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Wausau School District

2015-2016 Annual Report


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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Shared Key Interests........................................................................ 3 Message from Superintendent of Schools................................... 4 WSD Fast Facts................................................................................ 5 Message from School Board President......................................... 7 Business Services.............................................................................. 8 School Nutrition Services Buildings and Grounds Career & Technical Education..................................................... 12 Communication.............................................................................. 14 Education........................................................................................ 15 Human Resources and Employee Relations.............................. 16 O.N.E (WSD Volunteer Program).................................................. 18 G2M - Growing Great Minds (Out-of-School Learning)........... 19 Pupil Services.................................................................................. 20 Special Education........................................................................... 22 2016-2017 Wausau School District Calendar............................. 23 Technology Services...................................................................... 24 SCHOOLS Franklin Elementary School......................................................... 26 Grant Elementary School............................................................. 28 Hawthorn Hills Elementary School............................................ 30 Hewitt-Texas Elementary School................................................ 32 Thomas Jefferson Elementary School........................................ 34 G.D. Jones Elementary School..................................................... 36 A.C. Kiefer Educational Center................................................... 38 Lincoln Elementary School.......................................................... 42 Maine Elementary School............................................................. 44 John Marshall Elementary School............................................... 46 Rib Mountain Elementary School............................................... 48 Riverview Elementary School...................................................... 50 South Mountain Elementary School........................................... 52 Stettin Elementary School............................................................ 54 Wausau Area Montessori Charter School.................................. 56 Horace Mann Middle School....................................................... 58 John Muir Middle School.............................................................. 60 Enrich, Excel, Achieve Learning Academy................................ 66 WAVE - Wausau Area Virtual Education.................................. 68 Gold Card........................................................................................ 69 Wausau East High School............................................................. 70 Wausau Engineering & Global Leadership Academy.............. 74 Wausau West High School............................................................ 76 Wausau School Forest................................................................... 82

Our Mission...To advance student le


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

SHARED KEY INTERESTS Advance student learning, achievement, and success by keeping it at the heart and as the filter for our decision making.

Education

Utilize research-based curricula that reflects 21st Century themes and applications and are responsive to the needs and potential of all students, preparing them for a global society. Provide real-life, diverse learning opportunities with practical applications in the classroom and beyond. Inform and engage the community in shaping educational strategy and formulating responses to change. Attract, retain, and develop a high quality, diverse, creative, and innovative workforce of leaders. Provide safe, secure, flexible, inviting, and well-maintained environments that nurture student well-being and enhance teaching and learning. Identify, integrate, and expand technology to foster adaptability and maximize learning for all. Foster mutually beneficial partnerships and collaborations that expand learning opportunities and resources.

earning, achievement, and success.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

MESSAGE FROM SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Dr. Kathleen Williams

Welcome to the 2015-2016 issue of the Wausau School District Annual Report! Per usual, this year’s Annual Report is intended to provide you and other stakeholders with a synopsis of the major events, actions, highlights, and key work of our entire District – from the Board of Education to District departments to our individual schools. I hope you find this year’s report both informative as well as enlightening. Sincerely,

Dr. Kathleen Williams Superintendent of Schools


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

WausauSCHOOL SchoolDISTRICT District FAST FACTS WAUSAU FAST FACTS

CHARTER S

1 Early Childhood Center

46% STUDENTS receive

Free and Reduced Meals

Thirteenth largest school

district in the state of Wisconsin

174 days of school

9 School

34

White. . . . . . . . . . . . 67.7% Asian. . . . . . . . . . . . 19.2% Hispanic. . . . . . . . . . . 5.0% Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4% American Indian . . . 0.9% Hawaiian Pacific Islander. . . . . 0.6% 2 or more . . . . . . . . . . 4.8%

WSD encompasses 258 SQUARE MILES 9 MUNICIPALITIES

Over 1,200 Employees

STUDENT ETHNICITY

(yellow bus) to transport students to and from school

LANGUAGES spoken

409,889 Breakfasts served

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TWO High Schools

962,902 Lunches served

13 Elementary Schools 1 VirtualEducation School 950,000 MILES 2 Middle Schools traveled by First Student Nearly

Board Members

8,443 STUDENTS preK-12 ------53% female 47% male

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

MESSAGE FROM OUR SCHOOL BOARD PRESIDENT Lance Trollop

During the 2015-2016 year, the Board of Education worked on several items that carried over from the prior year and also regularly addressed new agenda items. We continued our practice of reviewing Board policies, typically addressing several policies at every meeting of the Policy, Resolution & Legislation (PRL) Committee of the Whole. In summer of 2015, we approved the adoption of new math instructional materials for Wausau East and Wausau West high schools. The Board also approved the purchase of property on North 3rd Avenue next to Thomas Jefferson Elementary School to increase the size of the parking lot and to improve the drive-through lane for pick-up and drop-off of students.

Lance Trollop President Theresa R. Miles Vice President Jane A. Rusch Treasurer Yvonne Henning Clerk Jeff Leigh Beth Martin Patrick McKee Mary Thao Kathi Whalen Geiger

In fall, the Board approved a $98 million District budget. We also received a report from a committee in response to a Board referral to study world language options. Over the course of six meetings, the committee comprised of students, parents, teachers, and administrators, conducted research into world language alternatives and potential enhancements. The Board requested additional research into potential pilot programs. As we moved into the winter the Teacher Compensation Team requested, and the Board approved, the continued use of Justin Petrarca as a facilitator of this important committee. Progress has been made, and the teacher compensation model will be developed further next year as well. In spring, the District’s technology plan took a big step forward as we approved the purchase of Chromebooks and the lease of iPads to make our devices one-to-one for the 2016-2017 school year. Also, in spring, three Board member positions were up for election. Theresa Miles and Jane Rusch were reelected and the Board welcomed a new member, Mary Thao. A Board reorganization meeting always follows and this year officer positions did not change. I was again elected President, Theresa Miles was elected Vice President, Jane Rusch was elected Treasurer, and Yvonne Henning was elected Clerk. As the school year neared completion, the Board established a Long-term Capital Improvement Trust Fund. This will allow the


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

District to set aside funds in a dedicated account to be used for expenditures consistent with an approved long-range capital improvement plan.

Education

Throughout the entire 2015-2016 fiscal year, a significant amount of Board time was spent on two recurring agenda items related to facilities utilization. This process began with a committee of District, parent, and community members five years ago and lead to last year’s referendum. One of the related recurring agenda items this year was a continued analysis of our elementary school boundaries. In September the Board hired Martenson and Eisele, Inc., to facilitate a committee of parents from each elementary school to study school boundaries and make recommendations to provide more equitable elementary enrollment. The committee’s recommendation was presented to the Board on February 22, 2016; and, after discussion that evening, a special meeting was held later in February with open comment for parents and other community members. The Board continued to study and discuss boundaries in March and decided, at that time, that we would not change boundaries for the 2016-2017 school year and that we would continue to discuss the issue with the hope of a final decision in time for the 2017-18 school year. Boundaries have continued to be studied and discussed by the Board every month since. The other recurring agenda item in 2015-2016 was related to implementing the successful $29,565,000 construction referendum which was supported by voters in April of 2015. Starting in August, “referendum construction update” became an agenda item at each monthly meeting. In November, site plans for the Thomas Jefferson and G.D. Jones elementary additions were finalized and contractor bids were awarded. By February of 2016, construction at both schools was well under way and contractor bids were also awarded for the Riverview and Hawthorn Hills elementary additions. Contractor bids for the Wausau East and Wausau West high schools projects were awarded in March and, by April, construction was taking place at all six schools. Prior to the successful referendum vote, it was predicted that the mill rate impact of the $29,565,000 debt would be 12 cents per every $1,000 of property value (or $12 for the owner of a $100,000 home.) The Board was pleased to learn in July of 2015 that the impact was lower, at 10 cents per every $1,000 of property value (or $10 for the owner of a $100,000 home). Also, the combined interest rate on the $29,565,000 debt (we divided it into two debt issues), ended up being 3.06%, which was less than we predicted prior to the vote. The good news is this means over the course of the 20-year term the total cost of the 2015 referendum debt will be $4.2 million less than initially anticipated. Looking forward to future months, we will see the finalization of the referendum construction projects and we will continue to work on elementary boundaries to improve the balance of enrollment in our elementary schools. We encourage you to stay informed by attending our meetings, watching them on television (or online), and reading our monthly Board Action and Committee Clips newsletters that are posted to the District’s website.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

BUSINESS SERVICES

Robert Tess, CSRM, Chief Finance & Business Services Officer Financial Challenges and Opportunities As 2015-2016 closes, and we prepare for the next school year, fiscal challenges to Wisconsin’s PreK-12 public schools remain a concern that will need to be addressed while maintaining student learning, achievement, and success as a top priority. State-wide revenue limits are still lower per pupil than in 2010 with the coming year offering little relief as that amount is expected to remain constant once again. In spite of the lack in state funding, District leaders continuously reevaluate spending to align resources with our Shared Key Interests and protect students as much as possible from necessary budget reductions. Furthermore, the coming budget offers salary and wage increases for all employee groups at or beyond the Consumer Price Index for the fourth consecutive year while holding health and dental costs steady during that same time span. District budgets will continue to reflect these priorities by funding computing devices for students; providing necessary support services for all students; attracting, retaining, and developing talented leaders; and maintaining safe and secure learning environment, as examples. The initial 2016-2017 budget was approved by the Board of Education with several modifications incorporating data that is currently unknown to move through the final process in summer and fall. However, the tax levy is anticipated to remain relatively level as compared to last year.

Referendum-Funded Construction Following a successful April 2015 capital improvement referendum, the District was fully engaged in design work for the six building addition and remodeling projects. Additional classroom space and 4K Learning Academies are scheduled to open at Hawthorn Hills, Riverview, G.D. Jones, and Thomas Jefferson elementary schools this fall. Additionally, technology education classrooms and lab spaces are scheduled to open this fall at Wausau East and Wausau West high schools. Construction commenced during the winter months on each of these building projects with work continuing throughout the summer for the scheduled opening in August 2016. Through careful planning, suitable weather, use of existing District resources, and several significant donations, all projects are expected to open on time and within the original budget. An example of fiscal responsibility -- the District repurposed more than 1,900 items of furniture and equipment for these new and remodeled spaces. Financing these projects was accomplished through the sale of general obligation construction bonds. The bond sale was strategically divided into two offerings to leverage current market conditions with the final sale taking place in February 2016. This strategy resulted in a final interest cost for the full $29,545.000 bond issue of approximately $12,677,000, whereas the original pre-referendum estimate used was $16,910,000, a savings of over $4.2 million from what was projected.

Affordable Care Act Reporting and Health Insurance Changes To be in compliance with the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the Payroll Department sent all employees documented evidence of health insurance coverage and associated costs for the first time since the ACA became reality. Ultimately, the simple 1095-C form that all employees received through payroll does not accurately reflect the hours of planning and preparation done to assure compliance with the ACA and to demonstrate that the District does indeed offer valuable and affordable coverage to employees. More noteworthy perhaps, at the beginning of 2016, was the introduction of a new choice for health plan participants, the optional High Deductible Health Plan with Health Savings Account (HDHP/HSA). This optional health insurance coverage offers participants a significant District contribution towards an HSA along with lower premiums to


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

offset the higher deductible. The start of 2016-2017 also represents the sixth consecutive year that family and individual health and dental insurance premiums will not increase.

