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IN THIS ISSUE:

No Title, No Problem: Quinn Martin on the Launching of a Student Mag Past the Bar: Tom Loughlin’s Journey From Law to Art Art School is All in the Family for Mother-Daughter Duo BFA Film Student-Artist Adrian Burrell Makes a Change for the Better

ART EFFECT


San Francisco Art Institute ART + EFFECT

In this issue of ART + EFFECT, the SFAI community comes together to celebrate its richness and diversity. Past and present student-artists, as well as a parent, reveal the meaningful contributions they’re making to SFAI. A student filmmaker/ writer discusses pushing the boundaries of digital publishing, and Wells Fargo Foundation Vice President Mario Diaz shares his thoughts on the future of SFAI and the arts. You’ll also find a recap of all of the SFAI events and fundraising efforts that you’ve helped to make possible. sfai gratefully acknowledges the supporters who make this work possible. sfai is accredited by the accrediting commission for senior colleges and universities of the western association of schools and colleges (wasc) and by the national association of schools of art and design (nasad). sfai is also a member of the association of independent colleges of art and design (aicad).

COVER: BARI FLEISCHER (MFA PAINTING, 2015) 120’, 2015 WATERCOLOR AND ACRYLIC ON YUPO, 60 X 1440 INCHES PERFORMING DANCE PHOTO BY DREW ALTIZER


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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LETTER FROM INTERIM PRESIDENT RACHEL SCHREIBER

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SFAI UNDERGRADS LAUNCH A MAGAZINE

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INSIDE THE ARTFUL MIND: TOM LOUGHLIN

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THE CASE FOR ART SCHOOL: A PARENT-ARTIST WEIGHS IN

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CHANGING THE FACE OF FILM: ADRIAN BURRELL

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MAKING HISTORY: BARBRO AND BARNEY OSHER

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WELLS FARGO SETS THE STANDARD FOR CORPORATE GIVING

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GALA VERNISSAGE

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SFAI CONCENTRATE + ALUMNI DAY

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CELEBRATING THE ART OF CHARLES HOBSON

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IN REMEMBRANCE

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ANNUAL REPORT 2014–2015 BY THE NUMBERS

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FINANCIAL STATEMENT

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2014-2015 DONORS

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES

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FROM THE ARCHIVES


LETTER FROM INTERIM PRESIDENT RACHEL SCHREIBER Dear Friends:  It’s with great pleasure that I step into the role of Interim President at San Francisco Art Institute. SFAI is an extraordinary institution. It’s a place where art is in the air 24/7. It’s where contemporary art and its histories are being made, discussed, debated, viewed, and experienced. I’ve felt this vitality in my two years as Dean and Vice President for Academic Affairs, and am honored to continue fostering this in my new position. During the four years of his leadership, outgoing President Charles Desmarais set an inspiring example of service to SFAI’s artists and scholars, as well as the broader art community. I join Board Chair Cynthia Plevin, the Board of Trustees, and many others in “I GUESS YOU COULD CALL ME expressing my appreciation for AN ‘ART SCHOOL JUNKIE.’” all that he accomplished—from

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former sfai president charles desmarais and interim president rachel schreiber at alejandro almanza pereda’s opening reception july 30, 2015. photo by alessandra mello

In this inaugural issue of Art + Effect, you’ll find examples of these accomplishments in stories from SFAI student-artists, alumni, parents, faculty, and donors— a lawyer-turned-conceptual-artist, a globetrotting filmmaker, a civic leader, and much more. Each subject experiences SFAI from a distinct perspective, but all have chosen to commit themselves to this incredible institution.

strengthening SFAI’s institutional health to launching a visionary campaign to transform Pier 2 at Fort Mason Center into a hub for graduate artist studios and public engagement. As Charles begins a new chapter as art critic for the San Francisco Chronicle, we look forward to his continued contribution to the Bay Area cultural landscape. And as for me, I guess you could call me an “art school junkie.” I’ve been hanging around art schools for over 30 years as a student, faculty, Dean, and now Interim President. To be honest, this is a difficult time for education in the arts and humanities. The media is asking us to question the value of higher education, and to measure its benefits solely based upon earning potential. I deeply believe that the education we offer at SFAI prepares our alumni for the lifelong pursuit of their passions. It helps them contribute to society in ways beyond measure—as artists and in a wide range of fields enriched by creative and critical thinking.

