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A Magazine for In-The-Know Parents

Parents INSIDE: MAY/JUNE 2018 SANJOAQUINMAGAZINE.COM

OUTSIDE THE TOY BOX TECHNICAL EDUCATION FOR KIDS KIDS IN THE KITCHEN


Schoooslt is alm out!

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(SCIENCE · TECHNOLOGY · ENGINEERING · MATH) Move over, karate, soccer and ballet. This summer’s hottest activities are Robotics and Coding for Kid’s. Whether your child is interested in building robots using LEGO® bricks or designing video games he or she will have a blast in these fun and interactive camps. (And, you never have to mention all of the cool, 21st century skills being learned along the way!)

Sylvan delivers results like no one else: up to 2 times the growth in reading or math. Just as important, kids love coming to Sylvan (and yours will too). Our personal approach and amazing teachers build your child’s skills and confidence, so he or she can succeed. And our interactive iPad® lessons and fun rewards make learning oh-so-cool! It’s no wonder our summer camps are a favorite among kids. Our camps are designed to spark a child’s mind. Don’t miss out!

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Take the summer to prep for the SAT/ACT before the school year gets too busy!

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ART STUDIO Family Owned & Operated

Weekends Through August Critter Corral San Joaquin County Historical Museum Micke Grove Regional Park www.SanJoaquinHistory.org

Ceramics, Canvas Paintings, Drawing Classes, Watercolor Art. Specializing in Private Events including Birthdays, Fundraisers, Field Trips, & Summer Programs.

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MARCH/APRIL | 2018

SAN JOAQUIN PARENTS MAGAZINE

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MAY / JUNE 2018

CONTENTS 4

MAY/JUNE 2018 PUBLISHER | EDITOR

Tony Zoccoli MANAGING EDITOR

Lindsey Rodrian SECTION EDITOR

Nora Heston Tarte GRAPHIC DESIGNER

David Martinez / Lucas Zoccoli MARKETING ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER

Neelam Patel ADVERTISING

10 6. Fair for All: The SJ County Fair

There are lots of reasons to go to the fair—the food, the music, the rides— but this year the San Joaquin County Fair, June 14-17, is about more than summer fun.

6. Countdown to Concerts in the Park: Back for the 65th year, the

2018 Concerts in the Park season will kick off on June 6 and run every Wednesday from 6 to 8 PM until August 22.

10. Outside the Toy Box: Experience Gifts: Experience

gifts beckon mom and dad to get creative and think outside the toy box when it comes to showing love and appreciation through real-life experiences.

12. Preparing for Summer Camp

First time campers may get nervous before heading to summer activities. Whether it’s an overnight camp or a day camp, being in a new place, away from parents, can be nervewracking for campers of all ages.

14. Foolproof Family Flights

Traveling is stressful even without kids. The trick to family travel is to be prepared for every contingency. Here’s how to not just survive your family flight but start your trip on the right foot.

THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

18. Germs Galore: Why they’re

an important part of growing up healthy. Long gone is the classic childhood spent eating mud pies and kissing frogs. Instead, growing up today seems to involve a lot of hand sanitizer and sterilization. But, health experts are now warning parents that completely sanitizing their child’s environment is actually detrimental to their health.

20. Career Technical Education

Not every child is college bound after high school. While that may be the goal—it’s simply not a reality. But that doesn’t mean a student can’t pursue a meaningful career without a four-year college education.

24 Disneyland Timesavers: 6 Tips

to cram in more happy at the happiest place on earth

26. Kids in the Kitchen: Tips and

tricks to savor more veggies Dexter Ridley, a father, and seasoned chef of more than 20 years offers parents some easy tips to add the region’s ingredients into any recipe to create tasty meals and snacks for kids to truly savor.

Michelle Cox REGULAR CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Copper Williams, Heather Isbill Faith Lewis, Steph Rodriguez PHOTOGRAPHY

Dan Hood DISTRIBUTION SERVICES

Rebecca Ristrim

CONTACT US EDITORIAL/ADVERTISING OFFICES

San Joaquin Parents Magazine published bi-monthly by San Joaquin Magazine 318 W. Pine Street, Lodi, CA 95240 Phone: (209) 833-9989 www.sanjoaquinmagazine.com All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from this publisher. Photographs, graphics, and artwork are the property of Inside Magazines Publishing Company. © 2018 Inside Magazines Publishing Co.

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Our studio offers classes in Ballet, Pointe, Jazz, Tap, Acrobatic Dance and Contemporary. It is our goal to teach our students the art of dance in a structured yet positive environment. Our studio is about striving for excellence in dance, community, school, family and life. We take pride in the fact that all students learn theatre and studio etiquette as well as the terminology, history, and proper execution of dance steps in an environment that builds respect, poise and self-confidence. We are convinced the benefits of their experience will be applied and utilized throughout their life.

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MARCH/APRIL | 2018

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HIGHLIGHTS

FAIR for ALL  BY FAITH LEWIS

There are lots of reasons to go to the fair—the food, the music, the rides—but this year the San Joaquin County Fair, June 14-17, is about more than summer fun. Organizers are taking the opportunity to celebrate the diversity of cultures found throughout the county.   “This year, the County Fair is celebrating the various cultures that make our county diverse,” says CEO Kelly Olds. “Realizing everyone defines culture differently, whether it’s heritage or the culture of an organization, the goal is to feature as many as possible.”   As culture is so often expressed through music and the traditions that come with it, there will be performances from various cultural organizations’ dance groups over the course of the four days.   But the jewel of the fair will be the new County Cultures Contest. These same organizations will create educational displays for fairgoers to peruse and vote for their favorite. The winning group will take home a $500 cash prize.    Also new this year will be an agricultural display for kids, an exotic animal display aptly named “Walk on the Wild Side,” and a new science display called “Mind Works.”    If all that learning has worked up an appetite, head to the food courts for all your fair favorites: corn dogs, shaved ice, tacos, and hamburgers.    “A large portion of the fair vendors are local to the valley and some have been with the fairgrounds for decades,” Kelly says. It’s just another way to show San Joaquin County Pride. FOR MORE INFORMATION: SanJoaquinFairGrounds.com (209) 466-5041, info@sanjoaquinfairgrounds.com

