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Quarterly The

The Quarterly Magazine

Winter 2017

PERMIT #422 PASADENA, CA

PAID

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE

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1345 New York Drive, Altadena

&

Design Build

L

ocated in the ever popular Altadena Country Club area, this fabulously updated home features a circular flowing floorplan, formal living and dining rooms, gourmet kitchen and master retreat with private balcony and spa-like master bath. Enjoy the privacy of the front yard with its tranquil tree-canopied sitting area and entertain in the rear on the patio among the many fruit trees.

Offered at $998,000 Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed. Buyer to verify.

www.majorsmarketplace.com “When it comes to buying or selling real estate EXPERIENCE COUNTS!!!� CALL TODAY and let me help you achieve your goals!

TOM NOTT Architect

626-403-0844

JEFF NOTT

General Contractor

626-403-2146 LIC#B746905

NOTT & ASSOCIATES Relationships are our strongest foundation.

626.399.9665

2 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

cmajors234@gmail.com

CalBRE: #00769694

1508 MISSION ST., SOUTH PASADENA nottassociates.comWinter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 3


In all seasons of life, whether upsizing, downsizing, or investing, we are here to help you and those who mean the most to you in the realm of real estate.

S O U T H P A S A D E N A

Quarterly

Design Art. Build Art.

The

The original lifestyle magazine in the San Gabriel Valley PUBLISHERS Andy and Carie Salter ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AND ART DIRECTOR Nancy Lem EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Camille Lozano ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Madeline Renn PHOTOGRAPHERS Rafael Najarian STAFF WRITERS Mitch Lehman Camille Lozano Madeline Renn Harry Yadav CONTRIBUTORS Mark Langill Julie Stires Jim Thompson Billie Tone

F

or over 20 years, The Maloney Group has worked closely with

ADVERTISING MANAGERS Monica Hong mhong@gavilanmedia.com Joelle Grossi jgrossi@sanmarinotribune.com

clients to match homes and neighborhoods to complement

quality time listening to the needs and wants of our clients and about connecting people to their homes and the communities that sustain them.

Tying people, homes, and communities together.

Š2017 Gavilan Media. All rights reserved. No reproduction is allowed without written permission from the publishers. PUBLISHER (1987- 2012) William Ericson PUBLISHERS (2012 - 2017) Ted Shaw, Bill Glazier

Mike & Erin Maloney 626.483.2265 www.MyMaloney.com CalBRE#01216091, 01928844

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ON THE COVER: Cover photography by Rafael Najarian. Arrangement by Gilly Flowers & Events.

Photo by Alexander Vertikoff

greater Pasadena and Los Angeles. We are passionate about spending

Gavilan Media 2650 Mission St., Suite 208 San Marino, CA 91108 (626) 792-6397

Lic.653340

and enrich people's lives in the highly nuanced communities of

A R C H I T E CT U R E . C O N S T R U CT I O N . I N T E R I O R S . 626.486.0510

HartmanBaldwin.com

Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 5


SARAH ROGERS

Quarterly The

REAL ESTATE

VOLUME 31 / NUMBER 4 / WINTER 2017

SOLD

SOLD

PASADENA Ambassador Gardens 160 S. Orange Grove Bl. $4,500,000

SAN MARINO 1735 Chelsea Road Listed at $2,688,000 Sold $200K over asking

PHOTO BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN

IN ESCROW

8 TOUR THE WORLD WITHOUT LEAVING THE ARROYO

34 WINTER DIY: A HOLIDAY FLORAL ARRANGEMENT

15 WINTER HOLIDAY TABLETOP DESIGN

36 THE ONLY WOMAN TO TAKE HER SHOT AT THE NBA

25 THE GATEKEEPER OF OLD PASADENA

38 GETAWAY: SANTA YNEZ VALLEY

30 UNDOUBTEDLY DELIGHTFUL

44 A HANDS-ON APPROACH TO REVOLUTIONARY MIND SCIENCE

50 MUSEUM IN FOCUS: NORTON SIMON MUSEUM 52 FOODIE FAVORITES

LA CAÑADA FLINTRIDGE 5341 Godbey Drive Listed at $1,190,000 Golf Course & City Views

SOLD

ACTIVE

SAN MARINO 1640 S. Euclid Avenue $1,926,000 Sold over asking

ACTIVE

SAN GABRIEL 413 Warner Lane Listed at $1,575,000 San Gabriel Country Club

SAN GABRIEL 8315 Josard Road Listed at $1,198,000 San Marino Schools

Thank you to my clients, my team, and my family and friends for your continued support and your referrals. I am honored to be recognized as the #1 Agent at John Aaroe Group Pasadena.

54 PALM & CYPRESS WALK 57 WINTER EVENT GUIDE

“Sarah is the epitome of professionalism and integrity, and she combines an in-depth knowledge of the community with real diligence and keen interpersonal skills. Sarah’s detail-oriented and direct style were ideal for me and were accompanied by a genuine interest in what I wanted as a client. Sarah took the time to listen and understand any specific concerns or goals I had

32 GOLDLINE EXCURSION: GRAND CENTRAL MARKET

48 FEEL GOOD HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

65 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES DIRECTORY

with respect to the transaction and was always available to respond to questions. She is supported by a strong team but was always personally involved and you felt her level of commitment, which was very comforting.”

66 ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY

SARAH ROGERS

6 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

A PACIFIC UNION COMPANY

Thank you for your continued business and support!

MBA, GRI, e-PRO Director, Aaroe Estates Director, Master Trust and Probate Division Platinum Circle Top 1%

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Professional Real Estate Services since 1994

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JOHN AAROE GROUP

- Carolyn C, seller

John Aaroe Group does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size, or other information concerning the condition or features of the property provided by the seller or obtained from public records and other sources and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information. If your property is currently listed, this is not a solicitation. CalBRE 0120181

Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 7


TOUR THE WORLD WITHOUT LEAVING THE ARROYO The Classic, Eclectic Home of Diane & Sam Nicholson Reflects the Couple’s Keen Eye for Tasteful Décor BY MITCH LEHMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN

They affectionately say their San Rafael home is decorated in the charming style of “International and Eclectic Bazaar,” and—if so—it’s a trend that can’t catch on soon enough. Perched high above the west rim of Pasadena’s Arroyo Seco Canyon, the 9,600 square foot home of Diane & Sam Nicholson elegantly blends a classic Pasadena aesthetic with the creative tastes of well-traveled eclectics. Sam Nicholson is CEO and founder of Stargate Studios, an award-winning visual effects production company with studios in South Pasadena, Vancouver, Dubai and—most recently—China. He began his career in visual effects with Star Wars I and Star Wars II and has since gone on to work on some of television’s blockbuster shows, including The Walking Dead, Grey’s Anatomy and Ray Donovan. He is currently working on Happy Time Murders with Brian Henson and Melissa McCarthy. Diane Reed Nicholson has been

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C A B I N E T RY

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next door to:

mission west kitchen & bath photography by Stephanie Wiley ad design by Blue Metropolis Design

described by one of her best friends as “a public relations and branding maven,” a title that anyone who knows the energetic San Marino native will say fits to a “T.” Currently, Diane is enjoying a stint as Executive Director of the Western Region of the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation. But when their busy schedules eventually intersect, the long, airy halls and unique gardens of an estate that was built in 1962 by Herbert Hoover, Jr., is simply “home” to the

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Nicholsons. Sam purchased the one-and-ahalf-acre property in 2002 and in 2010, the couple welcomed 250 of their closest friends for a most memorable event. “Our wedding reception,” Diane says with a comfortable smile. That only marked the beginning of what has been a steady drumbeat of events. “The house lends itself really well to entertaining,” she says. “It’s all built on one level, so a large group of

guests can enjoy a common space and experience. It’s easy to flow in and out.” The Nicholsons have hosted more than 200 guests, two years in a row— including a live band and auctioneer—for a Cancer Support Community “Ladies Night Out” fundraiser. For the past two years they have also hosted a fundraiser for Grace Center, a charity that provides shelter and services to abused women and children. The first year’s Grace Center event included a concert by Crosby, Stills & Nash, who performed in the Nicholson’s driveway. Spirited bidding ensued at a live auction, where the winner earned the privilege of singing the iconic “Teach Your Children” onstage with the song’s creators serving as back-up. Kristin Chenoweth performed the following year at the Nicholson’s Grace Center benefit. Smaller, more intimate gatherings are also common, as is the occasional presence of famed chef Joachim Splichal, who enjoys being cooked

for at the Nicholsons. “Sam loves to cook and barbecue,” Diane says. “He doesn’t use recipes. He just likes to try new things.” The Nicholsons’ kitchen is currently undergoing a remodel under Splichal’s directive. It’s difficult to choose a most unique feature, but a round swimming pool that offers a stunning view of the San Gabriel Mountains certainly bears mention. Aimlessly drifting atop the water is what Diane calls “an aqua palapa,” basically, a floating bar. While vacationing at the One&Only Palmilla Resort in Los Cabos, the couple saw an original version when Sam’s creative instincts took over. He went to the front desk and requested a ruler and measuring tape. Sam even used an underwater camera to better evaluate the construction techniques. He sent the dimensions to his Stargate production people and the result is floating in the Nicholsons’ swimming pool. “We love it,” Diane says fondly. “We will just sit there, drink coffee

F I X T U R E S

Why Go All Over Town?

905 mission street south pasadena california . 91030

6 2 6 . 7 9 9. 3 5 0 3 m i s s i o n w e s t. b i z

next door to:

mission tile west photography by Stephanie Wiley ad design by Blue Metropolis Design

Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 11


and read the paper.” A little bit of Los Cabos, just 1,300 miles north. The grounds were originally designed by famous landscape architect Thomas Church, a pioneer of Modernism and what eventually became known as the “California Style.” The walled Hoover Garden is near the front of the house and boasts a Mission-style fountain. The grounds are home to more than 100 different types of roses—each marked with a hand-painted sign— and dozens of species of palm trees, all of which the Nicholsons personally groom. Hoover’s wife, Margaret Ava Watson, was confined to a wheelchair when the family designed the estate, so every doorknob was placed well below the normal height—somewhere around the level of mid-thigh. Interested in maintaining the original flavor of the home, Sam decided to leave well enough alone. The sight is curious when gazing down one

of the long halls, and the choice to maintain the original design is much appreciated. The house is full of collectibles reflecting the couple’s extensive travel around the globe including Africa, China, Japan, Morocco, Malta and Sri Lanka—hence the “International and Eclectic Bazaar” moniker. “Everywhere we go, we find a piece that means something to us,” Diane says. A hookah pipe. A tribal war mask.

A tiki statue from the original Trader Vic’s in San Francisco. A colorful array of lanterns that Sam personally wires for electricity. And the artwork. Sam’s website, samnicholsonfineart.com, describes the medium as combining “photography, light and time with traditional oil painting on canvas. His extensive background in motion pictures and commercial art enables  him to fuse fine art and technology into dramatic and compelling images.” They are located throughout the home and, apparently, are coveted by many. “It seems as though every time we host a fundraiser, somebody ends up buying a piece of his artwork,” Diane says with a rich laugh. But the enduring, most compelling image is that of an environment filled with warm memories and keepsakes where the expansive marketplaces of the world enjoy respite in a remote corner of Pasadena. •

Family giving is about more than tax benefits. It’s about strengthening families and making the world a better place.

There is no greater gift you can give your children than the desire to give back . . . to those in need, causes held dear, or for the benefit of the community. Family giving is a powerful tool to learn about managing money and working as a team. We help you create a structured giving program that best suits your family. And, we offer guidance and tools to help unify your family around giving by sharing common interests, core values and purpose for your wealth. The Doolin Group at Morgan Stanley 55 South Lake Avenue, 7th Floor │ Pasadena, CA 91101 Phone: 626.304.2411 │ Email: diane.k.doolin@morganstanley.com Morgan Stanley and its Financial Advisors do not provide tax or legal advice. Individuals should seek advice based on their particular circumstances from an independent tax or legal advisor. ©2017 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC. CRC1930444 10/17

12 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

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1540 Oak G rOve avenue

Main House: 8166 Sq. Ft. Pool House: 1160 Sq. Ft. San Marino, CA 1.5 Acres This majestic French Provincial Estate located above Lacy Park exemplifies luxury and is situated on one of San Marino’s most exclusive streets. Attention to every detail make this residence one of the most prestigious in all of Los Angeles. It was designed by renowned architects Robert Woolf and Robert Koch. As you enter the grand foyer you will note the stunning marble floor and 25’ tall vaulted ceiling. Beyond the foyer, is the formal living room with floor to ceiling windows. Directly off the living room, awaits the recently updated family room with stunning wood coffered ceiling and built-in wet bar. With 4 en suite bedrooms and a glorious master suite there is more than enough space for larger families. The yard and grounds have been designed for entertaining — with two pool houses, outdoor fireplace, pool, spa and tennis court. www.1540OakGroveAve.com Price Available upon Request

WINTER HOLIDAY TABLETOP DESIGN BY CAMILLE LOZANO PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN

The holidays here in the San Gabriel Valley are a time for gathering together friends and loved ones to share a moment, a meal, a tradition. From cool tones to bold hues, vintage to modern, four talented local proprietors and designers share their inspirational tabletop designs that can be incorporated into your festivities this year. TABLETOP DESIGNS BY:

Jennifer P. Allen

Realtor® 626.893.5090 JennAllenRealEstate@gmail.com

CATHY ARKLEY OF ELEMENTS (2511 MISSION ST., SAN MARINO, (626) 799-3000) ANNE BAGASAO OF PARTINI (1136 FREMONT AVE., SUITE 101, SOUTH PASADENA, (626) 243-7226) KIRSTEN POOLE OF KMP INTERIORS, LLC (BY APPOINTMENT ONLY, (626) 791-5141) JENNY STERN OF J. STERN HOME AND GARDEN (1367 FOOTHILL BLVD., LA CAÑADA, (818) 864-6644)

CalBRE 01984217

©2017 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. If your property is currently listed for sale, this is not intended as a solicitation.Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of information concerning the features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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PHILLIPS EYE CENTER Premium cataract surgery is our focus

Kirsten Poole of Pasadena’s KMP Interiors Coordinates Icy Hues for a Glistening Winter Tabletop Setting: Kirsten’s dazzling monochromatic tabletop plays with texture, shimmer and nature to create a Winter Wonderland. Cool blues, silvery leaves, snowflake plates and a bundle of fresh hydrangeas transport guests with the best elements of the holiday season while hearkening back to past times with vintage Portieux Vallerysthal blue opaline milk glass goblets and Orrefors crystal. Kirsten’s linens and vases were sourced from West Elm, plates and textured chargers from Crate & Barrel and Christofle silverware. Story: “There’s nothing like a well-dressed table for the holidays. Growing up in the Bay Area with its identifiable seasons, it reminds me of my childhood, spending time in the mountains and colder climates. This tabletop design incorporates my favorite hue with vintage glassware inherited from my husband’s grandmother with some of my own vintage pieces blended in. Holiday tables can be equally stunning without using the traditional red and green.” DIY: Choose peacock and arctic blues and pine green to explore this color scheme, working in textures like Kirsten’s matte chargers and glazed Crate & Barrel plates for a coordinated look. Visit a craft store like Michaels for glittery dried florals and mix in fresh cuttings in icy hues like Dusty Miller draped over baby blue-hued vases. Play with size and shape for your glassware—Kirsten’s miniature Orrefors crystal glasses are a delightful surprise. Identify florals that will steal the show atop your table: the mass of hydrangea blooms brings to mind snowballs and wintry days spent in the snow.