My aim as Interim President is to make SFAI the best it can be, which is a goal I know we all share. As alumnus Tom Loughlin says in his interview, SFAI is a place “where a small group of committed people can make a big impact.” Thank you so much for your ongoing commitment and support. 

Rachel Schreiber, PhD

Interim President San Francisco Art Institute

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SFAI UNDERGRADS LAUNCH A MAGAZINE In October, six San Francisco Art Institute student-artists launched the student-artists publication Untitled. To mark the first issue of Art + Effect, we thought it only appropriate to highlight our students’ work on their own publication. Student-run, student-curated, and studentmade, Untitled is led by founding member and second year BFA student in Film, Quinn Martin.

essay on ecological feminism to a Southern gothic short story. The biggest takeaway from this launch was to trust our community. We want to let this magazine reflect the conversations and debates happening in our campuses, classes, and individual works.

What inspired you to launch Untitled? By launching Untitled, I wanted to create a space where SFAI students could share their visual work, writing, opinions, and have a discourse with one another. This seemed to be something that was lacking in our community as we are often isolated within our own groups, whether that be by department, year, or social circles.

What is your hope for Untitled and inspiring the SFAI community? I hope Untitled stays bold, engaging, and current. I hope that 15 years from now, we can come back and the new wave of students are pushing boundaries, collaborating, questioning, and keeping these conversations alive through the magazine. Untitled is an opportunity for artists to share what they are up to and what frustrates, engages, and inspires them. The hope is that larger dialogues will spark from the work and ideas being offered in the magazine. The work and ideas radiating from SFAI are so uniquely beautiful and poignant to what’s happening now and what’s next. I hope that Untitled can be a

What was the launch process like and what did you learn from it? From the beginning, we wanted to utilize our first issue and initial launch process as an experiment. All of us strived to have an organic process, allowing ourselves to try things and see what worked and what did not. We received over 100 pieces of combined visual and written work, ranging in topics from an

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quinn martin, bfa student in film, and founding member of untitled.

a storyteller, and the stories I love to tell are ones that aren’t conventionally one-dimensional and leave room for conversation. What can readers expect to see from Untitled in the future? Readers can expect Untitled to always be changing, new, activating, and communityoriented. Even in our plans for expansion, we are staying true to our core values, driven by our staff, contributing artists, and interests of the students. We have some very unique and exciting plans for the coming issues.

conduit to transcend outside of the school, to show what exactly is going on here that is so special. How does your work as a writer for Untitled overlap with your work as a film director? Is it easier or harder to do both? My work as a writer and film director often overlaps alongside my passions for community building and arts administration. I feel like each of my practices is intrinsically a part of me that I can’t imagine myself just doing one thing. These practices help inform each other, allowing me to see different perspectives. In each part of my work, I emphasize collaboration. As a director, writer, or administrator, I see myself as

To learn more about Untitled, visit Untitled.ink

“MY WORK HAS DEVELOPED DRASTICALLY SINCE I CAME TO SFAI. BEING EXPOSED TO SO MANY NEW WAYS OF LOOKING AND MAKING HAS FORCED ME TO VIEW MY OWN WORK DIFFERENTLY.”

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INSIDE THE ARTFUL MIND: TOM LOUGHLIN Before Tom Loughlin earned an MFA in New Genres (2013) at San Francisco Art Institute, he received an undergraduate degree from Dartmouth University, a law degree from UC Berkeley, and practiced law for a few years. Loughlin considers why and how he made the transition from law to art, and how it changed his outlook on life.

Of the many areas to focus on, why choose New Genres? I chose to study New Genres because I was interested in exploring different mediums rather than being committed to photography. I was really drawn to the freedom that SFAI gave me to explore whatever direction seemed right.

