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Quarterly The

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Spring 2018

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In all seasons of life, whether upsizing, downsizing, or investing, we are here to help you and those who mean the most to you in the realm of real estate.

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Quarterly The

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VOLUME 32 / NUMBER 1/ SPRING 2018

9 A HOME FOR ALL TIME 14 SPRING PLANTING 18 DODGERS CELEBRATE 60 YEARS IN LOS ANGELES 23 THE ARTIST AMONG US 26 RUNNING MAN 30 PASADENA TIES

32 GOLD LINE EXCURSION: HIDDEN CORNERS OF CHINATOWN 34 SPRING DIY: EGGS WITH PROSCIUTTO 37 BACKYARD CHICKENS 38 EGG-COUTREMENTS

50 WATER WATCHER 54 FOODIE FAVORITES 56 PRETTY POSTCARDS: ALLURING PASADENA 58 SPRING EVENT GUIDE 66 ADVERTISERS DIRECTORY

40 MUSEUM IN FOCUS: LACMA 44 GETAWAY: LAKE TAHOE

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A HOME FOR ALL TIME BY CAMILLE LOZANO PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN Just inside of South Pasadena’s city limits lies a charming, three-story, 101-year-old Georgian Revival-style home. It rises up, competing with foliage in the foreground. This makes the one-and-a-half acre Urquhart property easy to miss—charmingly off the grid along a private road where old native oak trees grow in the middle of the pavement, parents walk their dogs and children often first learn to ride bicycles. Mary and her husband Bill Urquhart, of the internationally-renowned Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan global litigation firm (think FIFA corruption investigation), decided to purchase the home in 1998. Mary’s goal was to fit her vision of what the house was for its previous illustrious owners, the Banks, Whittiers and O’Melveney families. The home, designed by famed Pasadena architects Marston and Van Pelt, needed significant structural and interior work.  It took six years of interior renovations and massive structural renovations to complete the work—one year longer than it took to build the house from 19121917. As a result of extensive measures to protect the home from earthquake damage, Mary often says it is “built like a Red Cross bomb shelter.” The Urquharts lived in the home, on the third floor, during the last two years of construction with the three youngest of their seven children. “It was an adventure,” Mary said. “The staircase was closed on the third floor, so we’d have to ask the construction workers ‘please close the elevator, we need to get the kids to school,’ and the dog and every-

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and restoration. Since the Urquharts moved to Pasadena in 1988, Mary has immersed herself in local charities. This began with the Los Angeles Mission for the Homeless where she was Chairwoman of The Presidents Circle, raising more than $1 million in a new holiday card program. In 1991, their son Brian was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder.  Mary then began her work with Villa Esperanza, a nonprofit dedicated to the care and education of disabled children and adults. Working to support her son’s challenges, she left her successful career and cheese business to support the first early intervention program for autistic children in the area.  Mary was later presented with the Fellow’s Award from Villa Esperanza by Betty White Ludden. As Brian entered the Pasadena Unified School District, The Help Group, and after high school, Advance LA, Mary received awards from all three organizations for her work: the one would get in the elevator and go down. We lived through the construction, but there were fond memories.” The exterior of the home remained intact; however, the interior underwent a complete remodel.  “We wanted to maintain the historic integrity of the entry, library, living and dining rooms as it was planned by the original homeowners, the Banks, a wealthy family from Philadelphia,” Mary said. The kitchen and bedrooms are another story. “We reduced the original eight bedrooms to five bedrooms, and removed a staircase in the middle of the kitchen to make an expansive kitchen and sunroom.” Entering into the home, clean lines and elaborate crown moulding draw the eye upward toward the bright staircase that ascends to the second and third floors while the formal dining room, living room and library split off from the entry hall. The inspiration for many elements

in the living room was drawn from the White House’s East Room, with Edward F. Caldwell & Company wall sconces that Mary tracked down in London from W. Sitch & Co, a purveyor of period lighting, in addition to decorative moulding and trim of both wood and plaster. It took two years to craft the exquisite Zuber wood-block wallpaper located in the dining room. The full scenic panels of  “Hindustan,” which cover all four walls of the formal dining room, were an exact fit. Zuber wallpaper of “Views of North America” can be seen in the White House’s Diplomatic Reception Room, installed under the direction of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in 1961.   The Baccarat crystal pendant lights, which hang in both the dining room and living room, were sourced from antique shops in Buenos Aires known for carrying period fixtures. Mary brought back containers of antiques filled to the brim from that trip, a testament to her passion for design

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H A R DWA R E L I G H T I N G P LU M B I N G

F I X T U R E S

VA N I T I E S

MARY & BILL’S DAUGHTER ABIGAIL CELEBRATED HER WEDDING LAST YEAR WITH A RECEPTION AT THE FAMILY HOME IN SOUTH PASADENA. PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY URQUHART

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Award of Excellence from the PUSD for her work at San Rafael elementary school, The Champion for Children Award from The Help Group in Sherman Oaks and Advance LA’s Advancing Awareness Award. During this time, Mary coached YMCA basketball, chaired annual funds and benefits for her children’s schools and was Chairwoman of the Los Angeles Zoo. Her zeal for volunteering and supporting worthwhile causes endures today. Bill says Mary’s boundless energy and capability has always astonished him. “She has the energy of six people,” Bill said. “We’ve been married over 30 years and I don’t know how she does it. She’s extremely efficient with her time, very organized mentally and very focused.” Her energy is echoed in the sixinch sheer walls of the home, the interior of which Mary designed entirely. Matching Emile Galle vases sit in windowsills of the kitchen, their rich amber tones serving as a spectacular foreground to the Gingko trees just beyond the window. Snack, the family’s fragile, wizened Shih Tzu can often be found curled up in front

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of the warm hearth in the kitchen, which Mary selected from South Pasadena antique dealer Susanne Hollis. Blue-hued milk glass leaded cabinet windows once located in the butler’s pantry now take the main stage, brilliantly surrounded by dark wood panels. In the living room, a Dennis Doheny plein air oil painting hangs above the mantelpiece, its earthen palette offset by refreshing Chardonnay green, reinforcing the crisp white of the moulding. Directly opposite the mantel, seasonal paintings by Danuta Rothschild depict Mary, Bill, their children and dogs enjoying the seasons. Nowadays, just two of Mary and Bill’s seven children remain nearby: Brian in his last semester of Otis College of Art and Design in Playa Del Rey, and Abigail who clerks for the Ninth Circuit in Pasadena and held her wedding reception at the Urquhart home last year. The rest of the family spans the globe, with two sons living in Connecticut, and three daughters living in London, Geneva and Washington, D.C., respectively. “That’s why I need to have lots of people around!” Mary said of her frequent gatherings of 50 to 100 friends,

MARY AND BILL URQUHART

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY URQUHART

and hundreds more for the occasional annual events for organizations like WISPPA, or Women Involved in South Pasadena Political Action, which Mary co-founded in 2009. And what better place to host intimate and memorable celebrations than in the Urquharts’ home and spacious backyard, which boasts a pool and an arched cabana built from 26 pallets of brick repurposed from the

home during reconstruction, under which long tables invite guests to take respite. The cabana prefaces a sleek, lofty guest space with a mosaiced fireplace of swirling blues and white reminiscent of Van Gogh’s The Starry Night. From the backyard, one is compelled to turn back toward the gorgeous Georgian structure, its chimneys and white-cased windows at once startlingly impressive and charming, while just below two covered patio spaces and seating areas ensure any and all are welcome. On a day like many others, the leaves of old Live Oak trees that surround the property rustle in the breeze, quiet sounds that provoke contemplation. The Urquharts are constantly on the move, flying off to New York and Washington, D.C. for lengths at a time and yet the home rests: soft overstuffed sofa chairs abound in the living room, a cozy library equipped with a fireplace, five bedrooms on the second floor and an entertainment room on the third floor, thoughtfully designed to ensure comfort as soon as the threshold is crossed, signaling as has been the case throughout time, that one is home, once again. •

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SPRING PLANTING Gardening Tips from The Urban Homestead STORY BY CAMILLE LOZANO Just off the 210 Freeway in Pasadena, a small, family-run business on a humble fifth of an acre is making waves across the world with its “homegrown revolution.” The Dervaes family is carrying on generations of tradition to share with others a conscious living choice—urban farming. Justin Dervaes took time out of his morning at The Urban Homestead to share a few tips for how you can kickstart your own urban garden this spring. Start Small Justin recommends using a sturdy container, like a whisky barrel for one or two vegetables (don’t overload it) or make your own raised bed...all you need are four wood boards and some screws. Containers are practical for starting out in an urban setting as they’re easy to maintain and adjust with the seasons. For great soil, the ideal way to go is to start your own compost, Justin says, reducing your trips to the store for fertilizer and money leaving your pocket. If you’re clearing your yard, consider how that yard waste can be recycled into compost. If you have chickens or ducks (or other farm animals...the Dervaes have both, plus goats), well, all the better! Cinder blocks can be used to make a quick, easy and cheap enclosure, then pile in your compostable waste and let it sit. Did you know half the waste the average American family produces is compostable?

PHOTO BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN

PHOTO COURTESY OF URBAN HOMESTEAD

PHOTO BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN

PHOTO COURTESY OF URBAN HOMESTEAD

PHOTO COURTESY OF URBAN HOMESTEAD

PHOTO BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN

Watering Tips and Tricks Justin says the Dervaes family is moving toward drip irrigation, but it also uses Ollas, or earthen clay pots, buried up to the necks in raised garden beds. Depending on the size of your bed, you can bury two or even three. These simple pots deliver water directly to the roots of the plants as the water seeps through the unglazed clay. The root systems grow in around the pots much stronger, and the Ollas eliminate runoff and other issues associated

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PHOTO BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN

PHOTO COURTESY OF URBAN HOMESTEAD

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A few notes: You can start squash from seeds or pick up a plant from a nursery. If you want to try out your green thumb with some Tromboncino squash, use a trellis to allow the squash room to grow and dangle. You can eat this squash green as a zucchini, or cook it like a butternut squash when the skin is dried to a light-tan color. Keep in mind...The Dervaes family’s urban garden is the product of more than 30 years of hard work, blood, sweat and tears. They live to grow and share produce, information and their lifestyle with those around them, and they encourage everyone to take what steps they can toward growing their own produce, even if it’s just tomatoes for a dinner salad! So start small and know your limits, as your garden won’t look like The Urban Homestead immediately. Take it one step at a time, have fun and get growing! •

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PHOTO COURTESY OF URBAN HOMESTEAD

with hand watering—delivering just about all of the water directly to your plants while reducing water use. (Find them at retailers like The Home Depot or online at Amazon.com.) In the springtime, consider growing something you can eat. There’s no denying the beauty of a lush edible garden when perusing the Dervaes family’s farm. They plant tomatoes, beans, cucumbers, peppers, eggplant, Tromboncino squash, zucchini, pumpkins, basil and more. Edible flowers are also now in higher demand than ever before, and add a flurry of color to the urban plot. Try growing some of these selections in your own space, and don’t be afraid to change things up if something’s not working...The Dervaeses do it, too! With a focus on bare-bones gardening, the organic intent of the urban plot sometimes means the family loses an entire crop of one veggie or another to persistent bugs. Justin says “if you can’t make it work, don’t force it.”