Countdown to

CONCERTS IN THE PARK  BY FAITH LEWIS

Summer feels like sunshine, tastes like burgers, and sounds like Concerts in the Park. Back for the 65th year, the 2018 Concerts in the Park season will kick off on June 6 and run every Wednesday from 6 to 8 PM until August 22. Come enjoy an evening–or two–of live entertainment and the cool Delta breeze at Stockton’s Victory Park.   This year’s Concerts in the Park series will feature local musical acts across genres. Performances include the Lodi based Would Be Famous Band with their country meets rock ‘n’ roll style and the Valley Concert Band, a 30-piece band with a 20-year history in San Joaquin County and a specialization in show tunes, jazz, and classical music.    Free to the public and drawing 12,000 people annually, Concerts in the Park turns Wednesday evenings into the perfect opportunity to pack that picnic basket, spread out your blanket, and kick off your shoes. But it is recommended you arrive early to snag a parking spot and a prime piece of picnic real estate as the park fills up quickly.

ON THE ROSTER JUNE 6 6-8 PM: Would Be Famous JUNE 13 6-8 PM: Valley Concert Band

THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

JULY 25 6-8 PM: Trucco

JUNE 20 6-8 PM Rick Webb

AUGUST 1 6-8 PM: Tropical Nights

JUNE 27 6-8 PM: RBX

AUGUST 8 6-8 PM: Valley Concert Band

JULY 4 6-8 PM Valley Concert Band

AUGUST 15 6-8 PM Nick Issac

JULY 11 6-8 PM, Summit

6

JULY 18 6-8 PM Swingaires

AUGUST 22 6-8 PM: Waterloo


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MARCH/APRIL | 2018

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NOTEWORTHY

Golden Gate

PINBALL FESTIVAL COMES to LODI  BY EILEEN WEBER

Flashing lights and whizzing sounds, exhibits, lectures, food and adult beverages, a silent auction, and even a space to camp out. If that sounds like fun to you, then the Golden Gate Pinball Festival is the place to be. The event will take place on the Lodi Grape Festival Grounds from May 18th to 20th.    For years, the event took place in Dixon. But with an ever-increasing popularity, the Northern California Pinball Association (NCPA) needed a bigger place to host it. Nestled between two freeways making it easily accessible, Lodi was the perfect spot.    “The show has been growing year after year,” says Chris Bannister, a NCPA board member heavily involved in organizing the event. “We actually had to turn people away with pinball machines last year. We had 284 machines but could easily have had way over 300.”    Chris says the show is a very family-oriented “affair” and a great way for parents and kids to connect. Everything is digital these days— phones, tablets, laptops—but pinball is a social thing.   “Playing pinball is real and tactile,” he says. “Your senses are completely engaged.”

8

THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

  Pinball has been one of the hottest arcade games for decades. At one time, it was banned in most major cities including New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. From the 1940s to the early 1970s, pinball machines were considered gambling devices with ties to the mafia that wreaked havoc on youth morality. Today, pinball is less criminal and more nostalgic.    This is the seventh event hosted by the NCPA, a nonprofit organization. Every year they give all of their net proceeds to a specific charity. Previously, they have raised over $100,000 for the Dixon Teen Center as well as benefiting the Boys & Girls Club of Vacaville and the 4-H Club. This year’s recipient will be Lodi’s World of Wonders Science Museum. A hands-on facility, they focus on getting kids of all ages excited about science.    Chris points out that pinball and science go hand in hand. The game involves everything from electronics and mechanics to art, woodworking, and metallurgy. Sally Snyde, the museum’s president, heartily agreed. “There’s a huge correlation between pinball and science,” she says. “What’s going on inside is not just hitting the balls.”    The museum has two pinball machines and is currently building a pinball exhibit. As part of a group effort at the festival, they will also have a vendor space, provide all the food, and help with promotion and advertising.    With the price of admission, you can play hundreds of games for free! A three-day pass is $50 for adults, kids 13 and under $25. Prices vary for individual days. Active military with ID are half price, and parking is free. FOR MORE INFORMATION: GoldenStatePinball.org Event Location: Lodi Grape Festival Grounds, 413 E. Lockeford St., Lodi


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MARCH/APRIL | 2018

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OUTSIDE

PARENTING

THE

10

THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

 BY STEPH RODRIGUEZ

Forgo the latest shiny monster truck, doe-eyed stuffed animal or bulky action figure when it’s time to pick out a special present for the beloved child in your life. Instead, many parents are turning to experience gifts to express their affection because not only do they offer parents and children the opportunity to create meaningful conversation, it also creates memories and those last longer than any doll’s shelf life.   Experience gifts beckon mom and dad to get creative and think outside the toy box when it comes to showing love and appreciation through real-life experiences. Whether it’s enrolling a child in an art or dance class, signing them up for a membership at the World of Wonders Science Museum in Lodi, or even ordering them creative tinker crates that cover various areas of interest online, the possibilities for handson experiences between parents and children are endless.   Coordinator and docent of the Lodi Lake Nature Area, Julie Wahl, says parents can find inspiration just about anywhere when it comes to making a fun and lasting impression on their child.    “With my own children, I saw that it was very important to take them on trips, or to a museum, or places where the family spent time together talking about what they saw,” Julie says. “I think it’s now coming back to that where families want to find ways to connect with their children and give them experiences other than a computer screen or their phone.”    Julie knows the 58 acres of the Lodi Lake Nature Area with its looped trails, full lakes, ancient oak forests, and natural wildlife like it’s her own backyard. She organizes and often leads nature walks, star-gazing nights, and creates fun activities like journaling or creating exploration kits with magnifying glasses or little spoons for digging when children are out along the dusty trails.


LAKE DAYS &

STRAIGHT A’S  BY FAITH LEWIS

Use the lake as inspiration for summer learning. Here are four activities to encourage art, learning, and a love of the outdoors at the lake.