Can you talk about your journey to becoming an artist and your time at SFAI? There was plenty that I loved about being a lawyer, but the practice of law has a paint-by-numbers quality that ultimately didn’t suit me very well. I took a yearlong sabbatical to figure out what to do next and found myself taking a lot of increasingly strange photographs. It felt important to keep doing that, and after a while I realized if I was going to get better, I needed a community of peers and mentors. So I moved to San Francisco and applied to SFAI, and fortunately the school decided to take a chance on a weirdo ex-lawyer.

You make work that viewers stumble upon in their daily lives, rather than in a gallery environment—often creating unexpected or surprising circumstances. How is the viewer’s surprise important to your work? There’s a risky and an unmediated quality to those encounters that I find really interesting. About a year ago, I was installing a piece of mine—a neon sign entitled Bitcoin Payday—at Google’s Mountain View headquarters. I’d just gotten off the ladder when a Google engineer asked me in a deeply skeptical tone, “Why is that art?” Using my best SFAI critique manners, I asked her, “What happens when you look at it?” We ended up having a really interesting conversation about conventions and expectations and who gets to say what’s true.

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“IT’S PERFECTLY OK TO FAIL AT SFAI, AS LONG AS YOU’RE WORKING AMBITIOUSLY AND WITH INTEGRITY.”

You’ve said that your work is about asking questions that you don’t have the answers for. What questions are you currently asking? tom loughlin, bitcoin payday, 2014

Recently I find myself wondering things like what’s going on in San Francisco these days? Who’s hustling whom and why? If I keep digging along those lines, the questions seem to end up being about time-honored human behaviors like conquest, desire, and construction of identity.

courtesy of the artist

ever had, and they taught me to evaluate my own work much more effectively. And by the way, it’s perfectly OK to fail at SFAI as long as you’re working ambitiously and with integrity. What motivates you to stay connected to SFAI? I get a lot from my ongoing connections with SFAI, both socially and professionally. Now that I’m a few years out, I see more clearly the role that SFAI plays in the ecosystem of art in the Bay Area and beyond. It’s not easy to be a stand-alone, pure conceptual art school in this day and age. But SFAI fills an important niche and shapes a unique community of dedicated artists and thinkers. I’m pretty sure the world of commerce can get along just fine without my help at this point. I’d rather spend my energy supporting a place more valuable and rare, and where a small group of committed people can make a big impact.

What qualities did you develop at SFAI that continue to guide your art and life? Discipline and commitment. When you have bad criticism at SFAI, it’s not because someone is trying to put you down or sabotage you. It’s because your peers are trying to help you, and they’re astutely pointing out grave defects in your work. Those bad critiques were probably the most helpful, harrowing experiences I’ve

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THE CASE FOR ART SCHOOL: A PARENTARTIST WEIGHS IN Jean Cherouny, an artist and parent of Anneke Jewett, BFA student-artist, considers why she felt a responsibility to support her daughter by giving to San Francisco Art Institute’s Annual Fund. Were you influential in your daughter Anneke’s decision to attend art school? I don’t feel directly responsible, but she saw me from a very young age living the life of an artist. It was always about doing what you love and what you want to do. Once she decided to go to art school, she was very direct about it. The hardest part was deciding which one to attend. SFAI is more about process and exploration—it’s a laboratory experience where you’re using all media. Last year you contributed to SFAI’s Annual Fund. What inspired you to make your gift? As a parent, I want to support the vision of the school and really understand that it’s for my child’s future. I feel I should participate in her experience but not control it. And that is a crucial thing because, as you know, the arts have suffered. “AS AN ARTIST, IF YOU ACCESS SOMETHING THAT’S CREATIVE WITHIN YOU, IT GIVES YOU A FREEDOM AND A PEACE THAT—IF YOU ARE REALLY BEING TRUE TO YOURSELF—YOU CAN ALWAYS MAINTAIN.”

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What are your hopes for your daughter’s life in art?

develop—young artists finding themselves and making it on their own. The students are doing amazing things by putting themselves out there. The curriculum, and the way SFAI does things, has made Anneke feel like she is in charge of the experience.