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DODGERS CELEBRATE 60 YEARS IN LOS ANGELES STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK LANGILL Moving to Los Angeles may have seemed like a last resort in 1958 when the Dodgers couldn’t build a new ballpark in Brooklyn, but the consolation prize turned into a jackpot. As the Dodgers commemorate their 60th anniversary in Southern California in 2018, images and memories of their first home game at the cavernous Los Angeles Coliseum proved “a star was born” in the land of Tinseltown with just one screen test. Despite ten years of Major League service and two career no-hitters under his belt, starting pitcher Carl Erskine barely slept the night before the team’s April 18 opener against the San Francisco Giants. “The first pitch in Los Angeles…” Erskine said. “I wanted it to be a strike.” More than 78,000 fans would be in attendance, a far cry from the 31,000-seat capacity at Ebbets Field, which had only 300 parking spaces by 1957. Now 91 and living in his hometown of Anderson, IN, Erskine still savors the excitement of L.A.’s wild 6-5 victory, the potential game-tying run in the ninth inning erased when San Francisco rookie Jim Davenport missed third base trying to score on a triple. Earlier in the game, Erskine noticed his teammates were looking over their dugout roof to spy the movie stars in the grandstands, a lineup that included Danny Kaye, Bing Crosby, Edward G. Robinson, George Jessel, Ray Bolger, Lana Turner, Jeff Chandler, Lauren Bacall, Jo Stafford and 2017 WORLD SERIES

VINTAGE DODGER BOBBLEHEAD AND 1957 HEADLINE ANNOUNCING DODGERS’ MOVE WEST

1980 ALL-STAR GAME TICKET

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VINTAGE STADIUM SIGNS ON TOP DECK AT DODGER STADIUM

JACKIE ROBINSON STATUE ON RESERVE LEVEL

DODGER STADIUM’S ADDRESS RENAMED IN BROADCASTER VIN SCULLY’S HONOR IN 2016

Paul Weston. “There were a lot of movie stars there because it was a historic day in Los Angeles,” Erskine said. “It wasn’t a baseball crowd yet. It was a curiosity crowd. They came and wanted to be part of the big event. It was a social event more than a rousing, hyped-up fan base like we used to have in Brooklyn. But they didn’t know any of us. We were all just names that maybe they had heard about.” The Dodgers have since played before more than 174 million fans at the Coliseum and Dodger Stadium. The franchise brought its storied history dating back to its Brooklyn roots in the 1880s and continued its popularity with five championships, Hall of Fame performers and unforgettable personalities. Dodger Stadium, the third-oldest ballpark in the Majors after Boston’s Fenway Park and Chicago’s Wrigley Field, underwent a $100 million facelift after Guggenheim Baseball Management purchased the franchise in 2012. In addition to new clubhouse and workout facilities for the players, fan amenities included more restaurants and restrooms and Instagram-friendly “landmarks” such as life-sized bobblehead statues and a retired numbers plaza on the top deck. In 1958, Vin Scully marked his ninth season in the Dodger broadcasting booth. Scully stuck around for a few more generations before retiring in 2016 with the ballpark’s Elysian Park Avenue street renamed in his honor. Also in 1958, Spanish radio station

COLLECTION OF DODGER PLAYER BATS

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VINTAGE UNIFORMS IN DODGER POP-UP MUSEUM

FORMER LOS ANGELES CITY COUNCILMEMBER ROSALIND WYMAN POSES WITH VINTAGE 1957 WALTER O’MALLEY SIGNED BASEBALL

HALL OF FAMER TOMMY LASORDA GREETS NEW DODGER MANAGER JOE TORRE IN NOVEMBER 2007

KWKW assigned its top broadcaster to study baseball for a year and become a Dodger broadcaster. Now a Hall of Fame member like Scully, Jaime Jarrín in 2018 begins his 60th season with the Dodgers. Although he is considered a Brooklyn Dodger for his baseball career, the life of Jackie Robinson falls under the category of “great American” as he forever impacted the social consciousness of the United States while breaking the sport’s color barrier in 1947. Robinson, a Georgia native who grew up in Pasadena and attended Pasadena Junior College and UCLA, was honored with a statue at Dodger Stadium in 2017. His uniform No. 42 was retired by all MLB teams in 1997. When the Dodgers reached the 2017 World Series, it was the team’s first National League pennant in 29 years. Such patience wasn’t required during the Coliseum days as manag-

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LEGENDARY PEANUT VENDOR ROGER OWENS AT DODGER EXHIBITION GAME IN L.A. COLISEUM IN 2008

er Walter Alston’s team won a championship in only its second season in Los Angeles, defeating the Chicago White Sox in a 1959 World Series that featured three home games that each drew more than 92,000 fans. In a 2003 interview, former Dodger general manager Buzzie Bavasi said winning the team’s home opener in 1958 was the most important game of the season. “You only get one chance to make a good first impression,” said Bavasi, a Brooklyn and Los Angeles executive from 1950 to 1968. “We finished in seventh place in 1958 because of the team’s attitude, they didn’t want to be here. The players were disappointed. They weren’t happy. By 1959, they realized they had the backing from the fans in Southern California and decided this is where they wanted to play.” • South Pasadena native Mark Langill is the Team Historian of the Los Angeles Dodgers.

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THE ARTIST AMONG US

The Familiar Work of Pasadena Artist R. Kenton Nelson Represents An Idealistic Lifestyle BY MITCH LEHMAN PAINTINGS BY R. KENTON NELSON R. Kenton Nelson speaks in a soft voice and is genuinely reticent to boast of his accomplishments. But when you communicate in such rich tones as does the work of the famous local artist, little else needs to be said. “I started painting in 1992 when my job as a graphic designer/illustrator went the way of ‘desktop publishing,’” Nelson said. “Although the computer was a magnificent tool, I thought it would make handmade, well-crafted objects of art more extraordinary over time. So never having taken painting in school, I taught myself how to paint.” And paint he did. Nelson is one of the more prolific artists in the San Gabriel Valley. He produces almost one painting every week, sleeping little and creating often. Nelson is most famous for his works in oil and watercolor and has recently dabbled in mosaic. In 2016, he created a mosaic mural behind Vroman’s Bookstore on Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, which honors filmmakers, actors and producers whose careers started in the city. The project included 170,000 Italian glass tiles that were handset in his studio before onsite installation. Nelson has lived in Southern California all his life. He attended Long Beach State University and Otis-Parsons Art Institute. He has served on the faculties of Otis-Parsons and the Academy of Art in San Francisco. For seven years, Nelson kept a studio in the turret of Pasadena’s iconic Castle Green, but recently relocated to a quaint 1893 farmhouse near the Arroyo. Nelson’s great uncle, Roberto Montenegro, was a renowned Mexican muralist and Modernist. Nelson’s own paintings have their origins in American Scene painting and the work of the Works Progress Administration artists, dating back to the 1930s. One of Nelson’s standing gigs consists of producing a poster for the Colorado Street Bridge Party, an event running every other year sponsored by Pasadena Heritage that allows guests to wander unfettered across the famous landmark structure, which is closed to traffic that one night each year. “I grew up loving the Colorado Street Bridge,” said Nelson. “It is iconic and a testament to man’s talent, promise

AN IMAGINARY VIEW

DO THIS

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FREEDOM

R. KENTON NELSON

PHOTO BY ERWIN DARMALI

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and capability. I love what the Pasadena Heritage has done to preserve our architecture and history in Pasadena, and I wanted to support them.” Nelson has described his own creation as “comfort art,” portraying an idealistic Southern California of the mid-20th century that is rife with swimsuits, cars, outdoor barbecues, bowties and large, puffy clouds. One reviewer, Grady Turner of ARTnews, said Nelson “creates an American ideal reminiscent of Dick and Jane or Ozzie and Harriet.” It could be considered surprising, then, that Nelson is extremely popular in parts of Europe, with a presence at galleries in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. His work has also been featured five times on the cover of The New Yorker. Nelson has a permanent presence at the Peter Mendenhall Gallery on Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles, where his works can be purchased. •

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RUNNING MAN

Pete Magill Has Taken Both the High and Low Roads Into Running’s Record Books. BY MITCH LEHMAN   Motivation comes to different people through different voices, and for South Pasadena’s Pete Magill, it was spoken by an emergency room doctor in a local hospital in the winter of 2000. “I was thirty-eight years old, recently divorced, fifty pounds overweight, splitting care of my six-year-old son, Sean, and working around the clock as a struggling Hollywood screenwriter,” Magill said, matter-of-factly. “I was sleeping two to three hours a night, living on junk food, hard liquor, Marlboros and various amphetamines—only sobering up long enough to attend weekly court-ordered meetings for my various alcohol-related offenses. My physical activity consisted of thrice-weekly outings to local parks with Sean. He’d chase me around the playground equipment until I got too dizzy to stand. Think Marlon Brando in The Godfather just before he pitches facefirst into the tomato plants. One night, alone at home, I did collapse, tumbling unconscious to the floor,” and here Magill paused to laugh heartily at the scenario. Later that night at what was then known as Verdugo Hills Hospital, the ER physician explained that Magill had “gotten off easy.” “I hadn’t had a heart attack, stroke, or something more serious,” Magill added. “Instead, I was exhausted, overworked, and suffering the predictable effects of massive substance abuse.” Then the epiphany. “Is that your son out there in the waiting room?” the doctor inquired. When Magill answered in the affirmative, the doctor asked Sean’s age. Magill said Sean had just turned six. “At the rate you’re going, you won’t live to see him graduate from high school.” Magill paused. “Something had to change,” he said. A former runner who had won the Rio Hondo League championship in the mile run as a junior at La Cañada High School, Magill said he “pulled my Nikes out of the closet” and returned to the road. But not with the level of success he had grown to expect. “On my 39th birthday, I ran for five minutes before I had to sit down on the curb,” Magill said, chuckling. “I thought ‘I am having that heart attack I didn’t have at the ER.’ I decided I would get back into shape slowly. It took me five months before I could run five miles. And I kept going from there.” And going. And going. By age 45, Magill—who is now 56—had become the top runner for his age group in the world and has remained there ever since, setting American age group records from the mile to the half maraA TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE LED PETE MAGILL BACK TO HIS RUNNING ROOTS PHOTO BY DIANA HERNANDEZ

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thon, and several points in between. Already holding the 45 to 49-year-old 5K mark at 14:34, Magill broke the record for the 50 to 54-year-old age group in the 5K, running a 15:01. Last year, he set the mark for the 55 to 59-year-old age group by cruising to a 15:42. Magill has won six overall USA Track & Field Masters Cross Country Championships, was five times named the USA Masters Cross Country Runner of the Year, and has paced his club to a remarkable 19 national championships in cross country and road racing. Magill doesn’t keep count, but guesses that he runs about 85 miles per week in as many as 11 different sessions. He doesn’t limit himself to just distance running, but mixes in eight-second hill sprints, intervals, tempo runs, downhill sprints and resistance training. Still writing the occasional screenplay and doubling as a personal trainer, Magill has also penned two books on running, with a third due out in May. He was a columnist for Running Times magazine for five years and has contributed to several other publications dedicated to the running trade, including Runner’s World and Competitor. His next book, SpeedRunner, will include a training program that he designed with Sean, who is now 24 and finishing his degree in Human Physiology at the University of Oregon. SpeedRunner, to be published on May 1 by VeloPress, presents a fourweek training program designed to improve any athlete’s performance and fitness—no matter the sport. Magill began his coaching career specializing in sprints, and the SpeedRunner program evolved from an initial set of exercises he developed to help football players lower their 40-yard dash time. The program targets nervous system, muscular, and connective tissue adaptations to build speed, strength, agility, balance, and explosive power. While Magill uses the same training to improve his leg speed for running, the

SOUTH PASADENA’S PETE MAGILL, WHO GREW UP IN LA CAÑADA AND GRADUATED FROM LA CAÑADA HIGH SCHOOL, IS CONSIDERED ONE OF THE TOP RUNNERS IN THE WORLD AND HOLDS SEVERAL RECORDS. PHOTO BY DIANA HERNANDEZ

book’s target audience is youth and adult participants in all sports, including football, soccer, baseball, basketball, lacrosse, and the like. Magill also intends to host competitive SpeedRunner Combine events this coming summer, in which participants score points in the 40-yard dash, 20-yard shuttle, 3-cone drill, standing broad jump, vertical leap, with medals and prizes for age group podium winners. Magill’s wife, Diana Hernandez, is an accomplished photographer who has contributed to his books and articles. So SpeedRunner will be a true family production. “She used to go to my meets,” Magill explained. “I ran a race where I set the American record and she had taken a photo. A magazine asked me if I had a photo and I sent them Diana’s. They started asking me to bring her along to all of my events and they ended up paying her more for her photographs than they paid me for my articles. They liked her photos more.” He now has so much to run home to, but Magill spent many years running away. He began drinking at age 13 and after several failed attempts at college (and alcohol-fu-

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eled cross-country hitchhikes and a European train extravaganza), bought a cheap around-the-world airline ticket that allowed him unlimited miles and stops as long as he traveled in a single direction. Magill ended up in the U.S. Virgin Islands as the co-owner of a rock ‘n’ roll nightclub named World Headquarters, on St. John, smoking four packs of cigarettes a day and drinking beer and rum from the time he woke up until the time he passed out. “When a DEA agent investigating cocaine distribution got stabbed in my club, I panicked,” Magill said. “I was paranoid that I would be wrongly implicated in the cocaine trade or the stabbing, so I fled back to the mainland USA.” Magill tried to turn things around. He started running again, coached high school track and club cross country and returned to school. He was “thrilled” about Sean’s birth— then threw it all away for a life of drinking, smoking and drugs. “It was my modus operandi,” Magill said. He was 36, broke, jobless, divorced and “a few weeks from homelessness” when he reached out to a friend in the entertainment industry. He sold a script, rewrote another and moved into a nice house, but returned to drugs and alcohol. Then the Verdugo Hills ER incident happened. Magill has since employed a new method to his life and running. Though a champion runner, he signs his books under the caveat of “Slower is faster!” After that initial five-minute run that put him on the curb, Magill took the hint. “I changed my approach,” he said. “I visualized my end goal—running comfortably again—and then imagined all the workouts it would take to realize that outcome. Instead of putting myself through that initial self-inflicted body slam, I alternated walking and easy jogging for fifteen minutes. It was a full year before I ran my first Masters race.”