Nutrition Services

Education

The School Nutrition Services Department began the 2015-2016 school year with a new management staff. Director of Nutrition Services: Lee Nielsen was hired as Director in August. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Hotel and Restaurant Management from UW-Stout and joined the Wausau School District in 2013 as kitchen manager at Wausau West High School. Previously, Lee held food service management positions in the private sector and was the Director of Food Service at Lakeland Union High School. Nutrition Specialist: Karen Fochs joined the department in September. Karen has a strong dietetics background and holds a Masters Degree in Dietetics from UW-Stevens Point. She previously was the Food Service Director of North Central Health Care. Karen has focused on the redesign and enhancement of the District’s elementary breakfast and lunch menus, advancement of our Farm-to-School initiative, directing the Summer Learning feeding program, and upgrading and implementing the Department’s new web-based nutritional analysis software program. Administrative Assistant: Tracy Bliese joined the department in September. She organizes and manages the Department’s accounting, computer/software functions, and overall office operations. Administrative Assistant (half-time): Ann Bunkelmann joined the department in December. She developed a web-based food ordering system for the 13 elementary schools. The Department has moved forward in many areas during this past year. We continue to provide healthy, well balanced meals to over 5,500 students daily. As a new management team, we have been able to evaluate and improve the program through a fresh perspective while implementing changes as appropriate. Department and Facility Improvements • Designed the expansion of the dining area at G.D. Jones Elementary School. • Designed the new and expanded kitchen, serving, and dining spaces at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School. • Expanded the kitchen at Lincoln Elementary School. • Added a dishwasher at Grant Elementary School. • Redesigned the dining and serving spaces at John Muir Middle School. • Added, in fall 2015, Franklin Elementary School as a CEP (Community Eligibility Program) school, bringing the number of elementary schools to six that provide universally free breakfast and lunch meals. • Consolidated and reclassified the Department’s wage structure. Department Facts Number of staff: 84 Meal service sites: 17 Summer Learning service sites: 8 After-School Snack Program sites: 8 4K Special Milk Program sites: 7

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

BUSINESS SERVICES Number of CEP Elementary schools: 6 Free and Reduced Student Percentage: 46% Breakfasts served: 409,889 or approx 2,300 per day Lunches served: 962,902 or approx 5,500 per day Looking forward to 2016-2017 • The kitchen at Thomas Jefferson Elementary School will become a full production kitchen. • Continue professional learning standards implemented in 2015-2016. • Continue expansion of the “Farm to School - Harvest of the Month” locally grown foods program. • Compare, analyze, and benchmark current program data to facilitate continued advancement of program. • Continue to increase availability of fresh fruits and vegetables offered in the elementary schools for both breakfast and lunch meals. • Revise student allergy information forms to better manage needs. The Nutrition Services Department strives to provide high quality meals that enhance student learning, achievement, and success.

Buildings and Grounds The Buildings and Grounds Department continues to build on previous efficiency gains as well as to implement new cost savings measures through the completion of a number of upgrades/repairs and critical analysis of process and procedures. The Department continues to leverage existing partnerships and acquire news ones in conjunction with the Business Department to prepare the District for future success. The most significant of these achievements are outlined below. The District’s performance contractor, Nexus Solutions, is in the implementation stages of numerous performance upgrades under the energy efficiency exemption to the revenue limit. Most notable are: • Roof replacements of 120,000 square feet. • Boiler replacements at Thomas Jefferson, G.D. Jones, Riverview, and Hawthorn Hills elementary schools. • Building automation upgrades District wide (bring every building up to the current version and release). • Air handling upgrades and/or chiller replacements at John Marshall and Hawthorn Hills elementary schools, Horace Mann and John Muir middle schools, and Wausau West High School. The cumulative effect of these changes, combined with the upgrade of our building automation system, results in more closely controlled buildings while reducing our energy consumption and improving occupant comfort. We continue to build on the already strong partnerships with local government entities. These relationships have enabled us to cost share on significant purchases; utilize their services for educational purposes; and work collaboratively on solutions for radio communication, bus drop-off area improvements, and stormwater management solutions. In almost all cases, the solutions proved beneficial to both entities and provided costs savings to the taxpayer. The Buildings and Grounds Department conducts numerous competitive sourcing exercises


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

annually and biannually, resulting in the best value for goods and services necessary in operation of our District. The most significant of these include:

Education

• Competitively sourcing elevator maintenance and reducing our service providers from three to one, saving approximately $4,700 annually. • Competitively sourcing MRO (maintenance, repairs, and operations) supplies with a savings of nearly 10% over previous years. • Continually enhance fuel (gas, diesel, LP, and natural gas) purchasing strategies to leverage favorable market conditions and lock-in pricing when appropriate. • Competitively sourcing the purchase of replacement turf and grounds equipment across vendors and manufacturers. • Competitively sourcing the disposal of recyclable materials including monitors, IT equipment, hazardous waste, confidential material, metals, and cardboard. Historically these items were disposed of at a cost; many now generate a modest income stream. The Buildings and Grounds Department completed numerous projects in addition to routine replacements of carpet, tile, sidewalks, plumbing fixtures, paint, and countless other repairs and grounds-related improvements. Some notable projects include: • Replaced annealed glass with tempered glass in our elementary schools. • Re-purposed tennis courts at Thom Field. • Refurbished tennis courts at Wausau East. • Renovated a corridor/restroom at Wausau West. • Renovated the stage/elevator addition at Wausau West. • Converted emergency panels from analog to cellular. • Replaced analog surveillance cameras with digital. • Replaced lockers at John Muir. • Replaced 50 exterior doors due to rust and deterioration. • Replacement of approximately 120,000 square feet of roof. • Replaced outdated print equipment. The Buildings and Grounds Department also implemented a number of programs and processes designed to increase efficiency, increase regulatory compliance levels, improve worker safety, ensure accountability, and foster professional development to enhance our ability to promote from within the District. These include: • Implemented a tracking solution for MRO supply consumption to ensure materials and supplies are used appropriately. • Implemented a tracking solution for consumable supplies to identify use patterns and offer guidance for locations that have higher than normal use rates. • Continued investing and offering professional development to our employees to enhance their value and minimize reliance on outside entities for technical support. • Implemented an online facility use and reservation process. • Invested in equipment and training for janitorial processes that are more efficient, effective, and utilize chemical-free solutions. Through the hard work and dedication of our Buildings and Grounds Department, our schools continue to be a source of pride in our community as well as safe, inviting, flexible, and well maintained environments for our students and staff. With the support of the Board of Education and Administration, we look forward to continued success in 2016-2017 and beyond.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION

Jon Winter, Career & Technical Education / LVEC Coordinator The focus of Career and Technical Education (CTE) is to prepare students for a wide range of careers that reflect the contemporary workplace. CTE programs incorporate academic and technical standards that equip students with skills necessary for successful transition to postsecondary education or work while promoting life-long learning in a global society. Direct ties to community, education, and the workforce are essential to every CTE program and allow learning to take place in multiple settings that result in students earning a local, state, or industry credential. Work-based learning programs enhance business/education partnerships, provide students with opportunities to reinforce skills learned in the classroom in a work-setting, and teach employability skills and work behaviors to be effective in the workforce. CTE departments include: • Agriculture and Natural Resources • Family and Consumer Sciences • Technology and Engineering Education

• •

Business and Information Technology Marketing, Management, and Entrepreneurship

The 2015-16 school year was an exciting year in the Career and Technical Education Departments as we set our sights on the future expansion and renovation projects at Wausau East and Wausau West high schools. These projects are focused in high-demand areas such as agriculture, automotive, and manufacturing. Students will benefit by having enhanced facilities, curriculum, and equipment that will train them for postsecondary opportunities in college or on the job. Local business and industry have been very supportive of these projects, which were approved by voters through a referendum election in April 2015, by helping the District inform the community of the demands of the workforce and the need for our CTE expansion. This community support was a direct result of the leadership teams from Central Wisconsin Metal Manufactures Alliance (CWIMMA) and the Wisconsin Trucking Automotive Education Association (WATEA). Organizations like this continue to partner with the District by participating in focus groups, providing resources, and creating new opportunities for our students.

2015-2016 CTE Highlights 66 students earned Technical Skills Certifications through Department of Public Instruction or Department of Workforce Development in: • Assistant Childcare Teacher • Infant Toddler • Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) • Marketing Certified Skills Portfolio • Child Services • Youth Apprenticeships • Employability Skills 35 students participated in Youth Apprenticeship programs at Wausau East and Wausau West high schools. Theses students are currently placed in the following pathways: • Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources • Information Technology • Architecture and Construction • Science, Technology, Engineering, Math (STEM) • Transportation Distribution and Logistics • Finance • Health • Manufacturing


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

432 students enrolled in our Career and Technical Student Organizations representing the following areas: • FFA - Future Farmers of America • DECA - An Association of Marketing Students • SkillsUSA - Trade, technical, and skilled service occupations • FCCLA - Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America

Education

106 students enrolled in Project Lead the Way, Pre-Engineering/STEM courses: • Introduction to Engineering & Design • Principles of Engineering • Engineering Design & Development • Computer Science Engineering

Additional Highlights • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Wausau East and Wausau West DECA programs both received national recognition for their certified school-based enterprise. They also participated in the Polar Plunge for Wisconsin Special Olympics and raised nearly $10,000 with 40 students taking the Plunge. High School FFA members hosted 580 fourth grade and special needs students for our annual Food For America program. 16 FFA members attended the National FFA Convention to receive leadership training and toured Fair Oaks Farrowing Barn, Church Hill Downs, and the Louisville Zoo. All 8th grade students participated in Career Day that allowed them to attend the 8th Grade Career Fair with 65 employers and to receive lessons from Junior Achievement on career decisions. 225 students attended the first annual Youth Employment Fair held in partnership with the United Way of Marathon County and the Boys & Girls Club of Wausau. All 8th grade students participated in the “Heavy Metal” tour where they toured two local manufacturing facilities to experience careers in manufacturing. The event was in partnership with the Central Wisconsin Metal Manufacturing Alliance. Wausau East Health Occupations classes toured Northcentral Technical College’s Health Science Building and gained hands-on experience with dementia simulation, starting IV’s, giving injections, and finding/listening to vital signs. 35 students attended the Auto Collision Repair and Refinishing Discovery Day at Northcentral Technical College’s Antigo Campus. Wausau East’s Advanced Manufacturing class built and sold a utility trailer to help support their program. Wausau West’s Project Lead the Way competed in a design challenge where students partnered with North Central Healthcare to design and build vocational solutions for employees with special needs. Wausau East’s Family Consumer Science developed an Assistant Childcare Teacher (ACCT) program. Wausau West High School’s Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) students competed at the regional and state competitions in a variety of competitions. Wausau West’s Business Education Department qualified a team of students for state competition in only the second year of the program.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