My hope for Anneke is that she has a life of being an artist. I think it’s a rare and hard thing. As an artist, if you access something that’s creative within you, it gives you a freedom and a peace that—if you are really being true to yourself—you can always maintain. What she chooses to do with it is going to be exciting to watch. It’s an evolution. I love that it takes time to

sfai student anneke jewett and her mom jean cherouny.

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ADRIAN BURRELL IN ABU DHABI PHOTO BY NICHOLAS LA

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CHANGING THE FACE OF FILM: ADRIAN BURRELL In 2013, Adrian Burrell (BFA student-artist, Film) and a few friends cofounded a production company, Picture a Change, to address social inequality. Last summer, he traveled to film the company’s first documentary feature and was kind enough to answer a few questions on location in Mumbai. Tell us about your experience at San Francisco Art Institute. The best part of my experience at SFAI is that I’m not placed in a box. There is some structure but everyone is open to change and growth. I feel like the faculty encourages you to step out and make your work. There are people at SFAI who want me to succeed just as much as I do. I’ve had staff help me do research for projects and even go as “WE AIM TO MAKE CONTENT far as to contact their friends THAT INSPIRES A SENSE OF and family to help. Teachers DREAMLIKE IMAGINATION AND and staff have donated to MOVES PEOPLE TO ACTION.” my Kickstarter effort and have given me more time on deadlines when they knew I was working on projects outside of school.

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adrian burrell photo by andy to

Who has impacted you and your work at SFAI?

and organizations that need quality media content such as photos, videos, and graphic design. A portion of the money we make will go to making documentary and narrative projects that bring attention to the issues the world faces. Picture a Change is my overly optimistic conceit that we can change the world for the better.

Darcy Padilla is probably the professor at SFAI who has affected me the most. She helped me begin to believe that I can really do this for a living. She encouraged me to just go and do it—just start. She gave my peers and me information about grants and fellowships that could help us out. She introduced us to her friends and contacts. She continues to send us emails about opportunities that we should pursue. I really appreciate her hands-on, never-give-up attitude. She really cares.

Find out more about Adrian Burrell’s vision and projects at pictureachange.org

What are you trying to achieve with your current project? Picture a Change is my own take on “social entrepreneurship meets film.” It’s a platform to share the human experience as seen from the perspectives of people who are not frequently heard. It’s a production company started by a few close friends and myself. We aim to make content that inspires a sense of dreamlike imagination and moves people to action. We also provide a commercial service to people

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art

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120’, 2015 WATERCOLOR AND ACRYLIC ON YUPO, 60 X 1440 INCHES

PERFORMING DANCE PHOTO BY DREW ALTIZER

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annual report

BARI FLEISCHER (MFA PAINTING, 2015)


MAKING HISTORY: BARBRO + BARNEY OSHER With great generosity, Barbro and Barney Osher recently donated $1 million to the Making History capital campaign. Their gift raises the campaign total to more than $9 million. This is their second million-dollar gift to San Francisco Art Institute, the first being an endowment of the Osher Scholarship Fund in 1998. We are honored by this display of confidence in SFAI’s mission and future plans, and their extraordinary dedication to the arts. In recognition of their gift, SFAI’s lecture hall will be named The Osher Lecture Hall.

“[BOTH SFAI AND WELLS FARGO SHARE A] RESPONSIBILITY TO FURTHER ADVANCE THE WELL-BEING OF OUR COMMUNITY AND INSPIRE A FUTURE THAT VALUES THE ARTS.” the uncertainty salon, 2015 photo by shane o'neill

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WELLS FARGO SETS THE STANDARD FOR CORPORATE GIVING

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At Wells Fargo, we encourage team members to volunteer for causes that they are passionate about and that make them feel useful. My advice to student-artists and alumni would be the same: Volunteer in your community!

art

SFAI recently received its first corporate contribution to the Making History campaign—a $100,000 grant from the Wells Fargo Foundation. Mario Diaz, vice president of the Wells Fargo Foundation, shared his thoughts about SFAI’s future at Fort Mason Center and the responsibilities corporations have in securing a future for the arts in our community.