THOUGH HE DOESN’T KEEP EXACT RECORDS, MAGILL RUNS MORE THAN 80 MILES PER WEEK TO STAY IN SHAPE AND HAS ALSO WRITTEN THREE BOOKS. HIS LATEST, “SPEEDRUNNER,” IS SET TO BE RELEASED IN MAY. PHOTO BY DIANA HERNANDEZ

Magill’s books deal with all aspects of running, from shoes, clothing and nutrition to the rules of the road and etiquette (jaywalk at your own risk). SpeedRunner also includes physiological data representing the latest

scientific studies on sports (a two-foot stack of which sits on the desk in his South Pasadena home). Magill has logged hundreds of miles along Arroyo Boulevard heading toward the Rose Bowl and back and is one of the more familiar faces in the community. When asked how often he is stopped in public by those asking him if he is “that running guy,” Magill said: “Three or four…a day.” He has returned to the coaching ranks and will be mentoring La Cañada High School’s sprinters for this spring’s track season. He joked that he feels like he is 20 years old, “until my shoelace comes untied and I can’t bend over to fix it.” When asked to name his greatest accomplishment, Magill said without hesitation but with great emotion, “In June, 2012, I sat in the South Pasadena High School stands, fit and healthy, and watched Sean get his diploma. That was easily the greatest accomplishment of my life. I started to run again for that moment.” •

PETE MAGILL’S RUNNING LEGACY American Men’s Age 45-49 record-holder 3,000-meter run – 8:36.86 5,000-meter run – 14:34.27 American Men’s Age 50-54 record-holder 5K – 15:01.2 10K – 31:11 American Men’s Age 55-59 record-holder 5,000-meter run – 15:42.13 American Men’s Single-age 51 record-holder Half marathon – 1:10:19 World Single-age 49 record-holder 5,000-meter run – 14:45.88 Member Masters (age 40+) World Record Relays 4 x Mile – 17:14.31 4 x 1,500 – 16:24.12 Distance Medley Relay – 10:19.11 4 x 1,600 – 17:40.63 2016 Inductee: USATF (USA Track & Field) Masters Hall of Fame Six-time overall Masters National Cross-Country Champion (13-time age group champion) 2007, 2008, 2011, 2013, & 2015 USA Masters Cross-Country Runner of the Year 2006 & 2007 USA Masters Track & Field Age Group Athlete of the Year 2009 & 2012 USA Masters Road Race Age Group Athlete of the Year

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PASADENA TIES BY LISA SEE

AUTHOR LISA SEE

PHOTO BY PATRICIA WILLIAMS

LISA SEE’S LATEST BOOK, THE TEA GIRL OF HUMMINGBIRD LANE, WILL BE RELEASED IN PAPERBACK ON APRIL 3. PHOTO COURTESY OF LISA SEE

My most-recent novel, The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane, tells the story of a young woman, Li-yan, who grows up in the tea mountains of China, has a baby out of wedlock, and is forced to abandon her baby. That infant, Haley, is adopted by a family in Pasadena. Her adoptive mother teaches at Caltech, her adoptive father is an arborist at the Huntington, and she herself attends Westridge School. Many years later and after many trials, Li-yan also comes to America. She buys a home in Arcadia and becomes a successful businesswoman. I get lots of questions from readers, but one of the most common ones is why, out of all the places in the United States, I chose Pasadena and, more generally, the San Gabriel Valley to set the story. “Do you live there? Did you grow up there?” The answer to both of those questions is no, yet my reasons are very much connected to my family and our long attachment to this city. My great-grandfather, Fong See, was Chinese, my great-grandmother, Ticie Pruett, was white, but in California, it was against the law for a Chinese to marry a white person and against the law for a Chinese to own property in the state until 1948. Despite these obstacles, my great-grandparents opened a shop specializing in Chinese antiques in Pasadena more than one hundred years ago. I’m not going to say there wasn’t prejudice in Pasadena, because there was, but many Pasadenans were more open-minded about Chinese and were far more familiar with Chinese antiques than those who lived farther west in places like Beverly Hills, Bel Air, or Santa Monica. How and why did that happen? Many of the people who lived in Pasadena in the early 20th century were originally from back east, where the miscegenation and oth-

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er laws that were so discriminatory against the Chinese didn’t exist. When people who hailed from the Eastern United States thought about Chinese, they didn’t get angry that laborers were “taking their jobs.” In fact, they didn’t have the stereotype of Chinese as laborers at all. Instead, their exposure to Chinese was through businessmen, diplomats, and students. (Some of the earliest Chinese to America came to attend classes at Yale.) Beyond this, Pasadenans often had money—either through old wealth or as self-made men and women. Again, many of these folks were from back east and were familiar with products that had come to America via the China Trade, which began in 1783 and brought high-quality porcelain, tea, silk, and antiquities to the United States. This meant that when Easterners thought about China, what came to mind were not the stereotypes of disease and opium, but the objets d’art that they bought and collected to fill their mansions. They saw in these products China’s history and culture. They had a completely different mindset than what was going on in Los Angeles, California, or elsewhere in the west. When these families came to Pasadena—for the winter, for the healthy weather, or to live permanently—and they wanted Chinese porcelains, furniture, bronzes, or silk hangings, they went to my family’s store, the F. Suie One Company, to buy them. My great-grandfather also sold merchandise to Grace Nicholson, another Asian art dealer in Pasadena, whose home/shop would eventually become the Pacific Asia Museum. My family’s store has had many locations around Southern California over the past hundred-plus years, but it’s almost always had a presence in Pasadena and has been there per-

“My family’s store has had many locations around Southern California over the past hundred-plus years, but it’s almost always had a presence in Pasadena and has been there permanently since the 1980s.” manently since the 1980s. (I’d like to add that on the other side of my family, my grandmother rode in a horse-pulled cart in the 1915 Rose Parade.) It’s been interesting for me to receive e-mails from realtors or new homeowners—who are doing research about furniture, decorative elements, or architectural details of a property, and have found receipts for those items from my great-grandparents’ store, some going back to the teens of the last century—to see what information I can give them. So, while I’ve never lived in Pasadena, I feel that some of my deepest roots are there. Beyond the personal connection to the city, I was able with The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane to explore something that’s fascinated me for a long while: the changing demographics of Pasadena and the San Gabriel Valley and the layers of diversity within that, which are not only unlike any other place in this country but, I would argue, in the world. I’m speaking specifically about the diversity within the Chinese-American community. There are pioneer Chinese-American families, like my own, who’ve had a presence in Pasadena for more than a century. They may have, like me, lost their ability to speak Chinese and may no longer follow Chinese traditions, apart from getting together for Chinese New Year or eating Chinese food. These families, again like my own, were typically Cantonese speakers, descended from poor and uneducated laborers, who sought and found the American Dream against harsh odds. In 1967, after the immigration laws were changed, a large influx of Chinese came to Southern California from Taiwan. They arrived educated and with money, and they were different culturally from Chinese-American pioneer families. Later, in the

leadup to the handover of Hong Kong to the People’s Republic of China, there was another influx of immigrants, who were, again, wealthy and well-educated but also different culturally from those from Taiwan or the pioneer families. After President Nixon’s visit to China in 1972, it still took quite a few years before the United States started seeing significant immigration from the People’s Republic of China. Most of those immigrants are Mandarin speakers, but within this single category there is tremendous diversity: some have come to attend school, some are poor, some are extraordinarily wealthy, some own international conglomerates. In all these layers of what is broadly called “Chinese” is one more category: young women (and some young men) who’ve been adopted from China. They may look Chinese, but they’re usually raised in white families surrounded by American culture. Having Haley grow up in Pasadena allowed me to explore the different ways she could identify herself as American, Chinese, and Chinese American, how she might compare herself to others who look like her but have very different backgrounds and experiences, and rejoice in the beauty, diversity, and culture of Pasadena. Having Li-yan settle in the San Gabriel Valley gave me the opportunity to go on field trips to restaurants and shops, explore with fresh eyes places I’ve long loved, and help me bring all that to readers around the country and the globe. • Lisa See is the New York Times best-selling author of many books, including On Gold Mountain, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, and Shanghai Girls. The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane will be released in paperback on April 3.

SEE IS THE FIRST AUTHOR TO HAVE HANDPRINTS IN THE COURTYARD OF PASADENA’S VROMAN’S BOOKSTORE. PHOTO COURTSESY OF LISA SEE

SEE AND OWNER OF DENONG, ELAINE LUO CUT THE RIBBON FOR THE TRADITIONAL CHINESE TEA SHOP IN DECEMBER. LUO IS THE LARGEST IMPORTER OF FINE PU’ER TEA IN THE UNITED STATES. PHOTO COURTESY OF LISA SEE

Spring 2018 / The Quarterly Magazine / 31


GOLD LINE EXCURSION:

HIDDEN CORNERS OF CHINATOWN BY MADELINE RENN AND CAMILLE LOZANO PHOTOGRAPHY BY CAMILLE LOZANO

CHINATOWN WEST GATE

L.A.’s Chinatown has long been known as the stop for tourists looking to experience one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods steeped in tradition and community. Today, a stroll down Broadway is met with the faint, smoky aroma of incense, the enduring, colorful Chinese lanterns which dangle from awnings and sleek storefronts cropping up in the historical district that spans a little less than a mile. The district is quietly reinventing itself as trendy purveyors, artists and creators occupy spaces under stairwells and in corners, eventually spilling out along Chinatown’s main streets. Hop on the L.A. Metro and head to Chinatown today to partake in truly unique shopping, dining and cultural experiences—a few of which are listed here. Shop: BUILDING BLOCK Part design studio, part retail space, Building Block is a multi-medium project based in L.A., initiated in Tokyo, by sisters Kimberly and Nancy Wu. Here you can find beautiful leather bags, wallets and other goods, all

BUILDING BLOCK

made with minimalist and essential design in mind. Many of the bags are unique shapes with surprising accents, from round wood spheres to leather tassels. Whether you head into Building Block for your new favorite bag or just some inspiration, you are sure to find it. Building Block: WED. – SAT. 12 P.M. TO 7 P.M., SUN. 12 P.M. TO 5 P.M. 970 N. Broadway #104, Los Angeles Eat: HOWLIN’ RAY’S From a quaint food truck to hour-long lines, Howlin’ Ray’s Nashville-style hot chicken has all of L.A. talking— and eating—fried chicken. L.A. native Chef Johnny Zone and his Texas-raised wife, Amanda, began with the Howlin’ Ray’s food truck in 2015 after working in Nashville and discovering spicy fried chicken. They then went on to open their white-tiled and red-accented brick and mortar shop in April 2016, and haven’t stopped since. The counter-only spot serves up a simple menu, with plates from a quarter to whole bird, wings, and the hot chicken Sando, all with spiciness

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BLOSSOM

NOW SERVING

BUBBLE U

HOWLIN’ RAY’S

LOS ANGELES STATE HISTORIC PARK

BRUCE LEE STATUE

options ranging from Country (no heat) to Howlin’ (can’t touch this. 10++). The fresh chicken is always cooked to tender perfection, with a crispy layer of flavorful spices. With fried chicken this good, an hour-long line is well worth the wait. Or, head to Chinatown on an off-hour or weekday for some instant gratification. Howlin’ Ray’s: TUES. – FRI. 11 A.M. TO 4 P.M., SAT. & SUN. 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M. 727 N. Broadway #128, Los Angeles Shop: NOW SERVING Recently opened and thriving in Chinatown’s Far East Plaza, Now Serving is the culinary shop L.A. deserves. Owners Ken Concepcion, former Chef de Cuisine at Wolfgang Puck’s CUT restaurant, and wife Michelle Mungcal, pack the small store with specialty culinary products, from kitchen knives to hand-carved cutting boards and cookbooks. The shop has a cookbook for every diet and every chef, including first editions, vintage rarities, and hot-offthe-press finds. Now Serving: MON., THURS. – SAT. 11

A.M. TO 7 P.M., SUN. 12 P.M. TO 5 P.M. 727 N. Broadway #133, Los Angeles Drink: BUBBLE U Bubble U is blowing up Chinatown’s boba scene, having opened in late 2016. While the lines are never too long, it’s become a popular spot for those intent on finding the perfect balance between expertly-brewed black and green tea, and sweet tapioca pearls. The menu features a range of iced teas, including Lavender black tea and honey, pineapple and passion fruit, plus all the smoothie options you could wish for, and even “milk icees.” There are specialty iced coffees, ice cream, health drinks and Bubble U lunch boxes including Taiwanese favorites like braised pork and popcorn chicken with rice…perfect for a picnic at Los Angeles State Historic Park. Or settle into Bubble U’s cozy bar with a milk tea and a few tea snacks like salt & pepper tofu or sweet potato fries. The menu is quite extensive. Bubble U: MON. – THURS. 11:30 A.M. TO 7 P.M., FRI. – SUN. 11:30 A.M. TO