COMMUNICATIONS

Amy Arlen, Communications Coordinator The Communications Department is proud to share information about our students, schools, staff, and programs. Our work centers around our Shared Key Interests and the District’s mission of advancing student learning, achievement, and success. This year, the Communications Department moved forward with a social media presence ~ Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube ~ #WausauSchools. You are invited and encouraged to like and follow us! We have so much to share and celebrate! For the 2016-2017 school year, the District will open its new 4K Learning Academies at G.D. Jones, Hawthorn Hills, Riverview, and Thomas Jefferson elementary schools as well as new and expanded career and technical education spaces at Wausau East and Wausau West high schools. A huge thank you goes out to the Wausau community for supporting our April 2015 referendum! Our students and staff look forward to moving into these new and remodeled spaces ~ it’s been many months since the groundbreakings were held! And, wait, there’s more. Work is underway to completely modernize the District’s Planetarium. When the Planetarium re-opens in fall, it will have a new look and will feature new digital capabilities. This modernization project was made possible by a $230,000 grant from the Walter Alexander Foundation. The Board of Education bestowed Resolutions of Commendation to Jena Lawson, 4th Grade Teacher at South Mountain Elementary School, and Paul Clark, Social Studies Teacher at Wausau East High School, for receiving the 2016 Teacher Fellowship by the Herb Kohl Educational Foundation.The Resolution of Commendation program is a formal process the Board uses to recognizestudents, staff, and community members who have brought honor and notoriety to themselves through outstanding achievement, recognition at state and national levels, and/or community service. The program began in 1995 and 148 individuals and groups have been recognized. Names and dates of all recipients are proudly displayed in the Nicholson Board Room at the Longfellow Administration Center. The Communications Department facilitates the Resolution of Commendation program. The Board of Education honored and recognized 66 District team members (25-Year Club inductees and retirees) at the District’s Annual 25-Year Club & Retirement Banquet. A highlight of the banquet was the induction of a Wausau School District graduate into the District’s Hall of Fame; a program that began in 1983. This year’s inductee was Michael Cepress, a 1999 graduate of Wausau West High School. Michael is a fashion designer, artist, and educator and owns Michael Cepress Design Studio in Seattle, Washington. Photos and plaques of all Hall of Fame inductees are proudly displayed in the Nicholson Board Room at the Longfellow Administration Center. The Communications Department coordinates this special event. The District continued with both formal and informal methods of engagement. Our annual parent and staff engagement surveys were administered in spring, and the parent survey results will inform schools’ improvement plans. The staff engagement survey results will inform District department SMART goals and schools’ improvement plans. An informal method of community engagement dubbed, Table Talk!, began last year. Dr. Williams, Superintendent of Schools, hosted a Table Talk! session at a local restaurant as an opportunity for the community to casually meet with her and members of her administrative team to ask questions and to seek information about the District. Again this year, the Board of Education’s regular monthly and committee of the whole meetings were televised live through Wausau Area Access Channels. The meetings are also rebroadcast and hosted online via video on demand. You may contact the Superintendent’s Office at 715-261-0505 to check out a DVD for a particular meeting. All of the Board’s meeting agendas, materials, and minutes can be found on the District’s website.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

EDUCATION

Dr. Mike Schwei, PK-12 Director of Curriculum & Instruction • Thom Hahn, Director of Secondary Education • Andrea Sheridan, Director of Teaching, Learning & Leadership Integration

A goal of the Education Department is to create and implement a guaranteed and viable curriculum in all content areas PK4-12 that will directly impact student achievement.

Education

Additionally, 80% of students will be proficient readers at their grade level by spring 2017. Check out this video to see our new literacy resources being implemented in elementary classrooms across the District:

https://youtu.be/JyK-cdjQdHE

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

HUMAN RESOURCES & EMPLOYEE RELATIONS Jeff Gress, SPHR, Director of Human Resources & Employee Relations New Compensation Model for Teachers 2015-16 marked the second year of the District’s new compensation system for its teachers. In 2013 the Board authorized Administration to form a team, including teachers, administrators, and board members, to begin researching and designing a new compensation model forteachers. The new model was initially implemented at the beginning of the 2014-2015 school year. In 2015-16, teachers were able to begin taking advantage of key design features of the model by credentialing (which is an annual process that includes completion of specific training and meeting Educator Effectiveness requirements) and earning professional development points (through the completion of District-offered courses, college credits, seminars, etc.). The combination of cre entialing and earning a specified number of professional development points can result in the ability to advance on the compensation model. The Compensation Design Team has continued its work over the past school year and will continue to refine and further develop the model in the coming year.

Health and Wellness Initiatives Staff Wellness Program -- Program Year 4 The District recognizes the many benefits of a staff wellness program and continues to promote a culture of wellness. Beginning in 2012 and continuing through June 2016, we partnered with WellNation (formerly Trotter Wellness) to provide a comprehensive health and wellness management program to our employees and their spouses. The primary goal of the program continues to be long-term improvement in the overall health and wellness of District employees and their spouses. The key components of the program includes an annual health screening panel (i.e., biometric screening), annual health risk assessment (HRA), targeted telephonic health coaching sessions (by WellNation’s professional health coaching staff), and year-long targeted programs and activities. The ongoing success of the wellness program is measured based on data from employee participation rates, aggregate biometric health screening results, telephonic health/wellness coaching sessions, changes in our aggregate average wellness scores, and the percentage of employees in risk groups. (The District does not receive any individual data on wellness program participants -- only group aggregate data). Year 4 of the Wellness Program has shown a slight decrease in participation. Of the 903 participants who initially enrolled in the program for this year, 704 successfully completed the program (i.e., 509 employees and 195 spouses) and qualified for the incentive. Individual feedback and survey data from participants indicated that engagement and overall satisfaction with the wellness program was declining. Accordingly, early in 2016, the Wellness Steering Team began exploring options for enhancing participation and satisfaction levels of the program. As a result, the Steering Team has developed plans for exciting program changes for the coming year.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

The Insurance Committee

Education

The Insurance Committee, with representatives from all employee groups, has been meeting regularly for over 13 years. In 2015-2016, the District Insurance Committee continued to study the effectiveness of our self-funded health plan and considered options to help slow the increasing costs of health insurance and stay in compliance with new health care reform laws. Based on the Insurance committee’s recommendation, and with the Board’s approval, in January, our employees were given the option to switch from the regular health plan to a high deductible health plan (HDHP). Upon its introduction, 29% of employees enrolled in our self-funded health plan opted to change to the HDHP. Employees have the ability to switch to or from the HDHP on an annual basis. The Insurance Committee believes the popularity of the HDHP, and enrollment in the plan, will grow as positive feedback from those in the plan is shared. We are also pleased to report that health insurance premiums did not increase in 2015 and will remain unchanged in 2016. This is the fifth consecutive year without a premium increase.

Staffing and Human Resources Statistics The Human Resources & Employee Relations Department filled 80 vacancies in its certified groups, i.e., teachers and administrators, during the 2015-2016 fiscal year, down 6% from the previous year. These vacancies were due to retirements, resignations, transfers, discharges, and changes in the needs of the District. Staffing for our Summer Learning Program remained consistent with the prior year’s levels.

Vacancies filled by employee group and for the Summer Learning Program: Non-certified Staff Nutrition Services: 27 (up 12% from previous year) Administrative & Educational Support: 78 (up 1.3% from previous year) Maintenance & Custodial: 16 (up 45% from previous year) Municipal: 3 (up 50% from previous year) Summer Learning Support Staff: 127 (down 1.5% from previous year) Average number of applicants per posted vacancy: 14 (down 7% from previous year) Certified Staff Teacher retirements (as of June 30, 2016): 29 (up 45% from previous year) Teacher resignations (as of June 30, 2016): 41 (up 41% from previous year) Teachers hired (replacing 2014-15 retirements/resignations and additional staff): 72 (down 14% from previous year) Summer Learning teaching staff: 219 (1% increase from previous year) Average number of applicants per posted vacancy: 13 Administrator retirements (as of June 30, 2016): 2 (same as previous year) Administrator resignations (as of June 30, 2016): 7 (up 40% from previous year) Administrators hired (for the 2015-16 fiscal year) 10 (up 150% from previous year) Percentage of WSD teachers with a master’s degree: 73% (down 4% from previous year) Substitute Staff Teacher substitutes hired: 64* (up 28% from previous year) Support staff substitutes hired: 26 (up 8% from previous) *Maintaining adequate staffing level of substitute teachers and support staff continues to be a challenge.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

OUR NETWORK FOR EDUCATION (O.N.E.)

Roxane Hagedorn, Volunteer & Community Involvement Coordinator The Wausau community is very fortunate to have parents and community members who voluntarily give of their time and talents to support our students and staff. Our volunteers are partners in one of the most important jobs our community has, educating our youth. The Wausau School District’s volunteer program, Our Network for Education (O.N.E.) fits firmly into the District’s Shared Key Interest to “Foster mutually beneficial partnerships and collaborations that expand learning opportunities and resources.” Volunteers are not required to log their volunteering hours. However, for the 287 volunteers we have information on, they logged 3,616 hours for the 2015-16 school year, totaling $81,287.68. (The value of a volunteer hour in Wisconsin is $22.48.*) Of those hours and value, United Way RSVP volunteers logged over 400 hours, valued at over $9,000. The Wausau School District has a valuable partnership with United Way’s RSVP Program (program for volunteers age 55 and older). One priority area of the Program’s grant is education, making the partnership a perfect fit. RSVP volunteers can be found providing general classroom assistance, mentoring, listening or reading to students, and so much more. The O.N.E. Program continued to offer volunteers across the District the opportunity for literacy training from the District Reading Specialist. The two-hour training gave reading volunteers the opportunity to learn how to be most effective. Volunteers have continually stated how valuable the training is when working with students in our schools. At the end of each school year, volunteers are surveyed. These results are invaluable, as they help the District understand where improvements need to be made and where we are doing a good job. Our most recent survey (2014-15 school year) indicated 95% of respondents were extremely satisfied or satisfied with their volunteer experience, 89% indicated they felt they were making an impact by volunteering, and 88% of respondents were very likely or likely to continue volunteering. *The value of volunteer time is determined by Independent Sector for 2015. This number is based on the hourly earnings (approximated from yearly values) of all production and non-supervisory workers on private non-farm payrolls average (based on yearly earnings provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics). Independent Sector indexes this figure to determine state values and increases it by 12 percent to estimate for fringe benefits.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

G2M - GROWING GREAT MINDS

Nancy Cedar, G2M Out-of-School Learning Coordinator The Wausau School District strives to reach as many students and families as possible in before-school, after-school, summer learning, and family programs; all of which encompasses what we now term “Out-of- School Programs.” These programs are made possible through a variety of resources, including 21st Century CLC grants, Title I funds, the District’s community service fund, and community partnerships. New collaborations this past year include the Aspirus and Ministry Foundations, the Wausau Children’s Museum and the UW-Extension and each offers health and wellness programming. We are grateful to have a School Board and community that recognize and value out-of- school programs and have for over 15 years. These programs are open to all who reside within the District’s attendance area, including those who are home-schooled or attend private schools.

Education

More than 2,600 students participated in out-of- school programs at the elementary and middle school sites and approximately 500 adults participated in family programming. Of the students who participated, 53% qualified for free or reduced lunch and 40% of the students werenon-Caucasian, reflecting the diversity of the District. We are again offering the summer Community Connection program, now in its sixth year. This six-week afternoon program links with the District’s morning program, creating full-day enrichment opportunities for students. This program is offered in partnership with a number of community agencies and resources and serves 300 students across all summer learning sites. The Wausau School District’s Family University Network is looking forward to partnering with Childcaring and other local agencies this fall to offer a Parent Café series at G.D. Jones Elementary School. Watch for information on this program that builds on protective factors of family resiliency and strengths-based parenting, which we hope to offer at additional locations. Research shows the importance of out-of- school learning to support the social development and academic success of all our students. We invite community involvement in our out-of- school programs as a participant, community partner, volunteer, or financial supporter. A campaign launched last fall to brand a new logo and name for the Wausau School District out-of- school enrichment programs, grades K-8. The program’s new name is Growing Great Minds (G2M). We introduced this at a Spotlight on Education to the School Board in October 2015 showing the comprehensive scope of these programs. Enrichment Coordinators, or other teaching staff, plan out-of- school enrichment and parent involvement activities. New for the 2016-2017 school year, John Marshall and Riverview Elementary Schools will have part-time Enrichment Coordinators, along with other elementary Title I sites (Thomas Jefferson, Grant, Lincoln, GD Jones, Franklin, and Hawthorn Hills) and at Horace Mann and John Muir Middle Schools.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

PUPIL SERVICES

Dr. Jeff Lindell, Director of Pupil Services

The Pupil Services Department continued its priority work around two SMART goals during the 2015-2016 school year. Specifically, the goals are to “Advance safety and security measures utilized by our District buildings and learning environments,” and to “Evaluate and establish programming to meet the needs of all students.”