Over the years, I have seen team members get involved in a broad array of issues and organizations, stemming from their individual interest—health care, education, animal causes, and countless others. Student-artists and alumni should follow their instincts as to what will make them feel good and have the most meaningful impact. It could be counseling students, serving meals at a shelter, or helping a nonprofit improve their website. Their artistic and professional skills can improve the well-being of our community and each other.

How will Fort Mason Center better serve the community with SFAI as an anchor tenant?

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SFAI will be the catalyst in driving foot traffic to Fort Mason Center for locals and visitors who want to experience the unique and impressive work of San Francisco-based artists. People will enjoy knowing that each time they visit Fort Mason, they can see new, fresh artwork on display.

SFAI and Wells Fargo have a shared history of nearly 150 years as beacons of the cultural and economic fabric of the city. What qualities or characteristics do both institutions possess that will contribute to a stronger, more vibrant, San Francisco? We both share a long history and legacy in this iconic City by the Bay. With that history comes responsibility to further advance the well-being of our community and inspire a future that values the arts.

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annual report

Wells Fargo Foundation has always been at the forefront of corporate responsibility and citizenship. What is your advice to student-artists and alumni regarding their own roles as citizens?


GALA VERNISSAGE CELEBRATES ART + EFFECT opposite page: minoosh zomorodinia woman in grid, 2015

art

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soul

photo by drew altizer

annual report

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The spring festivities in mid-May 2015 featured the opening of San Francisco Art Institute’s the MFA and MA student exhibition Edge Effect and honored longtime arts visionary and advocate Roselyne Chroman (Cissie) Swig. In addition, the Roselyne Chroman Swig Scholarship Fund was established to provide students from a broad range of backgrounds the opportunity to pursue an SFAI education. In true SFAI-style, Swig donned an electrifying blue and purple silk coat designed by artist and friend William Wiley. The event raised more than $330,000 for student scholarships.

THE ROSELYNE CHROMAN SWIG SCHOLARSHIP FUND LAUNCHED AT GALA VERNISSAGE TO ENSURE THAT STUDENTS FROM A BROAD RANGE OF BACKGROUNDS HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO PURSUE AN SFAI EDUCATION. LEFT to RIGHT: cynthia plevin, charles desmarais and cissie swig photo by drew altizer

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2015 sfai concentrate

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alumni day

all photos by alessandra mello

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SFAI CONCENTRATE + ALUMNI DAY

art

In November, hundreds of people celebrated at SFAI Concentrate + Alumni Day with a student art sale, alumni exhibition, and family festivities.

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+ annual report

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CELEBRATING THE ART OF CHARLES HOBSON

from left : charles hobson , mario diaz , mady jones , dave nelson, d.a. brooke, kitty morgan photo by joshua band

charles hobson quarantine, 2011

Trustee, alumnus, and beloved teacher

artist book, mixed media

Professor Emeritus Charles Hobson

courtesy of the artist

shared his remarkable art, in July 2015. Hobson, who has published more than 40 contemporary artist books, gave a talk as part of SFAI’s Graduate Lecture Series, titled Taking Off Emily Dickinson’s Clothes: Approaching Contemporary Art Books.

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IN REMEMBRANCE

Richard Berger Memorial Celebrating the life of Richard Allen Berger 1944–2015 Paule Anglim Memorial Epiphany Epilogue

travis collinson untitled, 2014 graphite and pastel on paper

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x

10 inches

In late May 2015, San Francisco Art Institute’s campus hosted a gathering to honor the exceptional life and career of Paule Anglim. Guests appreciated words and performances by Ed Gilbert of Gallery Paule Anglim, longtime friend Katherine Sherwood, poet Bill Berkson, and artist-performer Terry Allen. A video of the complete program can be viewed at sfai.edu/pauleanglimservice. A naming fund has been established at SFAI in recognition of Paule’s myriad contributions to art and artists. To contribute, visit sfai.edu/makeagift.

richard and elephant courtesy of the estate of richard berger

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In mid-April 2015, friends and family of beloved SFAI faculty member Richard Berger came together at 800 Chestnut Street to celebrate his life and art. A fund was established by Richard’s family and friends that, as of December 2015, had raised more than $33,000. At the $50,000 mark, the fund will be used to establish the Richard Berger Studio in Pier 2 at Fort Mason Center. To contribute to the fund, visit sfai.edu/makeagift.