REALM

CHINATOWN CENTRAL PLAZA

8 P.M. 843 N. Broadway, Los Angeles Shop: REALM Tales of old-time Chinatown never fail to include Hong Kong Low, a restaurant and bar built in 1939 that underwent a transition in the 70s to a metal band venue dubbed the Hong Kong Café. The building, located in Chinatown’s Central Plaza, is now restored with lovely hand-painted ceiling tiles and vibrant red pillars. The original bar now houses Realm and its eclectic collection of unique housewares and design elements sure to delight. Traversing through the distinctive space, objects of interest include glazed vases, teacups, greeting cards, candles and an assortment of books. Realm: MON., WED. – SUN. 12 P.M. TO 6 P.M., 425 Gin Ling Way, Los Angeles Eat: BLOSSOM Bright and modern with the best view of Chinatown’s iconic Gin Ling Way, Blossom serves up Vietnamese comfort dishes alongside a curated wine list. Owner Duc Pham, who was born

in Vietnam but raised in Anaheim, obsesses over the quality of every detail, from the minimalist design to freshly baked bread. The perfect end to your Chinatown adventure, Blossom is guaranteed to please vegetarians and pork belly lovers alike. Blossom: TUES. – SUN. 12 P.M. TO 4 P.M., 5:30 P.M. TO 9 P.M., 451 Gin Ling Way, Los Angeles Do: LOS ANGELES STATE HISTORIC PARK After a three-year-long renovation, Los Angeles State Historic Park (LASHP) is now open to the public for picnics, downtown views, and, of course, a walk in the park. Just steps from the Chinatown Gold Line Station, the expansive 34-acre park includes sculptures, a ranger station and citrus trees that provide shade on sunny days. Order your Howlin’ Ray’s to go, grab a drink from Bubble U, and head over to LASHP for the perfect spring picnic. Los Angeles State Historic Park: MON. – SUN. 8 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M., 1245 N. Spring St., Los Angeles •

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SPRING DIY:

EGGS WITH PROSCIUTTO Little Flower Shares a Heavenly Egg Dish of Pure Comfort BY MEAGAN GOOLD PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN

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There’s something sweet about Pasadena’s beloved neighborhood restaurant Little Flower. Something more than the aroma of candy owner Christine Moore has been cooking up for the last 19 years. There’s something comfortable. Something other than the cozy physical space the café and candy kitchen occupy. And the overwhelming sense of warmth has less to do with the unusually temperate Southern California weather and more to do with the genuine welcome that Christine and Cecilia Leung, creative director and chef, extend to those who stop in at this charming and popular spot. Such was the case on a recent afternoon when we were invited in to experience and share the making of one of Little Flower’s special dishes, Parmesan Eggs with Prosciutto. “I love this dish. Eggs are a perfect food,” Christine commented. It’s possible that part of the reason the dish is so good, so special, has everything to do with how much she and her entire team love what they do. “It’s about more than the food. It’s about feeding people. We are here to serve. Work is a joy,” Christine said. “It’s about the neighborhood, the community.” That sense of community is evident. Our conversation in the dining room about eggs and buttery baguettes is casually interrupted as Christine and Cecilia say hello or hug visitors. Little Flower’s commitment to the community extends beyond those who stop in for a bite to eat or to shop in its beautifully-curated gift section. They are aware of their impact on the community at large. Christine is passionate about connecting and supporting local arts. She enjoys the opportunity to collaborate with members of her team, friends and others in the food business. And she and her team actively participate in local school outreach programs throughout the Los Angeles area. Christine has made a lasting impression on Southern California. Her signature candies and homemade marshmallows are now joined by a stunning array of made fresh daily pastries and other menu items created by her and Cecilia. “We just love to learn,” said Cecilia, once a full-time fifth grade teacher who cooked on the weekends. “There is just so much happening.” This is evidenced by their recent return from Penn State, where they took a week-long intensive course on ice cream making. Ultimately, it took longer for our team to assemble our camera equipment than it did for Cecilia to whip up this disarmingly accessible dish of Parmesan Eggs with Prosciutto. “The goal is not to create masterpieces. It’s to have fun, keep it simple, keep it fresh and don’t overthink it. Make your cooking process enjoyable,” wrote Christine in her 2012 cookbook Little Flower Recipes From the Café. Sure, she’s an experienced chef. And sure, she creates delicious recipes for a living. But take it from someone with subpar cooking skills—you can do this, and friends and family will be impressed. • Little Flower is located at 1422 W. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91105. It is open 7 days a week, from 7 a.m. to 7

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BACKYARD CHICKENS BY MADY RENN PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN

THE 54TH ANNUAL PASADENA SHOWCASE HOUSE OF DESIGN HOUSE & GARDEN TOUR

APRIL 22 - MAY 20, 2018

the 50th annual HOURS OF ENTRY pasadena showcase Saturday, Sunday, house of design

Tuesday through Thursday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

CHRISTINE MOORE AND CECILIA LEUNG

(Property closes promptly at 6:00 pm)

Friday

house 10:00 am&–garden 9:00 pm tour

(Property closes promptly at 9:00 pm)

April 13 - May 11, Closed Mondays 2014 TICKET PRICES Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts Prime Time is a California 501(c)3Tickets: corporation. $40 online or by phone $45 at the House

Regular Tickets: $35 online or by phone $40 at the House

Don’t miss our shops, restaurant, bar and complimentary garden tour! To Order Tickets visit www.pasadenashowcase.org or call 714.442.3872

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p.m. (626) 304-4800. https://littleflowercandyco.com. Christine Moore also owns the popular eatery Lincoln, located at 1992 Lincoln Ave., Pasadena, CA 91103. It is open Mon. – Sat. 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sun. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (626) 7656746. https://lincolnpasadena.com.

PROSCIUTTO PARMESAN EGGS

3 eggs, room temperature 1 tablespoon crème fraiche 1 ½ tablespoons parmesan, grated 2 ounces prosciutto, thin sliced 1/8 teaspoon black pepper, fresh ground ½ teaspoon chives, chopped 5-inch half baguette, cut on bias 1 teaspoon butter, softened • Crack eggs into a medium mixing bowl. Whisk together well. Season with a pinch of salt. • Heat small nonstick sauté pan on medium heat. • Add 1 tablespoon oil to pan to warm. • Toast baguette and remove from pan. • Add whisked eggs to sauté pan. Use rubber spatula to gently fold edges of eggs toward the center as they cook and swirl pan for the uncooked eggs to pour out to the edge. Cook for about 2 minutes. • Dollop crème fraiche and sprinkle 2 tablespoons of parmesan evenly across eggs. • Continue to cook eggs to yield a soft scramble, a bit runny. Remove from heat. • Place eggs in center of plate. • Handkerchief prosciutto on top. • Spread butter on baguette points and place onto plate next to eggs. • Sprinkle remaining parmesan over eggs and prosciutto. Grind fresh black pepper on top. Garnish with chives.

LEMON

Lemon, Tiki, and Bug were happy to pose and lend their eggs for their Quarterly Magazine debut. The chickens reside at the Whalen’s Pasadena residence, with plenty of backyard to explore and a comfortable coop for laying eggs. Chickens of different breeds lay eggs of varying colors (as seen on the cover); however, contrary to popular belief, the color of the egg has no impact on the nutritional value. Bug, a Barred Rock chicken with black and white speckled feathers, lays TIKI

brown eggs and is known for her playfulness around the coop. She enjoys the occasional bike ride around the cul-de-sac, swinging, and perching on the Whalen’s shoulders. Lemon, affectionately nicknamed Limoné, is an Orpington chicken and lays light brown eggs. A recent canine run-in left Lemon without her usual plume, but with the same friendly demeanor. Tiki, the most temperamental of the coop, is an Easter Egg chicken known for her excellent egg production and multitude of egg colors. She often protects her newly-laid eggs and does not like to be picked up or swing like Lemon and Tiki, but was particularly excited about being photographed. The Whalens have had chickens for about five years, and, through trial and

BUG

error, have learned how to raise healthy, happy chickens. •

Spring 2018 / The Quarterly Magazine / 37


EGG-COUTREMENTS

From the silly to the sublime, there are so many options to dress up your eggs PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAFAEL NAJARIAN

Egg cups are a fabulous way to serve soft-boiled eggs inside of their shells. But these vessels don’t have to be limited to serving breakfast fare. You can repurpose them into shot glasses, bud vases, and so much more! The only limit is your imagination. Vintage egg cups have become quite collectible over the years and can be found at antique stores, flea markets and specialty retailers (the silver egg cup pictured is part of a set from Port O’Call). Newer editions are available online and at kitchen essentials retailers throughout the year, as well as at a variety of different stores during the spring. Egg coddlers are a wonderful way to create delicately tender eggs. Much like poached eggs, but cooked inside a decorative container, coddled eggs can be rendered even more delicious with the addition of an herb or bacon garnish. Egg spoons, with their shorter handles and bowls and more pointed tips, are specially designed for eating soft-boiled eggs. They come in all sorts of creative designs and can be paired with your favorite egg cup for a picture-perfect meal! Egg toppers make it so that you no longer need to decide to tap or whack your soft-boiled egg. They slice off a neat top section of shell, enabling you to enjoy the deliciousness of your breakfast without worrying about biting into unwanted fragments. •

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Spring 2018 / The Quarterly Magazine / 39


MUSEUM IN FOCUS:

LACMA

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art Is Preparing for the Largest Construction Project In Its History, But Director Michael Govan Says There’s Plenty to See Right Now BY MITCH LEHMAN The exhibitions, programs and facilities he has brought to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art—LACMA, in local museum parlance—have more than doubled attendance since he arrived on the Miracle Mile in 2006, but Director Michael Govan sounds like he’s just getting started. Energetic, enthusiastic and educated on everything that is happening on campus, Govan exudes the persona of someone who just bought a new house and wants everyone to come over and look at it. Approaching an ambitious construction project set to begin in the fall of 2019 that will replace four buildings that were put into service in the 60s and 80s with a single state-of-the-art facility, Govan seems equally excited about several ongoing and upcoming exhibitions. “Mexico!” he exclaimed, when asked what excited him the most about the season now upon us. “You should not miss this.” Found in Translation: Design in California and Mexico, 1915–1985 opened in late January and amplifies design dialogues between California and Mexico. “This is an incredible exhibition,” Govan said. “It looks at the influences of the back and forth nature of design in architecture between the two regions. There are a lot of local references that visitors will recognize including the Los Angeles Public Library and the works of architect George Washington Smith, who designed some homes in Pasadena.” Smith is known for his use of the Spanish Colonial Revival style in the early 20th century. City and Cosmos: The Arts of Teotihuacan opens March 25 and presents recent findings from Mexican national and international archaeological projects currently being excavated at Teotihuacan’s three main pyramids—the Sun,

FOUND IN TRANSLATION: DESIGN IN CALIFORNIA AND MEXICO, 1915–1985, LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART, SEPTEMBER 17, 2017–APRIL 1, 2018, PHOTO © MUSEUM ASSOCIATES/LACMA

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THE ULTRA-POPULAR URBAN LIGHT CELEBRATES ITS 10TH ANNIVERSARY IN 2018. CHRIS BURDEN, URBAN LIGHT, 2008. PHOTO BY © MUSEUM ASSOCIATES/LACMA

MICHAEL GOVAN, DIRECTOR OF LACMA

Moon, and the Feathered Serpent. “This is a beautiful exhibition and a nice follow-up to our LA/LA offerings,” Govan said. LA/LA was a comprehensive study of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles that included exhibits at several museums in Southern California. The conversation is ongoing at LACMA. City and Cosmos showcases monumental sculptures and other items that have been unearthed to illustrate how works of art relate to place, both above and below ground. It provides visitors an opportunity to see the new discoveries, many of which have never been exhibited in the United States.