Safety and Security One of our Shared Key Interests focuses on providing safe and secure environments that nurture student well-being and enhance teaching and learning. This key interest serves as the driving force of our work surrounding safety and security throughout the District. Our belief is that providing our students with opportunities to meet their full potential require they feel comfortable and safe when entering the learning environment and when outside the learning environment. Our District was privileged to have Dr. Justin Patchin, nationally known expert in cyberbullying, visit our schools in fall. Dr. Patchin spent one day with our middle school students and one day with our high school students discussing ways our students could keep themselves out of bad situations, as well as defining bullying vs. conflict. During each of the two evenings, Dr. Patchin spoke to members of the community to discuss how our community can assist our students. We continue to increase our collaboration with local law enforcement and emergency personnel in all aspects of what we do. The Wausau Police Department (WPD), Marathon County Sheriff’s Department, and Wausau Fire Department each continue to have representation on our District-wide Safety Committee and play a valuable role in assisting the District in maximizing the safety and security of our buildings. We have also collaborated with the WPD, Wisconsin Department of Justice, District Attorney’s Office, and Peaceful Solutions Counseling to focus future initiatives on the ongoing need surrounding juveniles that send inappropriate and sexually charged pictures via technology. In addition, our Nursing team is finalizing a multiyear process of replacing our Automated External Defibrillators (AED’s), devices that aid in cardiac emergencies. The majority of our AED’s were 10+ years old, and our local emergency response experts advised us the devices needed replacement. There have been many improvements in AED’s, allowing for more cost effective maintenance of the devices.

Evaluating and Establishing Programming We are in the process of completing our second year of a federal grant called the School Climate Transformation Grant, a $750,000 grant that is renewable for up to five years. From a District perspective, we named the grant Holistic, Academic, and Behavioral Interventions through Tiered Supports (HABITS). The grant will continue to assist the District in the final implementation stages of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS), including an additional coaching position, two additional school social workers, and a half-time school counselor who are instrumental in our work at a building level. In the process, the grant is also providing critical financial support


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

at the building level, including bringing in key professional development and speakers that will meet the needs and interests of both our staff and our students. We look forward to the continued impact our team can provide to students with the additional resources provided through the grant. Our School Social Work department delivered professional development to our teachers in the area of trauma informed practices. It was a great reminder of the struggles so many in our society face and the opportunity we have as educators to understand first, so we can educate most effectively.

Education

The District continued to partner with local mental health agencies and provide office space within our buildings to meet with their clients when all parties are in agreement. We have another local agency now looking to partner as well, with two of the three hoping to establish official clinics within our buildings. Through these partnerships, we have eliminated the need for parents to transport their child to the agency and decreased the amount of time a student is missing class instruction.

Additional Highlights • •

• •

The District partnered with a local counseling agency to pilot a program offering low-level Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (AODA) counseling to secondary level students. Three schools in the District (Franklin, G.D. Jones, and Hawthorn Hills) were invited to participate in the Department of Public Instruction’s Mental Health Project. The teams consisting of District employees, parents, and community stakeholders are working to develop building level practices to better meet the needs of our students. The District continued its collaboration with Northcentral Technical College (NTC) in operating the Alternative High School at NTC for students who are credit deficient or need an alternative learning site. The District continued to collaborate with the Department of Social Services, Marathon County Sheriff’s Department, and a local mental health agency to facilitate the Marathon County 180 (MC 180) program. The program is an alternative to out-of-county residential placement designed to strengthen family relationships and promote personal and community success for youth struggling with delinquency issues. The District is in the process of expanding our PEER (Prepare, Educate, Empower, Rebuild) program servicing students who may need to be temporarily removed from a building. The District collaborated with United Way and the Department of Social Services, along with Georgetown University, to examine county-wide delivery models for students displaying delinquent behavior in the community.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Tammy Nyen, Director of Special Education

The Wausau School District provided special education services to more than 1,200 students this school year. Although this is a slight increase from previous years, the District’s current special education identification rate of 14% is consistent with the overall identification rate for Wisconsin schools. In the Wausau School District, we provide services to students with disabilities, ages 3-21 in over 80 locations, including homes, hospitals, childcare centers, juvenile detention, and day treatment facilities. The Special Education Department offers a continuum of individualized services for special education students as required by State and Federal regulations under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 2004. It is with great pride that the Wausau School District continues to be a leader in the state of Wisconsin for exemplary special education programs and services. In addition to supporting goals of other District departments, the Special Education Department created SMART goals that braided Federal, State, and District initiatives to ensure college and career readiness for all of our students. Through the continued efforts of our special education staff, with the support of administration and the Board of Education, the Special Education Department accomplished several objectives in keeping with innovation and best practices in special education: • Implemented a sequential curriculum for students with intellectual disabilities at the middle school and high school levels. • Established a partnership with Northwest Counseling and Guidance Clinic by providing educational support services for students receiving therapeutic day treatment. • Continued to provide crisis intervention and prevention courses for all District staff. • Awarded a Department of Public Instruction PI Transition Improvement Grant that allowed teams of teachers to explore postsecondary options for students with disabilities in the Wausau community. • Fully implemented a special education data software system. • Implemented new procedures for student assessments, including ACT, Wisconsin Forward Exam, and Civics Test for students with disabilities. • Expanded options for assistive technology for staff and students. • Provided professional development for all certified District staff in Universal Design for Learning, a best-practices framework for meeting the diverse needs of all learners. • Successfully piloted new special education forms for the Department of Public Instruction. We look forward to the 2016-2017 school year, as the Department of Public Instruction will introduce new special education forms and procedures for all Wisconsin districts. The new forms and procedures are in keeping with recent changes in Federal and State requirements in an effort to increase reading and math skills for students with disabilities. In Wisconsin, reading achievement will be the foundation for all special education programs and services beginning with the 2016-2017 school year. To effectively address the new requirements, the Special Education Department will focus on professional development for all special education staff, including the exploration and implementation of research-based reading interventions and progress monitoring systems for students with disabilities. Student achievement and success remain the focus of our steadfast efforts to ensure students with disabilities have access to high-quality special education programs and services. The Special Education Department will continue to strive for excellence for our students and staff to support the Wisconsin vision of “Every Child a Graduate, College and Career Ready.”


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

2016-2017 WAUSAU SCHOOL DISTRICT CALENDAR 2016-2017 Wausau School District Calendar Board approved: 1-12-2015

Su

Mo 4 11 18 25

July 2016

Tu 5 12 19 26

We 6 13 20 27

Th

Fr

7 14 21 28

1 8 15 22 29

Sa

Su

Mo

August 2016

Tu

September 2016

Education We

Th

Fr

1 2 3 4 8 9 10 11 15 16 17 18 22 23 24 25 29 30 31 Aug 29-31: Professional Learning

Sa

5 12 19 26

Su

Mo

Tu

We

5 6 7 12 13 14 19 20 21 26 27 28 Sept 1: First Day of School

Th

Fr

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

Sa

Sept 5: No Classes - Labor Day

Su

Mo

October 2016 Tu

We

Th

Fr

3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 25 26 27 31 Oct 27-28: No Classes - PL

7 14 21 28

Sa

Su

Mo

November 2016 Tu

We

Th

Fr

Sa

1 2 3 4 7 8 9 10 11 14 15 16 17 18 21 22 23 24 25 28 29 30 Nov 4: No PM Elementary Classes -

Su

Mo

December 2016 Tu

We

Th

Fr

Sa

1 2 5 6 7 8 9 12 13 14 15 16 19 20 21 22 23 26 27 28 29 30 Dec 23-Jan 2: No Classes - Winter Break

Recordkeeping No AM/PM Pre-K Classes Nov 4: 1st Quarter Ends (44) Nov 23: No Classes - Non-Contract Day Nov 24-25: No Classes-Thanksgiving Break

Su

Mo

January 2017 Tu

We

Th

Fr

Sa

Su

2 3 4 5 6 9 10 11 12 13 16 17 18 19 20 23 24 25 26 27 30 31 Jan 2: No Classes - Winter Break Jan 20: No PM Elementary Classes Recordkeeping No AM/PM Pre-K Classes

Mo

February 2017 Tu

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

Mo

Tu

We

Th

Fr

1 8 15 22

2 9 16 23

3 10 17 24

Sa

April 2017

Mo

Tu

We

Th

Fr

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

April 14: No Classes

Sa

Su

May 2017 We

Th

Fr

1 2 3 4 5 8 9 10 11 12 15 16 17 18 19 22 23 24 25 26 29 30 31 May 5: Inclement Weather make-up Day, if needed May 26: No Classes - PL May 29: No Classes - Memorial Day

Mo

March 2017

Tu

We

Th

Fr

Sa

1 2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 29 30 31 March 24: No PM Elementary Classes Recordkeeping No AM/PM Pre-K Classes March 24: 3rd Quarter Ends (43) March 27-31: No Classes - Spring Break

Jan 20: 2nd Quarter Ends (44) Jan 23-24: No Classes - PL

Su

Su

Sa

Su

June 6:

June 6: June 6: June 7:

Mo

June 2017

Tu

We

Th

Fr

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

5 6 7 12 13 14 19 20 21 26 27 28 No PM Classes - All Elementary Recordkeeping No AM/PM Pre-K Classes Students' Last Day 4th Quarter Ends (44) Teachers' Last Day

Classes possible: Make-up Day No Classes Students' first and last days of school No Classes - Professional Learning (PL)

Quarter Ends (1st - 44) (2nd - 45) (3rd - 43) (4th - 43) = 175 Teachers' last day of school High School Graduation: May 25 - EEA; May 30 - East;

No PM Elementary Classes - Recordkeeping. No AM/PM Pre-K Classes

May 31 - West; June 1 - EGL

Sa

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

TECHNOLOGY

Jon Euting, Director of Technology & Media Services During the 2015-2016 school year, the Technology Services Department supported many initiatives defined in the District approved and Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction approved LongRange Information and Technology Literacy Plan. This comprehensive plan addresses goals, objectives, and action steps for both instructional and information technology needs. While there are specific goals within the long-range plan, ultimately the plan supports the following Education Department’s SMART goal: Identify, integrate, and expand technology options to provide learning, 24/7. The efforts of the Technology Services Department focused on implementing the action steps of the second year of the long-range plan.

Instructional Technology Continuation of technology integration needs assessment was completed in spring 2016. District-wide data collection was completed by certified staff and students in grades 3-8. This needs assessment is called Clarity from Byright-Bytes. Clarity is an online software platform that measures whether technology programs are impacting student learning and delivers easy-to-use, customized technology plans at the District and building level. Clarity’s proprietary CASE (Classroom-Access-Skills-Environment) framework outlines the essential factors that schools need to improve learning through the use of technology. Results from 2015-2016 provided a point of comparison to the baseline scores collected in 2014-2015. Clarity’s data is being used to guide professional learning for the 2016-2017 school year at both the District and building level. The Technology Department moved forward with plans to bring kindergarten through 10th grade into a full one-to-one instructional environment at the beginning of the 2016-2017 school year. A oneto-one instructional environment provides all students with a device for use at any time during the school day. This means that, at the start of the school year, all elementary students will be provided an iPad for their daily use. For students in grades 6-10, a Chromebook will be provided for their use. 629 certified staff members completed credentialing courses in the area of technology, which equates to over 1,200 hours of District-provided professional development. Over 65 teachers took courses within the digital Learning Academy. These courses included Digital Tools, Changing Our Perspective, and Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) and are designed to support instructional staff as they integrate, leverage, and utilize technology effectively for the advancement of student learning and success. A professional development program called “Into The Tech” was created and implemented by the Instructional Technology Integration Specialists (ITIS). The program brought together four ITIS and a Tech Mentor into a building for an entire day. Classroom teachers and other certified staff were able to schedule personal time to meet with one of the integrators to further develop their skill-set, ideas, lesson plans, and curriculum activities. This embedded professional development truly allowed staff to personalize their learning based upon their needs. Tech Mentors at each building worked with individual classroom teachers throughout the course of the school year. Tech Mentors also provided learning opportunities during faculty meetings and inservice days. They developed up to six hours of monthly professional development based upon the


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

needs of their building. Tech Mentors worked diligently to allow teachers to personalize their learning to best meet the needs of their students as well as school goals.