ANNUAL REPORT 2014–2015 BY THE NUMBERS $7.6 million in financial aid awarded with 87% of students receiving some form of institutional aid $330,000 raised at gala vernissage, with proceeds benefiting student scholarships

40,000 attendees at free exhibitions, lectures, and public programs

7,223 new fans on facebook for a

1,440 lightning strikes in the walter and mcbean

total of 37,076

galleries during the spring 2015 exhibition doug

456 likes, comments, and shares on a single facebook post

hall: the terrible uncertainty of the thing described, co-presented with sfmoma

675 FTE (full-time equivalent) enrolled students the highest in over 10 years

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7 years of reaccreditation earned in most recent Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) review 7 consecutive years of operating surpluses

6 “lost frescos� rediscovered on the walls of sfai’s 1926 building

137th commencement, with honorees theaster

95th place in new travel guide

gates (honorary doctor of fine arts) and sfmoma

111 places in san francisco

director neal benezra (douglas g. macagy

that you must not miss

distinguished achievement award)

59 student-artist exhibitions 49 visiting artists and scholars

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annual report

41 states and 37 countries represented by sfai students


FINANCIAL STATEMENT

Fiscal Year 2014–2015 was the seventh

annual fund report

consecutive year of operating surpluses. This was due to careful budgeting and cost controls and demonstrates that San Francisco Art Institute is in solid financial health. All surplus funds are used to benefit SFAI and the student experience. Examples include repairing/upgrading facilities and scholarships for student-artists.

audited financial information excludes capital campaign

FY2014-2015

TOTAL REVENUE FY2014-2015 tuition and fees

$27,129,445

housing

contributions investment income other

$1,578,110

$373,715

total revenue

$30,279,768

$1,099,601 $98,897

TOTAL EXPENSES FY2014-2015 college-funded scholarships

$7,644,113

instructional

institutional support facilities enrollment services housing marketing academic support public programs development community programs depreciation expense

$6,826,809

total expenses

$29,131,287

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$3,701,212 $2,567,675 $2,393,074 $1,446,655 $1,321,737 $837,675 $609,354 $534,538 $374,046 $874,399


TOTAL REVENUE FY2014-2015 tuition and fees

90%

housing

5%

contributions

4%

investment income

0%

other

1%

TOTAL EXPENSES FY2014-2015 college-funded scolarships

26%

instructional

23%

institutional support

13%

facilities

9%

enrollment services

8%

housing

5%

marketing

5%

academic support

3%

public programs

2%

development

2%

community programs

1%

depreciation expense

3%

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2014-2015 DONORS Gifts received for operating support, special projects, and scholarship funds July 1, 2014–June 30, 2015 Institute Circle ($50,000+) Anonymous* Winifred Johnson Clive Foundation Grants for the Arts/ San Francisco Hotel Tax Fund Historic Preservation Fund Josh Lipton and Wendy Clough Mental Insight Foundation Phoebe Snow Foundation President’s Circle ($10,000+) Anonymous (2) Henry Bell* D.A. Brooke Pegan Brooke and Tim Mott Enid Busser Christopher R. Coppola* Mary A. Crocker Trust Jennifer Emerson Penelope and Charles Finnie Diane and Charles Frankel Quentin and Sarah Gallivan Shelby and Frederick Gans Candace and Vince Gaudiani Charles* and Sandra Hobson Michael and Pepper Jackson Teresa Johnson and Daria Janese Quinn Delaney and Wayne Jordan Jay and Katie Kern Koret Foundation Bonnie Levinson and Donald Kay Jeff Magnin* Kathryn and Peter Muhs Jack K. and Gertrude Murphy Fund Michael* and Judy O’Shea* Joy Ou Cynthia Plevin and Nicholas Heldt Antony and Lara Ritch Elizabeth and Karl Ronn Matt Brooks and Pamela Rorke Levy John M. Sanger Seiler and Company, LLP Brent Sikkema* Steven Spector and Robert Ripps Marjorie Swig