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Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 17


Anne Bagasao of South Pasadena’s Partini Embraces Mother Nature with a Climate-Conscious Holiday Table Setting: Anne’s delicate black, white and gold holiday table exudes elegance and festivity, weaving together vintage finds and local treasures. With a color scheme suitable for multiple occasions, the addition of brightly colored napkins, fruit or backyard blooms signifies the cause for celebration. Anne’s tabletop includes gold chargers found at the Dollar Tree years ago, candleholders and champagne glasses inherited from a client, her mother’s gold flatware, wine glasses from a consignment shop and a vintage white figurine gifted to her from South Pasadena retailer Lloyd & Lane. Story: “I am a big proponent of sustainable living. As an event planner and stylist, my work is sometimes at odds with my desire to be kind to the planet and conscious of how things are made. The textile and home décor industries can be very taxing on the environment, which is why I do my best to shop vintage, flea markets and antique stores when looking for my tabletop accessories. Having started collecting antiques as a child, I also incorporate items from around the house.” DIY: Use fresh-cut Magnolia branches and Eucalyptus for an earthy element atop your holiday table. Anne worked with floral wire and gold paint to create subtle accents, and candlelight to draw attention to the centerpiece. Consider potted flowers like orchids from Trader Joe’s, which can last for months with proper care. Place knotted cloth napkins over plates of a contrasting color for a clean and elegant touch, and add a personalized element with place cards or tidings of joy, like Anne’s customized fortunes set inside shimmering fortune cookies.

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CHESBRO TREE CARE

626 799 4552

chesbrotree@gmail.com ISA WE-3901A - CL#973310

A Legacy of Exceptional Tree Care PHOTO © DESCANSO GARDENS

Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 19


Your health is safe in our hands. We received an ‘A’ grade from The Leapfrog Group, the highest safety rating possible. This grade is a testament to our dedication to our number one priority — our patients’ safety. www.huntingtonhospital.org

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10/31/17 4:01 PM

Cathy Arkley, Interior Designer and Proprietor of San Marino’s Elements, Curates a Christmas Dinner for All Generations Setting: Saturated reds, bold pinks, fuchsia, purple and gold reach outside the traditional holiday color palette while masterfully blending reflective, transparent and glittering materials. Cathy’s setting includes a collection of heirloom dishware, gold-flecked flatware by Vietri, golden vine-wrapped Et Al candles, Zodax vases, linens by Crate & Barrel and bejeweled placemats and artistic napkin rings by Kim Seybert. Story: “I like to take a non-traditional approach to the traditional Christmas dinner table. The key is to mix everything together; it’s not meant to be perfect and symmetrical. People may be hesitant to use family heirlooms. I like to mix them with contemporary pieces which can translate into establishing new family traditions that encompass the past and the present.” DIY: Dig out your heirloom dining ware and mix in fresh flowers and unique finds like Cathy’s gold-flecked flatware for the perfect finishing touch. Draw attention to the center of your table with glassware that builds in height and hue. Find your own vintage treasures during a trip to the Pasadena City College and Rose Bowl flea markets—some of Cathy’s favorite places to score antique dishes, delicate glassware and more, or shop online at https://www. replacements.com.

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Jenny Stern, Owner of J. Stern Home and Garden, Showcases a Warm and Whimsical Modern Holiday Tabletop Setting: Jenny’s table features the best of any holiday: love, tradition, family and fun. With Eero Saarinen tables and chairs, Wedgwood china from England hand-picked by Jenny’s mother-in-law, vintage Fenton hobnail milk glass goblets, Williams Sonoma flatware received as a wedding gift, polka dot plates from a San Gabriel Valley boutique now long gone, and pillows, throws, and sea grass placemats from Jenny’s own business, she melds warmth, modernity, and memories into a timeless table design that exudes holiday cheer. Story: “I always like a casual look with formal elements and using what I love. I have an obsession with plants and flowers and have incorporated them throughout the tabletop and space, as well as local finds I’ve collected over the years. Polka dots are also a mainstay in my repertoire. It’s best to decorate with what you’ve got, and our table and chairs, inherited from family, serve as a perfect fixture to decorate for any occasion—it’s just a matter of putting it all together.” DIY: Shop garage sales for unique pieces like Jenny’s white milk glass chargers. Are you an ornament collector? Save some for your tabletop this year to place around the centerpiece—the shinier, the better to reflect candlelight. Use light flowers, like these Amaryllis, and cedar greens to achieve a balance of light and dark elements. Use metal candleholders with organic shapes to add warmth to your table. Make a day of it: Brick-and-mortar shops throughout the San Gabriel Valley hold holiday treasures sure to delight family and friends visiting for the holidays. Get all you need for decorating and gift giving while supporting local businesses.

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Discover more than 300 shops and restaurants nestled in 22 historic blocks... An architectural gem with treasures around every corner. 90 minutes free parking in the Park & Walk Garages

THE GATEKEEPER OF OLD PASADENA Claire Bogaard and Pasadena Heritage Were On the Ground Floor of the Historic Transformation of the Once-Dilapidated Downtown Area BY MITCH LEHMAN

w w w. o l dpa s a d e n a . o r g

“It’s just gotten busier and busier,” said Claire Bogaard, and for someone of her activity level, that’s quite a statement. Her spry nature belies the fact that she and her husband, former 16-year Pasadena Mayor Bill Bogaard, enjoy the company of eight grandchildren. But any discussion of Old Pasadena, known as Old Town Pasadena or simply Old Town to many, will grasp Claire’s full level of engagement. And why not—few on this earth know the material as well as she does. Bogaard was referring to her long, busy tenure as founder, president and board member of Pasadena Heritage, an iconic historic preservation organization that almost singlehandedly brought the Crown City back from what had become a dilapidated shell of its former self. Pasadena Heritage recently celebrated the 40th anniversary of its charter as the 501(c)3 nonprofit that grew from it origins

CLAIRE BOGAARD CHANNELED HER KEEN APPRECIATION FOR “PLACE” INTO THE MOVEMENT THAT RESULTED IN THE RESURRECTION OF OLD PASADENA, ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT REDEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS IN THE NATION. PHOTO COURTESY OF CLAIRE BOGAARD

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A UNITED ARTISTS THEATER BECAME ONE OF OLD PASADENA’S ANCHORS, PROVIDING A DESTINATION FOR THE “DINNER AND A MOVIE” CROWD. PHOTO COURTESY OF CLAIRE BOGAARD PHOTO COURTESY OF PASADENA HERITAGE

as a grass-roots cluster of concerned citizens into what is now the second largest preservation organization in the state of California. “We had a great time celebrating all of the crazy things we have done,” she said with a hearty laugh, as though she had just walked out of the event. “A lot of us had moved here in the 1970s and in those days, Pasadena wasn’t exactly thriving. I think a lot of other people felt the same way.” The city announced plans to tear down buildings in the city’s oldest region that had become economically and commercially barren. “We heard about the plans to tear down these buildings and we thought ‘Well, this area has a true sense of place. Why would you tear it down?’” Bogaard said. “They were thinking about building more places like (Ralph M.) Parsons and including a large freeway interchange, like Downtown Los Angeles. So we all came together and formed Pasadena Heritage in 1976. The issue that galvanized us was the demolition of all the buildings that were demolished to build Plaza Pasadena. So many great buildings went down for what was a very mediocre shopping mall. Fortunately, the mall was redesigned some years later and is now known as The Paseo.” Shortly after its inception, Pasadena Heritage began hosting tours and workshops to help educate the community. “We brought in roofers, contractors and had them speak about ‘How do you protect historic homes?’” Bogaard said. “At first, the city looked at us like we were obstructionists, but from Day One we were saying that Old Pasadena should stay. That is how we got our start.” Once a vital, thriving heart of the city, Old Pasadena had fallen into disrepair between 1930-1980. After World War II, most of the city’s growth took place in East Pasadena and the area known as Hastings Ranch. Even the most intrepid Pasadenans from

DEVELOPER TONY CANZONERI USED TAX CREDITS TO PURCHASE THE HISTORIC BRALEY BUILDING, ANOTHER IMPORTANT STEP IN THE PRESERVATION OF THE AREA. PHOTO COURTESY OF PASADENA HERITAGE

the early to mid-eighties remember a downtown area that had grown threadbare due to decades of neglect, where visits to the few oases of activity (anyone remember Ernie Jrs.?) required several looks over one’s shoulder. Even Bogaard admits the place had an eerie feel when Pasadena Heritage first leased office space in the late 1970s in what is now the Apple Store. “It looked really scary, but if you were there every day you quickly realized it was a safe place,” Bogaard said. “Everyone knew one another and there was a definite sense of community. There were several homeless people who lived in Old Pasadena and they were very friendly.” Bogaard recalled one homeless man who had come to Pasadena from Orange County and lived un-

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF PASADENA HERITAGE

point,” Bogaard said. Using historic tax credits, Tony Canzoneri purchased and restored the Braley Building. Soon, other iconic structures were acquired and the landscape began to change. The result was a cooperative project between private investors and public agencies that resulted in a groundbreaking result. Members from the Pasadena Central Improvement Association worked together to attract even more interested parties to the Old Pasadena area. Soon, a United Artists theatre popped up at the southeast corner of Colorado Boulevard and De Lacey Ave. Shortly thereafter, Barney’s – a high-end hamburger joint – opened its doors across the street. “These were very important additions,” Bogaard said. “Now there was a place for people to go to see a movie and have a hamburger. The Loch Ness Monster Pub was very popular, with Snotty Scotty & the Hankies frequently playing there. It suddenly

der (yes, under) the sidewalk at present-day Tiffany’s. “Everybody knew him,” Bogaard said, as if referring to a family member. Eventually, even the most ardent resistors saw the proverbial writing on the wall and figured the status quo was unsustainable. The area lost its negative reputation as miscellaneous shops and businesses popped up across the landscape. “The city had tried to form a redevelopment area in Old Pasadena long before the 1980s, but the merchants fought it off,” Bogaard said. “The merchants wanted to continue with their businesses. But underneath it all, they worried and believed it was only a matter of time before the city would remove the business through the power of eminent domain.” “The early 80s was the turning

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SINGLE STONE

2527 MISSION STREET · 626.799.3109 · SHOPSINGLESTONE.COM

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became a very busy place. To this day I hear people talk about the Loch Ness Monster Pub, Peter Apanel and the Dooh Dah Parade. There were some really fun crazies around and a lot of friendships were formed in Old Pasadena during the early days. That contributed to the excitement. It was a fun place to be.” Looking back, some might now call those the glory days of Old Pasadena, before the chains came in and displaced what few mom & pop shops remained. “Gradually, and into the 90s, more national brands moved to Old Pasadena,” Bogaard said. “The older businesses gradually moved on and sold their businesses. Another turning point came about when the three parking structures were built. I thought that was overdoing it, but I was dead wrong. Parking is easy and plentiful in Old Pasadena. The city gets full credit for that forward thinking.” When asked about how she views the future of Old Pasadena, Bogaard responded with a wistful tone. “Who knows what the future holds. Everything is on the line. Retailing is changing and how is that going to impact Old Pasadena? They have a lot of restaurants, but there has to be a balance.” Bogaard reflected on the 40-year journey that has led her to this place: “When I walk the streets of Old Pasadena, I smile. When we got involved, it was simply a matter of saving the old buildings. I didn’t expect the area to turn into the very popular destination that it has become. Today’s stores and restaurants and activities bring a lot of people, a lot of young people to Old Pasadena. It is exciting to see so many people in Old Pasadena in the late afternoon and early evenings who are pushing strollers and getting an ice cream. They love being there among those great old historic buildings and people feel safe there. That’s important.” An accomplishment for which she should be exceedingly proud, and the community excessively grateful. •

h u r k a . /c o Winter 2017 / The QuarterlygMagazine 29m


UNDOUBTEDLY DELIGHTFUL South Pasadena resident Jane Soudah, the award-winning pastry chef at Eveleigh and owner of Sweet Jane’s online bakeshop, recently published her first cookbook, Delightful Desserts. In it, she takes an innovative approach to shaking up dessert, focusing on flavors inspired and enhanced by citrus, bitters, flowers and herbs, spices, vinegars and salts. Soudah believes desserts should have unique flavors, not just sweetness, and achieves this by using unexpected ingredients. She draws inspiration from her everyday life, including what’s growing in her backyard, and even flavor combinations that emerge when making dinner for her family. The result is recipes that are refreshingly unconventional, such as brown sugar and lavender bitters pots de crème, curried oatmeal cookies and peach and white balsamic vinegar cobbler. Two of Soudah’s go-to holiday favorites are her orange blossom-marmalade cake and star-anise molasses cookies. Her cake highlights the bright, sweet and wonderfully bitter taste of oranges—which are abundant in Southern California, and Soudah’s garden, during the winter—by combining orange blossom water, fresh orange zest and marmalade. Another crowd-pleaser is her star-anise molasses cookies, which friends clamor for during the holiday season. The star anise, with its mild licorice flavor, helps to heighten the flavors of the more traditional spices in the cookies.

