang, CA 93463;

Christopher S Yahn 8835 Tiber St. Ventura, CA 93004; Isaac R Meeks 1612 Juniper Ave Solvang, CA 93463 This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Christopher Sandon Yahn, Co‑Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003148. Published: Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE CITY WIDE ANNUAL REPLACEMENT OF TRAFFIC STRIPING AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, City of Goleta, CA PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“CITY”), invites sealed bids for the above stated project and will receive such bids via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site until 3:00 P.M., January 13, 2022, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available on the CITY website at http://www. cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/view/city-bid-opportunities. The work includes but is not limited to mowing, tree maintenance, irrigation management, irrigation system maintenance and repair, shrub and ground cover maintenance, trimming, pruning, fertilization, aeration, weed control, cultivation, pest control, deep root watering, plant replacements, trash and debris removal, renovation and cleanup of drainage facilities using landscape maintenance procedures, and all labor, supervision, material and equipment necessary to provide CITY WIDE ANNUAL REPLACEMENT OF TRAFFIC STRIPING AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS. The services shall be performed in accordance with the Contract Documents, which includes provisions that the work shall be performed without the use of pesticides or commercial fertilizers. The term of the contract shall be thru June 30, 2024, however it will be subject to annual approval of the budget on July 1st of each year within the contract term. A non-mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting is scheduled on December 22, 2021, at 10 A.M at 130 Cremona Dr. Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 for this project. Meet outside of Suite B. No relief will be granted to contractors for any conditions or restrictions that would have been discovered if they had attended the pre-bid meeting. Please RSVP via PlanetBids no later than close-of-business the day prior to the scheduled bid walk. Bidders must be registered on the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids portal in order to receive addendum notifications and to submit a bid. Go to PlanetBids for bid results and awards. It is the responsibility of the bidder to submit the bid with sufficient time to be received by PlanetBids prior to the bid opening date and time. Allow time for technical difficulties, uploading, and unexpected delays. Late or incomplete bids will not be accepted. The bid must be accompanied by a bid security in the form of a money order, a certified cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond executed by an admitted surety, made payable to CITY. The bid security shall be an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total annual bid amount included with their proposals as required by California law. Note: All bids must be accompanied by a scanned copy of the bid security uploaded to PlanetBids. The original security of the three (3) lowest bidders must be mailed to the office of the City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, in a sealed envelope and be received within three (3) City business days of the bid due date and time for the bid to be considered. The sealed envelope should be plainly marked on the outside, “SEALED BID SECURITY FOR CITY WIDE ANNUAL REPLACEMENT OF TRAFFIC STRIPING AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS.” The Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) per California Labor Code Section 1771.4, including prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure against discrimination in employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion will also be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this notice and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion in any consideration leading to the award of contract. A contract may only be awarded to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder that holds a valid Class ”C-27 – Landscaping Contractor” Contractor’s license in accordance with the provisions of the California Business and Professions Code. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price. Each bond shall be in the forms set forth herein, shall be secured from a surety company that meets all State of California bonding requirements, as defined in Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a California admitted surety insurer. Pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, all contractors and subcontractors that wish to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or enter into a contract to perform public work must be registered with the DIR. No Bid will be accepted, nor any contract entered into without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractors’ current registration with the DIR to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the DIR for the duration of the Project. Failure to provide proof of the contractor’s current registration pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bid as non-responsive. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 961-7505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For information relating to the details of this Project and bidding requirements contact J. Paul Medel in writing at pmedel@cityofgoleta.org.

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FAIRVIEW GARDENS FARM at 598 N Fairview Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Center For Urban Agriculture At Fairview Gardens (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Chris Melancon, Executive Director Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003189. Published: Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) i s / a re doing business as: BELOW MAGID CONSTRUCTION COMPANY at 823 Jennigs Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Below Magid Construction Company (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Mark Magid, Owner/ CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003240. Published: Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CARPINTERIA VALLEY ROOFING INC., CARPINTERIA VALLEY ROOFING, VALLEY ROOFING, CARPINTERIA ROOFING, CARP ROOFING, JIMENEZ ROOFING at 4791 8th St, #3 Carpinteria, CA 93013; Carpinteria Valley Roofing Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Julie Jimenez, Secretary Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003147. Published: Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OLIVE HOUSE INC., FEELEY WINES, LOS OLIVOS OLIVE OIL COMPANY, TWENTY MILE WINERY at 1603 Copenhagen Dr. Solvang, CA 93463; Olive House Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jeff Feeley, President Filed with the County

Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 03, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E17. FBN Number: 2021‑0003068. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MINDFUL EATING INSTITUTE at 610 Maple Avenue, #B Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Petra Beumer (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Petra Beumer, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 09, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003121. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE GOODLAND COALITION at 6155 Verdura Avenue Goleta, CA 93117; Robert E Wignot (same address) George A Relles 484 Valdez Avenue Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Unincorporated Assoc. Other Than a Partnership Signed: Robert E. Wignot, Treasurer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0003103. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOKI VENDING at 1426 Burton Mesa Blvd. Lompoc, CA 93436; Kevin Maxwell Telfer 740 N H Street #161 Lompoc, CA 93436 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Individual Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002961. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BEE WILD COLLECTIVE at 875 Cieneguitas Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Evan R Froewiss (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual

Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk

DECEMBER 9, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PACIFIC CARPET CLEANING at 5142 Matorral Way, Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Jose Antonio Rodriguez (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jose Antonio Rodriguez Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E28. FBN Number: 2021‑0003139. Published: Nov 24. Dec 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE SANDBOX SANTA BARBARA LLC at 414 Olive Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Sandbox Santa Barbara LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Kyle Ashby, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003215. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) i s / a re doing business as: THE SANDBOX COLLABORATIVE LLC, THE SANDBOX GOLETA, GATHER

Looking to be more involved in what happens in your community? There are currently vacancies for the Design Review Board. The City has also extended the application period for the Planning Commission vacancy. Those with an eye for design are encouraged to apply for the Design Review Board. This seven-member body encourages development that uses the best professional design practices to enhance the visual aesthetics of the community and prevent poor quality of design. Members are appointed to a threeyear term. The Design Review Board meets the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 3:00 p.m., and the position is compensated $50 per meeting. The three vacancies are: • 1 Licensed Landscape Professional (Landscape Architect or Landscape Contractor) • 2 At-Large Members (Must be a resident) The Planning Commission sits as a decision-making body on land use issues for the City and consists of five members who each serve a four-year term. Their role is to review and take appropriate action on discretionary development applications and to make recommendations to the City Council regarding any proposed legislative actions, including the General Plan and its implementation, as required by law. The Planning Commission meets on the second and fourth Mondays of each month starting at 6:00 p.m. Compensation is $100 per meeting. There will be one vacancy. To be eligible, applicants must reside within City limits and be a qualified elector.

The deadline to apply is January 14, 2022 by 5 p.m. THE INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GIFFIN EQUIPMENT at 285 Rutherford St. Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Mel Giffin, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Amanda Twining, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003179. Published: Nov 24. Dec 2, 9, 16 2021.

Applications for all open Boards and Commissions may be submitted online at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/city-hall/city-clerk/boards-commissions. Additional information can be provided by emailing cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta. org.

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Signed: Evan Froewiss Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 11, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003134. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021.

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GOLETA at 69 Santa Felicia Drive Goleta, CA 93117; The Sandbox Collaborative LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Kyle Ashby, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003216. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BREAKTHROUGHS INTERNATIONAL at 486 Vaquero Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Educational Kinesiology Foundation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: Julie Newendorp, Finance Director with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E28. FBN Number: 2021‑0003294. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARCHITECH DENTAL LABORATORY at 322 North F St. Ste E Lompoc, CA 93436; Derek K. Walker 3979 Agena Way Lompoc, CA 93436 This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: Derek K. Walker with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0003267. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ABOVE & BEYOND BODY ARTS at 407 State St, Fl #2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Parkhurst Enterprises Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Joshua N Parkhurst, CEO Filed with the

County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0003219. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE POPES NEW CASTLE at 140 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Industrial Way LLC 2060 Huntington Dr. Ste 1 San Marino, CA 91108 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: Robert Tweed, Managing Member with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 03, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003284. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOL SANTA BARBARA at 1822 Loma St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Jennifer A. Panchal (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jennifer Panchal Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0003221. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALEX RASMUSSEN STUDIO at 133 S La Patera Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Neal Feay Company (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Alex Rasmussen, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003255. Published: Dec

9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TOM H A S E LW O D E , TREKKIELIFE at 237 Town Center W Ste 111 Santa Maria CA 93458; Thomas C Heslop Jr 3210 Santa Maria Way Spc 132 Santa Maria, CA 93455 This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: Thomas C Heslop Jr with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 03, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0003281. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF GLENDY JUDITH AYALA & CESAR AUGUSTO ARRIAZA TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV04141 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: SHEYLA JUDITH AYALA TO: SHEYLA JUDITH ARRIAZA AYALA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this