Julie L. Wainwright Diane B. Wilsey Mike and Bobbie Wilsey

Roselyne C. Swig Susan Swig* Tad and Dianne Taube Chris Tellis and Isabella Kirkland c b and Dick Watts Wells Fargo Bank Dean’s Circle ($5,000+) Anonymous* American Industrial Center Joachim and Nancy Bechtle Rena Bransten David Crane and Carla Baird Crane Sandra de Saint Phalle Hank Feir Ferrilli Carolyn Zecca Ferris* and Timothy Ferris Fort Mason Foundation G2 Insurance Services Hirschfeld Kraemer LLP Kent Hodgetts* Peggy Lamoree Stephen and Maribelle Leavitt Noelle Leca and Michael Moradzadeh Flicka McGurrin* Christina Noren Edna M. Reichmuth Educational Fund Paul Sack Alice Ross Carey Preservation Fund/ San Francisco Architectural Heritage Susan and Patrick Scannon Jack and Betty Schafer Jeremy Stone USA Student Residences

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Tower Circle ($2,500+) Anonymous* Michael R. Chambers* Patricia S. Dinner Denise Donato-McConnell and Patrick McConnell Imogen Doumani David Dworman* Sam and Cathy Humphreys H. William Keland* and Roxana Keland-Bartholomay* Adaline Kent Memorial Fund Kevin King and Meridee Moore Richard and Pamela Kramlich Shari Lamanet La Londe* John and Leslie McQuown Dusan Mills Rachel Schreiber and David Gissen Nancy H. Schwanfelder Rick and Darian Swig Alan and Joanne Vidinsky Benjamin and Michele Wysocki* Courtyard Circle ($1,000+) Anonymous (2) Anita Adams Richard Alpert* Colin Bailey Alvin H. Baum and Robert Holgate David and Judy Beech Bill Berkson* and Connie Lewallen Nancy and Roger Boas Robert and Daphne Bransten Kit Cameron* and Peter Vaccaro Brian and Elizabeth Cayne* Robert Bechtle and Whitney Chadwick Jean Cherouny Donald and Jillian Clark Elizabeth Clark and Esteban L. Camahort


*SFAI Alumni A special thank you to donors to the Making History Capital Campaign, including the Richard Berger and Paule Anglim Studio Funds Anonymous (2) Alvin Baum and Robert Holgate Mary L. Beebe and Charles J. Reilly David and Judy Beech Bill Berkson and Constance Lewallen Ruth Berson Nancy and Roger Boas Agnes Bourne Frances F. Bowes Rena G. Bransten Sylvia Brown John Buck and Deborah Butterfield SallyAnn Carr

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annual report

Marna Clark Gianna dalla Gasperina Joseph Davies Kelny Denebeim and First Republic Bank Charles Desmarais and Kitty Morgan Leni Eccles Lynn Feintech and Anthony Bernhardt Julie and Greg Flynn Diana Fuller Jeff Garelick Stanlee Gatti Larry Goldfarb John Green Anne Herbst* Stephen and Kathy Hirschfeld James C. Hormel David and Madeline Israel Barbara and Ron Kaufman James D. Kavanagh Maureen Keefe Mark Kelley Michael Leavell Anthony Ligamari* and Juana Schurman George Lucas Family Foundation Frank Mainzer and Lonnie Zwerin Ivan and Ruth Majdrakoff Heather A. Martin* Paul Martinez Lisille and Henry Matheson Marsha Maytum Heather McFarlin Jim F. Melchert Eileen and Peter Michael Jo Lynn Milardovich Ruth Ellen Miller Hiro Narita* David and Julie Nelson Craig Nerenberg

L. J. and Jeanne Newman Howard and Jan Oringer Blair and Helen Pascoe Larry and Lillian Postaer Sarah Ratchye* and Edward Frank William Z. Richard* Kate Rittmann Lili Ruane* Espi and Veera Sanjana Richard* and Martha Shaw Denny Silver* W. Douglass Smith Judith Snyderman* Bruce and Diane Spaulding Michiko Tanabe Lydia Titcomb Cathy and Ned Topham Nancy Warren* Beth Weissman and Kevin Boru Kirsten Wolfe and Andrew Brown Todd Yancey William and Margery Zellerbach