ORANGE BLOSSOM–MARMALADE CAKE YIELD: 1O TO 12 SERVINGS 1 cup (237 ml) buttermilk, room temperature ½ tsp baking soda 3¼ cups (406 g) all-purpose flour ½ tsp kosher salt 1 tbsp (11 g) baking powder 1 cup (230 g) butter, room temperature 1½ cups (288 g) sugar 3 large eggs 1 cup (320 g) orange marmalade 2 tbsp (30 ml) orange blossom water 1 tbsp (10 g) fresh orange zest FROSTING 4 oz (113 g) cream cheese, room temperature ½ cup (115 g) butter, room temperature ¼ cup (80 g) orange marmalade 2 tsp (10 ml) orange blossom water ½ tsp kosher salt 2½ cups (325 g) powdered sugar, sifted Preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C, or gas mark 4). Line the bottoms of three 9-inch (23-cm) round cake pans with parchment paper and spray them with nonstick cooking spray. In a small bowl, combine the buttermilk and baking soda. The mixture may get bubbly. In another bowl, whisk together the flour, salt and baking powder. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy, approximately 2 minutes. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition, and scraping the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the marmalade, orange blossom water and orange zest. Mix well. Add the dry ingredients in 2 additions, alternating with the buttermilk-soda mixture, and mixing well after each addition. Divide the batter evenly among the prepared cake pans. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the cake is golden brown and a cake tester inserted into the middle of each cake comes out clean. Cool the cakes in their pans for 10 minutes before removing from the pans and cooling completely on a wire rack. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together the cream cheese and butter until light and fluffy. Add the marmalade, orange blossom water and salt. Mix to combine. Add the powdered sugar and mix on low speed until incorporated. Increase the mixer speed to high and whip for 2 minutes, until the frosting is light and fluffy. To frost the cake, place one layer on a serving plate and spread with 1/3 of the frosting—making sure to spread the frosting to the edges, but not on the sides of the cakes. Repeat with the remaining 2 layers.

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STAR-ANISE MOLASSES COOKIES YIELD: APPROXIMATELY 3 DOZEN COOKIES 2½ cups (312 g) all-purpose flour 2 tsp (9 g) baking soda 1 tsp kosher salt 1 tsp ground star anise 1 tsp ground ginger 1 tsp ground cinnamon ¼ cup (57 g) butter, room temperature ½ cup (110 g) solid vegetable shortening, room temperature 1 cup (220 g) dark brown sugar, packed 1 large egg ½ cup (120 ml) dark molasses 1/3 cup (80 g) diced, crystallized ginger ½ cup (96 g) coarse or sanding sugar In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, salt, star anise, ground ginger and cinnamon. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the butter, vegetable shortening and brown sugar. Cream together on medium for 2 minutes, scraping down the sides and bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the egg and molasses, mixing until well combined. With the mixer on low speed, add the dry ingredients. Mix in the crystallized ginger. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, and refrigerate the dough for 1 to 2 hours. Preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C, or gas mark 4). Line baking sheets with parchment paper. Scoop the cookie dough with a ¾-ounce (22-g) scoop (4 ½ tsp), rolling each ball of dough in the coarse sugar. Place the dough on the prepared baking sheets. Bake for 9 to 11 minutes until the edges of the cookies are set and the centers begin to crack. The centers of the cookies will look slightly underbaked, but they will firm upon cooling. Cool the cookies on baking sheets for 5 minutes before removing. RECIPES: DELIGHTFUL DESSERTS BY JANE SOUDAH, PAGE STREET PUBLISHING CO. PHOTO CREDIT – ALLIE LEHMAN

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Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 31


GOLDLINE EXCURSION:

GRAND CENTRAL MARKET STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY HARRY YADAV Traces of the original Grand Central Market are still discernable in the pink blocks of cow flank at Belcampo Meat Co. and the deep bins of dried chilies at Valeria’s. But make no mistake about it, the market’s most recent transformation into a foodie wonderland, one that is a gourmet sit-down option for breakfast, lunch and dinner, may be a permanent one. Former owner Adelle Yellin, who took over after her husband Ira passed away in 2002, watched for a decade as formerly empty nearby downtown streets welcomed trendy restaurants while her vendor stalls were increasingly vacated. At one point after the 2007-08 recession, 40 percent of her stalls had failed. In 2012, Yellin decided that in order to survive, Grand Central would need to appeal to a broader demographic. Lower-income shoppers had, over the past two decades, come to frequent the market for its cheap produce and lunch options, most of which were Latin American. Over the next couple of years, Yellin set out to diversify her eateries. The market now offers a vendor lineup ethnically more diverse than any comparably-sized space in Los Angeles with, perhaps, the exception of the Westside’s Farmers’ Market. Berlin Currywurst, serving an authentic German plate of fried pork sausage lathered in spicy tomato sauce, is just a couple of stalls away from Ramen Hood, a vegan, vegetarian creation started by Illan Hall, a winner of the Bravo Network’s Top Chef contest. PBJ LA, a specialty peanut butter and jelly sandwich counter, sits farther west, past legendary California chef Mark Peel’s Prawn, and caddie corner to the longtime vendor Sarita’s Pupuseria. And of course, one would be remiss not to mention Eggslut, the biggest draw in the market with an egg-infused menu and a line perpetually wrapping around from its order counter to its pick-up counter. Eggslut’s Gauche option provides a glimpse of the sensation’s appeal: seared wagyu tri-tip steak, cage-free over medium egg, chimichurri, red onions and dressed arugula in a warm brioche bun. October 27 was the market’s 100th anniversary, and the city celebrated in extravagant fashion. News media joined the throng of Angelenos on hand to enjoy the day’s festivities, which included the cutting of a 100-layer cake by mayor Eric Garcetti, in-market musical performances and discounts on beer and food. The swarms of market traffic made the Metro Gold Line the easiest — and cheapest — form of transportation. This is often the case as parking can be up to $15 and difficult to come by. A 15-minute train ride from the South Pasadena stop to Union Station, with a 3-minute connecting Red Line trip to the Pershing Square Station (exit on the north side to surface on the same block as Grand Central), revealed a Hill Street exterior draped in hundreds of colored balloons. In a way, taking a train to Grand Central is reminiscent of how Angelenos traveled to the market in the early 20th century, when it was the city’s premier destination for fresh meat and produce. From their Victorian houses atop Bunker Hill, well–to–do shoppers descended via the Angels Flight Railway to the market’s Hill Street entrance, returning on the funicular with bags swelling with their day’s ingredients. The Victorians have been replaced by high rises and shoppers now predominantly buy their produce elsewhere, but Angels Flight is back up and running and the Metro now links those suburban Angelenos to downtown LA’s culinary melting pot.

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WINTER DIY:

A HOLIDAY FLORAL ARRANGEMENT BY MADELINE RENN FLORAL DESIGN BY GILLY FLOWERS AND EVENTS PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN “I found I could say things with color and shapes that I couldn’t say any other way—things I had no words for,” said botany-inspired artist Georgia O’Keeffe. This couldn’t be truer for florist and owner of Gilly Flowers & Events, Neal Guthrie, who is otherwise known as “Gilly.” Through his work, he speaks in a language of flowers bursting with inspiration and creativity. Each arrangement has a message of its own, through the movement, color and texture he so thoughtfully puts together. “Take it easy, take your time and don’t worry about the end result,” Gilly says. Here’s how to create this festive and chic arrangement for the holidays. DIRECTIONS 1. Select your base—gleaming metallics impart a sophisticated look while glass allows for a natural vibe. 2. Start by filling in greenery at different angles and lengths. Gilly used magnolia leaves and pine for different dimensions and lots of movement. 3. Intersperse cotton branches for texture and snowberries for shape, visually balancing the elements asymmetrically. 4. Take a step back and see where there are open areas or gaps, this is where you will add your roses and wood pieces. Don’t worry about overdoing it! 5. Add a pomegranate, or surprising element, for color. Most fruits and berries will add a beautiful accent to finish your arrangement. Tip! When arranging, it’s good to work in odd numbers. Here, a pomegranate cut into thirds looked better than two or four.

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THE ONLY WOMAN TO TAKE HER SHOT AT THE NBA BY MARK LANGILL

ANN MEYERS, RIGHT, IS PICTURED WITH SOCCER ICON MIA HAMM – WHO IS ALSO MARRIED TO FORMER BALLPLAYER/CURRENT BROADCASTER NOMAR GARCIAPARRA. PHOTO BY JON SOOHOO/L.A. DODGERS

After hearing the cheers throughout their athletic careers at UCLA, Jackie Robinson and Ann Meyers never expected years later to take center stage in national debates on whether they still belonged in their respective arenas. Scouted by the Brooklyn Dodgers while playing in the Negro Leagues in 1945, Robinson was offered the chance to shatter the sport’s color barrier. Robinson, a four-sport letterman at UCLA in 1938-39 after attending Pasadena Junior College, eventually became the first African American player in the 20th century to appear in the Major Leagues during his Rookie of the Year season in 1947. The Hall of Famer spent his entire 10-year career with the Brooklyn Dodgers and Robinson’s uniform number 42 was retired by all MLB teams on the 50th anniversary of his Dodger debut in 1997. Like Robinson, Meyers didn’t know she was being scouted for history in 1979 when the Indiana Pacers offered her a professional contract and invited her to a three-day training camp tryout. “I was thrilled inside, but I had no idea where this thing was going,” she said. As the sixth of 11 children in her family, basketball was always in Meyers’ blood. Her father, Bob, played guard for Marquette University. Her older brother, David Meyers, was a member of the Milwaukee Bucks following his All-American career at UCLA under coach John Wooden. Ann’s childhood hero was John Havlicek of the Boston Celtics. At age 24 in 1979, Meyers had already established herself as one of the top players in women’s basketball. She was the first player to be part of the U.S. national team while still in high school. At Sonora High School in La Habra, Meyers lettered in seven sports, including softball, badminton, field hockey, tennis and basketball. She was a member of the U.S. Olympic basketball team that won a silver medal in the 1976 Summer Games in Montreal, Canada. “In college, I played pickup games with guys like Magic Johnson, Mark Eaton and Marques Johnson at Pauley Pavilion and with Calvin Murphy and Julius Erving in Vegas,” Meyers said. “They were fast, but so was I. They had size, but I had quickness. They had strength, but I had heart.” Meyers led UCLA to a championship in 1978, defeating Maryland 90-74 at Pauley Pavilion. Earlier in the season, she recorded the first quadruple-double in NCAA Division I basketball history: 20 points, 14 rebounds, 10 assists and 10 steals. Her uniform number 15 would be one of the first four retired in 1990 by UCLA, along with Denise Curry (12), Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (33) and Bill Walton (32). Despite the success, there was always one shot that bothered her – not a miss, rather one she didn’t take. “When you’re in high school, you go through a lot of emotions,” Meyers said. “I was never one to let people intimidate me. But I let people talk me out of playing on the boys’ varsity team.” At 5-foot-9 and 134 pounds, Meyers wasn’t afraid of competing against men who were much taller and stronger. The decision, though, wasn’t an easy one because her dreams weren’t based on playing in the NBA. If Meyers signed with the Pacers, it would forfeit her amateur status and she couldn’t compete in the 1980 Olympics. Meyers also felt mixed emotions because she championed women’s sports. The Title IX portion of the United States Education Amendments of 1972 prohibited the exclusion, based on sex, of any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Although the word “sports” wasn’t included in the description, the legislation would allow young women more equitable access to school funding in college. Meyers was the first woman to receive a four-year athletic scholarship in 1974. In 1978, she had been the first player drafted by the new Women’s Professional Basketball League (WPBL), but she had opted to finish her Sociology degree at UCLA. Her decision to accept the Pacers’ offer triggered waves of criticism, including Mademoiselle magazine charging that Meyers was slighting her col-