Education

itsLearning was selected as the District’s Learning Management System (LMS). A LMS increases teacher and student efficiency with a one-stop shop to house and manage functions for creating and delivering courses, assessments, standards management, attendance, grades, and other online activities. Secondary teachers participated in professional development centered on itsLearning. Their learning empowered them to develop online content and information that is accessible to students anytime and anywhere. Secondary teachers will be fully ready for implementation for the 2016-2017 school year. Elementary staff will embark on the same learning in 2016-2017 and will be fully ready to implement with students at the start of the 2017-2018 school year. The Technology Department planned a Tech Summit for this August 24-25. The Summit will allow all District employees the opportunity to attend two full days of learning centered on the integration of technology. Over 80 sessions will be presented by members of the Technology Department as well as classroom teachers from across the District. The Tech Summit is designed for staff members to grow professionally while enhancing their skill-set around the integration of technology. In spring, the Technology Department visited each building during a faculty meeting to discuss and present the District’s vision of technology integration. The presentations allowed staff to ask questions as well as learn more about the integration of Technology into instructional settings in the coming school years. A Personalized Learning Academy was completed by 15 Franklin staff members and two Horace Mann staff members. These 17 people spent over 50 hours learning about, discussing, and implementing the core components of Personalized Learning. These components include Learner Profiles, Custom Learner Paths, Performanced Based Assessment, and Goal Setting.

District Infrastructure The District’s wireless infrastructure was completely upgraded this year. The upgrade allowed for successful implementation of a statewide online assessment during the spring. Additionally, all sites have a more stable and robust wireless system to fully support the coming one-to-one implementation. A complete upgrade to the District’s network switching equipment was completed, which involved the replacement of 141 switches. Funding for this project was largely supported by E-rate, a Federal program designed to assist school districts and libraries with these types of projects. The aging phone system was replaced at all District sites. Replacement required the installation of over 1,500 phones with professional development provided for all end users. A critical component of the District’s infrastructure is the Uninterruptible Power Source (UPS) at each site. The UPS provides power to the network in the event of a power outage to prevent data loss and damage by allowing end users to correctly shutdown computers. The District replaced three main UPS systems as well as several at school sites. A Disaster Recovery System was brought online this spring. This system allows for the safe storage of all data as well as the ability to maintain phone and computer systems in the event of a significant incident causing an outage at the District’s main site.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

FRANKLIN ELEMENTARY

1509 North 5th Street, Wausau WI 54403

Sharon Kind, Interim Principal franklin.wausauschools.org

Reading

80% of all students will score above Benchmark on the Spring AIMSweb Assessment. Results • 82% of all students scored at or above target in fluency on the Spring 2016 AIMSweb assessment. • A new reading series was implemented with instructional coaching for staff. • Interventionists used instructional strategies within the new Wonders and Superkids reading curriculum.

Math

80% of all students will score above Benchmark on the Spring AIMSweb M-COMP Assessment. Results • 14% more learners scored at or above the Benchmark on the Spring AIMSweb M-Comp Assessment. Staff will continue to increase opportunities for learning number sense, math concepts, and mathematical operations. • Individual goals and additional practice opportunities through math apps and math resources contributed to the percentage of learners who increased their M-Comp score.

Behavior

94% of all students will have fewer than two Office Discipline Referrals. Results • 84% of all students received two or fewer major Office Discipline Referrals. 80% of our learners received less than two major Office Discipline referrals. The discrepancy of 10% was impacted by new students who moved into the Franklin area. Of these students, 8 were placed in special education to receive additional support to address their behaviors. • Professional development around the importance of data collection increased staff documentation of student behaviors. • Data collection improvements resulted in improved Tier 2 interventions for students.

School SLO and Smart Goal 2016-17 Reading: 82% of all learners’ fluency scores will be at benchmark or above as measured on the Spring AIMSweb assessment. Math: 15% of additional learners below benchmark will improve to at or above benchmark as measured on the Spring AIMSweb M-Comp assessment. Behavior: Universal Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) will become a schoolwide committee with four distinct work groups - Acknowledgement, Recognition, Data, and Boosters. Universal recognition and acknowledgement will be built into the class DOJO system representing school values of Respect, Work, Belong, and Be Safe.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

FRANKLIN ELEMENTARY

Additional Successes at Franklin •

• • • • •

• • •

Education

80% of Instructional staff completed the personalized learning academy and capstone projects or bootcamp. This professional development increased learner engagement and ownership of student work. An instructional template of “must do’s” and “may do’s” aligned to the common core standards and increased student work completion. Staff continue to work on learner self assessment through the use of rubrics, peer review, and questioning strategies. A new reading series, SuperKids and Wonders, was implemented providing universal instruction in literacy. It’s Learning hosted learner folders for SuperKids and Wonders student work assignments. This allowed learners an increase in voice and choice, fostering greater engagement and work completion. Instructional technology was integrated through iPads to enable learners through It’s Learning to review lessons for SuperKids and Wonders. Girls on the Run completed their first 5K with support from staff, parents, and community. Tier III training was completed as part of PBIS. Professional development was started for Functional Behavior assessment and will continue for Complex Functional Behavior assessments. This will provide a comprehensive view and understanding of student behaviors and help staff match strategies to students, improve learner readiness, and self regulation. Tiered Fidelity Inventory (TFI) showed an increase from 80% in November to 84% in May of the successful impact of interventions provided at each Tier. Purchased alternative learning options for learners. Increased mental health presentations for staff to three times a month to increase awareness of strategies enabling staff to be proactive with learner behaviors. Increased number of instructional staff and paraprofessionals who were trained in Crisis Prevention Intervention (CPI).

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

GRANT ELEMENTARY

500 North 4th Avenue, Wausau WI 54401

Chris Nyman, Principal grant.wausauschools.org

Literacy

Spring 2015 data indicated 83% of our students met or exceeded Benchmark Expectations as per spring AIMSweb. In spring 2015, 87% of kindergarten students met or exceeded benchmark standards on PALS. 94% of first grade students met or exceeded benchmark standards on PALS while 88% of all second grade students met or exceeded benchmark standards. 51% of our third through fifth grade students scored Proficient or Advanced on the Badger Exam in English Language Arts (ELA) in spring 2015. By the end of the 2015-2016 school year, we projected 87% of all K-5 students would meet or exceed benchmark expectations in the area of reading, as indicated by the Spring 2016 AIMSweb Universal Assessment. Results A school-wide increase of 4 percentage points for students reading at benchmark level from fall 2015 to spring 2016. A school-wide decrease of five percentage points for students identified as in need of ‘strategic supports’ from fall 2015 to spring 2016. Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Bi-weekly collaboration between all teachers (classroom, interventionist, pupil services, encore) to build instructional continuity for students (bi-weekly collaborative PLC-Professional Learning Communities-meetings focused on planning to ensure consistency between core instruction and intervention supports. • Investigated additional tools or resources available (including the use of technology)—NearPod, MYon. Provided learning opportunities at weekly faculty meetings supporting the use of MYon and NearPod by our building technology coordinator. • Weekly Progress Monitoring for all K-5 students scoring below the 25th percentile for all areas of identified skill deficiency to further diagnose student’s individual needs and plan instruction to support. • Weekly PLC meetings at grade level to plan for ongoing targeted instruction. • Winter and Spring PLCs following Universal Assessment window including RtI Team and leadership to further diagnose and make instructional recommendations and implementation plans for grade level groups of students.

Math

Our second school-wide goal is to significantly improve mathematics achievement levels for all K-5 students: 100% of all K-3 students will demonstrate growth on annual SAGE assessments, and 63% of all K-5 students will score at or above the proficient level on the AIMSweb math screener. Both math goals were met/ exceeded for the 2015-16 academic year. Results We ended the year with 63% of our K-5 student population scoring at or above benchmark standards as measured by AIMSweb.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

GRANT ELEMENTARY

Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels: • Implementation of EnVision Common Core aligned K-5 math resources. Universal AIMSweb math screener administered to all K-5 students three times each year to determine individual areas of identified need. • Bi-weekly progress monitoring probes were administered to all students scoring in the ‘some risk’ or ‘at risk’ categories to measure effectiveness of differentiated classroom instruction. • Teachers meet in weekly Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) to discuss small group response to intervention and make adjustments to flexible groups accordingly.

Education

Goals for 2016-2017

Our school-wide goal in literacy will focus on improving rate and accuracy in oral reading fluency by providing daily opportunities for students to practice during small group differentiated instruction in the regular classroom and the intervention setting when applicable. Based on our Parent Survey results and our School Implementation Review (SIR) results, we have also included action steps in our goal to share quarterly progress with families focused on effective instructional strategies that can be reinforced at home.

Additional Successes at Grant •

• •

Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a School of Distinction for successful PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports) for the 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 academic years. This award recognizes our work to improve social/emotional growth for all students through the implementation of tiered levels of support. Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a Title I School of Recognition in the category of Beating The Odds. This award recognizes our work to advance levels of student achievement and success in literacy and math. Schools Beating The Odds are in the top 25 percent of high-poverty schools in the state and ​have above-average student achievement in reading and mathematics when compared to schools from similarly sized districts, schools, grade configurations, and poverty levels. F.A.C.T. (Families and Children Learning Together) Nights are held on the first Thursday of each month. These 90-120 minute sessions provide families with opportunities to participate in teacher directed academic activities designed to support literacy/math achievement and social/emotional growth. Monthly community assemblies provide an opportunity to recognize students for their academic and behavior successes. The Spring Art /Writing Expo gives students an opportunity to display and discuss personal art projects and individual writing pieces with their parents and community members. This twohour event takes place in May and showcases projects that students collected throughout the school year.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

HAWTHORN HILLS ELEMENTARY 1600 Kickbusch Street, Wausau WI 54403

Angie Lloyd, Principal

hawthornhills.wausauschools.org

School Learning Objective

By spring of 2016, 72% of all first through fifth grade students will be proficient or advanced in the areas of fluency and comprehension (composite score) as measured by the AIMSweb R-CBM and MAZE assessments. Results We exceeded our SLO goal by 3 percent. Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels: • Bi-weekly Professional Learning Communities (PLC) meetings were held between teachers, interventionists, and the principal to identify areas of need and to talk about specific student data. • Weekly PLC meetings at grade levels were held to identify “I can” statements and to develop lesson plans. • Weekly progress monitoring occurred for students below the 25th percentile to watch growth and to identify additional interventions. • Continued use of student and parent portals for Superkids, Wonders, and MYon.

Reading Goal

By spring of 2016, 50% of grade 3-5 students will meet or exceed standards as measured by the state reading assessment. Results 72% of 3-5 graders met or exceeded standards based on the results of the Smarter Balanced Assessment. Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Each grade level set student learning objectives (SLOs) based on the school goal. • Students below target on AIMSweb probes were progress monitored. • At least 20% of all students were instructed in a researched-based Response to Intervention (RtI) intervention with a school interventionist. • School RtI team met bi-weekly to track progress and assess school goal progress. • School interventionists and classroom teachers met bi-weekly to discuss progress and make changes to groupings. • Parental Involvement in Reading--60% of students participated in reading at home with the Reading Rally program and at school Family Nights.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

HAWTHORN HILLS ELEMENTARY

Math Goal

By spring of 2016, 42% of students will meet or exceed standards as measured by the smarter balanced math assessment.

Education

Results 65% of 3-5 graders met or exceeded standards based on the results of the Smarter Balanced Assessment. Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Students receiving well below average on AIMSweb probes will be progress monitored on M-Comp or M-Cap. • School RtI team met bi-weekly to track progress and assess school goal progress. • Incorporated use of classroom iPads to assist in math computation skills. • Continued implementation of District Math curriculum with the goal of 95% curriculum completion.