COLOR SCAVENGER HUNT

Scavenger hunts are a hit with all ages, and a color scavenger hunt gives kids freedom to creatively interpret the world around them. Have your child draw swatches with as many different colors as they can; older kids can use paint to create a unique color pallet. Then turn the kids loose at Lodi Lake with some tape and the goal of collecting something that matches each of the colors. Easy matches include a blade of grass for green or a fallen leaf for brown.

PAINTED ROCKS

Have all the fun of making a pet rock without the responsibility of caring for it afterward! Let your kids go crazy with paint and glitter. Once the rocks dry, go for a walk to hide the colorful rocks around the lake for others to find.

STAINED-GLASS

  “I enjoy being outdoors and I enjoy being grubby and digging and looking for worms and neat things under rocks,” Julie says. “One of my goals is to get more people out to the nature area just to interact with the environment.”    Some animals little nature hikers might see when out and about include quiet deer, otters and beavers bathing in the river, muskrats in Pigs Lake, little frogs and turtles, as well as colorful butterflies and eight-legged spiders.    During the summer, the annual fishing derby is held on the first Saturday in June and two opportunities to sign up for the outdoor adventure camp in June and July are a few more experience gift ideas for parents. Julie also says camping is permitted at

Lodi Lake and a majority of these activities are little to no cost and are listed in the Lodi Parks and Recreation Activity Guide available at headquarters.   “This is such a precious thing in Lodi because very few cities have this space in their urban setting,” Julie says. “When you take the time to explore with your children, ask them how they felt about what activity they did because children are naturally inquisitive and they want to be able to talk with the adults in their lives.” RESOURCES: LODI LAKE NATURE AREA 1101 Turner Road, Lodi, (209) 368-5624 Lodi.gov/PRCS/lodilake.html Open 6 AM – 6 PM daily weather and season permitting

MARCH/APRIL | 2018

Whether the goal is a deliberate design or an abstract creation, kids will love working with the many textures and colors they can find at Lodi Lake. Leaves, flowers, grasses, and feathers all make great materials for a “stained-glass window”. You’ll need two pieces of transparent Con-Tact Paper cut to the desired size. Tape the non-adhesive side of one sheet to the table so it won’t move while the kids create their masterpieces, then remove the paper and have the kids stick their materials to the adhesive side. When they’re done, place the second sheet on top so the design is sandwiched between the two adhesive sides. Trim any protruding plant materials and hang in a window for all to admire.

WILDLIFE BAR CHART

Appeal to your future mathematician’s systematic outlook on life by creating a bar chart while walking the Lodi Lake nature trail. Add a column for each new animal you spot and keep track of how many of each animal you find. You’ll come across squirrels and birds throughout the day, but the best time to find a variety of animals is early in the morning or in the evening when it starts to cool off. Look for the group of deer often found in the Nature Trail area within the inner loop.

SAN JOAQUIN PARENTS MAGAZINE

11


XTRA CURRICULAR

Preparing for

SUMMER CAMP  BY NORA HESTON TARTE

First time campers may get nervous before heading to summer activities. Whether it’s an overnight camp or a day camp, being in a new place, away from parents, can be nerve-wracking for campers of all ages.   Preparedness helps ease those nerves. If possible, get your child acquainted with the space before camp starts. World of Wonders offers a camp at its Lodi facility. In the weeks leading up to camp, plan a family outing to the facility. If camp is held at a park, visit the park.   Preparedness applies to the parent, too. Jen Young, the Program Director for the World of Wonders Science Museum, suggests parents show up early on the first day to complete any extra paperwork. Also, don’t forget your child’s lunch. “The first day of camp is always when parents forget the child’s lunch or snack,” Jen says.   While camp is a great place to meet new friends and have new experiences,

12

THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

a friendly face may help a shy child acclimate. Try booking camp with a friend or with an instructor your child knows.

THE NIGHT BEFORE CAMP

It’s normal to be nervous before starting something new. Those pre-camp jitters can make it hard to sleep. Help your child get to bed early so they will be well rested for the first day of camp. Talk about the positive aspects of camp and draw on your own summer camp experiences to help your child get excited.   Lay out everything needed for camp the night before. Feeling prepared and not rushing the first day of camp will ease stress and get the day started on the right foot. Pack a lunch, pick an outfit your child likes, and bag any extra items your child will need, including an extra outfit.

HOW TO MAKE THE BEST OF SUMMER CAMP Suggestions provided by the YMCA of San Joaquin Leave electronics home. Camp is a place to focus on character building and creating ever-lasting memories.   BYOWB stands for bring your own water bottle. It’s the number one thing first time campers forget.   Pack extra snacks. We tend to be so busy during camp that by mid-afternoon campers are ready for an afternoon bite. Just be sure that those snacks are nut free. Most summer day camps are nut free for the safety of campers with food allergies.   Check in with a counselor. Most camps have forms that ask about allergies, asthma, or any other medical conditions, but it doesn’t hurt to tell your child’s counselor once more.   Bust out that permanent marker. Label everything and anything your camper takes to camp.


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ww Cheers! Come taste a variety of Northern California wineries, including Rombauer, Ironstone Vineyards and Jeremy Wine Co., hors d’oeuvres & live music. $20 in advance online (LincolnCenterShops.com) or $25 at the event. Proceeds benefit the Junior League of San Joaquin County.

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MARCH/APRIL | 2018

SAN JOAQUIN PARENTS MAGAZINE

13


FAMILY TRAVEL

Foolproof

FAMILY FLIGHTS  BY FAITH LEWIS

TRAVELING WITH TODDLERS:

Toddlers rely on routine to make sense of their world, but they are capable of understanding more than people give them credit. Explain what to expect ahead of time and things will run more smoothly.    Let them pick a new coloring book and make them wait for it until the flight. Keep a new toy and window gel stickers stashed in your carry-on for when the inevitable boredom sets in. You’ll also want to pack sippy cups to minimize spills, and be ready with snacks.

PRESCHOOLER PASSENGERS:

This is the perfect age to give kids some independence by having them pack their own carry-on bag. Let them decide what stuffed animals, toys, and books make the trip, and be ready to orchestrate some competitive games of I Spy and Travel Bingo. The flight crew is usually happy to allow kids to see the cockpit after the flight, so use this as an incentive for good behavior.