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leagues trying to start a viable women’s league. A large and supportive family came in handy for Meyers. Her brother Mark, a personal injury attorney, negotiated a three-year, $150,000 personal services contract with the Pacers on Ann’s behalf, meaning she would still be a member of the Indiana organization. Her brother Jeff assisted during Ann’s three-week training session that included all-day pickup games, running stairs and hitting the speed bag for quickness. David Meyers, a 6-foot-8, 215-pound power forward entering his fifth NBA season with Milwaukee, warned his sister, “Don’t expect any special treatment. You could be taking someone’s job.” Meyers was hoping to be just another player attending Indiana’s free agent/ rookie camp at Butler University. But even in an era before the internet and ESPN, a swarm of media attention tried to chronicle her every move. Meyers didn’t use the locker room. She instead retreated to the ladies’ restroom, where she could not be followed. The three-day tryout started slowly as Meyers tried to fit in and teammates weren’t sure whether to be aggressive toward a female player. When she collided with another player playing defense during a one-on-one drill, the other player instinctively bent down next to her and asked “Are you okay, Annie?” The tentative pace to the practice continued until Pacers assistant coach Jack McCloskey finally broke the tension with an expletive-filled tirade imploring everyone to focus on the task at hand. “Forget about the cameras and the reporters, and the fact that they’re here because of Annie,” he said. “She’s no different than any of us. Now get out there and play!” Meyers felt relief, and at long last, a part of the team. Meyers thought the tryout went well, but she didn’t make the final roster. She cried in private, something she also did when giving up a chance at the 1980 Olympics. But she wasn’t the type to wallow in self-pity. Looking back at the experience, she wouldn’t change a thing. Meyers left the Pacers after one season and joined the WPBL’s New Jersey Gems and won co-MVP honors in 1979. She entered the Women Superstars competition in 1979 and finished fourth, but won the next consecutive three years. During the Superstars competition, she met her future husband, former Dodger pitcher Don Drysdale, who was broadcasting the event for ABC Sports along with colleague and former MLB catcher Bob Uecker. When Meyers and Drysdale were married in 1986, Uecker danced at their wedding with Drysdale as Ann laughed with delight in the background. It was also the first time that a married couple was comprised of members of their respective sports’ Hall of Fame. The union produced three children – sons D.J. and Darren and daughter Drew - all raised by Ann since Drysdale’s sudden passing of a heart attack in 1993 at age 56. Life for Meyers these days seems to resemble perpetual motion as she commutes weekly from Southern California to Phoenix as a broadcaster and sports executive. For more than 25 years, Meyers served as a network television sports analyst for TNT, ESPN, CBS and NBC. She has been the women’s basketball analyst at the Summer Olympics since NBC’s coverage of the 2000 Sydney Games. She is currently a vice president for the WNBA’s Phoenix Mercury and a color analyst for the Phoenix Suns television broadcast. Her image even appeared on a Wheaties cereal box in the team photo when Phoenix won the WNBA championship. Her advice to young athletes is basic: don’t count yourself out before the game begins. “When people give you an opportunity, take it,” she said. “No matter the obstacle or what people say, if you get an opportunity, you have to try.” South Pasadena native Mark Langill is the Team Historian of the Los Angeles Dodgers.

ANN MEYERS WAS THE FIRST WOMAN TO RECEIVE A FULL ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP AT UCLA. SHE WON THE 1978 BRODERICK CUP – THE “HEISMAN TROPHY” OF WOMEN’S ATHLETICS – AFTER LEADING UCLA TO THE AIAW NATIONAL BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP. PHOTO COURTESY OF ANN MEYERS DRYSDALE COLLECTION

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G E TAW AY :

SANTA YNEZ VALLEY Nestled between the Santa Ynez and San Rafael Mountains in Santa Barbara County, the Santa Ynez Valley serves up diversity and excitement without the stress in a compact area that’s family – and pet – friendly. BY JIM THOMPSON

BLANKETED BY THE CALIFORNIA SUN AND FANNED BY GENTLE OCEAN BREEZES, THE SANTA YNEZ VALLEY SPAWNS VARIATIONS IN TEMPERATURE AND MICROCLIMATES CREATING A NEAR PERFECT ENVIRONMENT FOR CHARDONNAY, PINOT NOIR, SYRAH AND OTHER WINE GRAPE VARIETALS. PHOTO BY JIM THOMPSON

From the charm of rural Ballard to the friendly hospitality of Buellton, the Old West vibe of Los Alamos and the wine culture of Los Olivos, to the turn-of-the century charm of Santa Ynez and the Northern European atmosphere of Solvang, a visit to Santa Ynez Valley gives you six getaways for the price of one. Often overlooked as a vacation destination, the Valley – and its wine culture – was put on the map in 2004 as the setting for the Academy Award-winning film Sideways. Fans of the movie can often be seen at the Sideways Inn and the Hitching Post II Restaurant as they look to recreate the experiences of fictional characters Miles and Jack. Ironically, the name of the area was a mistake. When the original town was settled in 1881, it was to be called “Santa Inés” (Saint Agnes) but the settlers didn’t speak Spanish so they spelled “Inés” as “Ynez.” In the 1800s, the region was an important stagecoach stop, a major horse breeding area and home to some rough and tough saloons – some say as many as 11 thrived at the time. Today, the temperate climate of the Valley gives rise to a surprising variety of excellent wine grapes, fresh produce, beautiful natural surroundings and diverse communities.

PROTECTED BY THE SANTA YNEZ AND SAN RAFAEL MOUNTAIN RANGES, THE SANTA YNEZ VALLEY ENCOMPASSES SIX COMMUNITIES WITHIN A COMPACT, 10-MILE RADIUS. PHOTO COURTESY OF VISIT THE SANTA YNEZ VALLEY

QUIET COUNTRY ROADS PASSING VINEYARDS, ORCHARDS, FARMS AND RANCHES MAKE THE SANTA YNEZ VALLEY A GREAT PLACE FOR BIKING, HIKING, HORSEBACK RIDING AND JUST KICKING BACK. PHOTO BY JIM THOMPSON

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SPANNED BY A 200-YEAR TRADITION OF WINE MAKING, THE SANTA YNEZ VALLEY IS HOME TO A SURPRISING VARIETY OF WINES AND MORE THAN 120 WINERIES, MOST FAMILY-OWNED WITH LIMITED PRODUCTION. PHOTO COURTESY OF VISIT THE SANTA YNEZ VALLEY

Scenic Drive To explore the area, take U.S. 101 north to scenic Route 154 through the 2,000-foot San Marcos Pass and into the Santa Ynez Mountains. Stop at Rancho Cielo Vista Point for a breathtaking panoramic view of the Santa Ynez Valley framed by the San Rafael Mountains before descending into the Valley itself. Along the way, take a short detour to Lake Cachuma. Dry for a long time during the drought, this artificial lake, created by the construction of Bradbury Dam, is coming back. It’s a great place for camping, fishing, hiking or a quiet picnic. Farthest north in the Valley is Los Alamos, where the Old West lives. Only seven blocks long, the town, which is surrounded by ranches, farms and vineyards, is a true reflection of its cowboy heritage. The historic centerpiece is the 1880 Union Hotel, a Victorian-style bed & breakfast featuring nine authentic Old West suites. But, don’t let the western exterior fool you. Like the rest of the Santa Ynez Valley, the town offers a wealth of sophisticated restaurants like the

Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 39


wonderful Pico, art galleries, antique shops and wine tasting rooms. Buellton (junction of U.S. 101 and Highway 246) is probably the most “down-to-earth” yet cosmopolitan community. A wealth of restaurants, wine tasting rooms and two distilleries (offering tastings of whiskey, vodka and even moonshine) ensure you won’t leave hungry or thirsty. There are plenty of hotels, but camping and “glamping” are major attractions here. Flying Flags RV Resort & Campground has become a destination all on its own. This 40-acre park offers RV and camping sites as well as cabins, cozy cottages, vintage trailers and safari tents. Next door is the Sideways Inn and across the street the iconic Pea Soup Andersen’s (opened in 1924). Surrounded by vineyards, lavender farms, ranches and orchards intertwined by horse and bike trails, Los Olivos is nestled in the northeast part of the Valley. With more than 30 tasting rooms in a five block area, it’s a perfect place for a laid-back wine country experience. Take in a spa treatment at the Fess Parker Wine Country Inn followed by a taste of refined ranch cuisine at The Bear and Star Restaurant. A real feel for the Old West can be found in Santa Ynez. Period–style building facades, saloons, a feed store and even a few horses give you the feeling of the 1880s. The Santa Ynez Valley Historical Society Museum (https://www.santaynezmuseum. org) is a must stop for anyone interested in the history of the area. Western-style events include the Vaquero Show & Sale in November, while nearby Chumash Casino Resort offers 24-hour gaming and world-class spa facilities. More Danish Than Denmark Founded by Danish immigrants in 1911, Solvang (http://www.solvangusa.com) is the Santa Ynez Valley’s most popular tourist destination with more than a million visitors each year. A visit to Solvang (“sunny

IF YOU GO

HOUSED IN AN OLD GENERAL STORE, THE UPSCALE COMFORT FOOD AT PICO RESTAURANT IN LOS ALAMOS IS A STANDOUT IN AN AREA THAT IS FAST BECOMING A CULINARY MAGNET. PHOTO COURTESY OF PICO, LOS ALAMOS

RELAX BY THE POOL AT THE SPA AT FESS PARKER WINE COUNTRY INN BEFORE INDULGING IN SOME OF THE MANY THERAPEUTIC AND BEAUTY SERVICES OFFERED THERE. PHOTO COURTESY OF VISIT THE SANTA YNEZ VALLEY

THE PICTURESQUE SUNSTONE VINEYARDS AND WINERY TRANSPORTS IS MADE FROM RECLAIMED LIMESTONE AND ARTIFACTS FROM FRANCE. PHOTO BY JIM THOMPSON

DOTTING THE SANTA YNEZ VALLEY, LOCAL FARM STANDS OFFER FRESH, LOCALLY GROWN, ORGANIC PRODUCE. PHOTO BY JIM THOMPSON

BESIDES FINE WINES, THE VALLEY ALSO PRODUCES SOME OF THE BEST OF CALIFORNIA’S OLIVE OILS LIKE THE INCREDIBLE, ALL-NATURAL VARIETIES FOUND AT GLOBAL GARDENS IN LOS OLIVOS. PHOTO BY JIM THOMPSON

THINGS TO DO (For a more complete list of things to do, places to go, wineries and restaurants, visit the official Santa Ynez Valley website at: https://www. visitsyv.com) • Winery Visit. With more than 120 wineries in the Valley, there is something for every taste. A favorite is Sunstone Vineyards & Winery in Santa Ynez. Enjoy fine wines in the idyllic setting of Provençal French courtyards, stone barrel-aging caves or picnic grounds. Tastings are $18 per person. Group and private wine tours incorporating several wineries in the area are available with prices starting at about $75. They include Breakaway Tours (https://www.breakaway-tours.com), Stagecoach Co. Wine Tours (http://www.winetourssantaynez.com), and Santa Barbara Wine Country Tours (http://www. winetours-santabarbara.com).

• Hiking, Cycling and Horseback Riding. Rolling hills, wild flowers, and hundreds of miles of bike and horse trails make the Valley a paradise for those who love the outdoors. • Spa & Wellness. From vineyard Yoga to luxurious spas, relaxation should be part of any visit. For the ultimate in luxury visit the Fess Parker Wine Country Inn (https://www. fessparkerinn.com). The Spa at the Chumash Casino Resort also offers full service treatments (http://chumashcasino.com). • Global Gardens Farm Stand. Enjoy all-natural olive, olive oil and fruit vinegar tastings at this truly unique farm stand that offers a fun, small-farm experience. Owner Theo Stephan (the author of a definitive book on vinegars and extra virgin olive oils) is always happy to share her knowledge and passion for this healthy cooking ingredient (http:// www.globalgardensonline.com). • Feed an Ostrich. OstrichLand

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THE OLD-FASHIONED COUNTRY TOWN OF LOS OLIVOS IN THE SANTA YNEZ VALLEY IS HOME TO ART GALLERIES, WINE TASTING ROOMS AND THE WORLD-CLASS FESS PARKER WINE COUNTRY INN. PHOTO BY JIM THOMPSON

VINTAGE AIRSTREAM TRAILERS ARE AVAILABLE FOR RENT AT THE FLYING FLAGS RV RESORT & CAMPGROUND IN BUELLTON. PHOTO BY JIM THOMPSON

field” in Danish) is like stepping into a Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale. Sometimes called “more Danish than Denmark” it is a patchwork of cobblestone streets, towers, gabled roofs and windmills. Authentic Danish bakeries, restaurants, wine and beer tasting rooms and gourmet food shops along the flower bedecked streets make it a special place for family fun. The quaint history of the region is reflected in Ballard, the smallest town in the region. The well-preserved historic homes, churches and the famous “Little Red Schoolhouse”

(operating since 1883) make it one of the Valley’s great treasures. The Ballard Inn (called “one of the most romantic B&Bs in the region”), is the perfect place to enjoy a fine wine and watch the world go by. The diversity of the six communities and the sheer beauty of the area make a getaway to the Santa Ynez Valley an easy and exciting destination throughout the year.• Jim Thompson is a veteran newsman, president of the World Travel Media Guild and author of seven books on travel.