Goals for 2016-2017

We exceeded our SLO goal by 3% this year so we will reach for 80% next year. We will also increase both SMART goals (reading and math) by 8% next year. Additional Successes at Hawthorn Hills • Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a Title I School of Recognition in the category of Beating The Odds for four consecutive years. This award recognizes our work to advance levels of student achievement and success in literacy and math. Schools Beating The Odds are in the top 25 percent of high-poverty schools in the state and ​have above-average student achievement in reading and mathematics when compared to schools from similarly sized districts, schools, grade configurations, and poverty levels. • Hawthorn Hills is one of 50 schools in the state of Wisconsin to pilot a Mental Health Project through the Department of Public Instruction. • We eagerly await the completion of one of the District’s new 4K Learning Academies that is being constructed at Hawthorn Hills and will open for the 2016-2017 school year.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

HEWITT-TEXAS ELEMENTARY T10331 Quarry Road, Wausau WI 54403

Cassie O’Keefe, Principal hewitt-texas.wausauschools.org

Literacy

Improve reading instruction in analyzing text and evaluating and extending text which will result in 60% of students in grades 3-5 achieving proficient or advanced status on the state assessment by spring 2016. Additional indicators will be 85% for grade 2 students achieving average or above on the AIMSweb R-CBM; 75% for grade 3; 90% for grade; and 95% for grade 5 achieving average and above on the AIMSweb R-CBM. Kindergarten and first grade will have 95% at benchmark or above in AIMSweb.

Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Teachers implemented new reading curriculum materials: Superkids and Wonders. • Teachers worked closely with the District Reading Specialist to develop intervention plans for students using these new materials. • Teachers administered a phonics assessment to further identify where students needed intervention. • Teachers worked with our school’s Technology Mentor to incorporate more technology into our literacy blocks.

Math

Continue to refine our use of math materials with special attention to Math Processes which will result in 55% of students in grades 3-5 achieving proficient or advanced status on the state assessment by the spring 2016. Additional evidence of growth for students in grade 2-5 will be 75% at benchmark or above on AIMSweb MCAP assessments and AIMSweb TEN Assessments for students in K-1. Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Teachers used Front Row, a computerized math program, to assist students needing additional math support.

Goals for 2016-2017

Reading: Continue to improve reading instruction in analyzing text and evaluating and extending text which will result in 70% of students in grades 3-5 achieving proficient or advanced status on the state assessment by spring 2017. Additional indicators for grades 2-5 will be 80% of students average or above on the AIMSweb R-CBM. Kindergarten and first grade will have 90% at benchmark or above in AIMSweb.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

HEWITT-TEXAS ELEMENTARY

Math: Continue to refine our use of the math materials with special attention to Math Processes which will result in 65% of students in grades 3-5 achieving proficient or advanced status on the state assessment by spring 2017. Additional evidence of growth for students in grade 2-5 will be 80% at benchmark or above on AIMSweb MCAP assessments and AIMSweb TEN Assessments for students in K-1.

Education

Additional Successes at Hewitt-Texas •

• • • •

Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a School of Distinction for successful PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports) for two consecutive years. This award recognizes our work to improve social/emotional growth for all students through the implementation of tiered levels of support. The student council raised $894.25 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, their chosen fundraising project. Celebrated our fourth year of holding a Science Fair and showcasing students’ experiments. Celebrated a month-long Readathon that culminated with a fun-filled family evening. For the third year hosted Grandparents Night and Art Fair, a popular and well-attended family event.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

THOMAS JEFFERSON ELEMENTARY 500 West Randolph Street, Wausau WI 54401

Cathy Prozanski, Principal jefferson.wausauschools.org

Literacy

In the 2015-2016 school year, 70% of ELL students at K-5 will maintain their current average to above-average percentile rank, as reported on the fall and spring AIMSweb benchmark percentile ranks report. If students fell below the 25th percentile rank as indicated on the fall AIMSweb benchmark report, he/she will demonstrate a 25% change on the spring AIMSweb benchmark percentile rank report. In addition to the above criteria, students will also be expected to score 80% (cumulative) on the Superkids or Wonders assessments. Superkids assessments are given periodically throughout units, and Wonders assessments will be given weekly. 

Results Kindergarten - 100% met the goal; 1st Grade - 92%; 2nd Grade - 70%; 3rd Grade - 71%; 4th Grade - 63%; and 5th Grade - 81%.

Objective - To increase student vocabulary achievement in the Language and Literacy Domain Area. • Kindergarten: 65% of students will score at benchmark in the literacy area of Nonsense Word Fluency of the AIMSweb screener, will meet cut scores on the Superkids progress tests that measure letter sound combinations, and score at benchmark on PALS assessment screener. Benchmark must be met using 2 of 3 assessments. 86% of students met the goal. • 1st Grade: 70% of students will score at benchmark in the literacy area of Nonsense Word Fluency of the AIMSweb screener, reach benchmark on oral reading assessments found in Superkids curriculum, and score at benchmark on PALS assessment screener. Benchmark must be met using 2 of 3 assessments. 82% of students met the goal. • 2nd Grade: 80% of students score at benchmark in the literacy area of R-CBM on the AIMSweb screener, reach benchmark on oral reading assessments found • in Superkids literacy curriculum, and score at benchmark on the PALS assessment. Benchmark must be met using 2 of 3 assessments. 77% of students met the goal. • 3rd Grade: 70% of students will achieve 80% or show positive growth from semester 1 to semester 2 on the weekly Wonders Assessments, score at benchmark in the literacy area of R-CBM on the AIMSweb screener, and meet annual measurable objectives (AMO) on the Forward Wisconsin assessment. Benchmark must be met using 2 of 3 assessments. 91% of students met the goal • 4th Grade: 65% of students will meet 80% or show positive growth from semester 1 to semester 2 on the weekly Wonders Assessments, score at benchmark in the literacy area of R-CBM on the AIMSweb screener, and meet annual measurable objectives (AMO) on the Forward Wisconsin assessment. Benchmark must be met using 2 of 3 assessments. 46% students met the goal.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

THOMAS JEFFERSON ELEMENTARY

5th Grade: 70% of students will show positive growth from semester 1 to semester 2 on the weekly Wonders Assessments, score at benchmark in the literacy area of R-CBM on the AIMSweb screener, and meet annual measurable objectives (AMO) on the Forward Wisconsin assessment. Benchmark must be met using 2 of 3 assessments. 71% of students met the goal.

Education

Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Staff successfully implemented the new literacy programs, Superkids for K-2 and Wonders for grades 3-5. • Staff met with the District’s ELL Coordinator regarding ELL teaching strategies. • Teachers in grades 3-5 intentionally taught test taking strategies to students. • Teachers in all grades met quarterly with the Title 1 literacy coach to support their implementation of the literacy programs. • Hosted two literacy nights to inform parents of the literacy program and provided support to parents in assisting their child at home. • Interventionists and classroom teachers met bimonthly to plan and discuss student progress in interventions.

Goal for 2016-2017

We will again focus on our ELL population and their progress. In the 2016-2017 school year, 80% of ELL students at K-5 will maintain their current average to above-average percentile rank, as reported on the fall and spring AIMSweb benchmark percentile ranks report. If students fall below the 25th percentile rank as indicated on the fall AIMSweb benchmark report, he/she will demonstrate a 25% change on the spring AIMSweb benchmark percentile rank report. In addition to the above criteria, students will also be expected to score 80% (cumulative) on the Superkids or Wonders assessments. Superkids assessments will be given periodically throughout units, and Wonders assessments will be given weekly.    

Additional Successes at Grant •

• •

Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a Title I School of Recognition for the seventh consecutive year in the category of Beating The Odds. This award recognizes our work to advance levels of student achievement and success in literacy and math. Schools Beating The Odds are in the top 25 percent of high-poverty schools in the state and ​have above-average student achievement in reading and mathematics when compared to schools from similarly sized districts, schools, grade configurations, and poverty levels. Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a School of Merit for our work in PBIS (Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports). Book Bowl team 1st place in District competition.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

G.D. JONES ELEMENTARY

1018 South 12th Avenue, Wausau WI 54401

Robin Kordus, Principal gdjones.wausauschools.org

During the 2015-2016 school year, our school improvement plan focused on improving literacy and math achievement for all students. Improving student academic outcomes ensures that all students have access to the most effective and accurately implemented instructional practices and interventions as possible.

Literacy

By June 2016, 85% of kindergarten students will score at or above target as measured by the AIMSweb Instructional Recommendations/ Blended report. (We achieved 81%) By June 2016, 85% of first grade students will score at or above target as measured by the Aimsweb Instructional Recommendations/Blended report. (We achieved 73%) By June 2016, 70% of second through fifth grade students will score at or above target as measured by the Aimsweb Instructional Recommendations/Blended report. (We achieved 70%) The overall outcome shows that 75% of K-5 students scored at or above benchmark as measured by the AIMSweb Instructional Recommendations Chart, an overall growth of 1.8% from spring 2015. Action Steps • Bi-weekly literacy collaboration between grade level and interventionist teachers to discuss instructional supports to ensure success for all students. • Weekly progress monitoring for all K-5 students scoring below the 25th percentile for areas of identified skill deficiency to ensure each student’s individual needs, through planning, are met. • Weekly PLC (professional learning communities) meetings at grade level to plan for ongoing targeted instruction. • Winter and spring PLCs following Universal Assessment window including RtI Team and leadership to further diagnose and make instructional recommendations and implementation plans for grade level groups of students. • Family Literacy Nights to allow parents opportunities to learn more about the newly adopted Superkids and Wonders literacy programs.

Math

By June 2016, 70% of kindergarten students will score at or above target on the AIMSweb Missing Number Assessment. (We achieved 77%) By June 2016, 75% of first through fifth grade students will reach target on the AIMSweb MCOMP Assessment. (We achieved 82%)


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

G.D. JONES ELEMENTARY

Action Steps • Universal AIMSweb math screener administered to all K-5 students three times during the school year to determine individual areas of identified need. • Bi-weekly progress monitoring probes were administered to all students scoring in the ‘some risk’ or ‘at risk’ categories to measure effectiveness of differentiated classroom instruction. • Weekly PLC (professional learning communities) meetings at grade level to plan for ongoing targeted instruction, to discuss small group response to intervention, and make adjustments to flexible groups as needed.

Education

2016-2017 Goals

We will continue to work toward the District goal of 80% of students becoming proficient readers. We will meet, at least quarterly, with other District schools identified as part of the mental health grant to continue to build our capacity in the area of mental health and work to implement best practices for all students.