SOARING SCHOOL AGE KIDS:

Take advantage of longer attention spans by making activity books about your destination. Include coloring pages, word searches with tourist attractions, and vacation themed Mad Libs. Leave room at the end so they can journal about their favorite parts of the trip on the flight home.

SNACK ATTACK You may be tempted to bribe your kids with sugary treats, but this isn’t the best idea. Too many sweet snacks will leave them feeling icky and irritable with no chance to burn off that sugar rush! The best snacks are finger foods like dry cereal, pretzels, goldfish, and trail mix. And don’t be afraid of the inevitable potty breaks–keeping your kids hydrated will ensure they’re feeling their best.

14

Traveling is stressful even without kids. The trick to family travel is to be prepared for every contingency. Here’s how to not just survive your family flight but start your trip on the right foot.

BRINGING BABY:

Keep your little bundle of joy comfortable by bringing a blanket and toys from home so they are surrounded by familiar textures and smells. Be sure to pack extra clothes and diapers for baby—and an emergency outfit for mom and dad— and a pacifier to help with those pressure changes.   You can also book a bassinet for the flight. Most airlines will provide them for children under 20 pounds free of charge, but there are a limited number available and they can only be used with certain seats. Book your tickets over the phone to maximize your chances of snagging the bassinet.

THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS


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Last year was Kalani’s first time playing YMCA soccer. She was nervous but with the support of her coaches she continued to gain confidence every week. Kalani continues to play today. Her mother said Y sports helped Kalani discover the joy of playing, learning new skills and making friends outside of school. Playing also created new connections for Kalani’s parents, as her father is excited to volunteer as a coach for their teams.

To learn more about TEAM, contact us at (209)462-2282. Please visit our website at www.team-charter.org

“Kalani loves soccer now! It’s amazing. Her self-esteem has gone up and she has become more social.” - Jennifer Thay, Soccer Mom

1016 E. BIANCHI ST. • STOCKTON

600 E. MAIN ST. • STOCKTON

209.279.5500 209.462.2282

The Y brings people and families closer together and encourage healthy habits. Join our teams today!

MARCH/APRIL | 2018

www.ymcasjc.org SAN JOAQUIN PARENTS MAGAZINE

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LOCAL MOM Q & A

LOCAL MOM Q&A:

KELLI POWELL

OWNER OF GINGER BUGS MOTHER-OF-TWO KELLI POWELL TALKS BUSINESS PARENTING, AND LIVING IN LODI Kelli Powell has a lot of ambition. Born and raised in Stockton, the mother-of-two’s resume includes options manager for a multimillion dollar home building company and working in reality TV (where she met her director/ producer husband Jim Powell). After having her son Cooper, 9, Kelli became a stay-at-home mom, but she struggled with post-partum depression and an overwhelming feeling she wasn’t prepared for the challenge of motherhood. Instead of shutting down, Kelli found refuge in indoor play spaces. “They were places that my kid could crawl safely. It gave me a reason to get out of the house. Most of all it gave me adult interaction with other moms who validated my feelings and struggles as a mom because they were experiencing them too.”   After moving to Lodi to be closer to family (and later) welcoming her second child, Morgan, 4, Kelli noticed a lack of indoor play spaces nearby. So, she took matters into her own hands and in 2016 she opened Lodi’s Ginger Bugs, a safe space for kids and caregivers.

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THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

WHAT HAS SURPRISED YOU MOST ABOUT PARENTHOOD?

How you could love it and hate it at the same time. You hear all the time about how the days are long but the years are short. That’s so true. All the clichés are true.

WHAT IS THE BEST PIECE OF ADVICE YOU’VE GOTTEN ABOUT PARENTING? Trust your mom instincts, they are usually right on!

OUTSIDE OF GINGER BUGS, WHAT LOCAL ESTABLISHMENTS DOES YOUR FAMILY FREQUENT?

We are usually at Target at least two to three times a week, if not more. Our kids do gymnastics and hip-hop dance so we are at Impact Sports Center and Elevate Dance Company several times a week.


WHAT DO YOU DO ON YOUR DAY OFF?

Day Off? What’s that? I feel like I’m constantly working. However, when I do get some time to myself, I try and rest, sleep in or relax at Wine & Roses Spa—something quiet because work and home are so loud and crazy.

WHAT DOES BEING A WOMAN IN BUSINESS MEAN TO YOU?

Everything! I had great independent women as role models growing up. Working in the maledominated field of construction and purchasing, I had to prove myself early on and hold my own. When working in TV I worked with some amazing female producers and directors who balanced careers and family and I was so inspired.    When I told my friends and family about my idea to open Ginger Bugs, I think some thought I was crazy. However, the ones who knew me knew I would figure out a way to make it happen. From first talking about it to doors opening it took about six years, but I did it! It’s tough to have a small business and a family. I am so proud that my kids see me in this role. I want my son to see women as equals in the world of business and my daughter to know she can do anything she wants. I have a special place in my heart for us “mamapreneurs.” We get things done and juggle it all.

HOW DO YOU AND YOUR HUSBAND JIM SPEND DATE NIGHTS?

We sadly don’t get a lot of date nights. When we do, it usually is pretty mellow—beers, movie, and maybe some Mexican food. We like to people watch.

WHERE DO YOU SHOP MOST?

Well of course Target, it’s really our go to for everything. I find myself

at Hobby Lobby and Party City a lot for last minute party items for work. However, since I’m so busy, I mostly shop online.

SHARE YOUR BEST MOM HACK.

I literally have Costco wipes everywhere—a pack in the car, in my purse, in the bathroom and kitchen at home, and at Ginger Bugs. They clean everything.

IF YOU COULD GO BACK IN TIME, WHAT WOULD YOU TELL YOUR PREGNANT SELF ABOUT PARENTHOOD?

Relax; it will all be ok. (Confession: I still try and remind myself of that daily!)

WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT LIVING IN LODI?

It’s still got that small town feel and I of course love being close to family and old friends. You run into people you know all the time. However, when it’s too small and you just need to get away, you can be at the beach, in San Francisco, or in the snow in about two hours.