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USA in Buellton offers visitors a unique opportunity to get up-close and personal with these most unusual birds (https://www.ostrichlandusa.com). FESTIVALS/EVENTS • Solvang Julefest (First three weekends in December): Named one of TIME magazine’s “Nine Most Christmassy Towns in America,” Solvang celebrates the season with events combining small-town holiday cheer and Danish-American traditions (http://www.solvangusa. com/things-to-do/solvang-julefest). • Restaurant Week (Jan. 21-27): Restaurants and wineries throughout the Santa Ynez Valley celebrate the region’s diverse cuisine with tasting menus from some of the Valley’s top restaurants (https://www.visitsyv. com/restaurant-week). WHERE TO STAY (Rates approximate and vary by season and day of week)

INSPIRED BY THE FILM SIDEWAYS, (FILMED ON LOCATION IN THE SANTA YNEZ VALLEY) FANS OFTEN STAY AT THE SIDEWAYS INN IN BUELLTON. PHOTO BY JIM THOMPSON

• Flying Flags RV Resort & Campground (Buellton). A resort offering everything from camping to “glamping” and luxury accommodations. Along with 235 RV and campsites there are 65 hospitality units that include elegant cottages, comfortable surf cabins, ranch houses, vintage trailers and Airstreams, and deluxe safari tents. There is also a restaurant, bar, aquatics complex, fitness center, dog park, sports field and concert stage. For many, this is their destination. Prices range from $50-$200. Pet friendly. (https://high-

waywestvacations.com) • Fess Parker Wine Country Inn (Los Olivos). Wine country elegance guest rooms (many with fireplaces) include full breakfast for two at The Bear and Star and complimentary wine tasting. Rates: $300-$800. (https://www. fessparkerinn.com) • Chumash Casino Resort (Santa Ynez). This highly-rated hotel offers 320 rooms and 58 suites adjacent to the casino, many with views of the Santa Ynez Valley from its 35-foot tower. Rates: $135-$1,200. (http:// chumashcasino.com) • Sideways Inn (Buellton). Follow the footsteps of Miles and Jack from the Academy Award-winning film Sideways. Rates: $100-$500. (https:// highwaywestvacations.com/properties/sidewaysinn) • Ballard Inn & The Gathering Table (Ballard). Elegant accommodations and award-winning cuisine make this one of the top luxury inns in the Valley. Rates: $295-$475. (http://www.

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ballardinn.com) • Alamo Motel (Los Alamos). Small, inexpensive, recently renovated and hip, The Alamo Motel is perfectly centered on Bell Street, the heartbeat of lively Los Alamos. Rates: $79$249. (http://www.rememberthealamomotel.com) • 1880 Union Hotel (Los Olivos). Got a group? How about taking over an entire 1880s hotel? Take a step into the past with nine authentic Old West quarters for your family reunion, club event or couples retreat. It’s only for groups, individual room rentals are not available. Check for rates. (http://1880union.com) WHERE TO EAT • Pico (Los Alamos). When it opened in 2016 (in an old general store) by winemaker Will Henry, his wife Kali Kopley, and Chef Drew Terp, Pico was one of the most anticipated restaurants in an area where food and wine is an art form. Its farm-to-

THE HOUSE MADE PAPPARDELLE NOODLES WITH MAITAKE AND SHALLOT TOMATO SAUCE IS ONE OF THE MANY DELIGHTS AT PICO IN LOS ALAMOS. PHOTO COURTESY OF PICO, LOS ALAMOS

table, upscale comfort food, like the bone-in short ribs with braised local collards and Yukon gold risotto or ribeye with peach chutney and grilled cornbread, is an experience like few others. (http://www.losalamosgeneralstore.com) • Bottlest Winery, Bar & Bistro (Buellton). Set in the hip Industrial Way entertainment area, Bottlest combines a fine dining experience with a cool, relaxed vibe and excellent wine selections. Craft cocktails and a “wine wall” offering 52 wines by

the glass perfectly complement the “wine country bistro” menu shaped by Chef Owen Hanavan. You can even get a custom-blended wine from their website. (http://bottlest. com/bistro) • The Bear and Star (Los Olivos). Natural ingredients from the nearby 714-acre Fess Parker Home Ranch including Wagyu cattle, chickens, quail, rabbits and pigs raised on-site paired with organic vegetables provide for a remarkable, ever-changing menu created by Chef John Cox while the Fess Parker Winery supplies estate-grown Rhône varietals. (http://www.thebearandstar.com) • S.Y. Kitchen (Santa Ynez). Co-owner and Executive Chef Luca Crestanelli, a native of Verona, Italy, serves up a remarkable variety of modern Italian dishes almost entirely sourced from local farms and ranches in the relaxing atmosphere of this Italian-inspired California farmhouse. (http://www.sykitchen.com)

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Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 43


A HANDS-ON APPROACH TO REVOLUTIONARY MIND SCIENCE San Marino’s Dr. Brian Lee Is at the Forefront of Groundbreaking Brain Research and Surgery and Doubles As A Sideline Physician for the USC Football Team BY MITCH LEHMAN

Dr. Brian Lee calls it his “dream job,” one that he began chasing as early as his days at Whitney High School in Cerritos. “I had the laboratory set that my parents bought me when I was a kid,” he says with a laugh.  We are in Lee’s office at the Keck School of Medicine on the University of Southern California Health Sciences Campus in Los Angeles as the San Marino resident calmly explains his vocation.  “I knew from high school that I wanted to be a doctor, but I also wanted to be a scientist,” Lee says. “Medicine is applied science. I wanted to invent new technologies that could help people live better lives.” Lee, 40, is Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurological Surgery at the Keck School of Medicine, where he puts to use both his MD and the Ph.D. he earned at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Computational Neuroscience. “Computational neuroscience aims to understand how the brain processes information and communicates with other parts of the brain, for example, to let you see, walk, or talk,” he explains. “In medical school, the brain was always the most interesting organ and the most complex subject. We have a fair idea of the anatomy of the brain, but a lesser understanding of how the brain works. That led me to neurosurgery. I like working with my hands and I like building things, I wanted to have a hands-on approach to medical science.” Lee is one of just 15 doctors in USC’s Department of Neurosurgery, who all have their own sub-specialty, he says. Lee’s is Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, a revolutionary field that involves modulating the function of the brain using deep brain stimulation, or DBS. DBS consists of an electronic pulse generator and electrodes implanted directly into the brains of patients who are suffering from neurological disorders. The electrodes are placed in hyper-specific locations of the brain in order to provide therapy via electrical stimulation. In order to accurately place the electrodes, the surgery is typically performed with the patient awake in the operating room. The technique seeks to control the symptoms of movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia through deep brain stimulation. Although he was not a patient of Dr. Lee, among the more recognizable subjects who underwent the treatment was, ironically, former USC President Dr. Steven Sample, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2001, yet continued in that posi-

DR. BRIAN LEE COMBINES HIS PASSION FOR RESEARCHING AND DEVELOPING UNIQUE APPROACHES TO BRAIN SCIENCE WITH A LOVE FOR ALL THINGS USC – INCLUDING HIS ROLE WITH THE ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT AS A SIDELINE PHYSICIAN AND CONSULTANT. PHOTO BY JOHN MCGILLEN/USC ATHLETICS

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Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 45


tion for nine more years. During public appearances, Sample frequently credited deep brain stimulation for improving his quality of life. At this point, Lee clicks on a video showing a 20-something male who suffers from dystonia, which is characterized by persistent or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements and postures. In the beginning footage, the patient appears in the fetal position, overcome with contractures. Lee then shows the “after” video, in which the same patient is seen contracture-free, walking toward and away from the camera. Most importantly, in the second clip, the young man is smiling. “As a neurosurgeon, I see many devastating neurological problems such as stroke, trauma, and tumors,” Lee says. “But I also get to work with patients who after treatment do much, much better. There are many cases where we see a dramatic improvement after DBS surgery. When someone with one of these disorders is able to enjoy a much better quality of life, well, that is very satisfying.”  Lee asked one patient following a successful procedure that cured him of uncontrollable tremors if the first thing he wanted to do was shave.  “No,” the patient replied. “I want to drink a beer.” And so he did. Since Lee’s tenure at USC, he’s introduced a new asleep MRI-guided DBS insertion technique, allowing the patient to be under general anesthesia during DBS surgery. Currently, electrodes are inserted into the brain of the patient while they are awake in the operating room with a head-mounted frame that positions probes for “pinpoint accuracy,” in the doctor’s words.  Feedback is received in real-time by the medical team through computer software “so we can target exactly where we need to be. We have to be extremely precise.”  Lee says the patient no longer has to be awake during DBS surgery, but

LEE HOLDS THE JEWELED SHILLELAGH, THE TROPHY GIVEN TO THE WINNER OF THE ANNUAL USC – NOTRE DAME FOOTBALL GAME. PHOTO COURTESY OF DR. BRIAN LEE

instead can be asleep under general anesthesia. The entire surgery is performed using MRI guidance for accurate placement of the DBS electrodes.  “Many patients don’t want to be awake for this type of surgery and asleep, MRI-guided DBS surgery is a great alternative.  In addition, we’ve found that patients who do not speak English natively are attracted to this type of surgery to reduce the stress of being awake in the operating room and being asked to interact in a non-native language.” When Lee is not operating, he runs his own university- and government-funded research laboratory.  “In my laboratory, we are trying to better understand the brain and how it works so we can create better therapies,” he says. “Intertwining the clinical and the lab research is crucial.” Lee spends a good deal of his day in surgery and “rounding” – visiting his patients in the busy Keck Medical Center – as well as publishing papers and applying for grants to help fund his research. One of his goals is to develop more data on the brain-computer interface.  “The whole idea of that is for pa-

46 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

tients who are paralyzed, we will be able to implant electrodes into the brain and understand what the brain is trying to do. There is a hope we can interpret those signals that would allow a patient to control a robotic arm, for example.” He is actively collaborating with colleagues at Caltech on numerous brain-computer interface projects. If there is a traditional “fun part” to Lee’s job, it’s his role as one of the team neurosurgeons who cares for the USC student athletes.  For the sport of football, you might catch a glimpse of him on TV on the sidelines, home and away. A fan of Trojan football for more than half his life, Lee has been to every stadium in the PAC 12.  Lee says those involved with the sport are “very proactive about player health and safety with concussion protocols.”  He works closely with the athletic trainers and players themselves when there are suspected concussions and second-year head Coach Clay Helton, who Lee says is “a really nice guy.”  Lee is also part of a team that provides concussion education to each student athlete at USC. When asked about the future of brain research, Lee pauses, then reflects on this incredibly exciting time to be in the field of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery.  “We’re at this point in history where laboratory research, technological advancements, and neurosurgical innovation are coalescing,” he says. “The advancements we have seen in the past 20 years are amazing and have profoundly changed the lives of patients with movement disorders. The next generation of advancements may allow us to treat additional neurological disorders such as depression, Tourette’s disease, obsessive compulsive disorder, obesity, post-traumatic stress disorder, and many more. With such a fascinating and wide-open future, it makes you just focus on the short term: the next day, week, and month. I don’t want to miss a thing.” •

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FEEL GOOD HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE Let’s face it: the holidays can be hectic. This year, why not focus on giving gifts that make the recipients feel good? Below are some of our suggestions for fabulous presents that are sure to delight.

Good Flowers (for A Year): Treat someone you love to the gift of gorgeousness throughout the year! You can arrange for these monthly (or more!) deliveries with a variety of local florists including Gilly Flowers & Events (www.gillyflowers.com, (323) 953-2910).

Good Scents: This Agraria diffuser will visually and olfactorily delight its recipient. You can find gorgeous Chando and Agraria diffusers and a variety of coveted gift items at Elements (2511 Mission St., San Marino, (626) 799-3000). Good and Sweet: What’s better than sweet treats? Sweet treats that are delivered to your home. Let awardwinning baker Danielle Keene of Sheila Mae (www.sheilamae.com, (310) 614-4458) spread some joy to those you love with her custom cakes, cookies, cupcakes and bars. The beautiful thing? They taste as good as they look. Good Dog: Spoil the pups in your life with all-natural, whimsical treats from The Dog Bakery (36 W. Colorado Blvd., #3, Pasadena (626) 440-0443 or www.thedogbakery.com). We’ve been told they’re delicious.

Good Boxed Wine (and Truffles): Let Karl Curran of Charlemagne Fine Wines (www.charlemagnewines. com, (310) 554-9734) help you select the perfect bottle(s) of select smallproduction wines from France and Italy, elegantly presented in a gift box and paired with truffles created by Yvan Valentin. Delicious!

48 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

Good Grooming: When you look good, you feel good! Have your loved ones feeling like a million bucks with gift certificates for hair, nails, and make up this holiday season at a local salon or an inhome service provider like our fave, Glamsquad (www.glamsquad.com).

Good and Cozy: Being able to cuddle up with a cozy throw to read a book or watch television is a simple pleasure. Make your loved ones feel good with the gorgeous alpaca throws from Peltier Home (1011 Mission St. A, South Pasadena, (626) 799-2265). They’ll thank you for years to come.

Good Spirits: A 21+ twist on holiday dessert, the Black Bull whisky-soaked cake, imported from Scotland, warms the senses—and the palate—with currants, sultana raisins, candied citrus peel and glacé cherries. Pick up a few gift-ready tins exclusively at Duncan Taylor (1020 Mission St, South Pasadena, (626) 441-1706).

Good Planets: Give them the world with Cassini Terrestrial, Antique and Traditional globes, which rotate using only Earth’s magnetic force and natural light (so no cords or batteries required)! Retreat (950 Mission St., South Pasadena, (626) 639-3365) will also be adding planets into the mix for the holidays.

Good Health: Help your loved ones start or keep their New Year’s resolutions with a local gym membership. Outfitting them with fab sporting accoutrements, like decorative bespoke snakeskin boxing gloves from Elisabeth Weinstock (8159 W. Third St., Los Angeles, (323) 655-3000 or www. elisabethweinstock.com), could add an extra “punch” to your gift!

Good Giving: Give the gift of giving back with a Charity On Top (www. charityontop.com) gift card! This Pasadena-based business issues customizable gift cards (think a personal photo or message) and digital gift cards that enable recipients to donate to over 1.8 million charities (“All charities in the US that are in good standing,” according to co-founder Kathy Selders). Perfect as stocking stuffers or gifts for family, friends and colleagues! Talk about a gift that keeps on giving!

Good Looks: Ward off any malevolent glares with this gorgeous Sydney Evan turquoise enamel evil eye pendant in yellow gold. This and other fabulous jewelry and gifts are available at Serafina (2670 Mission St., San Marino, (626) 799-9899).