Additional Successes at G.D. Jones •

• • •

Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a Title I School of Recognition in the category of Beating The Odds. This award recognizes our work to advance levels of student achievement and success in literacy and math. Schools Beating The Odds are in the top 25 percent of high-poverty schools in the state and ​have above-average student achievement in reading and mathematics when compared to schools from similarly sized districts, schools, grade configurations, and poverty levels. Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a School of Merit for implementation of PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports), a system-wide proactive framework that allows staff to be responsive to the social-emotional needs of students through a multi-leveled tier of support. Broke ground on our new 4K Learning Academy, early childhood classroom, and six classroom addition. Quarterly celebrations to recognize students for their academic and behavior successes. Held our 1st annual science fair with guest chemists from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point who shared their knowledge of chemistry, through experiments, with students and families. Held an Ice Cream Social/Art Fair in collaboration with the PTO where students showcased and discussed their artwork that was created throughout the school year.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

A.C. KIEFER EDUCATIONAL CENTER 700 West Strowbridge Street, Wausau WI 54401

Kara Rakowski

4K & Early Childhood Coordinator

715-261-0265

For the past 15 years, A.C. Kiefer Educational Center has been the coordinating site for the Wausau School District’s 4-year old Kindergarten (4K) and Early Childhood Special Education programs. The District’s 4K program provides the opportunity for every 4-year-old residing in the District who turns four years of age by September 1 to receive a high-quality learning experience at no charge. Programs are located within elementary buildings and community collaborative child care centers. Children attending a Wausau School District 4K program are guaranteed a high-quality learning experience because all teachers are licensed by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction and utilize a weekly scope and sequence with specific research-based learning targets. The District’s 4K program includes a strong focus on social-emotional skills to build lifelong success in understanding and expressing emotions, making friends, following rules, managing frustrations, and solving problems. Tucker Turtle is our program mascot because he teaches children to “stop - tuck think” of a solution when we have problems. Our school goals for the 2015-2016 school year focused on literacy, math, and social-emotional skills as specified below:

Goal 1

By June 2016, 95% of A.C. Kiefer students will be at or above benchmark on the spring PALS-PK Alphabet Knowledge and 90% Letter Sounds subtests (or an equivalent formative measure). Progress: In spring, 93% of our 4K students met the benchmark for the PALS-PK Alphabet Knowledge subtest and 93% met the benchmark for the PALS-PK Letter Sounds subtest. On average, in the spring of their 4K year, students who attend 4K at A.C. Kiefer or a community 4K site recognize 22 uppercase letters, 20 lowercase letters, and 17 letter sounds. These averages exceed the PALS-PK spring benchmark range of 12-21 for uppercase letters, 9-17 for lowercase letters, and 4-8 for letter sounds. Process used to support growth • The 4K teachers participated in a four-hour training focused on literacy instruction and the use of PALS data to inform instruction. • During weekly professional learning community and staff meetings, the teaching staff analyzed and used data to determine needs and strategies for instruction.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

A.C. KIEFER EDUCATIONAL CENTER

• • • •

A whole school data chart was used to visualize and monitor student learning. A team of teachers designed a data collection system linked to the “I can” learning statements used to inform instruction, reporting, and allow for authentic assessment during student-led, play-based instruction with the teacher as facilitator through environmental design. 4K teachers and special education teachers collaborated weekly to focus on instruction and groupings of the most at-risk students. Weekly Response to Intervention (RTI) team meetings were held to review students identified as needing additional support and to provide alternative teaching strategies and suggestions for embedded interventions. Monthly “parents at school” activities were held with teaching staff focusing on literacy skills that included building phonemic awareness. A “library card” was given to each family with a link, username, and password to the 4K eBook digital library.

Education

Goal 2

By June 2016, we will identify selected assessments to determine competency, growth, and development for math. Progress and process used to support growth: • Essential learning targets for math were identified and added to a curricular scope and sequence. • Math targets were integrated into intentional play-based activities. • Staff identified a continued need to look at math learning targets and consider the need for and possible purchase of additional curricular resources.

Goal 3

By June 2016, 100% of 4K students at A.C. Kiefer will be able to identify three problem-solving strategies and meet the benchmark of “I can find a good solution to my problem.” (benchmark 1.2) Progress: 100% of students at A.C. Kiefer met District 4K problem-solving benchmark 1.2 which indicates “child will identify a positive problem-solving strategy during play activities that could be used by self or peers when asked by the teacher.” Process used to support growth • Electronic social-emotional lesson plans were created and shared with all staff. • The b.e.s.t. Universal screener, which is a teacher-completed questionnaire, was used two times throughout the school year to identify students with behavior in an acceptable range, students behaviorally at risk, and students requiring intensive behavior intervention. • The Pyramid Model was used program wide with teachers embedding social-emotional practices into classroom routines and daily practices. • Strategic interventions to teach identifying feelings, managing emotions, and problem solving difficult situations were embedded by teachers into the classroom setting. • Information regarding “Social Thinking” was shared with staff during professional growth and development.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

A.C. KIEFER EDUCATIONAL CENTER

Planned Action Steps/Next Steps for 2016-2017 • •

4K programming will continue to focus on building social-emotional foundations for early learning while teaching academic readiness skills in the areas of literacy, math, writing, and large body movement. Program goals will continue to target expanding social-emotional skills and providing high-quality literacy instruction to include writing and expanding math concepts.

Accomplishments by the 4K/ Early Childhood Team • • • • • •

• •

Since 2010, A.C. Kiefer has been designated by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction as a demonstration site for advanced teacher training and practice in the use of The Teaching Pyramid for Social Emotional Development. We are excited to replicate our 4K program and move from A.C. Kiefer into the four new 4K Learning Academies at G.D. Jones, Hawthorn Hills, Riverview, and Thomas Jefferson elementary schools for the 2016-2017 school year. The 4K Academies were designed based on the latest research on the best learning and social environments for children. The District 4K and early childhood staff look forward to being part of a collegial environment with other 4K and kindergarten teachers. Staff also look forward to collaborating with families in the family resource center space within each of the four 4K Learning Academies. Our 4K program has a strong focus on parent-school communication with regular activities and training offered to families, free of charge. We offer more than 90 hours per school year for families to participate in community activities with their children. Once a month parents are invited to observe and participate in their child’s school day at all 4K sites for a deeper understanding of academic and behavior expectations. We offer a wide variety of individualized and family centered preschool options to meet the needs of 3-year-old to 6-year-old students who are identified as having special education disabilities. This support, provided through early childhood special educators, includes home, child care, school-based, and community options. Monthly child find screenings are offered to families that live in the Wausau School District. Beginning in July 2016, our 4K offices, special education preschool options team, and child find screenings will be housed at G.D. Jones Elementary.

As a child’s first and most influential teacher, families are invited and warmly welcomed to be a partner in their child’s first learning experience in the Wausau public school system. Please contact us at 715-261-0265 for more information about 4K and Early Childhood options and 4K registration.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

A.C. KIEFER EDUCATIONAL CENTER

Education

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

LINCOLN ELEMENTARY

720 South 6th Avenue, Wausau WI 54401

Julie Schell, Principal lincoln.wausauschools.org

School Learning Objective

Increase by 10% the percentage of students reading at or above proficient reading levels from 1st to 3rd quarter as measured by the District Report Card. Results We attained a 14% increase.

SMART Goal

Increase by 20% the percentage of students scoring proficiently written mathematical thinking responses from 1st to 3rd quarter - (As defined by Grade Level Common Scoring Tools) - on the District Report Card. Results We attained a 49% increase. Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • To decrease the number of Behavioral Incidents from 1st to 2nd Semester for all students not receiving Specialized Supports by 10%. Actual Student Outcome = Decrease by over 50%! • To decrease the number of Behavioral Incidents from 1st to 2nd Semester for all students currently receiving specialized behavioral supports. Actual Student Outcome = decrease of over 200 incidents - 38% decline! • 80% of K-2, and 70% of grade 3-5 students will score in the Average or Above ranges on the AIMSweb Reading Screener Assessment. Actual Student Outcomes = K-2, 90%; grade 3-5, 71%!(SLO • 50% of all 2nd graders will score the Mean Average RIT Score on the Spring MAP Assessment. Actual Student Outcome Score = 50%. • 65% of our K-5 students will score Average to Above on the AIMSweb Math Spring Screening Assessment. Actual Student Outcome Score = 71%!

Goals for 2016-2017

The School Learning Objective (SLO) is in the area of reading comprehension with a focus on decoding, fluency, and vocabulary development with the targeted skill of increased comprehension. We have seen gains in the areas of Written Responses to Mathematical thinking, which is also a 21st Century career readiness skill, and will be enhancing our SMART goal around this specific targeted skill area with all K-5 students. Increasing Pro-Social behaviors, technology integration, and student goal setting and self reflection strategies will also be woven into each of our two school goals for next year.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

LINCOLN ELEMENTARY

Additional Successes at Lincoln • •

• •

Education

School Of Merit - PBIS 15-16 School Year Before and After School Programming saw an increased number of students this school year and more than 15 community partners were involved. Highly Successful Family NIghts brought overwhelming positive responses in our Parent Survey for serving the families of Lincoln in a variety of ways. Safe School Ambassadors (SSA) concluded with another highly successful year of anti-bullying programming more than 30 participants in grades K-5. Partnership with Highland Church brought 15 new Peaceful Solutions Playground games to the children and families of Lincoln Elementary School. Highly successful Reading Curriculum Implementation with K-5 students showed progress in Reading Skills and Strategies.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

MAINE ELEMENTARY

5901 North 44th Avenue, Wausau WI 54401

Marie Northup, Principal maine.wausauschools.org

Literacy

All students will increase their District writing score with 80% of students increasing their score by 1 point or meeting the criteria for advanced from fall to spring as measured by the quarterly District writing assessment. Results Students increased from .79 to 2.46 points in their writing scores.

Math

Kindergarten: All kindergartners will increase their performance of missing number as measured by AIMSweb with 80% of students scoring proficient or advanced. Results: Kindergarten students demonstrated consistent growth throughout the year and exceeded the goal by 9%. Grade 1: All first graders will increase their performance of mathematical computations as measured by the AIMSweb MCOMP with 80% of students scoring proficient or advanced. Results: First grade began the year on target and the end-of-the-year goal was missed by 15%. Grades 2-5: All students will increase their understanding and performance in mathematical concepts andapplications as measured by the AIMSweb MCAP with 80% of students scoring proficient or advanced. Results: Students met and exceed the goal. Grade 4 demonstrated gains from fall to winter and declined from winter to spring.

Core curriculum for math

Action Steps • Frequent and explicit feedback from teachers to students on their writing • Implementation of new reading curriculum • Focused writing assignments on traits (organization, sequencing, conventions, word choice, sentence fluency, and voice) • Student goal setting and progress monitoring • Quarterly writing assessment


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

MAINE ELEMENTARY

Goals for 2016-2017

Education

Our reading goal will focus on extending text and deepening comprehension. Our math goal will focus on fluency, problem solving, and perseverance to complete multi-step problems.

Additional Successes at Maine • • • • • •

Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a School of Merit for our work in PBIS. Fourth Grade collaborative project with the WI Maritime Museum focused on the importance of our waterways. Collaboration with Leigh Yawkey Woodson Museum for Family Night, 3rd grade visit, and Art Cluster. 4th & 5th Grade Honor Choir Experience with Alpin Hong at The Grand Theater. 3rd Annual Fire Up for Reading Program, a Collaborative project with the Village of Maine Fire Department. 53rd Annual Chili Supper sponsored by the PTO.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

JOHN MARSHALL ELEMENTARY 1918 Lamont Street, Wausau WI 54403

Amanda Patterson, Principal marshall.wausauschools.org

Reading

During the 2015-2016 school year, at least 80% of our students will attain above the target in literacy as measured by the spring AIMSweb and PALS screeners. Results We made 5.8% growth toward this rigorous goal; moving from 65.2% above target to 71% above target at the end of the school year on the AIMSweb targeted screeners. We ended the year with 81% of students within the average range or above. Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Held parent literacy nights to support parent understanding of the new literacy resources. • Trained teachers on the new literacy materials including two Superkids coaching opportunities to ensure fidelity to the program. • Provided opportunities for support staff to learn about the new literacy materials and to meet with the Superkids coach. • K-2 teachers were trained in analyzing PALS data via a PALS trainer. • The principal participated in literacy data analysis and action planning trainings and had regular coaching meetings with District literacy coaches. • Emphasized literacy instruction, intervention, and enrichment to meet student needs during collaborative PLC meetings. • Set high PLC expectations, minutes recorded, and discussion prompts to guide discussion. • Utilized the foundation of John Hattie’s Visible Learning research for high impact instructional strategies. • Expanded the use of technology to enhance instructional practices and increase student engagement. • The principal and literacy coaches provided feedback to teachers during walk- through observations. • Created a Building Leadership Team focusing on building needs, climate, and culture to continue moving toward our building goals.

Math

During the 2015-16 school year, at least 80% of our students will attain above the target in math as measured by the spring AIMSweb screener. Results We made 4% growth on the AIMSweb targeted screener; moving from 57% to 61% of students above the target from fall to spring.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

JOHN MARSHALL ELEMENTARY

Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Fidelity to the math curriculum. • Emphasized literacy instruction, intervention, and enrichment to meet student needs in math during collaborative PLC meetings. • Set high PLC expectations, minutes recorded, and discussion prompts to guide discussion. • Utilized the foundation of John Hattie’s Visible Learning research for high impact instructional strategies. • Expanded the use of technology to enhance instructional practices and increase student engagement. • Principal provided feedback to teachers during walk-through observations. • Began math intervention during Intervention/Enrichment block. • Created a Building Leadership Team focusing on building needs, climate, and culture to continue moving toward our building goals.