TELL ME ABOUT YOUR BEST FAMILY VACATION.

We love Disneyland! We have been going there since the kids were babies. We do the Halloween party every year and dress in costume. It really is a happy place for our family. We also love Cabo.

WHAT ITEMS DO YOU NEVER LEAVE HOME WITHOUT?

My phone, cup of coffee (morning) or La Croix (afternoon), sunglasses, and my party calendar. I now make the kids carry their own stuff. They usually have a water and Cooper has his iPad and Morgan brings a doll.

Photo Credits: Bre Meyer Photography

MARCH/APRIL | 2018

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HEALTH

GERMS GALORE:

WHY THEY’RE AN IMPORTANT PART OF GROWING UP HEALTHY  BY FAITH LEWIS

Long gone is the classic childhood spent eating mud pies and kissing frogs. Instead, growing up today seems to involve a lot of hand sanitizer and sterilization. But, health experts are now warning parents that completely sanitizing their child’s environment is actually detrimental to their health.   The immune system develops by coming into contact with new pathogens and learning how to react to them. When children are not exposed to new situations or people, their immune system doesn’t have the opportunity to build a resistance to common germs and viruses. This is why otherwise healthy children frequently

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come home sick when they first start daycare or school.   “Children who have not been exposed  to other children usually will catch something when they start daycare or school because their body is being subjected to something new in the  environment,” says Carolyn Sanders, head of outreach for children’s health safety and education at San Joaquin General Hospital.  “A healthy child›s immunity should be able to respond by building antibodies for the next time they are  exposed  to that organism.”   But there’s a balance that needs to be found between, say, letting your children play with raw chicken or lick the shopping cart, and

THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

locking them in the house and sanitizing everything within reach. “It is not about exposing children to germs but exposing children to what is naturally occurring in [the] environment of their everyday life, learning, playing, and growing,” says Carolyn.    The idea is not to intentionally introduce your child to dangerous germs. If Auntie May has the flu, don’t encourage little Timmy to give her a kiss. However, it does mean giving children the opportunity to explore different environments beyond the house and interact with other children.    In addition to low exposure, many experts are pointing to over sanitation

as a detrimental trend. Sanitation products kill germs indiscriminately–even the good ones.    “Antibacterial soaps, hand sanitizers, and antibiotics help germs mutate,” says Carolyn. She also pointed out that while hand sanitizer kills most germs, they remain on your hands until you wash them, meaning you’ll still need that good old-fashioned soap and water to get rid of those pesky pathogens.    So take the kids to the park. Let them play in the dirt. Arrange playdates and get them out of the house. Then, when they’re done, rest easy knowing that hand washing with non-antibacterial soap and warm water is still the gold standard.


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MARCH/APRIL | 2018

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TECHNICAL EDUCATION  BYNORA HESTON TARTE

Not every child is college bound after high school. While that may be the goal—it’s simply not a reality. But that doesn’t mean a student can’t pursue a meaningful career without a fouryear college education. There are still plenty of opportunities for young adults to thrive in San Joaquin County by filling in-demand jobs that don’t require a bachelor’s degree.    To bridge the gap between high school and career, San Joaquin County schools have introduced Career Technical Education (CTE), a program of study that involves a multiyear sequence of courses integrating core academic knowledge with technical and occupational knowledge to provide students with a pathway to postsecondary education and/or careers. The San Joaquin County Office of Education supports the implementation of these courses into districts across the county in order to align with a shift in California high school goals, a change that took the focus off of four-year universities as the only acceptable post-high school track and instead trains students in skills needed for in-demand career fields in the region.   “Certainly we want to provide a college prep experience for every student who comes into our school,” James Mousalimas, San Joaquin County superintendent of schools, explains. But the school district also wants to prepare students for pathways to careers that don’t require a four-year degree by changing from the college-only mentality that dominated 30 years ago to a college and career preparedness goal for every student.   “There are a lot of very bright young men and women who just don’t want to sit in a classroom all day,” says James. “They want to learn by doing and they learn best by working with their hands.”

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THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

   SJCOE works with employers throughout the county to identify gaps in the local employment pool to develop its CTE coursework and CTE programs bridge the gaps between high school education and a career. By working with industries that have an immediate need in the region, teachers are able to provide students an education that will turn into a career. This approach guarantees that pathways are only created if there’s a job at the end.   The most in-demand careers in San Joaquin County are: logistics, including truck driving and warehouse operations from entry-level to management; healthcare, including nursing; and building trades and construction, including both commercial and residential projects, according to SJCOE research.   CTE coursework includes programs in building trades and construction, engineering and design, manufacturing and product development, hospitality and tourism, health science and medical technology, and transportation, as well as many others.    Every school has its own list of offerings but the model is the same from campus to campus. Students can enroll in CTE as early as freshman year either by choosing an introductory course in a field that interests


THE MOST IN-DEMAND INDUSTRY IN SJ COUNTY It’s hard to go wrong if you’re targeting the region’s most understaffed industry. Chris Kleinert, director of CTE at the San Joaquin County Office of Education, identified logistics (warehousing operations, truck driving, etc.) from entry level to management as the number one career need in SJ County. The county’s geographical location as a hub of commerce impacts this need. In addition to the Stockton Port, the furthest inland seaport, there are two freeways that run parallel to the county connecting it to other hubs, an airport, and the railroad off March Lane and 99 in Stockton. Everything is brought in by road, air, rail, or sea and San Joaquin County has all 4. This industry isn’t going away.

MARCH/APRIL | 2018

SAN JOAQUIN PARENTS MAGAZINE

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them or by taking a special course that introduces the student to a few pathways so they can explore several interests. After that, a concentrated course is offered. Students who take a third year enroll in an advanced CAPSTONE course.    At the end of high school, students can take up entry-level jobs in these career fields using the knowledge and certifications they have gained. For example, those interested in culinary arts can take courses in food service and will graduate with certifications including ServSafe, administered by the National Restaurant Association. Those who want to take up a higher level position in the industry will need to continue a pathway to postsecondary training or education, whether that be a fouryear univeristy or not. “There’s a wealth of programs,” James says.