Good Times: “Produced in Mass(achusetts) but not mass produced,” these animal clocks made of lightweight natural birchwood and printed with nontoxic inks will make the little ones in your life smile with several adorable designs to adorn their walls. Pick one up along with other special gifts at Marz (1512 Mission St., South Pasadena (626) 799-4032).

Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 49


PHOTOGRAPHY: NORTON SIMON MUSEUM, © NORTON SIMON ART FOUNDATION

MUSEUM IN FOCUS:

NORTON SIMON MUSEUM

Chief Curator Carol Togneri Looks Forward to an Exciting 2018 BY MADELINE RENN

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If you have visited the Norton Simon Museum in the past sixteen years, you have incidentally met chief curator Carol Togneri. Her curatorial eye subtly influences every visit and exhibit in the museum, from the colors, to the light, to the arrangement of pieces. Togneri says, “Every curator approaches exhibitions differently, from the choosing of colors, to the fonts, to the text on the walls. Nevertheless, [curating] is always a moment to reflect on the artist and the sentiment of the art’s century of creation.” As a Pasadena native, Togneri grew up frequenting the Colorado Boulevard establishment and kept it local by beginning her art career at the Getty. There, she worked for 23 years and sustains a collaborative relationship by working with them on conservation and surveying projects. Two of the Norton Simon’s most impressive holdings—the Branchini Madonna by Giovanni di Paolo and Self-Portrait by Rembrandt van Rijn— have been subject to the collaboration. “The Getty can scan and find out which pigments and hues were used,” Togneri notes, “Which tells us more about our pictures. For the Branchini, we learned how the artist laid down his squares of gold leaf to fill up the background. The new knowledge felt like a rebirth of the painting.” She says working with the Getty “feels like going home.” From conservation to concept, the

chief curator has her hand in every stage of an exhibition’s creation. Adding to her curatorial resume, “Taking Shape: Degas as Sculptor,” will debut on November 10, 2017 and continue through April 9, 2018, posing challenges and exciting possibilities for the curating team due to the sculptural objects. “With the sculptures and their bases, we wanted to keep the idea of movement and that something might perhaps be unfinished. In some cases, this meant putting three sculptures on the same base and even building some bases from scratch.” Norton Simon visitors will find the museum’s beloved Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen by Edgar Degas center stage at the exhibit. “Her silhouette will be at rest amongst a forest of sculptures facing all directions with a lot of activity and movement,” Togneri says. Also coming up from December 8, 2017 through March 5, 2018 the Norton Simon will be hosting Rembrandt’s Self Portrait at the Age of 34, on loan from the National Gallery, London. Thrilled by the loan, Togneri says, “Just to have the portrait here is incredible. It’s never been to the West Coast or in the U.S., for that matter. It’s going to be very, very exciting to have that incredible picture in these galleries.” The portrait, completed after Rembrandt had garnered fame, will juxtapose the museum’s perma-

nent self-portrait painted about five years prior. The loan is part of an international exchange program that included a field trip for the Norton Simon’s The Repentant Magdalene by Guido Cagnacci from New York to London. Conversations about the exchange began between the Norton Simon, the Frick Collection in New York, and the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. “We had been discussing with them the possibility of loans,” Togneri recalls, “Which would allow us to spotlight masterpieces that had come from different parts of the world. We then borrowed a Vermeer from the National Gallery, then expanded the partnership to include an exchange with the Musée d’Orsay in Paris and then the Art Institute of Chicago, and finally, the latest partner, the National Gallery, London.” Also to look forward to in 2018: a small exhibition of Rembrandt prints, an exhibition of arts and crafts from India, an Ellsworth Kelly show, a display of works by Matisse and a big tapestry and cartoon exhibition in the fall. As for Togneri, she’s excited about it all. “I look forward to every day— from the way the sun shines into the gallery to the way different lights cast different shadows on pieces.” • The Norton Simon Museum is located on 411 West. Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena. Visit www.NortonSimon. org for hours, events and more information on upcoming exhibits.

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Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 51

G


FOODIE FAVORITES

Restaurant Recommendations from Those In The Know We polled some of our favorite foodies about the places they like to eat in the area. Here are some restaurants that they’ve been frequenting and think you should, too. Bon appétit!

Red Herring

1661 COLORADO BOULEVARD, LOS ANGELES (EAGLE ROCK) (323) 739-0004; REDHERRINGLA.COM TUES. - FRI.: 5 P.M. TO 10 P.M.; SAT. & SUN.: 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M., 5 P.M. TO 10 P.M. The brainchild of college sweethearts Chef Dave and Alexis Woodall, this gem of a restaurant located in Eagle Rock offers upscale American cuisine that delights the senses. On any given day, one can expect to see a varied crowd ranging from 20-something hipsters to chic older diners, all effortlessly brought together by the promise of good food and solicitous service. Chef Dave’s attention to detail—from working with specific local farmers to guarantee the availability of the highest quality ingredients, to curing his own meats, to his artful plating—makes for a fulfilling culinary experience. The dinner menu enchants with appetizers such as pâté served with grilled bread and house made pickles; yam fritters with green goddess dressing; and heirloom tomatoes served with grilled avocado, crème fraiche, honey and Aleppo pepper. Entrée offerings include perfectly-seasoned chicken and waffles, tender braised beef short ribs and house made linguini with black mussels. Dessert does not disappoint, with delectable treats such as guava semifreddo and vanilla date bread pudding. The service is on point, with the waitstaff making diners feel cared for and appreciated. The well-curated wine and beer offerings complement the food, and the knowledgeable staff is happy to make pairing suggestions. Don’t let the lack of parking dissuade you—valet parking is imminent.

Winsome

1115 W. SUNSET BOULEVARD, LOS ANGELES (ECHO PARK) NOTE: ENTRANCE IS ON WHITE KNOLL DRIVE (213) 415-1818; EATWINSOME.COM CAFÉ: 8 A.M. TO 3 P.M. DAILY; BREAKFAST AND LUNCH: 8:30 A.M. TO 2:30 P.M. DAILY; DINNER: 5:30 P.M. TO 10 P.M. SUN. – THURS., 5:30 P.M. TO 10:30 P.M. FRI. & SAT. Winsome’s tag line is “a good place to be,” and it’s a perfect example of truth in advertising. Housed in the ultra-cool Elysian (formerly the headquarters of the Metropolitan Water District designed by Mid-Century Modernism pioneer William Pereira), Winsome offers up delicious comfort food from a variety of cultures with a modern twist. Marc Rose and Med Abrous (of The Spare Room and Genghis Cohen fame) created this unintimidating neighborhood eatery that caters to anyone who likes a relaxing environment (think lots of natural light and appealing décor) and good food. Offering breakfast, lunch and dinner every day, there is a panoply of deliciousness from which to choose. Some of the breakfast highlights include potato rostis with sunny side up eggs (there are three options: vegetarian, smoked salmon or house made corned beef), the fried egg sandwich with applewood smoked bacon, aged cheddar cheese and house made “everything” Kaiser roll, and coffee cake that is absolutely everything a coffee cake should be. Lunch offers up treats like flavorful and aesthetically pleasing farro piccolo and grilled chicken salad with white balsamic Caesar dressing, rich and savory charred escarole and chicken soup served with grilled sourdough bread and a satisfying banh mi sandwich. Not to be missed are the Kennebec potato chips with kaffir lime, chili and crème fraiche. The dinner menu features interesting small plates like Japanese Kanpachi, lamb ribs with cucumber, lemon, mint and harissa and pappardelle with a pork ragu as well as shared entrees like the whole roasted branzino and impressive grilled dry aged 32-ounce tomahawk chop. Dessert entices with treasures such as coconut tapioca pudding and banana rum tres leches with a passion fruit gelée and brûléed banana. Winsome’s beverages exceed expectations with delicious coffee offerings, agua frescas and Mexican soft drinks. Its bar serves unique cocktails with equally creative names as well as a nice selection of natural wines (made without chemicals and minimal technological intervention) and beers. With its inviting space and enjoyable food and beverage offerings, this charming restaurant definitely lives up to its name.

Sushi Enya

124 E. COLORADO BOULEVARD, PASADENA (626) 365-3512, SUSHIENYA.COM DINNER: MON.-THURS. 5:30 P.M. TO 10:30 P.M., FRI. & SAT. 5:30 P.M. TO 11 P.M., SUN. 5 P.M. TO 10 P.M. This understated restaurant in Old Town Pasadena opened by Chef Kimiyasu Enya houses what can simply be described as some of the best sushi around. With a daily menu that features only the freshest fish and produce available, Sushi Enya serves up delectable morsels that are both refined and balanced. Its sushi and sashimi receive high marks for not only quality, but also freshness and presentation. A recent menu featured selections like chopped Toro with pickled radish, Gindara with homemade miso and Saba marinated in vinegar with kelp, to name a few. But it’s Sushi Enya’s omakase menu that really sets it apart from its peers. This chef’s tasting menu, for which you must be seated at the sushi bar, is not inexpensive but worth every penny. After ruling out any foods or flavors that need to be avoided, diners are taken on a culinary adventure that usually lasts two to three hours, sampling amazing sushi and other skillfully-assembled delicacies (like lobster tempura with shrimp sauce and Japanese egg custard with caviar, truffle, crab and foie gras) that are not only artistic but also delicious. Being able to have a front row seat while the chef creates these masterpieces enhances the experience and makes diners appreciate what they are consuming even more. The service is solicitous but unimposing. The wine, sake and beer selection is top-notch. It is important to note that Sushi Enya does not take reservations and because of its small size cannot accommodate parties larger than six people.

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Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 53


EVA FENYES PAINTING EN PLEIN AIR, N.D. UNIDENTIFIED PHOTOGRAPHER (FCP.223.12B)

PALM & CYPRESS WALK

EVA FENYES RIDING AN INDIAN PONY TO PALM CAÑON, PALM SPRINGS, APRIL 1900. UNIDENTIFIED PHOTOGRAPHER (FCP.40.1.56B)

Palm Springs and the Towering Palms of Fenyes Mansion BY JULIE STIRES

The magnificent palms that sway above the gardens at Fenyes Mansion today are some of the original flora planted by Eva and Adalbert Fenyes along a path they called the “palm & cypress walk” or the “long walk.” Planted in 1907, the palms were interspersed with cypress, and together with flowering shrubs and annuals, they grew to create a lush corridor that connected the mansion’s east facing terrace to the pergola at the end of the walk in the heart of the garden. It’s not surprising that Eva chose fan palms to form the framework for this long walkway. Southern California’s palm trees had caught her eye from the moment she and Adalbert decided to settle down in Pasadena

TODAY’S ONE HUNDRED TEN YEAR-OLD PALMS AT FENYES MANSION. PHOTO COURTESY OF PASADENA MUSEUM OF HISTORY

LOOKING DOWN THE PALM & CYPRESS WALK, FROM THE EAST TERRACE. NEWLY PLANTED PALMS IN 1907 (FCP.40.2.28A) UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, ALL WATERCOLORS AND PHOTOGRAPHS ARE BY EVA SCOTT FENYES (1849-1930) COURTESY OF PASADENA MUSEUM OF HISTORY

54 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

OUR COTTAGE AND CACTUS GARDEN, PALM SPRINGS, APRIL 1900 (FCP.222.7.4)

PALM CAÑON, PALM SPRINGS, 20 MAY 1905 (ESF.010.2225)

INTERIOR OF PALM LEAF COTTAGE, PALM SPRINGS, APRIL 1900 (FCP.222.7.5)

20 MINUTE SKETCH OF OUR HOME. YOUNG PALMS LINE THE “LONG WALK” AS VIEWED FROM THE PERGOLA, 2 AUGUST 1908 (ESF.010.2558)

in 1896. A talented watercolorist, she first painted and photographed urban specimens. Then in the spring of 1900 she found a profusion of native palms at a place where she could photograph and paint them in their natural habitat–the canyon oases of Palm Springs. There, picturesque groves of palm trees grew in water-rich canyons named Andreas, Murray, and Palm, and together Eva and Adalbert explored these desert canyons on more than one occasion. While Adalbert collected beetles – he was an entomologist as well as a medical doctor – Eva painted. Her custom when painting en plein air was to balance her sketchbook and watercolors on her lap while sitting on a rock or a camp stool, shaded by her painting umbrella. The watercolor sketches she made in the desert canyons over the years reveal her fascination with the strange and ragged beauty of the California Fan Palm. Several of her photographs also reveal her delight in one imaginative use of the palm’s leaves in the clever construction of their desert lodgings. For one week in April 1900, Eva and Adalbert stayed in a cottage made of palm fronds, and for Eva this was nothing less than enchanting. She photographed the little house with its rock-lined paths and cactus garden. And she managed to capture the intricacies of the novel design when she snapped a picture of the pleasant, sunny bedroom inside their “palm leaf cottage.” Clearly Eva and Adalbert were charmed by the beauty and utility of the California Fan Palm. Today the canyons that Eva and Adalbert visited are part of Indian Canyons, a recreational hiking and horseback riding destination located on the tribal lands of the Agua Caliente Band of the Cahuilla people. Indian Canyons is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Its website is http://www.indian-canyons.com/ indian_canyons. • Julie Stires is Project Archivist at the Pasadena Museum of History.

Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 55


WINTER EVENT GUIDE PASADENA Farmers Markets • Old Pasadena Farmers Market, at the intersection of Holly St. and Fair Oaks Ave. Call 310-455-0181 or visit www.oldpasadena.org for more information. Sundays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Features locally-grown produce, food vendors and oftentimes live music. • Villa Park Center, 363 East Village St. at Garfield Ave. Call 626-449-0179 or visit PasadenaFarmersMarket.org for more information. Tuesdays, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Rain or shine. • Victory Park, at the intersection of Sierra Madre Blvd. and Paloma St. Call 626-449-0179 or visit PasadenaFarmersMarket.org for more information. Saturdays, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Accepts cash and EBT only. Rain or shine. Rose Bowl Flea Market 1001 Rose Bowl Dr., Pasadena. Visit rgcshows.com for more information. The second Sunday of every month, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

One of the most famous flea markets in the world! The monthly flea market features an eclectic array of crafts, apparel, antiques & other goods. Pasadena City College Flea Market 1570 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. Visit pasadena.edu/community/flea-market/for more information. The first Sunday of every month, 8 a.m.–3 p.m. Monthly flea market boasts 500+ vendors selling a range of antiques, clothing, wares & street fare. Pasadena Playhouse 39 El Molino Ave., Pasadena. Visit PasadenaPlayhouseorg or call 626-5346537 for more information. • King Charles III Nov. 8, 2017–Dec. 3, 2017 The Queen is dead. After a lifetime of waiting, the prince ascends to the throne. A future of power. But how to rule? Camilla, William, Kate and Harry join Charles in Mike Bartlett’s “future history play,” exploring the people beneath the crown. The Los Angeles premiere of the 2015 Olivier Award-winning best new play. A contemporary Shakespearean drama. • Pirates of Penzance Jan. 23, 2018–Feb. 18, 2018 Sappy pirates, dewy-eyed damsels, bumbling bobbies and a stuffy Major General. The Playhouse goes topsy-turvy as the audience joins the cast for a beach party onstage – tiki bar,

banjos, and beach balls included. Chicago theater rebels The Hypocrites bring their zany immersive production of Gilbert and Sullivan’s beloved operetta, Pirates of Penzance to Pasadena. Come join the party! Pasadena Dance Theatre Presents: The Nutcracker San Gabriel Mission Playhouse. 320 S. Mission Dr., San Gabriel. Visit pasadenadance.org or call 626-683-3459. Performances on Dec. 9, 10, 16, 17 at 2 p.m.; Dec. 22 and 23 at 1 p.m. More than 80 dancers magically bring to life Clara’s Christmas Eve dream of a dashing Nutcracker Prince, a devious Mouse King and an ethereal Sugar Plum Fairy. PDT Artistic Director Cynthia Young’s choreography to Tchaikovsky’s memorable musical score dazzles audiences of all ages. Norton Simon Museum 411 W. Colorado Blvd. Visit NortonSimon.org or call 626-449-6840 for more information. Rembrandt’s Self Portrait at the Age of 34 on loan from The National Gallery, London Dec. 8, 2017–Mar. 5, 2018 The Norton Simon Museum presents an installation of Rembrandt’s striking Self-Portrait from 1640, on loan from The National Gallery, London this winter season. Titled Self Portrait at the Age of 34, the painting captures the image of the artist in his middle age:

I can get you where you want to be. Reda Beebe

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56 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

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Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 57


50TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY LOOK IN HOME TOUR AND BOUTIQUE

BY BILLIE TONE The dedicated volunteers of the Women’s Committee of the Pasadena Symphony Association are pleased to present the 50th Annual Holiday Look In Home Tour and Boutique on December 2 and 3, 2017. The self-guided Home Tour will include four historic and architecturally-significant homes and gardens in Pasadena, beautifully decorated for the holidays by prominent floral designers Margit Holakoui, Jacob Maarse, Ixora Floral Studio and Drew Domenghini with Patterson’s Topiaries, Pots and Teas. The homes included in the Tour represent a variety of architectural styles including California Traditional, Pre-Craftsman Shingle-Style, Georgian Colonial, and Colonial Revival. Tours of the homes and gardens, which are considered some of the loveliest in the area, will be complemented by the music of talented Pasadena-area musicians. The Holiday Boutique will showcase seasonal and year-round gift and décor items, delicious gourmet foods and unique fashion accessories. Vendors will include past favorites like Accessories 4 Divas and Charter Oak

SCOTT VANDRICK, THE PASADENA SYMPHONY ASSOCIATION’S CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER, PRESENTS A COMMENDATION FROM SUPERVISOR KATHRYN BARGER’S OFFICE IN RECOGNITION OF THE WOMEN’S COMMITTEE’S 60 YEARS OF COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTIONS. PHOTO BY WING SHUM PHOTO BY HALAINE ROSE

PHOTO BY HALAINE ROSE

PICTURED FROM LEFT: DAVID LOCKINGTON, CLASSICAL CONDUCTOR FOR THE PASADENA SYMPHONY; MONA NETER, VICE CHAIR FOR 2017 HOLIDAY LOOK IN; LYNN COOPER, PRESIDENT, WOMEN’S COMMITTEE; BRENDA BAITY, CHAIR FOR 2017 HOLIDAY LOOK IN; AND SCOTT VANDRICK, CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER FOR THE PASADENA SYMPHONY ASSOCIATION. PHOTO BY WING SHUM

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Preserving Company as well as exciting new purveyors such as Louise’s Hats and Chandelier Sheets. Established in 1957, the mission of the Women’s Committee of the Pasadena Symphony Association has been to celebrate and support the Pasadena Symphony and POPS and music education in the San Gabriel Valley. In March of 1968 the first home tour was created and, because of its success, it was quickly followed by another home tour in December that same year featuring a holiday theme. Thus began the cherished holiday tradition that has raised almost $4 million in support of the Symphony over the last 49 years. The Holiday Look In Home Tour will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and the Boutique will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets for the Tour can be purchased online at http:// www.pasadenaholidaylookin.org/ or at French Hand Laundry (606 S. Lake Avenue, Pasadena) at a cost of $35 each. Tickets will also be available at the Scottish Rite Cathedral (150 N. Madison Avenue, Pasadena) on the days of the event for $40 each. The Boutique, for which no ticket is required, will be held at the Scottish Rite Cathedral. Ample parking is available in the lots on either side of the Cathedral. •

affluent, self-confident and wise. Its installation at the Norton Simon Museum marks the first time the painting has been on view in the U.S. Pasadena POPS All Saints Church. 132 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena. Visit pasadenasymphony-pops.org for more information. Holiday Candlelight Saturday, Dec. 16, performances at 4 and 7 p.m. Top off the holiday season and enjoy a chorus of holiday melodies in the architecturally exquisite and acoustically sonorous All Saints Church, Pasadena’s equivalent of a classic European cathedral. Pasadena Marathon & 5k Rose Bowl Stadium. 1001 Rose Bowl Dr., Pasadena. Visit pasadenahalf.com or call 213-542-3000 for more information. Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018 Enjoy the picturesque course through beautiful Pasadena, passing landmarks like the Colorado Street Bridge, Old Pasadena and Caltech before a majestic finish on the field at the world famous Rose Bowl. Pasadena Museum of California Art 490 E. Union St., Pasadena. Visit PMCAOnline.org or call 626-568-3665 for more information. Jan. 21, 2018–June 3, 2018 Testament of the Spirit: Paintings by Eduardo Carrillo The exhibit highlights the creative ef-

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Your South Pasadena and San Gabriel Valley Specialists www.themenggroup.com info@themenggroup.com Information provided by seller or third-party sources. Information not verified or guaranteed. Some features may be without permits.

58 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

(626) 536-1686

Alice Meng James Ta Janice Meng CalBRE#01749302 | CalBRE#02011467

Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 59


forts and social importance of Eduardo Carrillo as artist, teacher, scholar, and social activist. It showcases work created for three distinct realms: the public, the private, and the museum. The artist’s murals are featured in the full-color, bilingual exhibition catalogue. Caltech 330 S. Michigan Ave., Pasadena. Free parking located at 332 S. Michigan Ave., Pasadena–south of Del Mar Blvd. Visit Caltech.edu/calendar/public-events or call 626-395-4652 for more information. • The Alley Cats: “Jingle Bell Rock” Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017, 8 p.m. The Alley Cats, a talented and funny doo-wop a cappella group, performs songs for the holidays. • Film screening and talk: “Planet Earth–Deserts.” Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017, 4 p.m. While many believe that all deserts are similar expanses of dry land, a lack of rainwater is perhaps the only thing that unifies these diverse habitats. With incredible aerial and time-lapse footage, see how animals have learned to survive without the most precious resource of all. • Adonis Puentes and the Voice of Cuba Orchestra Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, 8 p.m. A world-class Grammy Award-nominated band with original compositions

that delivers great precision with witty, intelligent lyrics. Muse/ique 300 E. Green St., 3rd Floor, Pasadena. Visit muse-ique.com or email info@ muse-ique for more information. True Blues Feb. 11, 2018, 6 p.m. One of the most pervasive myths in the music world is that of Robert Johnson. In the 1920’s, Johnson wanted to play the Blues but wasn’t very good with a guitar. He went out to the crossroads just before midnight and let the devil tune his guitar. From there, he became an iconic Blues musician. Artistic Director Rachael Worby will narrate the journey and provide her insight into the venue, the repertoire, and the theme. Like all MUSE/IQUE events, this will feature a multitude of connections across music styles and disciplines. Rose Parade Pasadena Tournament of Roses, 391 South Orange Grove Boulevard, Pasadena. Visit tournamentofroses.com or call 626-449-4100 for more information. • 129th Rose Parade Presented by Honda. Jan. 1, 2018, 8 a.m. The 129th Rose Parade presented by Honda will feature floral floats, spirited marching bands and high-stepping equestrian units along the 5 1/2 mile route down Colorado Boulevard. Experience the magic of New Year’s Day

TIFFANY

in an unrivaled celebration, exclusive to the streets of Pasadena! • Post Parade: A Showcase of Floats Presented by Miracle-Gro Jan. 1, 2018, 1 p.m.–Jan. 2, 2018, 4 p.m. Following the Rose Parade, walk within feet of the floral and animated masterpieces parked along Sierra Madre and Washington Boulevards. Come rain or shine, take a closer look at the design and workmanship that went into each float entry and learn more about the float process from Tournament volunteers – “White Suiters” – on hand. Live on Green Pasadena Convention Center, 300 E. Green St., Pasadena. Visit liveongreenpasadena.com or call 818-243-6800 for more information. Friday, Dec. 29 and 30, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Dec. 31, Noon–4 p.m. Kick off the city’s New Year’s Day events for the Rose Parade and Rose Bowl Game. Featuring five pavilions of entertainment, discovery and fun the event includes free interactive exhibits, celebrity chefs, music and more! SAN MARINO Crowell Public Library 1890 Huntington Dr., San Marino. Visit CrowellPublicLibrary.org or call 626300-0777 for more information. • Rose Pruning Workshop Saturday, Jan. 6., 2018, 9–10:30 a.m. Ron Serven describes how to prune

roses in this easy to follow workshop. • Facebook for Seniors Monday, Feb. 5, 2018, 3:30–5 p.m. Interested in reconnecting with old friends? Want to stay in better touch with family? In this program, Crowell Public Library will discuss the pros and cons of Facebook use, privacy settings, and the steps for signing up. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino. Visit Huntington.org or call 626-205-2100 for more information. • Collections: WCCW /five Nov. 18, 2017–Feb. 12, 2018. The culmination of the second year of a five-year initiative called “/five,” which this year is based on the theme of “collecting” and “collections,” this focused exhibition features new work with related programming by seven artists who conducted research in The Huntington’s collections. • Star Chefs Series: Holiday Baking with Jim Dodge Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, 6–8:30 p.m. Discover the secrets to baking festive cookies, flaky pie crusts, airy cakes, and savory breads in a cooking demonstration by award-winning chef and culinary educator Jim Dodge. Attendees will take home baking tips and tricks that are sure to impress friends and family during the holidays. • Viewing Stones Show

Wednesday, Dec. 27, 2017–Saturday, Dec. 30, 2017, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. The California Aiseki Kai presents its 28th annual show featuring outstanding examples of ‘suiseki’ and other viewing stones. Practiced in Asia for centuries and gaining popularity around the world, the art of viewing stones invites contemplation of the subtle, often fanciful forms that have been shaped by nature, the elements, and time. San Marino Chamber of Commerce 1800 Huntington Dr., San Marino. Visit SanMarinoChamber.org or call 626286-1022 for more information. • Christmas Around the Drive Dec. 1, 2017, 5–8:30 p.m. Capture the spirit of the Holiday Season in the heart of San Marino! Bring your family and join the Chamber in lighting the community Christmas tree. Join Santa Claus at 6 p.m. as he arrives at the Fire Station on Old Engine #1. Board the Trolley for a trip “Around the Drive,” and enjoy music from carolers, a puppeteer, petting zoo and more. SIERRA MADRE, ARCADIA, MONROVIA & ALTADENA Monrovia Farmers Market Myrtle Ave. in Old Town Monrovia between Chestnut Ave. and Lemon Ave. Visit MonroviaStreetFair.com for more information. Fridays, 5–9 p.m. Live music, a Kid Zone, and more.