2014-2015 DONORS Chuck Close and Magnolia Editions The Comer Foundation Fund Shirley Davis Jose de los Reyes Sandra de Saint Phalle Lisa Dolby Chadwick Jennifer L. Emerson Henry I. Feir Carolyn and Timothy Ferris Penelope Finnie The Fisher Family Diane and Charles Frankel Patrick Freilinger Estate of Emily Frost Stanlee R. Gatti Candace and Vincent Gaudiani Marc and Diana Goldstein Sarah L. Goldstein Mathieu Gregoire Don Ed Hardy and Francesca Passalacqua Charlene Harvey Caitlin Haskell Hobson Family Foundation Lauren A. Horelick Michael and Pepper Jackson George and Beverly James Teresa L. Johnson and Daria Janese Mady R. Jones Suzan Kaplan Barbara and Ron Kaufman Jay and Katie Kern Richard and Pamela Kramlich Susan Krane Sally Crowder Leonard Bonnie Levinson and Donald Kay Jamie and Marc Lunder The Lunder Foundation Jeffrey A. Magnin Patricia Mainini

Irving and Elizabeth Marcus Laurence V. Mathews Anthony and Celeste Meier James F. Melchert Jeanne Meyers Eileen and Peter Michael Jo Lynn Milardovich Susan Miller Elizabeth Moody Kathryn and Peter Muhs Eliot Nemzer Paul Olsen Charles and Barbara Ordahl Jan and Howard Oringer Michael and Judy O’Shea Bernard and Barbro Osher Joy Ou and Elvin Padilla David R. Packard and Margaret B. Castor Tito Patri and Bobby Reich-Patri Paula Cooper Gallery Sarah Phelan Susan Phillips Cynthia Plevin and Nicholas Heldt Lucy Puls Jane and Larry Reed Richard Reisman Lara Ritch Mary Kate Rittmann Elizabeth and Karl Ronn Matt Brooks and Pamela Rorke Levy Paul Sack John M. Sanger Paula Brubaker Sasso Jack and Betty Schafer

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The Schreck Family Rachel Schreiber and David Gissen San Francisco Art Dealers Association Jill and Richard See Jon E. Sorenson Steven Spector and Robert Ripps Russell Steinert Jeremy P. Stone Roselyne Chroman Swig Joanna Szupinska-Myers Chris A. Tellis and Isabella G. Kirkland Katrina Traywick Shannon Trimble Steve Uchytil Vanessa Vaughan Valerie Velardi Julie L. Wainwright Daniel Weinberg Wells Fargo Foundation William J. Zellerbach


BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Officers Cynthia Plevin, Chair Penelope Finnie, Vice Chair Bonnie Levinson, Secretary Chris A.Tellis, Treasurer Trustees Jennifer L. Emerson Diane B. Frankel Candace P. Gaudiani Charles Hobson* Teresa L. Johnson John C. Kern Jeffrey A. Magnin Joy Ou Helen Pascoe Elizabeth Ronn Pamela Rorke Levy Steven J. Spector

Trustees Emeriti Agnes C. Bourne Gardiner Hempel Howard Oringer Paul Sack Jack Schafer Roselyne C. Swig William J. Zellerbach Trustees-at-Large Don Ed Hardy* Annie Leibovitz* Barry McGee* Brent Sikkema* *Alumni

annual report

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

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annual report

This historic photograph shows Studios 9 and 10, the iconic New Genres studios, looking toward Francisco Street, c. 1948. Photographer Minor White, SFAI faculty member and the first editor of Aperture, is at the view camera. Studios 9 and 10, which had been closed for several years, were renovated and reopened to students in Fall 2015. photo by al richter courtesy of the center for creative photography

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ART + EFFECT  

In this issue of ART + EFFECT, the SFAI community comes together to celebrate its richness and diversity. Past and present student-artists,...

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