A COMMUNITY

THAT CARES

The training starts in high school but it doesn’t end there. SJCOE and San Joaquin County school districts have partnered with private companies as well as secondary educational institutions to ensure the skills students learn in CTE courses are buildable. Just because the schools serve students who do not want to attend four-year universities post graduation doesn’t mean the coursework is any less valuable to those who do.

OPPORTUNITIES

ABOUND 22

THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

   Many students will go on to four-year universities to pursue degrees in the same fields they became introduced to in high school. In many cases, CTE courses help students figure out what they want to do when they get to college so they aren’t floundering their first two years. With the help of school counselors, students learn the best approach to entering the industries they want to be in.   In some cases, four year universities are not the best approach, but a student may not have learned that if they didn’t take the coursework and meet with counselors about their career goals. A counselor may instead recommend a technical school, a two-year program, or a coveted relationship with a local business hiring in that field and offering on-the-job training. Private businesses are developing their own programs that act as continuations of the CTE coursework, as well. Every pathway created by CTE has an option post-high school for students to explore. E&J Gallo is one such example. The Modesto giant created a job-ready program to teach technical skills to high school students.   It is a noble venture, however, E&J Gallo benefits, too. Now there are more eligible employees to fill their needs—a problem the company struggled with in years past. In addition to teaching interview skills, resume writing, communication skills, conflict resolution, change management, and lean principles, the company hired many of its students to work at the winery in operations and winegrowing.

CTE is offered at almost every school in San Joaquin County and all 14 school districts in the county have some sort of CTE program.


A PARENT’S

ROLE

By high school, students are equipped to take the reigns on their own career aspirations, or at least they should be. It’s a parent’s job to get their children to the point that they can choose coursework that matters, engage with teachers and counselors that will help them, and make decisions about their futures.    It never stops being a parent’s job, however, to guide their children. James says parents should expose their children to different trade and career opportunities at a young age, starting in elementary school. CTE coursework isn’t offered at that level, but students may enter high school with a better understanding of their interests in they have been exposed to potential career fields before. Field trips, for example, are a great way to introduce children to trades available in the county. Career days at school, take your child to work days, or even just encouraging conversation between children and adults in admirable career fields can help them find their calling.   Have conversations. Ask your children from a young age what they want to be when thy grow up. Continue to ask the question over the years and enroll your child in activities and

camps that will feed their interests, as well as expose them to new opportunities. When available, get your child enrolled in extracurriculars. Starting in middle school, many schools offer robotics, electronics, drafting and CAD classes that will give them a basis for CTE curriculum. In high school, keep an eye on the school calendar and attend career fairs that happen on campus with your child. James suggests this as an appropriate way for parents to be involved in their children’s futures while educating themselves on the jobs landscape and discovering industries they may not have considered before.   “Lets figure out what they are interested in and find that path for that child,” James suggests. Interests and needs are different for every child and honing in on what they care about and what they are good at can set them up for a lifetime of success. As a parent, ask yourself, what will grab their attention? What will get them engaged in learning? It could be auto mechanics, it could be choir, it could be football. Find a reason for your child to care about succeeding in school, even if that reason is to play sports. Then, challenge your child to make that passion their career.   Times are changing. Parents may need to adjust their mindsets to better serve their children. Those who forego a traditional college education can have a high paying job; they can be successful. In fact, many of the highest paying jobs are in trades. There’s no longer one way to succeed, and if you open your mind to the possibilities your child can have, they will open their minds, too.

MARCH/APRIL | 2018

SAN JOAQUIN PARENTS MAGAZINE

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FAMILY TRAVEL

Disneyland

TIMESAVERS 6 TIPS TO CRAM IN MORE HAPPY AT THE HAPPIEST PLACE ON EARTH

With the price of Disneyland tickets what they are, making the dollars count is key. Instead of looking for ways to save money, choose experiences and conveniences that will save time. From Disney apps to card member perks, there’s a lot of ways to fit more into those precious days. 1. There’s an app for that. The Disneyland app is loaded with time saving information. Free to anyone, it’s constantly updated with ride wait times so guests can plan around short lines.

3. Have a magic morning. A perk of staying at a Disneyland Resort, magic mornings let users into the park one hour before it opens. That’s one hour of little to no lines to knock out the best rides. Access jumps back and forth between Disneyland and California Adventure. If planned right, families can get more rides done in that one hour than the rest of the day. 4. Stay at a Disneyland Resort. Not only do you get that magic morning, staying at a Disneyland Resort cuts out walk/drive time to and from the parks, plus tram rides and parking. Instead you walk out of your hotel and right into The Happiest Place on Earth.

2. Pay for a MaxPass. Pay for something else at Disneyland?! We know. But this one is worth it. A MaxPass allows park goers to use the Disneyland app to grab fast passes instead of running from ride to ride and wasting time. Simply make your selections on the app and you’ll be updated when it’s time to grab another. Passes are $10 each.

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THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

5. Become a Disney Visa cardholder. Those who hold a Disney Visa card (available through Chase Bank) can get access to special character meet and greets. Once each day, a Disney Visa will get your whole group into see a mystery character of choice. The lines are short or nonexistent and the oneon-one time is supreme. (Oh, and you can use that card to buy merchandise and food around the park for extra discounts). 6. Meet the characters for breakfast. Knock out several character meet and greets in one sitting. Book a character breakfast at places like Goofy’s Kitchen where you can grub at an all-you-can-eat buffet, enjoy character performances, and get up close and personal with Mickey’s best pals. Then when you spot your pals in the park later, you can wave instead of jumping in line for another photo.


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Lodi Grape Festival

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First Baptist Christian School

3535 N. El Dorado St. . Stockton

209.466.1577 www.fbcschools.com

L C S

friday: $20 • 1 pm - 11 pm saturday: $30 • 10 am - midnight sunday: $20 • 9 am - 5 pm 3-day pass: $50 kids & active military discounts

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SUMMER DAY CAMP FOR KIDS & TEENS June 18-22 (Ages 14-17) • June 25 - 29 (Ages 8-13) (Except Weekends)

The purpose of LCS is to provide a sound academic education integrated with the Christian view of God and the world, based on His authoritative and infallible Word. Because of the differences between the Christian and secular approach to learning, LCS offers a curriculum rooted in a God-centered view of life. This view holds that God’s truth is the standard for all truth. The curriculum, taught by a qualified Christian faculty, promotes academic instruction consistent with Christ-centered teaching.