URGENCY ORDINANCE NO. 21-__ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING TITLES 5, 16, AND 17 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE TO PROVIDE PROCEDURES AND REGULATIONS FOR LOT SPLITS AND NEW HOUSING DEVELOPMENT PURSUANT TO SENATE BILL 9 (2021), CASE NO. 21-0006-ORD On December 21, 2021, at the Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta (“City”) will consider possible adoption of a proposed urgency ordinance that would amend Title 5 (Business Licenses and Regulations), Title 16 (Subdivisions), and Title 17 (Zoning) of the Goleta Municipal Code (GMC) to ensure the City’s regulations comply with Senate Bill (SB) 9 (2021) and to maintain City authority to regulate SB 9 projects where possible. Proposed amendments to the GMC include the following: • An amendment to Title 5 to include a cross-reference prohibition of Short-Term Vacation Rental licenses for any site where an SB 9 project was approved under Title 16 or Title 17. • New standards and procedures in Title 16 for urban lot splits in the SingleFamily Residential (RS) zone district to subdivide existing residential lots in two. Consistent with SB 9, urban lot splits will be processed ministerially if certain objective standards are met. • New standards and procedures in Title 17 to process applications for up to 2 principal dwelling units on lots in the RS zone district. This could be an additional unit on an existing lot that already has a principal dwelling or up to two new dwelling units on a newly created lot through an urban lot split described above. Consistent with SB 9, these new residential dwelling units will be processed ministerially if certain objective standards are met. If adopted, the Urgency Ordinance will be effective on January 1, 2022. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed urgency ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish:

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Santa Barbara Independent, December 9, 2021

order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Nov 03, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below

belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. December 30, 2021 at 3:30 PM wanbo Geng boxes, bicycle, table, bed Maria Robles studio apartment christine barrios bags boxes tv couches Sean Butts Personals, Boxes, Clothes, Kitchen, Ernesto Olivas 4 luggage bins and backpacks Jessica Maldonado

box suitcase bags The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

Post your Open Positions for free online on independent.com Contact advertising@independent.com for more details and in-print rates

NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING (Electronically and Telephonically) December 21, 2021 at 5:30 P.M. Urgency and Non-Urgency Ordinances for SB 9 Lot Splits and Residential Projects in the Single-Family Residential (RS) Zone District Case No. 21-0006-ORD ATTENTION: The Virtual Meeting is held pursuant to Assembly Bill (AB) 361. The meeting will be Virtual because meeting in person would present imminent risks to the health or safety of attendees. The public may only view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings and not in Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a public hearing to consider adoption of Urgency and Non-Urgency Ordinances related to implementation of Senate Bill 9 of 2021 (SB 9) (Case No. 210006-ORD). The date, time, and location of the City Council public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, December 21, 2021 at 5:30 P.M. PLACE: Teleconference Meeting; Given the local, state, and national state of emergency, this meeting will be a teleconferenced meeting (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PROJECT LOCATION: The regulations would apply citywide within the Single-Family Residential (RS) Zone District, including areas of the City within the Coastal Zone. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The proposed ordinances would amend Title 5 (Business Licenses and Regulations), Title 16 (Subdivisions), and Title 17 (Zoning) of the Goleta Municipal Code (GMC) to ensure the City’s regulations comply with SB 9 and to maintain City authority to regulate SB 9 projects where possible. Proposed amendments to the GMC include the following: • An amendment to Title 5 to include a cross-reference prohibition of Short-Term Vacation Rental licenses for any site where an SB 9 project was approved under Title 16 or Title 17. • New standards and procedures in Title 16 for urban lot splits in the Single-Family Residential (RS) zone district to subdivide existing residential lots in two. Consistent with SB 9, urban lot splits will be processed ministerially if certain objective standards are met. • New standards and procedures in Title 17 to process applications for up to 2 principal dwelling units on lots in the RS zone district. This could be an additional unit on an existing lot that already has a principal dwelling or up to two new dwelling units on a newly created lot through an urban lot split described above. Consistent with SB 9, these new residential dwelling units will be processed ministerially if certain objective standards are met. The Planning Commission will consider the above-described ordinances at a public hearing on December 13, 2021. Any recommendations from the Planning Commission will be provided to City Council. Environmental Review: Under California Government Code Sections 65852.21(j) and 66411.7(n), the adoption of an ordinance implementing the provisions of SB 9 is not a project and therefore exempt from the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act. PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to view the meeting and to provide written and/or oral comments. All letters/comments should be sent to cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY PURSUANT TO AB 361, written comments may be submitted as instructed above or via email to: cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the public hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the public hearing. Those who wish to participate in the public hearing must submit an email to cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org which states the item you want to speak to and provide your name, email, and phone number. More detailed instructions on how to participate in the public hearing and to provide comments during the public hearing will be included in the City Council agenda which will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/newsand-updates/government-meetingagendas-and-videos. FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Anne Wells, Advance Planning Manager, at (805) 961-7557 or awells@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION. If you require interpretation services for the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s office at (805) 961-7505 or via email to: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours prior to the hearing. Please specify the language for which you require interpretation. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the meeting helps to ensure that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility to the hearing. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent, December 9, 2021

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