On April 15, LACMA debuts 82 Portraits and 1 Still-life, a collection of paintings by David Hockney which provides “a vibrant and intimate view of people with whom he has developed relationships over the past 50 years,” according to the museum. Most of the portraits were were painted in the artist’s Los Angeles studio, all from life and over a period of two or three days, which Hockney described as “a 20-hour exposure.” “There are a lot of Angelenos you will recognize,” Govan said. This Hockney collection originated at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, and has traveled to Australia, Italy and Spain. LACMA is hosting the

only presentation in the United States. Visitors still have time to take in Wu Bin’s Ten Views of a Lingbi Stone, a Ming dynasty handscroll created in 1601 that is comprised of 10 separate views of a single stone from the famous site of Lingbi, Anhui Province. “This is part of a beautiful show of Chinese spirit stones,” added Govan. “This is one of the more important paintings ever made in China and certainly one of the more important paintings ever made of a rock.” Govan likened Ten Views to another iconic LACMA rock: Levitated Mass, Michael Heizer’s famed land art exhibit that took the region by storm in 2012 when a specially-built trailer

PHOTO © BRIGITTE LACOMBE

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carried a 340-ton boulder from the Jurupa Valley to the museum grounds where it remains on permanent display, perched above a 456-foot concrete slot which allows full viewing access. “This is what connects Ten Views to Levitated Mass,” said Govan. “You can see it from all sides. Heiser said ‘You never get to see the bottom of sculpture,’ which is one of his goals with Levitated Mass. It’s the same idea of the close contemplation of a rock, present and past.” Govan also mentioned that 2018 marks the tenth anniversary of Urban Light, Chris Burden’s assemblage sculpture of 202 street lights of 17 distinctive styles, most of which came from cities and towns in the Los Angeles area and were in service as far back as the 1920s. Urban Light, which is located in the public area on Wilshire Boulevard, is one of the most photographed attractions in Southern California. “I have always been interested in public art,” said Govan. “Levitated Mass, the exhibition we had here that the kids called ‘yellow spaghetti’ (in reality, it was Jesús Rafael Soto’s Penetrable, a thick curtain of yellow plastic hoses) and the Palm Garden. The whole idea is you are in the museum before you are in the museum and it gives the place friendliness. I learned through Urban Light that a work of art could be important and accessible. And fun!” LACMA Chief Operating Officer Diana Vesga said that Urban Light “brings a great social media pres-

LACMA DIRECTOR MICHAEL GOVAN CALLED WU BIN: TEN VIEWS OF A LINGBI STONE, “ONE OF THE MORE IMPORTANT PAINTINGS EVER MADE IN CHINA.” PHOTO © MUSEUM ASSOCIATES/LACMA

LACMA CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER DIANA VESGA PHOTO © BRIAN KRAMER

MICHAEL HEIZER, LEVITATED MASS, 2012

© MICHAEL HEIZER, PHOTO BY MITCH LEHMAN

WU BIN: TEN VIEWS OF A LINGBI STONE, LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART, DECEMBER 10, 2017 - JUNE 24, 2018, PHOTO © MUSEUM ASSOCIATES/ LACMA

83 PORTRAITS AND 1 STILL-LIFE, LOS ANGELES, 18TH MAY 2016, © DAVID HOCKNEY, PHOTO BY JEAN-PIERRE GONÇALVES DE LIMA

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ence.” “This exhibit is a great way for LACMA to create engagement with the community,” Vesga said. “It allowed us to reach an audience that is not easy to reach.” And LACMA will soon be reaching more. Though much of the physical space will be closed for the upcoming construction project, the exhibition space on the West campus will be configured so that LACMA will still offer a full slate of attractions until 2023, when the new building will open at the same time a new METRO Purple Line station across the street from the museum will be put into service. “With the METRO stop and the new building, we will be even more accessible,” Govan said. “There is always something new here,” Govan concluded. “You will see the continual refinement and improvement of the campus over here.” • The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, or LACMA, is located at 5905 Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles. Business hours are 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday; 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. on Friday and 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The museum is closed on Wednesdays. For more information, see the museum’s website at lacma.org or call (323) 857-6000.

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G E TAWAY :

LAKE TAHOE

From frozen frontier or mobster’s lair to winter wonderland or lover’s fairyland, Lake Tahoe has played the role of backdrop for famous films and famous people. But, this enchanted world is open to all who love the outdoors and seek the solace of its remarkable beauty. BY JIM THOMPSON On the big screen, Lake Tahoe was Al Pacino’s (as Michael Corleone) vacation compound in The Godfather Part II (1974), the romantic playground of Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift in A Place in the Sun (1951), and the frozen Yukon in the 1925 Charlie Chaplin classic The Gold Rush. But Lake Tahoe is more than a backdrop for classic films. From winter sports in the surrounding Sierra Nevada mountains to summer water sports in the largest alpine lake in North America, Tahoe is a paradise of year-round activities. Averaging 300 days of sunshine, interspersed with picture-perfect snowfalls, Tahoe offers leisure activities from casino gaming, world-class spas and gourmet restaurants to more active pursuits like dog sledding, biking and golf. But nothing matches the magnificent scenery. In the words of Mark Twain in Roughing It, it is “… the fairest picture the whole world affords.” In many ways, Lake Tahoe is a tale of four shores and two states (California on the east and Nevada on the west). Those who crave a quiet, relaxed experience should seek the solace of the North Shore, which offers more private vacation rentals; the woodsy and lush campgrounds of the West Shore; or the natural beauty of the environmentally-protected East Shore. But those who want to live large should head to South Lake Tahoe, the place for first-class casinos and resorts, exciting nightlife, wonderful restaurants, easy access to the slopes and top entertainment. Golden Dreams Since gold fever first infected America during the 1849 California Gold Rush and more than seven million tons of silver was extracted from the Comstock Load in nearby Virginia City, NV ten years later, Tahoe has been at the center of America’s dreams and fortunes. With the discovery of silver came the building of the “Bonanza Road,” an East-West passage through the mountains that allowed silver ore to be moved from Virginia City to Sacramento and San Francisco. Later, wealthy visitors were the cargo. That same route—now called Highway 50—still brings in visitors eager to experience the many wonders of the area. The first casino opened in Crystal Bay in 1927. Originally called the Ta-NevaHo, it was later renamed the Cal-Neva Lodge and subsequently the Cal Neva Resort and Casino. The gambling palace gained notoriety when it was owned by singer Frank Sinatra who brought in a string of notable figures including Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Marilyn Monroe and mobster Sam Giancana. That gambling legacy continues today with 24-hour gaming at casinos including Harveys Lake Tahoe Hotel and Casino, Harrah’s, the Hard Rock and Montbleu Resort Casino & Spa on the Nevada side of the Lake. Emerald Bay A drive around the lake is the best introduction to all there is to see and do in Tahoe. Don’t miss a visit to nearby Emerald Bay State Park. Millions of years ago,

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THE 2.5-MILE RIDE ON THE AERIAL TRAMWAY UP TO HEAVENLY MOUNTAIN PROVIDES THE BEST VIEW OF LAKE TAHOE. PHOTO BY JIM THOMPSON

THE LAKE TAHOE AERIAL TRAMWAY STOPS AT THE MASSIVE 1,300 SQUARE METER DECK WHERE YOU CAN ENJOY BREATHTAKING PANORAMIC VIEWS OF THE SIERRA NEVADA MOUNTAINS. PHOTO BY JIM

THOMPSON

DESIGNATED AS AN UNDERWATER STATE PARK IN 1994, EMERALD BAY IS THE RESTING PLACE FOR BOATS AND BARGES USED BEFORE THE TURN OF THE CENTURY. PHOTO BY KRISTIN RUST/LAKE TAHOE VISITORS BUREAU

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a massive glacier carved this teardrop-shaped three-mile-long, onemile-wide inlet surrounding Fannette, a small island in the lake. Framed by sheer granite cliffs, the jagged shoreline of the bay is the perfect location to watch the sunlight dance over the clear water and to bask in the never-ending kaleidoscope of colors that range from emerald green and cool jade to sapphire blue. Stop at The Lodge at Edgewood Tahoe for lunch at Bistro or just to take in the view. Opened in June 2017, this 250-acre property is the newest resort in the area. No visit to Tahoe is complete without taking a gondola ride from the South Shore up to Heavenly Mountain. Rising to an elevation of more than 9,000 feet, the two-and-a-half mile ride is truly like ascending to a heavenly place. Stop at the observation deck for a breathtaking view of the lake and surrounding mountains, then warm up with a hot chocolate, coffee or snack at Tamarack Lodge

at the top of the mountain. With 29 lifts, 94 ski runs and nearly 5,000 skiable acres, there is something here for skiers and snowboarders of all levels. Even if you are not a celebrity, skiing in the winter, golfing in the summer, casinos and spectacular views, make Tahoe a great backdrop for your next vacation.

IF YOU GO THINGS TO DO If you can tear yourself away from the spectacular lake and mountain views, there is an endless variety of things to do in Lake Tahoe. For a full list, visit the official South Lake Tahoe website at: https://tahoesouth.com. Gondola to Heavenly Mountain Ride the gondola up Heavenly Mountain for the absolute best way to see the lake. Once on the mountain, there are a variety of ski runs for all experience levels and classes for beginners. The gondola is open sev-

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en days a week. Tickets are $32 for adults, $26 for teens and $20 for children ages 5 to 12 and free for kids 4 and under (https://www.skiheavenly. com). Emerald Bay State Park Hiking trails and magnificent vistas are all around in this remarkable state park. The easy-to-walk Rubicon Trail follows the edge of the lake while another short one-mile trail leads up to the icy cascades of Eagle Falls and a panoramic view of the bay and lake. From inside the park, you get a perfect view of Fannette Island, and look closely—you will spot the ruins of a tiny stone teahouse perched on the top of the island (https:// www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=506). On the nearby shore is the 38-room Scandinavian-style stone castle known as Vikingsholm (http://vikingsholm.com). Cruises, like the Tahoe Queen paddle wheeler or a sunset dinner cruise aboard the M.S. Dixie II are available

www.harrahs-tahoe.com), Harveys Lake Tahoe Hotel and Casino (http:// www.harveys-tahoe.com), the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino (https:// hardrockcasinolaketahoe.com) and Montbleu Resort Casino & Spa (https://www.montbleuresort.com).

starting at $94. You can also rent a boat or a private yacht from Tahoe Boat Rides (http://www.tahoeboatrides.com). Gatekeeper’s Museum The museum tells the story of Lake Tahoe’s history and includes a wealth of Native American artifacts, historical displays, and personal stories of the pioneers who settled the area. The Marion Steinbach Indian Basket collection consists of an impressive collection of more than 700 baskets as well as dolls, artifacts and pottery (https://northtahoemuseums.org). Magic Fusion at the Loft Theater The Loft (located in Heavenly Village in South Lake Tahoe) contains an intimate theater home to award-winning magicians, a lounge with full bar, and restaurant featuring Italian cuisine. Tickets for the magic show are $38 for adults and $20 for children 16 and under (http://thelofttahoe.com).

WHERE TO STAY (Rates approximate and vary by season and day of week)

IT IS EASY TO SEE WHY THE LODGE AT EDGEWOOD WAS NAMED ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HOTELS BY ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST. PHOTO BY JIM THOMPSON

Casinos Tahoe has some great casinos. More relaxed than Las Vegas but with all the action you crave, the casinos in Tahoe are a great way to relax after a day on the slopes. Among the top locations are Harrah’s (http://

Hotel Azure This contemporary mountain retreat is just across from the shores of Lake Tahoe’s pristine El Dorado Beach, one hour from Reno International Airport and only minutes from Heavenly Village. Recently remodeled, it is dog friendly (small additional charge) in all of its 99 rooms and suites, so feel free to bring along Fido. Hotel Azure also provides complimentary WiFi, free parking, two-hour bike or snowshoe use, a game room, pool and hot tub, and fitness facilities. It’s the ideal place for a family

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“MATERIALIZATION of THE DIVINE ”

vacation. Rates: $99-$500. (http:// www.hotelazuretahoe.com) The Lodge at Edgewood Named one of the most beautiful hotels by Architectural Digest, the Lodge at Edgewood offers 154 luxury rooms, all with fireplaces and a private deck or terrace to make your stay warm, inviting and comfortable. Guests can purchase lift tickets and be fitted for skis and boards on the property. A private shuttle will take you to Heavenly Mountain Gondola and meet you when you return. Rates: $200-$3,000. (http://www. edgewoodtahoe.com/lodge)

ART OF THE GARDEN

A premier tour of exquisite gardens in the Foothill Communities Sunday, April 15 10:30-4:30 | Self-Guided Tour Tickets: $30 presale | $35 day of tour 626.355.8350

CreativeArtsGroup.org

Creative Arts Group

Montbleu Resort, Casino & Spa Take in lake views, relax by the pool or treat yourself to a spa treatment during the day and get into the action at the casino at night. Recently renovated, this 438-room resort offers mountain views, a casino, shops, live music, fitness center and is just a block from the California state line. Rates: $150-$2,000. (https://www. montbleuresort.com) WHERE TO EAT Evan’s American Gourmet Cafe Featuring flavors from around the world, Evan’s has long been a local favorite and was recently named a “Distinguished Restaurant of North America” by the DiRōNA organization (http://dirona.com). Under the direction of owners Evan and Candice Williams and the creative vision of chef Oscar Herrera, Evan’s enjoys the well-deserved reputation of being South Lake Tahoe’s finest restaurant. Note that with only 12 tables, the restaurant is normally full, so make reservations early. (https:// evanstahoe.com) Bistro at Edgewood Tahoe Lunch menus range from salads and sandwiches to a wonderful lobster roll and delectable brick oven pizzas. Gourmet dinners include fish, filets and venison all served in the relaxed, yet elegant surroundings of this