LODI CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

Registration is FREE. Space is Limited First Come, First Serve Deadline June 1st For more information: communitycenterfortheblind.org

OPPORTUNITIES IN CAREERS Education & Pre-Employment Transition Services

Identify Strengths • Resume Writing and Soft Skills Improve Social Skills • Build Self-Esteem • For ages 14-24

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MARCH/APRIL | 2018

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SAN JOAQUIN PARENTS MAGAZINE

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NUTRITION

KIDS in the KITCHEN TIPS AND TRICKS TO SAVOR MORE VEGGIES  BY STEPH RODRIGUEZ

With the bounty of fresh vegetables growing throughout the San Joaquin Valley, delicious and healthy mealtime opportunities for parents are aplenty. But, oftentimes it’s challenging to inspire kids to eat more veggies no matter what time of day.   Dexter Ridley, a father, and seasoned chef of more than 20 years, says this is the age-old struggle. Dexter teaches children’s cooking classes at Hutchins Street Square through the Lodi Parks and Recreation department during the winter and summer school breaks. There, he shows budding chefs the basics of kitchen safety and says students receive such boosts of confidence when they see their completed dish come to fruition.   “The look of excitement and contentment that they have on their face when they take that first bite or when they take it home for the parents to try, that’s it for me,” Dexter says.   From his experiences with kids in the kitchen, he offers parents some easy tips to add the region’s ingredients into any recipe to create tasty meals and snacks for kids to truly savor.

GLAZED CARROTS

Carrots are grown year-round in California and Dexter likes brings out the root vegetable’s natural sweetness by glazing them with a bit of finesse.   “Glazed carrots are one of my kid-friendly dishes with a little hint of sweetness, but they’re not overly sweet where we’re adding a ton of calories,” he says. “We also talk about what carrots are good for like maintaining eyesight.” Dexter’s

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THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS


students use baby carrots for their natural tenderness and glaze them in a skillet using a small tab of butter and a few pinches of brown sugar. The carrots are tossed around in a pan for one to two minutes to get them nice and caramelized before serving. He recommends this idea as a delicious side at dinnertime.

BREAKFAST PIE

As parents, quiche is a brunch staple. For kids, call it a breakfast pie and it’s an easy way to introduce more veggies in the morning.   “For breakfast we know most kids like eggs, so we’ll try to incorporate bell peppers, which are loaded with vitamin C, and mince them up really small so it’s not as visible,” Dexter says. “Kids are still getting the benefit of the vegetable without having it in such huge chunks.”    Introduce vegetables like onions, mushrooms or even a little bit of asparagus for a multitude of vitamins to energize kids throughout the day.

PASTA SAUCE

Another way Dexter likes to use a variety of veggies at mealtime is to make a tomato sauce from scratch using carrots, onions, celery and even some bell peppers. He cooks everything down and blends the sauce until its smooth and then uses it to make calzones with his students.    “They get the vegetables from the sauce and it’s hidden, but they don’t know it’s there,” he says. “Part of getting kids to eat vegetables at a young age is sometimes you have to hide it. As they get older, you introduce them a little bit more to the fuller version of that vegetable so they grow to like it.”

HOMEMADE RANCH DRESSING

Instead of the store-bought dressing, Dexter shows kids how to make their own. The student chefs then cut sundry vegetables and are more likely to try something new.   “We cut up the typical carrots and celery, but we try to incorporate other veggies like strips of bell peppers because they’re not spicy, they’re sweet and they have a great crunch to them,” he says. “We try to make a game out of it, especially if it’s something that they love eating. You can incorporate this snack into their homework and say, ‘If you get this math problem right, you get to dunk.’ I like to make it fun for them. It’s a good way to do your homework and eat a snack at the same time.”

ATTEND A COOKING CLASS WITH DEXTER: HUTCHINS STREET SQUARE 125 S. Hutchins St., Lodi, (209) 333-6782 Hutchinsstreetsquare.com

MARCH/APRIL | 2018

SAN JOAQUIN PARENTS MAGAZINE

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MAY

CALENDAR

JUNE 2018

DUCKY DERBY

MAY 12

 COMPILED BY COPPER WILLIAMS

Head down to McLeod lake of downtown Stockton for a rubber ducky race that will put our bathtubs to shame! Thousands of numbered rubber ducks will race—or bob—through the lake in an epic battle of wills. If your child’s rubber duck is among the first ten ducks to finish, they’ll win a prize—first place wins $1,000! All proceeds from the race will benefit the Child Abuse Prevention Council of San Joaquin County. McLeod Lake, 221 N. Center St., Stockton, (209) 464-4524, NoChildAbuse.org

7TH ANNUAL GOLDEN STATE PINBALL FESTIVAL

MAY 18, 19, 20

Bring your kids to a festival they won’t forget! The Golden State Pinball Festival is back and better than ever with pinball tournaments, classes, and

28

THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS

workshops, not to mention hundreds of pinball machines on free play with admission. On Saturday and Sunday, enter a drawing for your very own pinball machine! With all proceeds benefitting the World of Wonders Science Museum, this is one festival you won’t want to miss. Lodi Grape Festival Grounds, 413 E. Lockeford St., Lodi, (209) 368-0969, GoldenStatePinball.org

LINDEN CHERRY FESTIVAL

MAY 19

It’s a family affair at the Cherry Capital of the World! Enjoy live bands, car shows, vendors, and, of course, the freshest cherries you’ll ever taste. With a parade in the morning and numerous games and fair rides for the kids to enjoy, attending this Festival is a Spring tradition for families across the San Joaquin Valley. Linden Elementary School Grounds, 18100 E. Front St., Linden, (209) 547-3046, LindenPetersChamberofCommerce.WildApricot.org


hungry, make sure you complete the fair-experience by indulging in a classic funnel cake! With so many things to do, this fair is the perfect family event. San Joaquin County Fairgrounds, 1658 S. Airport Way, Stockton, (209) 4665041, SanJoaquinFairGrounds. com