Altadena Farmers’ Market Loma Alta Park. 600 W. Palm St., Altadena. Visit altadenafarmersmarket. com or email info@altadenafarmersmarket.com for more information. Wednesdays, 3–7 p.m. This certified market has 30 booths selling fresh fruits and vegetables as well as prepared and pre-packaged food that may be enjoyed onsite at the market setting of Loma Alta Park. Rain or shine. Monrovia Public Library 321 S. Myrtle Ave., Monrovia. Visit CityofMonrovia.org/Library or call 626-2568374 for more information. • Holiday Parade & Tree Lighting Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017, 7 p.m. Watch the holiday decorations light up Old Town! Enjoy a parade of classic cars, floats, horse-drawn carriages and more. • Monday Movie Night: “Muppet’s Christmas Carol” Monday, Dec. 18, 2017, 6–7:45 p.m. Dress in your pajamas, bring your blanket and your favorite stuffed friend for Monday Movie Night! Enjoy freshly popped popcorn and cuddle up to watch “Muppet’s Christmas Carol” with your family. Sierra Madre Public Library 232 W. Sierra Madre Blvd., Sierra Madre. Visit CityofSierraMadre.com or call 626-355-7135 for more information. • Christmas Movie Marathon

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GLASS

M A S T E R W O R K S F R O M T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F S TA N L E Y A N D D O L O R E S S I R O T T

Oct. 7, 2017–Feb. 26, 2018

1151 Oxford Road, San Marino, CA 91108 | huntington.org

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Dec. 23, 2017, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Pick up your last-minute holiday reading, enjoy treats and watch a holiday movie marathon at the Library. Movies include “Elf,” “A Charlie Brown Christmas,” “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” and “Miracle on 34th Street.” Arcadia Public Library 20 W. Duarte Rd., Arcadia. Visit arcadiaca.gov or call 626-821-5567 for more information. • Breakfast with Santa & Snowfest Dec. 2, 2017, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Santa Claus is coming to town! Enjoy a delicious breakfast, hot chocolate bar, caroling, games and a photo with Santa! Los Angeles Arboretum & Botanic Garden 301 N. Baldwin Ave., Arcadia. Visit Arboretum.org or call 626-821-3222 for more information. • Forces of Nature II Opening Reception & Sale Friday, Dec. 1, 2017, 6–9 p.m. Exhibit runs through Dec. 10. Five years ago, the first ‘Forces of Nature’ exhibit featured art created from trees toppled in the 2001 windstorm. Proceeds from that show benefitted the Arboretum Tree Fund to plant the next generation of trees. Many of the trees since then have been ravaged by drought and disease. ‘Forces of Nature II’ is a tribute to these lost trees. The work of more than 100 artists will

be featured at the exhibition, and their art will be for sale to benefit the Arboretum Tree Fund. Christmas Tree Lane Santa Rosa Ave. between Woodbury Rd. and Altadena Dr., Altadena. Visit christmastreelane.net for more information. Dec. 11, 2017–Jan 7, 2018. Stroll underneath 154 majestic cedars trussed with lights along Christmas Tree Lane. The dazzling display is the oldest large-scale light show in America. SOUTH PASADENA Farmers Market Meridian Ave. and El Centro St. next to the South Pasadena Metro Gold Line Station. Visit SouthPasadenaFarmersMarket.org for more information. Thursdays, 4–8 p.m. • Holiday Tree Lighting at the Farmers’ Market Thursday, Nov. 20, 2017, 4–7 p.m. Ring in the holiday season with a festive tree lighting at the South Pas Farmers’ Market! South Pasadena Public Library 1100 Oxley St., South Pasadena. For more information, visit SouthPasadenaCA.gov or call 626-403-7340. • Winter Chili Feast Dec. 2, 2017, 10 a.m.–noon Join the library for the second Annual Chili Feast! Try several kinds of chili while enjoying the company of neigh-

62 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

bors and friends. • Breakfast with Santa Dec. 9, 2017 Santa will return to South Pasadena again for festive photo ops and a tasty breakfast. • Snow Day Jan. 20, 2018 Let it snow! Enjoy sledding, crafts, food and more at the Library’s annual Snow Day at Garfield Park. LA CAÑADA FLINTRIDGE Farmers Market 1300 Foothill Blvd., across from Memorial Park. Visit lacanadaflintridge.com/ events-page/farmers-market.html for more information. Saturdays, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Vendors come from all over the region with fresh fruits, nuts, vegetables, flowers, baked goods and much, much more. Many items are organically grown. La Cañada Flintridge Library 4545 N. Oakwood Ave., La Cañada Flintridge. Visit colapublib.org/libs/lacanada/ or call 818-790-3330 for more information. • Holiday Creation Station Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017, 3–5 p.m. Children can create a variety of art projects in celebration of the holidays. For children ages 5 to 12. Descanso Gardens 418 Descanso Dr., La Cañada

Flintridge. For more information, visit DescansoGardens.org or call 828-9494200. • Enchanted: Forest of Light Nov. 17, 2017– Jan. 7, 2018 Don’t miss Decanso’s interactive, nighttime experience that’s unlike anything else in Los Angeles. Tickets are on sale now and must be purchased in advance. LOS ANGELES The Original Farmers Market 6333 W. 3rd St., Los Angeles. Visit farmersmarketla.com or call 323-933-9211 for more information. Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–9 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.– 8 p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.–7 p.m. A favorite destination among locals and tourists since 1934, LA’s world famous Original Farmers Market offers over 100 gourmet grocers, restaurants and more. The Broad 221 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. Visit TheBroad.org or call 213-232-6200. • Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017–Jan. 1, 2018 The Broad’s first visiting special exhibition, Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors is the first institutional survey to explore the celebrated Japanese artist’s immersive Infinity Mirror Rooms. This exhibition will embark on the most significant North American tour of her work

in nearly two decades, and The Broad will be the only California museum to host the exhibition. LA Zoo Lights 5333 Zoo Dr., Los Angeles, Visit LAZoo. org or call 323-644-4200 for more information. Nov. 17, 2017–Jan., 7, 2018, 6–10 p.m. L.A.’s brightest holiday tradition returns, now more brilliant than ever! Make unforgettable holiday memories as you explore this wild wonderland of light under the stars at the beautiful L.A. Zoo. Along the way, view real reindeer, visit with Santa on select dates, and enjoy seasonal treats and goodies. The Moth The Regent Theater, 448 S. Main St., Los Angeles. Visit themoth.org for more information. Monday, Dec. 4, 7 p.m. After ten StorySLAMs (open-mic storytelling competitions) in a city, the winners then compete for the title of GrandSLAM Champion with a brand new story. This is the ultimate battle of wits and words. Los Angeles Philharmonic Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. Visit LAPhil.com or call 213-972-7282 for more information. • Leslie Odom, Jr. Friday, Dec. 8, 2017, 8 p.m. Having won a Tony Award® for his portrayal of Aaron Burr in Hamilton on

Broadway, this deft, stylish and charismatic star will perform songs from his recent, self-titled debut album, as well as some holiday favorites, backed by a four-piece combo. • Holiday Sing-Along Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017, performances at 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Sing your holiday favorites like “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” “Silent Night,” and everything in between, accompanied by Walt Disney Concert Hall’s huge pipe organ, a choir and a jazz combo. Hosted by the hilarious Melissa Peterman, it’s a jolly good time for the entire family! LACMA 5905 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles. Visit LACMA.org for more information. • Wu Bin’s Ten Views of a Lingbi Stone Dec. 10, 2017–June 24, 2018 The exhibition focuses on the most extraordinary painting of a stone ever created in China: Wu Bin’s Ten Views of a Lingbi Stone (1610), a Ming dynasty handscroll comprising 10 separate views of a single stone from the famous site of Lingbi, Anhui Province. Also including superb examples of Lingbi and Taihu stones and contemporary Chinese ink paintings depicting stones, this exhibition explores the history of collecting strange stones in China and the relationship between stones, Daoist cosmology, and classical Chinese poetry.

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES DIRECTORY

RENEGADE CRAFT FAIR Los Angeles State Historic Park, 1245 N. Spring St., Los Angeles. Visit RenegadeCraft.com for more information. Saturday, Dec. 9 and Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Ring in the season and get your holiday shopping done all in just one weekend. Renegade will be serving up unique handmade items from hundreds of Makers, fun DIY workshops, immersive special features, food + drink, festive music, and much, much more. Renegade is a celebration of creative spirit and for each Fair gathers emergent and seasoned independent makers alike.

ELECTRICAL SERVICES

THE ZIEGLER ELECTRIC CO. Electrical Contractor, Stacy C. Ziegler (Owner), So. Pasadena, License #592639 (626) 441-4058

FLOORING AND WINDOW DESIGN

REIMAGINE YOUR HOME Area Rugs • Carpet • Vinyl Laminates • Hardwood & Refinishing Custom Draperies • Shutters Hunter Douglas Products 1518 Mission Street, South Pasadena (626) 799-3656 reimagineyourhome.com

QUALITY YOU CAN TRUST South Pasadena Since 1981 Landscape Maintenance •Irrigation Judicious Hand-watering Artistic Tree Trimming • Property Clean-up Handy-man Services JOHN SILVERTHORN (626) 441-9684

HANDYMAN SERVICES

While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, The Quarterly Magazine assumes no responsibilty for omissions or errors.

64 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

ALL TYPES OF JOBS Big & small Reasonable rates, References available Lic. #B718227 Bonded MARK (626) 222-5933

IN-HOME CARE & ASSISTANCE

SHAW, MOSES, MENDENHALL INSURANCE You’ll receive custom solutions for all your insurance needs including: • Commercial Insurance • Personal Insurance •  Life & Health Insurance (626) 799-7813 License OD94511

RAINGUTTERS

RICK’S RAINGUTTER & SYSTEMS • Steel • Copper • Aluminum • Standard and Custom installations • Cleaning & repairs Over 20 years serving Greater Pasadena License #731684, Insured (818) 504-0302

SPACE ORGANIZER

GROUNDSKEEPER ESTATE

• Capitol Ensemble Performs Beethoven Sunday, Dec. 17, 2017, 6 p.m. Noted for a sound which is “richly upholstered and well balanced,” the Capitol Ensemble is a unique group of musicians dedicated to the live performance of an eclectic repertoire, ranging from the Baroque to the 21st century.

INSURANCE & FINANCIAL SERVICES

THE STUFF WHISPERER Home, Storage, and Workspace Organization Clutter Clearing, Online Sales Listing, Upcycling Furniture Sourcing and Arranging, Custom Closets, Picture Framing and Hanging. Partial Barter Available. Look for us on Facebook and Instagram under “THE STUFF WHISPERER” TEXT US AT: (323) 867-8915 or email at: vortexwest@yahoo.com

SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

Water Efficient Irrigation System. Installations and Repairs on All types, drip, automatic and rotor.   Free Estimates. RENE (323) 344-3758 OR (626) 255-3730

TUTORING

In-home care agency can make all the difference in the world to an elderly family member who needs a little extra help to remain independent. Call today to learn more about our home care services and let us help develop a custom care plan for your loved one. RIGHT AT HOME (626) 584-8130 https://www.rightathome.net/pasadena/

McGRAIL TUTORING Experienced Tutors to Your Home All levels of Math SAT, US History, All Science Can work with special needs students Nearly any subject Very competitive prices Call or email Patrick today for your free session patrick@mcgrailtutoring.com (909) 702-4805

To advertise your business in this directory call Monica at (626) 792-9405 or Joelle at (626) 792-4925

Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 65


ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY Area code 626 unless otherwise noted

ADVERTISER

PHONE PAGE

Allen, Jennifer -Coldwell Banker

893-5090

Beebe, Reda - Dilbeck Realtors

ADVERTISER

PHONE PAGE

The Meng Group

536-1686

59

Middleman, Meg - Century 21

441-3449

17

14

(323) 394-9008

57

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23

799-4552

19

564-0011

19

The Doolin Group Morgan Stanley 304-2411

13

Escrow Trust Advisors

31

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799-4595

Mission West Kitchen and Bath Charlie’s Coffee House Chesbro Tree Care

799-3503

11

Morrow & Holman Plumbing, Inc. 799-3115

17

Nott & Associates Dahl Architects, Inc.

356-1876

10

403-0844

3

Old Pasadena

oldpasadena.org

24

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(800) 400-5353

61

Pasadena Photography

344-4112

21

Family Chiropractic Center of So. Pasadena

441-4888

23

Pascale Music Institute

403-4611

58

Gavilan Media

792-6397

51

Phillips Eye Center

446-1600

17

PM Jacoy

799-4600

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Post Alarm

(800) 654-7679

64

799-3656

12

Rogers, Sarah - John Aaroe Group

(626) 390-0511

7

Ghurka Halpin, Sarah - Markey & Associates Hartman Baldwin - Design/Build Hambleton & MacFarlane Orthodontics

ghurka.com 29 664-1598

27 Reimagine Your Home

486-0510

5

795-0634

63

San Pascual Stables

(310) 883-4581

42

(800) 903-9233

21

San Marino Security

285-7778

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The Huntington Store

405-2142

60

Shen Yun

shenyunperformingarts.org

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J & J Plumbing

799-7121

51

Single Stone

799-3109

28

Jorjorian Rugs

287-1146

23

Vana Watch & Jewelry

799-9919

41

68

Vlacich, Lin - Sotheby’s Realty

688-6464

67

Wong, Lorraine - Berkshire Hathaway

688-7600

43

Huntington Memorial Hospital

Johnny Was Knuth, Shirley - Castle & Home Realtors

403-5610 233-5202

19

Majors, Carol - Coldwell Banker

399-9665

2

The Maloney Group

483-2265

4

Mehlmauer, Marilyn, M.D.

585-9474

28

66 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

To advertise in the spring issue of The Quarterly Magazine please call Monica at (626) 792-4905 or Joelle at (626) 792-4925

Winter 2017 / The Quarterly Magazine / 67


68 / The Quarterly Magazine / Winter 2017

Profile for Gavilan Media

The Quarterly Magazine Winter 2017  

Serving the local community for over 30 years, The Quarterly Magazine is the San Gabriel Valley's original lifestyle magazine. Each issue is...

The Quarterly Magazine Winter 2017  

Serving the local community for over 30 years, The Quarterly Magazine is the San Gabriel Valley's original lifestyle magazine. Each issue is...