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PAN ROASTED BREAST AND CONFIT LEG OF DUCK WITH GRAND MARNIER JUS IS JUST ONE OF THE CREATIVE DISHES AT EVANS AMERICAN GOURMET CAFE. PHOTO BY JAMIE WHITE

first-class resort lodge. Even if you do not stay at the resort, it is worth dining at Bistro, touring the property and taking in the magnificent lake views. (http://www.edgewoodtahoe.com/ dine-imbibe) Revive Coffee and Wine Built by Robin Bender in 2013 after the tragic passing of her husband, Bob, from cancer, Revive quickly became a top place for locals to gather and enjoy good food, artisan coffee and fine wines. Under the direction of Chris Brackett and his son Jared, the restaurant was furnished from found and recycled materials giving it a real feeling of home. Much of the wood used to create the main bar and counter came from a house built in Zephyr Cove and was milled at the mill in Glenbrook in the 1920s. Doors from the same house serve as the tables. (https://www.revivecoffeewine.com) Jimmy’s Restaurant at The Landing Resort and Spa Serving contemporary Greek and California cuisine and offering lake views from the rooftop or inside along with several private dining alcoves with fireplaces. Jimmy’s is a great place to enjoy a relaxing afternoon drink or snack or a romantic evening dinner. Five additional fire pits invite guests to linger on the patio or rooftop deck overlooking the lake. (http://thelandingtahoe.com/ dining)•

“AWE-INSPIRING!” — “A MUST-SEE!” —Broadway World

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WATER WATCHER New JPL Mission Will Help Improve Accuracy of Environmental Monitoring and Forecasting BY MITCH LEHMAN

Sometime in April, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is planned to lift off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in Santa Barbara County, its payload fairing occupied by seven satellites that will take part in a most unique rideshare. Five will head into service for a telecommunications company and the other two will extend a long-term climate record that is helping to better understand global environmental changes. It’s called GRACE Follow-On, a joint project between Pasadena’s NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the German Research Centre for Geosciences, that will continue the work started by its predecessor, GRACE—the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment—which spent the years 2002–17 helping researchers analyze the crucial concepts of Earth’s water distribution and climate change. Though the subject of climate change ABOVE: AN ARTIST’S RENDERING DEPICTING THE TWIN SPACECRAFT OF THE GRAVITY RECOVERY AND CLIMATE EXPERIMENT FOLLOW-ON MISSION, A PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN NASA JET PROPULSION LABORATORY AND THE GERMAN RESEARCH CENTRE FOR GEOSCIENCES. LEFT: THE NASA JET PROPULSION LABORATORY. PHOTOS BY NASA JPL/CALTECH

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is brusquely bandied about in political debate, it’s quite a delicate science that is understood by few. After its first few weeks in low orbit 300 miles above the surface of the Earth, GRACE Follow-On—or GRACE-FO— will begin its task of tracking changes in the distribution of liquid water, ice and land masses by measuring changes in our planet’s gravity field every 30 days. In layman’s terms: It’s taking inventory of changes in Earth’s water stock and transport. “For 15 years, the GRACE mission has unlocked mysteries of how water moves around our planet,” said Frank Webb of JPL, the GRACE-FO project scientist. “It gave us the first view of underground aquifers from space and shows how fast polar ice sheets and mountain glaciers are melting.” The continuous movement of masses of water, ice, air and the solid Earth that GRACE-FO will track is driven by Earth-system processes, such as terrestrial water movement, precipitation, droughts, floods, changes in ice sheets and land glaciers, evaporation from the oceans, and groundwater use and storage. It also measures some components of tectonic activity, such as earthquakes and variations in Earth’s outer layer that includes the crust and upper mantle and mantle density. How It Works Flying 137 miles apart, the two satellites will use a JPL-built microwave ranging system to take continuous, precise measurements of the variations in the distance between each other. These variations are caused by minute changes in the gravitational pull on the satellites from local changes in Earth’s mass below them. The microwave ranging data is combined with GPS tracking for timing, star trackers for attitude information, and a device that considers non-gravitational effects, such as atmospheric drag and solar radiation. Scientists will calculate how mass is redistributed each month and monitor its changes over time.

THIS IMAGE SHOWS THE LAND WATER STORAGE ANOMALIES IN JULY, 2017, AS OBSERVED WITH THE GRACE SATELLITES. BLUE COLORS INDICATE BELOW-AVERAGE TERRESTRIAL WATER AMOUNTS, WHILE RED COLORS SHOW ABOVE-AVERAGE WATER AMOUNTS. PHOTO BY NASA JPL/CALTECH

Each satellite will also carry an instrument called an atmospheric limb sounder that will provide a technique to measure how much signals from GPS satellites are distorted by the atmosphere. The sounders will provide up to 200 profiles of atmospheric temperature and water vapor content each day that will aid in worldwide weather forecasting. GRACE-FO incorporates design upgrades emanating from the study of the 15 years of GRACE operations, which will improve satellite performance, reliability and mission operations. What It Does The information collected by the satellites will also track mass changes of Earth’s polar ice sheets, estimate global groundwater changes, measure the mass changes of large earthquakes and create data which infers changes in deep ocean currents—which researchers say impacts climate. To date, GRACE observations have been used in more than 4,300 research publications. Its measurements have far-reaching benefits to society, such as providing insights into where global groundwater resources may be shrinking or growing and where dry soils are contributing to drought. GRACE-FO is planned to fly at least five years. Its predecessor was expected to stay in service for

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the same duration but lasted three times as long before age-related battery failures and depleted fuel reserves forced NASA to end the active mission in the fall of 2017. What It Says Among scores of other scientific finds, data transmitted by the original GRACE has shown that the mass of the Greenland ice sheet has rapidly declined in the last several years due to surface melting and iceberg calving, a scientific term for the breaking off of ice chunks from the edge of a glacier. Between 2002 and 2017, Greenland shed approximately 280 gigatons of ice per year, causing global sea level to rise by .8 millimeters per year. The news is almost as grim at the other end of the planet, where GRACE showed that Antarctica shed about 125 gigatons of ice annually, pushing sea levels up an additional 0.35 millimeters a year. So what’s a gigaton? Though admittedly difficult to do, imagine the mass contained within 400,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools. Or the size of a kilometer, cubed.   What They Are Saying Felix Landerer is the mission’s deputy project scientist at JPL and has been involved with both GRACE projects. He makes no effort to hide

THE TWIN GRAVITY RECOVERY AND CLIMATE EXPERIMENT GRACE FOLLOW-ON (GRACE-FO) SATELLITES UNDERWENT A YEAR-LONG TEST CAMPAIGN BY SATELLITE MANUFACTURER AIRBUS DEFENCE AND SPACE AT IABG IN OTTOBRUNN, NEAR MUNICH, GERMANY. THE GRACE FOLLOW-ON MISSION WILL PROVIDE VALUABLE DATA AS SCIENTISTS SEEK TO UNDERSTAND THE MOVEMENT OF ICE, WATER, AIR AND SOLID EARTH ON THE PLANET. PHOTO BY NASA JPL/CALTECH

THE INFORMATION COLLECTED BY THE GRACE FOLLOW-ON SATELLITES WILL TRACK MASS CHANGES OF EARTH’S POLAR ICE SHEETS, ESTIMATE GLOBAL GROUNDWATER CHANGES, MEASURE THE MASS CHANGES OF LARGE EARTHQUAKES AND CREATE DATA WHICH INFERS CHANGES IN DEEP OCEAN CURRENTS–WHICH RESEARCHERS SAY IMPACTS CLIMATE. PHOTO BY NASA JPL/CALTECH

his passion for the missions. “The first GRACE mission, launched in 2002, was wildly successful,” Landerer said. “For one thing, it lasted more than 15 years, three times longer than its design life. The measurement concept was so unique and

new that it took a little while for Earth scientists to embrace and utilize the data that GRACE delivered. But after 15 years in orbit, the more than 4,000 research publications that have used GRACE observations in one way or another are testament to the broad

utility of the mission. With these data, we have been able to accurately measure how much glaciers and ice sheets are shrinking, and how land water storage and availability is affected by droughts, floods and consumption. With GRACE Follow-On, we are looking forward to continuing that data stream and enabling even more discoveries.” “GRACE and GRACE-FO are key components of NASA’s broad mission to use the vantage point of space to understand and explore our home planet,” Landerer said. “Their measurements provide a unique view of the Earth system and have far-reaching benefits to society. These data will improve scientific understanding of Earth-system processes and the accuracy of environmental monitoring and forecasts.” Considering the immense amount of information already obtained and used from the original GRACE mission, it is exciting to contemplate the data that will be gleaned from this new expedition and how it will be used to help better understand our planet and the measures that should be taken to ensure its health. •

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FOODIE FAVORITES

Restaurant Recommendations from Those In The Know For this issue, we asked some of our favorite foodies to tell us about the places they go for delicious eats in a more casual setting. Here are some of the “order at the counter” spots they’ve been frequenting for fab fare and think you should, too. Bon appétit!

Fiore Market Café 1000 FREMONT AVENUE, SOUTH PASADENA (626) 441-2280; FIOREMARKETCAFE.COM MON. – SAT.: 11 A.M. TO 4 P.M.; CLOSED SUNDAY When Bill Disselhorst and his late wife, Anne, opened Fiore Market Café in the historic Fremont Centre Theatre building in South Pasadena in 2010, their goal was to create a European style café where people could come to talk and connect over good, fresh food. By all accounts, their goal has been achieved. The charming outdoor seating area fills up quickly with customers happily gobbling down offerings from the small but well-curated menu comprised of sandwiches, salads, desserts and beverages. There is guaranteed to be a line of customers out the door during peak lunch times, with patrons all patiently waiting for the deliciousness that is promised upon the delivery of their orders. A perennial favorite is the roast chicken sandwich comprised of moist shredded chicken, flavorful basil walnut pesto and creamy burrata cheese served on Fiore’s signature homemade bread baked fresh daily. Other much-loved offerings include the short rib sandwich with pickles, Asian slaw and chipotle mayo on homemade bread; the piccolo grilled vegetable sandwich with grilled eggplant, zucchini, red pepper and homemade pesto on a French baguette; and the roasted chicken and maple glazed bacon salad served with a creamy dill-peppercorn dressing. Try their assorted deli salads such as the lentil salad with goat cheese, radicchio and sugared walnuts in a balsamic vinaigrette. The well-executed desserts are simple and satisfying with crowd pleasers like cupcakes, cookies and brownies.

SEED Bakery

Cacao Mexicatessen 1576 COLORADO BOULEVARD, LOS ANGELES (EAGLE ROCK) (323) 478-2791; CACAODELI.COM TUES. – THURS.: 11:30 A.M. – 3 P.M. & 5 P.M. – 9 P.M.; FRI.: 11:30 A.M. – 10 P.M.; SAT: 8:30 A.M. – 10 P.M.; SUN.: 8:30 A.M. – 8 P.M. This is not your run-of-the mill Mexican joint—in fact, it’s far from it. The menu is creative, the ingredients are high quality, and the sauces are so good they defy comprehension. Whatever you order—whether it’s the cheese enchiladas made with handmade corn tortillas and your choice of three sauces (chile guajillo red sauce, mole verde or mole poblano) served with rice and beans or the famous duck confit tacos with avocado, vinegar onions, radishes and chile oil—you will be charmed by the fabulous layers of flavor each dish achieves. Cacao’s extensive menu has something for everyone. Breakfast items (served Saturday and Sunday) run the gamut including huevos rancheros, tres leches pancakes topped with strawberries, cinnamon and almonds, and omelets. The lunch and dinner menu offers up a wide variety of entrees ranging from tacos (both conventional and unconventional) to tortas served on fresh-baked bolillo rolls from the Eagle Rock Bakery to plates featuring chile rellenos, pork three ways, seafood and steak. The sides are noteworthy, with items like house-made French fries topped with mission fig mole sauce and sesame seeds and steamed corn with cotija cheese, crema and powdered chile. If you’re able to save room for dessert, Cacao’s two versions of tres leches cake—chocolate and vanilla—are equally delightful. The beverage options receive high marks, particularly the aguas frescas and horchata. Cacao also serves a nice selection of wine and beers and wine and beer cocktails.

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942 E. WASHINGTON BOULEVARD, PASADENA (626) 486-2115; SEEDBAKERYPASADENA.COM TUES. – SAT.: 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. (BREAKFAST AND LUNCH UNTIL 3:30 P.M.); SUN. 8 A.M. TO 3 P.M. If you’re looking for flavorful fare with an emphasis on superior ingredients, look no further than this neighborhood gem. The phenomenal artisan sourdough breads are made onsite the way bread was originally made—with organic freshly milled whole grains, water and sea salt (no commercial yeast or additives) and long fermented 18 to 24 hours. Furthermore, the eggs are organic and cage-free, the meats are humanely raised, and the produce is sourced locally with an emphasis on what’s in season. SEED Bakery’s visually appealing and delicious offerings, not to mention its generous portions, will make you wish your stomach had more room. In addition to the expertly-crafted pastries, cakes and quiches available in the display case, breakfast offers up delectable dishes such as perfectly-executed farm fresh eggs with house-made toast and fresh greens; a lentil kale bowl with eggs, caramelized onions and zaatar; and brioche French toast with jam, cashew cheese, seasonal fruit, and almond praline. Lunch does not disappoint with spectacular sandwiches made on SEED’s amazing breads. Not to miss are the homemade meatloaf sandwich with remoulade and red onions; fresh mozzarella with avocado, arugula, roasted tomatoes and herb vinaigrette dressing; and pulled pork with apple coleslaw, house pickles, cilantro and aioli. Be sure to also check out the satisfying rotating specials, which are inspired by seasonal ingredients. Dessert options abound with tarts, cakes, cookies, brownies and more. Try to save room—especially for whatever version whipped cream cake SEED is offering—you’ll be glad you did! Of course, no trip to SEED would be complete without taking home baked goods like their gorgeous artisan sourdough breads such as freshly made kamut, Kalamata olive boule and rye with cranberries and a delightful selection of sweet treats.