HEALTHY KIDS DAY

JUNE 2

Bring the whole family out to the YMCA’s Healthy Kids Day, a day of education and fun activities that focus on fostering healthy habits. Discover new ways to keep you and your family healthy while your child enjoys games, music, crafts, obstacle courses, and a bounce house. There’s no better way to start your child’s summer! YMCA,

CHILDREN & YOUTH DAY AT PIXIE WOODS

MAY 19

Free admission, fun and games, and permission to dress up as your favorite superhero? Now, that’s an event that excites the kid in all of us. Head on down to Pixie Woods for an enchanting day of magical train rides, paddle-wheel boating, and much more. And don’t forget to bring the kids! Pixie Woods at

2105 W. March Ln., Stockton, (209) 472-9622, ymcasjc.org

ART AT THE PARK

Louis Park, 3121 Monte Diablo Ave., Stockton, (209) 461-2602, VisitStockton.org

JUNE 9

Foster your child’s creative spark and bring them to this philanthropic event featuring arts and crafts booths, entertainment, food vendors, and art displays. Kids can take part in watercolor painting, face painting, and much more. A raffle will also be held for tons of fun prizes, and all proceeds will go to the Manteca Junior Women’s Club to fund their many community projects.

LIL MUD RUNNER

MAY 20

Get muddy—really, really muddy—in Central Valley’s original kid’s mud run event. In this one-mile obstacle course, your kids will slip, slide and crawl to their heart’s content through the slick mud, and the best part is, parents can, too! Accompanying the obstacle course, there’s also a carnival to fill the day with endless fun! Eagal Lakes Resort, 12 W Lorenzen Rd., Tracy, (209) 640-4252, EagalLakes.com

Downtown Manteca Library park, 100 Manteca Ave., Manteca, (209) 482-3660, Manteca.org

STOCKTON PORTS

MAY 1-6, 15-20, 28-31 JUNE 8-14, 21-24, 29-30

CRITTER CORRAL

MAY 5, 6, 12, 13, 19, 20, 26, 27 JUNE 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17, 23, 24

Take the whole family out to the ballgame this month and watch the Stockton Ports dominate the opposition at Banner Island Ballpark. This month, the Stockton Ports are having a variety of special events and giveaways, such as the Cap Giveaway, Ball & Batt Giveaway, and the Aaron Judge Bobblehead Giveaway, just to name a few. So, gather up the family, grab a hotdog and soda, kickback and enjoy America’s favorite pass-time! Banner Island Ballpark,

Let your child interact with and pet a variety of furry farm animals! Free with admission to the San Joaquin County Historical Museum in Micke Grove Regional Park, this critter extravaganza is available every weekend from May through August. After you’ve finished admiring the animals, check out the rich history of the San Joaquin Valley at the Museum to wrap up the perfect day of education and fun. San Joaquin

404 W. Fremont St., Stockton, (209) 644-1900, MILB.com

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY FAIR

JUNE 14-17

The San Joaquin County Fair is back and better than ever, with live music, fascinating exhibits, and of course, tons of fun carnival rides! Get groovin’ at the Uptown Funk: Bruno Mars Tribute, or peruse through the Fine Art Exhibit. And when you get

County Historical Museum, 11793 N Micke Grove Rd., Lodi, (209) 331-2055, SanJoaquinHistory.org

MARCH/APRIL | 2018

SAN JOAQUIN PARENTS MAGAZINE

29


LAST word

MOMMY  BY NORA HESTON TARTE

My name is Mom, but my kid calls me mom mom mom mom mom mom mom. Sometimes that word starts to lose its meaning, especially after the three millionth time it is said in a single day.    Remember the first time your kid said, “mama?” I try to remember that day and soak in the goodness I felt hearing my name out of my child’s mouth for the first time. Some days it’s hard to recall the sweet sound I couldn’t get enough of. And is it just me, or does that “moooooom” sound a bit more like a whine these days?   It doesn’t help that the word mom is usually followed by a request, one that doesn’t always have a please and thank you attached. Threeangers seem to master the demanding/ annoyed “MOOOM” sound I thought only actual teenagers would use.   As I sit writing this I’ve dodged three MOMs already, mostly said too loud and not sweetly enough. When I’m doing something important is when my attention is most needed.    Sometimes I respond and my kid actually has nothing to say. It’s like a weird tick, to blurt out “mom” at random moments. Perhaps he only does it to see if I respond so if I don’t he can scold me for ignoring him.    I’ll admit sometimes I greet that “mom” with a sigh and a “what?” because I know what is coming. But then there are those moments that take me back to the first time. When mom becomes mommy and the request following is a bit easier to swallow. Mommy, will you read to me? Mommy, come cuddle. Mommy, I love you. Those mommys are the best ones and I cherish them just as much if not more than the first mama I got—the one that probably didn’t even mean mom but was more of a gurgled sound that resembled my name.    There’s the funny mommys, too. The one my husband taught my son to get what he wants. “Mommy, you’re pretty. Can I have some chocolate?”   Even weirder are the days my kid uses my real name. Why is it so strange to hear that coming out of my child’s mouth? I’ll admit. I prefer the endless chanting of “mom.”

FROM THE BLOG: slightlykrunchymama.blogspot.com

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THE MAGAZINE FOR IN-THE-KNOW PARENTS


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SO METHI NG GOOD IS JUST AROUND THE

corner CAFE & MARKET

Towne Corner Café & Market at Wine & Roses is opening soon! We will feature daily breakfast and lunch that highlights all the good things coming from our kitchen and local farms. The Market will have selection of handpicked, small batch crafted, quality foods, and artisan creations.

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Profile for San Joaquin Magazine

San Joaquin Parents Magazine May 2018  

The area's only Kids & Parents magazine geared toward parents. Focusing on local tips, great events, things to do and living in the San Joaq...

San Joaquin Parents Magazine May 2018  

The area's only Kids & Parents magazine geared toward parents. Focusing on local tips, great events, things to do and living in the San Joaq...

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