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PRETTY POSTCARDS:

ALLURING PASADENA BY JEANNETTE BOVARD “A Climatic Miracle in California” was the impossible-to-resist title for an article on Pasadena by proud resident Charles Frederick Holder in The Wide World Magazine issue of October 1900. In it, Mr. Holder chronicled his quest to prove that— with Pasadena as home base—one could pick oranges and roses, bathe in the Pacific, and go snowballing in one day during the months of January, February, or March, “thus having

enjoyed the fruits of summer and the sports of winter all in one day.” Needless to say, with a photographer and members of the Board of Trade in tow, Mr. Holder did just that, writing a charming chronicle of the achievement (which took place on January 16, 1900) to prove that Pasadena’s claims were based on fact and not hyped exaggeration. Pasadena’s picturesque location, mild climate, abundant orchards and vineyards, and cultured residents were touted in numerous pub-

lications in the late nineteenth/early twentieth centuries. R.W.C. Farnsworth titled his 1883 history of Pasadena, San Gabriel, Sierra Madre and La Cañada A Southern California Paradise and says in his introduction, “No apology is needed for the title of this book.” The 1903 Pasadena Illustrated Souvenir Book published by the Directors of Board of Trade noted, “It is not only the delight of the thousands of visitors who come here in increasing numbers each winter from all parts of our own country

TRAVELERS AND TRANSPLANTS TO PASADENA IN THE EARLY 1900S WERE EQUALLY MESMERIZED BY THE SCENES THEY WOULD CHOOSE TO SEND BACK TO FRIENDS AND FAMILY. PHOTOS COURTESY THE ARCHIVES, PASADENA MUSEUM OF HISTORY

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and from abroad, but Pasadena is becoming more and more known as a city of homes and a center of culture, intelligence, and civic pride, the radiating influence of which is widely felt.” Those “thousands of visitors” sent postcards back home to friends and relatives showing perfect gardens, charming bungalow-style homes, and orchards dripping with golden fruit. It must have seemed a paradise, indeed! Not surprisingly, most of us who call Pasadena and surrounding cities home today might just as easily spend our win-

ters shivering in the East and Midwest had our grandparents or parents not been captivated by the lure of sunshine-filled days with orange blossom scented breezes, December roses, and unlimited opportunity. • Pasadena Museum of History, is open to the public free of charge from 1 to 4 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays. For further information, please visit www.pasadenahistory. org or call (626)577-1660. Jeannette Bovard is Media Consultant for Pasadena Museum of History and teaches at Los Angeles City College and East Los Angeles College.

Spring 2018 / The Quarterly Magazine / 57


SPRING EVENT GUIDE PASADENA Farmers Markets • Villa Parke Center, 363 East Villa St. at N. Garfield Ave. Call 626-4490179 or visit PasadenaFarmersMarket. org for more information. Tuesdays, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Rain or shine. • Victory Park, at the intersection of Sierra Madre Blvd. and Paloma St. Call 626-449-0179 or visit PasadenaFarmersMarket.org for more information. Saturdays, 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Accepts cash and EBT only. Rain or shine. Flea Markets • Pasadena City College Flea Market, 1570 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. Visit pasadena.edu/community/fleamarket/ for more information. The first Sunday of every month, 8 a.m.–3 p.m. Monthly flea market boasts 400+ vendors selling a range of antiques, clothing, wares & street fare. • Rose Bowl Flea Market, 1001 Rose Bowl Dr., Pasadena. Visit rgcshows. com/RoseBowl for more information. The second Sunday of every month, 8

a.m.–4:30 p.m. One of the most famous flea markets in the world! The monthly flea market features an eclectic array of crafts, apparel, antiques & other goods. Caltech 330 S. Michigan Ave., Pasadena. Free parking located at 332 S. Michigan Ave., Pasadena—south of Del Mar Blvd. Visit Caltech.edu/calendar/ public-events or call 626-395-4652 for more information. • Jerusalem Quartet. March 11, 2018, 3:30 p.m. Storytellers make words speak. They also know that beyond the words they speak, their delivery is crucial. The Jerusalem Quartet has certainly mastered its delivery. Since 1996, this Israeli ensemble has been making strings speak on prominent concert stages throughout the US and Europe. Its goal, however, extends far beyond this: to achieve, it says, perfection of sound. • The Kingston Trio. March 31, 2018, 8 p.m. Legendary folk icons The Kingston Trio bring their timeless music to fans across the USA with a national tour that marks the group’s 60th anniversary. Keeping it in the family, Josh Reynolds, son of original member Nick Reynolds, along with lifelong musical partners Mike Marvin and Tim Gorelangton, perform many of the trio’s best-loved songs. The performances take the audience on an iconic musical journey

to a time when folk music made its extraordinary ascent to the pinnacle of popular culture – and the top of the music charts. • m-pact: Pop-Jazz Vocals. April 21, 2018, 8 p.m. Hailed as one of the best pop-jazz vocal groups in the world, m-pact is respected worldwide as a cutting-edge trailblazer in the realm of vocal music. MUSE/IQUE At various unique locations. Visit muse-ique.com, call 626-539-7085 or email info@muse-ique.com for more information. • HUMAN/INSTRUMENT. April 8, 2018 at 7 p.m. at The Huntington Hospital (100 W. California Blvd., Pasadena). The human body is the original musical instrument. It is no wonder then that acapella song and tap dance are two of the most powerful and widely-beloved forms of music. In this empowering musical celebration, Rachael Worby features breathtaking harmonies and show-stopping body percussion. • FREE/SKATE. May 8, 2018 at 7.p.m. at the Pasadena Ice Skating Center (300 E. Green Street, Pasadena). Rekindling the pure magic and joy of last year’s visit to the Pasadena Ice Skating Center, MUSE/IQUE presents an upclose experience of the ultimate pair—sublime live music and dazzling figure skating. Away from the worlds of sport and competition, Rachael

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Worby leads a symphony of artists in this intimate and exhilarating event of discovery. Norton Simon Museum 411 W. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena. Visit NortonSimon.org or call 626-449-6840 for more information. • Taking Shape: Degas as Sculptor. Now-April 9, 2018. This exhibition explores the improvisational nature of Degas’s artistic practice through the Norton Simon’s collection of modèles, the first and only set of bronzes cast from the original wax and plaster statuettes. This unique set of sculptures served as the matrix for the serial bronzes that followed, and in some cases they preserve objects or evidence of Degas’s handwork that has been altered in the wax originals. Capturing the condition of the figurines when they were discovered in the artist’s studio, the modèles vividly convey the instinctive way in which Degas pressed and smeared pliable wax and plaster over handmade wire armatures and bulked the core with cork and other easily accessible materials. Rather than serving solely as sources for paintings or pastels, these sculptures were independent objects, what the artist called essais—“trials” or “experiments. Pasadena Museum of California Art 490 E. Union St., Pasadena. Visit PMCAOnline.org or call 626-568-3665

for more information. • Ana Serrano: Homegrown. Now–June 3, 2018. Ana Serrano’s immersive “garden” both references a recognizable urban landscape and pays homage to the artist’s family connection to the land in Mexico. Highlighting the juxtaposition of the built environment and plant life, the installation is composed of brightcolored walls and lively plants made of cardboard and paper. The dynamic space invites viewers to move into the sculpture and immerse themselves in the disparate yet familiar elements of city living, emphasizing the balance between man-made constructions and natural elements as well as dense, permanent objects and those that are lighter, more ephemeral. Pasadena Playhouse 39 S. El Molino Ave., Pasadena. Visit PasadenaPlayhouse.org or call 626534-6537 for more information. • Bordertown Now. May 30-June 24, 2018. Twenty years after its hit Bordertown premiered, the threeman comedy troupe Culture Clash (Ric Salinas, Herbert Sigüenza and Richard Montoya) goes back to the border to investigate. Re-imagined and with new material drawing from the headlines, Bordertown Now is described as “an irreverent, sometimes hilarious exploration of the regions and people at the center of

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one of America’s most hot-button and controversial issues.” Directed by Obie award-winning Diane Rodriguez. Pasadena Symphony and POPS Ambassador Auditorium. 131 S. St. John Ave., Pasadena. Visit pasadenasymphony-pops.org or call 626-793-7172 for more information. • Rachmaninoff Rhapsody On A Theme Of Paganini. March 24, 2018 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Conductor David Lockington and pianist Andrew von Oeyen will take attendees on a musical journey featuring Miller’s Scherzo Crypto, Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini and Elgar’s Enigma Variations. • Beethoven Symphony No. 3. May 5, 2018 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Violin virtuoso Angelo Xiang Yu will enchant attendees, playing both Beethoven’s Violin Concerto and Symphony No. 3, on a 1729 Stradivarious violin. Pasadena Showcase House of Design Visit pasadenashowcase.org or call 714-442-3872 for more information. • 54th Pasadena Showcase House of Design. April 22-May 20, 2018, Tues.Sun. The Pasadena Showcase House of Design is one of the oldest, largest and most successful house and garden tours in the country. It will be held at a distinguished 1915 Mediterraneanstyle estate in Altadena designed by architect Reginald Johnson.

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Spring 2018 / The Quarterly Magazine / 59


PASADENA SHOWCASE HOUSE FOR THE ARTS

PSHA Celebrates Music For many students in the San Gabriel Valley, exposure to classical music begins in the third grade when the Music Mobile™ visits their schools. Established by Pasadena Showcase House for the Arts (PSHA) in 1971, the Pasadena Showcase House Music Mobile™ in partnership with the Pasadena Conservatory of Music, is a handson program that allows students to learn about and play orchestral instruments. More than 100,000 students have participated in this award-winning program since its inception. Fourth graders throughout the region are invited to attend the Pasadena Showcase House Youth Concert. This annual, free concert is designed to weave musical concepts into an appealing program that is presented at the Walt Disney Concert Hall by the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. Since it began in 1953, more than 250,000 fourth grade students have been entertained and delighted by this production. The Pasadena Showcase House

Complimentary parking, shuttle service and a keepsake program available. ARCADIA, MONROVIA & ALTADENA Monrovia Farmers Market 612 S. Myrtle Ave. in Old Town Monrovia between Chestnut Ave. and Lemon Ave. Visit MonroviaStreetFair.com for more information. Fridays, 5–9 p.m. Live music, a Kid Zone, and more. Altadena Farmers’ Market Loma Alta Park. 600 W. Palm St., Altadena. Visit altadenafarmersmarket.com or email info@altadenafarmersmarket.com for more information. Wednesdays, 4–8 p.m. This certified

WINNERS FROM THE 2017 PASADENA SHOWCASE HOUSE INSTRUMENTAL COMPETITION. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: SETH JOHNSON - “1ST” BRASS - TRUMPET; CRISTINA CUTTS DOUGHERTY - “GRAND PRIZE” - BRASS - TUBA; CONNER ROWE - “2ND” BRASS - TROMBONE; WEI PAN - “2ND” WOODWINDS - CLARINET; VITOR TRINDADE - “2ND” WOODWINDS - CLARINET; NICHOLAS DAVIES - “1ST” WOODWINDS - CLARINET; SI EON CHOI - “HONORABLE MENTION” WOODWINDS - FLUTE; TIANLU (JERRY) XU - “2ND” - STRINGS CELLO; JOHANNA NOWIK - “1ST” BRASS - VIOLA; MADELEIN VAILLANOURT - “HONORABLE MENTION” - STRINGS - VIOLIN PHOTOS COURTESY OF PSHA

Instrumental Competition was launched in 1984 for musicians between the ages of 16 and 24. Aspiring professionals compete annually for monetary awards in the categories of woodwinds, brass and strings. Over half a million dollars in cash prizes have been awarded to assist them in furthering their musical education. In addition to these programs, PSHA has nurtured the study and appreciation of the arts for a broad range of audiences through its Gifts & Grants program. Since its founding in 1948, the organization has cumulatively donated more than $23 million

market has 30 booths selling fresh fruits and vegetables as well as prepared and pre-packaged food that may be enjoyed onsite at the market setting of Loma Alta Park. Rain or shine. Los Angeles Arboretum & Botanic Garden 301 N. Baldwin Ave., Arcadia. Visit Arboretum.org or call 626-821-3222 for more information. • Ikebana International Show & Sale. March 17–18, 2018. Different schools of Japanese flower arrangement will be represented from classical to naturalistic to avant-garde at the twoday show. • Spring Plant Sale. March 23–24, 2018. Check out the annual Spring Plant Sale

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THIRD GRADERS EXPERIENCE THE JOY OF MUSIC THROUGH THE MUSIC MOBILE PROGRAM.

to provide support to the Los Angeles Philharmonic Association as well as to underwrite concerts, chorales, musical theater productions, operas, jazz quartets, marching bands, music education and music therapy. PSHA, an all-volunteer non-profit organization, has funded and produced these enriching programs through contributions and via its sole fundraiser, the Pasadena Showcase House of Design. “Many of the thousands of guests who tour the Showcase House, shop at the Shops at Showcase and dine in the Restaurant at Showcase, may not realize they have contributed, over 69 years, more than $23 million to support music education programs that serve people of all ages in the greater Pasadena area, parts of the City of Los Angeles and the Los Angeles Philharmonic,” Marilyn Anderson, PSHA President, said. 54th Pasadena Showcase House of Design The much-anticipated Pasadena Showcase House of Design is around the corner with public viewing set for April 22 to May 20, 2018. This year, it will be held at a distinguished 1915 Mediterranean-style estate designed by architect Regi-

nald Johnson. Johnson is responsible for such landmarks as All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena, the Santa Barbara Biltmore Hotel, the Santa Barbara Post Office and La Valencia Hotel in La Jolla. Many of his large houses and structures still stand in Altadena and Pasadena. High atop a hill in Altadena, this year’s Showcase House is known as “Overlook”, a name doubtlessly inspired by the view that originally extended over mostly open land to Catalina Island. With more than 20 interior and exterior designers participating, touring this villa and garden is not to be missed. The Pasadena Showcase House of Design is one of the oldest, largest and most successful house and garden tours in the country. Each year, about 25,000 guests attend. This year’s house is being chaired by Vikki Sung, who has helped pull off the Herculean feat of Showcase with the help of nearly 80 volunteers. To purchase tickets (at a cost between $35-$45), visit pasadenashowcase.org or call (714) 4423872. The Showcase House is open Tues.-Sun. Complimentary parking, shuttle service and a keepsake program available.

at the Market. Great prepared food options, breads and other goodies available. Open rain or shine. Taste of South Pasadena Down Mission St. and Fair Oaks Blvd. in South Pasadena. Visit SouthPasadenaRotary.org for tickets and details. • 7th Annual Taste of South Pasadena. April 17, 2018 from 6–9 p.m. Fun for the whole family. Over 20 restaurants participating in Eats on the Streets and a dozen craft wineries sponsored by Garagiste. Proceeds benefit local and international charities. South Pasadena Eclectic Music Festival and Art Walk Throughout South Pasadena. For more information visit theeclectic.rocks/ about-2018/. • South Pasadena’s Eclectic Music Festival and Art Walk. April 28, 2018. This event, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary, features a diverse musical line up—last year a recordbreaking 60 acts performed on multiple stages around town. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy is headlining this year. There’s an Art Walk featuring open galleries, studios and hosted events. Numerous intimate venues appear throughout the city, plus outdoor installations, food trucks and a beer and wine garden. The festival is family friendly and free to attend. The Huntington Library, Art Collections,

at the Garden & Gift Shop. There will be tomatoes plus other vegetables, herbs and native plants. SOUTH PASADENA AND SAN MARINO Farmers Market Meridian Ave. and El Centro St. next to the South Pasadena Metro Gold Line Station. Visit SouthPasadenaFarmersMarket.org for more information. Thursdays, 4–8 p.m. This year-round, award-winning market features certified farmers that grow the produce they sell—they do not buy it from second party sellers—which ensures quality, fresh produce, generally picked within 24 hours of appearing

Spring 2018 / The Quarterly Magazine / 61


and Botanical Gardens 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino. Visit Huntington.org or call 626-205-2100 for more information. • 61st Annual Bonsai Show. March 24, 2016, 10 a.m. –5 p.m. Discover the timeless appeal of an ancient horticultural art form as the California Bonsai Society presents its 61st annual show, featuring dozens of beautiful specimens created by bonsai masters. • Radiant Beauty: E. L. Trouvelot’s Astronomical Drawings. April 28 – July 30, 2018. A rare set of exquisite lithographs, depicting the pastel drawings of planets, comets, eclipses and other celestial wonders by artist/astronomer Étienne Léopold Trouvelot (1827–1895), take center stage in this exhibit. The 15 chromolithographs were the crowning achievement of Trouvelot’s career. LA CAÑADA FLINTRIDGE Farmers Market 1300 Foothill Blvd., across from Memorial Park. Visit lacanadaflintridge.com/ eventspage/farmers-market.html for more information. Saturdays, 9 a.m.–1 p.m. Vendors come from all over the region with fresh fruits, nuts, vegetables, flowers, baked goods and much, much more. Many items are organically grown. Descanso Gardens 1418 Descanso Dr., La Cañada

ART OF THE GARDEN TOUR The 2018 Art of the Garden Tour encompasses four stunning gardens in the foothill communities of Pasadena and Sierra Madre. One of the most talented and prolific landscape architects opens up her private estate containing twenty-two different garden rooms that showcase the creativity, talent and virtuosity of a master. Another garden combines vintage flair and elegance to create a romantic landscape of luxuriant grounds filled with profuse blossoms, and yet another marries European style and a modern aesthetic with exuberantly colored sculptures that will delight lovers of contemporary art and sumptuous landscapes alike. All this and more is awaiting visitors on this annual garden tour presented by Creative Arts Group. Tour day is Sunday, April 15th, from 10:30-4:30 pm. Tickets are $30 pre-tour and $35 the day of the tour and can be purchased on-line at creativeartsgroup.org, by phone at (626) 355-8350, or in person at 108 N. Baldwin Ave., Sierra Madre.

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Flintridge. For more information, visit DescansoGardens.org or call 818-9494200. • Abe Lagrimas, Jr. Trio Performance. March 24, 2018. Head to Descanso Gardens for a performance by multiinstrumentalist Abe Lagrimas Jr. as he draws from Hawaiian, folk, and contemporary music to create a unique brand of jazz ukulele. • TOMATOMANIA! April 6-8, 2018, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Back by popular demand, TOMATOMANIA!, the world’s largest tomato seedling sale, returns to Descanso. Enjoy 10-minute talks from experts on growing great tomatoes, a tomato cooking demo and tomatothemed activities for the whole family to enjoy. • Mt. SAC Plant Sale. April 19-21, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Students from the Mount San Antonio College horticulture program will sell a variety of potted plants to make your home garden zing this spring. LOS ANGELES The Original Farmers Market 6333 W. 3rd St., Los Angeles. Visit farm- ersmarketla.com or call 323933-9211 for more information. Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–9 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.–7 p.m. A favorite destination among locals and tourists since 1934, L.A.’s world

famous Original Farmers Market offers over 100 gourmet grocers, restaurants and more. The Broad 221 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. Visit TheBroad.org or call 213-232-6200. • Jasper Johns: ‘Something Resembling Truth.’ Now–May, 13, 2018. A collaboration with the Royal Academy in London, Jasper Johns: ‘Something Resembling Truth,’ will feature more than 120 of Jasper Johns’ most iconic and significant paintings, sculptures, prints and drawings, many never before exhibited in Los Angeles. With loans from international public and private collections, including significant works from the Broad collection, the exhibition will trace the evolution of the artist’s six-decade career through a series of thematic chapters. The exhibition encompasses the full range of Johns’ materials, motifs and techniques—including his unique use of encaustic (heated beeswax) and found-material collage in paintings—and the innovations he has achieved in sculpture and the graphic arts by expanding the possibilities of traditional media. Johns’ use of accessible images will be thoroughly examined, seen continually transformed through the artist’s engagement with a wide range of human experiences. In a departure from a retrospective approach,

Johns’ artistic achievements will be illuminated through the juxtaposition of early and late works throughout the exhibition. LACMA 5905 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles. Visit LACMA.org for more information. • City and Cosmos: The Arts of Teotihuacan. March 25, 2018–July 15, 2018. The ancient city of Teotihuacan flourished in central Mexico in the first millennium CE. This multi-ethnic, cosmopolitan city was the largest urban center in the Americas in its day. City and Cosmos: The Arts of Teotihuacan presents recent findings from Mexican national and international archaeological projects excavating at Teotihuacan’s three main pyramids—the Sun, Moon, and the Feathered Serpent—and major residential compounds. These discoveries have fundamentally changed our understanding of the city’s history. Organized in collaboration with Mexico’s Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH), this exhibit will provide visitors an extraordinary opportunity to see the new discoveries, many of which have never been exhibited in the United States. • David Hockney: 82 Portraits and 1 Still-Life. April 15–July 29, 2018. In 82 Portraits and 1 Still-life, David Hockney offers a vibrant and intimate view of

Spring 2018 / The Quarterly Magazine / 63


FLOWERS BLOOM AT DESCANSO GARDENS Spring is a magical time in the San Gabriel Valley—there is so much in bloom! Make sure to get outside to see the wild flowers, cherry blossoms, camellias, tulips and so much more. You can see both the wild and refined at Descanso Gardens located at 1418 Descanso Drive, La Cañada Flintridge.

DOUGLAS IRIS

© DESCANSO GARDENS

CAMELLIA JAPONICA ‘PINK PERFECTION’ PHOTO COURTESY OF DESCANSO GARDENS

people with whom he has developed relationships over the past 50 years. The majority of the portraits were painted in Hockney’s Los Angeles studio, all from life and over a period of two or three days, which the artist has described as “a 20-hour exposure.” None of Hockney’s portraits are commissioned; for this series he invited family, members of his staff, and close friends to sit for him—including several curators, art dealers, and collectors with local and international renown. John Baldessari, Douglas Baxter, Edith Devaney, Larry Gagosian, Frank

© DESCANSO GARDENS

© MARTHA BENEDICT

Gehry, Peter Goulds, Barry Humphries, David Juda, Rita Pynoos, Joan Quinn, Norman Rosenthal, Jacob Rothschild, and Benedikt Taschen are among those portrayed, as well as LACMA’s Stephanie Barron and Dagny Corcoran. This exhibition originated at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, and has traveled to Melbourne, Venice, and Bilbao. LACMA will host the only United States presentation. LA Zoo 5333 Zoo Dr., Los Angeles, Visit LAZoo. org or call 323-644-4200 for more information.

64 / The Quarterly Magazine / Spring 2018

TULIPS

CAMELLIA WALK

• Big Bunny’s Spring Fling. March 30– April 1, 2018. Celebrate the season with three bountiful days of “EGGciting” adventure! Fun for youngsters includes the opportunity to pet real bunnies, photos with “Big Bunny,” opportunities to view animals as they uncover Easter-themed paper mache eggs and baskets filled with treats, face painting, bunny ear crafts, Easter egg coloring, musical entertainment by Kiddle Karoo’s Easter Show, costumed bunny, and fairy characters and a strolling stilt walker. Adding to the excitement is a “Big Bunny’s EGG-

cellent Adventure” search with clues and a special treat provided by 99 Cents Only Stores awaiting youngsters at each stop. The Moth The Regent Theater, 448 S. Main St., Los Angeles. Visit themoth.org for more information. GrandSLAM Championship. Monday, April 23, 2018. After ten StorySLAMs (open-mic storytelling competitions), the winners then compete for the title of GrandSLAM Champion with a brand-new story. This is the ultimate battle of wits and words.

Los Angeles Philharmonic Walt Disney Concert Hall, 111 S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. Visit LAPhil.com or call 213-972-7282 for more information. • Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra & Chick Corea, Kurt Elling. March 23, 2018. The ever-swinging Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra presents a new program with jazz titan Chick Corea. Sparks will fly as the orchestra performs Corea’s gems, as well as swinging, soulful standards that will raise the roof! Grammy-winning vocalist, Kurt Elling, opens the evening with his lithe baritone and unique interpretations of

jazz and beyond. • Art Garfunkel. April 29, 2018. Spanning his solo hits from “All I Know” to “Bright Eyes,” as well as such favorites as “The Sound of Silence” and “Bridge Over Troubled Water” from his legendary partnership with Paul Simon, Grammy®-winning singer and poet Art Garfunkel shares diamond-cut melodies from his half-century career in this evening of words and music. While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, The Quarterly Magazine assumes no responsibility for omissions or errors.

Spring 2018 / The Quarterly Magazine / 65


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YEAR IN REVIEW 2017

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THANK YOU To all that made 2017 a success! I am forever grateful & humbled by the support of my family, friends and clients.

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Over $60 Million in 51 homes Sales. Additional List Available Upon Request

License 01046965

Pacific Union International does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size, or other information concerning the condition or features of the property provided by the seller or obtained from public records and other sources and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information.

68 / The Quarterly Magazine / Spring 2018

Profile for Gavilan Media

The Quarterly Magazine Spring 2018  

Serving the local community for over 30 years, The Quarterly Magazine is the San Gabriel Valley's original lifestyle magazine. Each issue is...

The Quarterly Magazine Spring 2018  

Serving the local community for over 30 years, The Quarterly Magazine is the San Gabriel Valley's original lifestyle magazine. Each issue is...