Education

Goals for 2016-2017

Continue to work towards our rigorous goals of 80% of students above target in both literacy and math. We will expand our knowledge and implementation of effective PLCs and focus on instructional practices that have the highest impact on student understanding. PLCs will also collaborate to learn how technology can enhance instruction and engagement for student learning.

Additional Successes at John Marshall •

Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a School of Distinction for 2015-2016 and as a School of Merit in 2014-2015 for successful PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports). These awards recognize our work to improve social/emotional growth for all students through the implementation of tiered levels of support. Our third grade classes held a successful “Socktober” campaign and presented more than 600 items to The Salvation Army ~ they doubled their goal of 300 and helped our community’s homeless stay warm!

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

RIB MOUNTAIN ELEMENTARY 2701 Robin Lane, Wausau WI 54401

Tammy Steckbauer, Principal ribmountain.wausauschools.org

School Learning Objective

By June 2016, 85% of students (192) who scored at or above benchmark in fall 2015, 100% will maintain or show growth by spring 2016. In addition, the 15% of students (33) who scored below benchmark in fall 2015, as measured by the AIMSweb Instructional Recommendations/Blended Report, all will work towards benchmark with these additional results expected: 50% of students scoring red “At Risk” (5/10) will progress to yellow “Some Risk” and 66.6% of students (16/24) scoring in yellow “Some Risk” will progress to green “Benchmark.”

SLO Student Outcomes

85% of students at benchmark in fall (192) grew to 93.3% at benchmark in spring (221). Goal was exceeded. 10.6% of students below benchmark (yellow) in fall (24) decreased to 8.3% in spring (19). Goal was not met; however, results were positive. Expected 16/24 or 66.6% to move to benchmark and missed goal by 3 students. 4.86% of students well below benchmark (red) in fall (10) decreased to 3% in spring (7). Goal was not met; however, results were positive. Expected 5/10 or 50% to move to yellow and missed goal by 2 students. Action Steps • Family Literacy Night was held with 80+ parents attending. • Weekly PLC meetings were held for planning of ongoing and targeted instruction. • Bi-weekly Literacy PLC (professional learning communities) meetings held with ELL (English language learner) staff and interventionists targeted at personalized instruction. • Faculty meetings devoted to literacy supported our professional growth. • Data analysis sessions were held in fall/winter/spring following universal screenings.

Reading SMART Goal

Our reading SMART goal measured growth in four areas, and student outcomes are listed following each assessment. Students will analyze and extend fiction and nonfiction text with 60% of students in grades 3-5 scoring advanced or proficient on the WI Badger Exam in spring 2015, 70% on the WI Forward Exam in spring 2016, and 80% on the WI Forward Exam in spring 2017. (Gr.3-66%, Gr.4-53%, and Gr.5-90% scored advanced or proficient on the 2015 Badger Exam. Results of the WI Forward Exam will be available in fall 2016.) Goal partially met. 85% or more second grade students tested on the MAP will score within the grade level mean RIT in the area of reading in fall 2015. (70.4% or 31/44 students hit the target.) Goal was not met. 85% or more second grade students tested on the MAP will score within the grade level mean RIT in the area of reading in spring 2016. (62.7% or 27/43 students hit the target.) Goal was not met; however, significant growth was noted from fall to spring by 11/16 of students who missed the target. 100% of reading intervention students will average an increase of at least one level from first quarter to third quarter. (100% of reading intervention students averaged at least one level increase with additional growth noted for some students.) Goal was met. Action Steps • Attended professional development training sessions for new literacy curriculum. • Implemented Superkids and Wonders materials with fidelity and discussed skills and strategies at PLC and faculty meetings. • Taught and reviewed testing vocabulary and the writing rubric necessary for students to be successful on the WI Forward Exam. • Daily reading interventions addressed specific deficits in reading.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

RIB MOUNTAIN ELEMENTARY

Math SMART Goal

Education

Our math SMART goal measured growth in three areas, and student outcomes are listed following each assessment. Students will produce proficiently scored responses to math problems that require evidence of strategy used to support their answers through written responses resulting in 60% of students scoring advanced or proficient on the WI Badger Exam in spring 2015, 70% on the WI Forward Exam in spring 2016, and 80% on the WI Forward Exam in spring 2017. (Gr.3-80%, Gr.4-60%, and Gr.5-63% scored advanced or proficient on the 2015 Badger Exam. Results of the WI Forward Exam will be available in fall 2016.) Goal was partially met. 80% of students tested on the MAP test will score within the grade level mean RIT score in the area of math in 2015 in the fall. (76.7% or 33/43 students hit the target.) Goal was not met. 80% of our students tested on the MAP will score within the grade level mean RIT score in the area of math in spring 2016. (60.4% or 26/43 students hit the target.) Goal was not met; however, significant growth was noted from fall to spring by 7/11 of the students who did not hit the target. Action Steps • Continued professional development for math curriculum via support from the District math specialist regarding math updates and best practices. • Provided students regular feedback regarding problem solving using the math rubric scored from the curriculum in grades 3-5 and through the use of oral feedback in grades K-2. • Used tools and resources including hands-on digital media (I-tools in grades K-2 and digital lessons in grades 3-5) to model, teach, and solve interactive problems.

SLO & SMART Goals for 2016-17

Continue our mission to achieve our building SLO and School Improvement Goals to meet the District literacy goal of 80% advanced or proficient by 2017 on the WI Forward Exam. As a result, we will continue to focus our SLO on literacy with continued efforts to achieve benchmark for all students. Our SMART goals regarding reading and mathematics will continue as these goals were originally written to be achieved over a 3-5 year time frame.

Additional Successes at Rib Mountain

• 100% of students in grades K and 1 achieved Benchmark status in reading in 2016. • 2015 Badger Exam results indicated that 80% of 3rd graders were advanced or proficient in math and 90% of our 5th graders were advanced or proficient in English Language Arts. • Grade 3 District writing results indicate that Rib Mountain students scored above the District average in nearly all areas. • Staff successfully completed Tier III of PBIS (Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports) training. • Raised over $63,000 towards new playground equipment through grants, fundraising efforts, and various donations. • Took first place in Division 1 Team and second place in Division II Team in the District Book Bowl. • Jump Rope for Heart earned $4,917 for the American Heart Association. • Peyton’s Promise Campaign collected 230 food items for local food pantries. • Blazing the Way to Reading, a reading incentive program sponsored by the Rib Mountain Fire Department, encouraged students to read over 100,000 minutes. • Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a School of Merit for the fourth consecutive year for our work in PBIS.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

RIVERVIEW ELEMENTARY 4303 Troy Street, Wausau WI 54403

Andrew Place, Principal riverview.wausauschools.org

Literacy

By June 1, 2016, at least 80% of students in grades 2-5 will score at or above target on the R-CBM Assessment from AIMSweb. (We achieved 85%) By June 1, 2016, at least 90% of students in 1st grade will score at or above target on the Nonsense Word Fluency Assessment from AIMSweb. (We achieved 92%) By June 1, 2016, at least 80% of students in kindergarten will score at or above target on the Nonsense Word Fluency Assessment from AIMSweb. (We achieved 98%) Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • PLC teams met for 60 minutes weekly to collaborate and plan. • Utilized literacy coaches to coach individuals and teams as needed, specific to Wonders/Superkids curriculum. • 2 FTE Title I teachers worked with small groups of struggling readers. • Title I paraprofessional worked one-on-one with struggling readers three hours daily. • Purchased a school myON license to allow students in grades K-5 access to eBooks both at school and home. • Held grade level Superkids/Wonders training with consultants. • Held three days of literacy training with consultants for ELL teachers and Interventionists. • Superkids coaching for K-2, ELL, and Intervention teachers. • Literacy Training for Principal. • Bi-weekly collaboration with classroom teachers, ELL teachers, and intervention teachers. • Provided additional small group instructional time to lower performing students who did not qualify for Title 1 or ELL services. • Utilized student iPads (QuickVoice App) and the Wonders 5th Grade Fluency Practice Stories to strengthen Fluency; students recorded progress on their individual Fluency Progress Charts. • A representative from each grade level visited Franklin Elementary School to observe a one-to-one environment and shared with their colleagues the strategies used to increase student engagement.

Math

By June 1, 2016, at least 70% of students in grades 1-5 will score at or above target on the M-Comp Assessment from AIMSweb. (We achieved 82%) Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • 4K teachers coordinated with kindergarten teachers to help with transition (math concepts expected in kindergarten, common language, etc.).


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

RIVERVIEW ELEMENTARY

• • • •

Incorporated “student friendly” language of Mathematical Practices into everyday instruction. Utilized the “Math Diagnosis and Intervention System” that is aligned with our Envision Math Curriculum during the intervention/enrichment blocks to ensure that both reading and math interventions occurred. Grade K-1 utilized paraprofessionals to work one-on-one with students on need specific skills. Grade K-2 utilized Soar to Success including the RtI book included in Math Expressions.

Education

Goals for 2016-2017

We will again focus on literacy and math. Additionally, we will implement a one-to-one iPad environment, intended to increase student engagement and boost both reading and math performance.

Additional Successes at Riverview •

• • • • •

Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a School of Merit for successful PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports) for 2014-2015 and as a School of Distinction for 2015-2016. These awards recognize our work to improve social/emotional growth for all students through the implementation of tiered levels of support. Successful Spinners (jump rope) program. Broke ground on our new 4K Learning Academy. Monthly family activities at school. First year of G2M (Growing Great Minds) after-school program. Offered volleyball, football, track, and 4 on 4 basketball.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

SOUTH MOUNTAIN ELEMENTARY 5400 Bittersweet Road, Wausau WI 54401

Deb Heilmann, Principal

southmountain.wausauschools.org

Literacy

By the end of the 2015-2016 school year, 90% of all students in grades K-5 will meet or exceed benchmark expectations in the area of reading, as indicated by the spring 2016 AIMSweb Universal Assessment Instructional Recommendations/Blended Report. Results We maintained student proficiency levels from the fall to spring benchmark assessments. Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Implemented core literacy programs at both the primary and intermediate level to fidelity. • Collaborated weekly in PLCs (Professional Learning Communities) to discuss instructional strategies to support student needs. • Provided interventions in addition to universal curriculum for students who did not meet benchmarks. • Provided enrichment opportunities for students who demonstrated grade level proficiency.

Math

By the end of the 2015-2016 school year, 80% of all the students in grades K-5 will meet or exceed benchmark expectations in the area of math as indicated by the spring 2016 AIMSweb Universal Assessment Instructional Recommendations Blended Report. Results We exceeded our building goal with 83% of our students reaching benchmark expectations. Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Provided universal curriculum. • Collaboration around student data was built into schedules in the form of weekly PLCs (Professional Learning Communities). • Provided intervention and enrichment for students within their regular classroom when necessary.

Goals for 2016-2017

We will continue our work to move all students forward in the area of literacy by providing additional intervention and enrichment opportunities. We will also integrate one-to-one technology to support our literacy goals. Staff will continue to focus on individualizing mathematics instruction for students who need additional support as well as for students who need enrichment. We will also integrate technology to enhance student learning in the area of math.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

SOUTH MOUNTAIN ELEMENTARY

Additional Successes at South Mountain •

• • •

Education

Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a School of Distinction for successful PBIS (Positive Behavioral Intervention and Supports). This award recognizes our work to improve social/emotional growth for all students through the implementation of tiered levels of support. The PTO significantly increased the number of volunteers and parents involved in partnership activities with the school throughout the year. Highlights include an ice cream social, book fair, lego/art fair night, a very successful spring fundraiser, and end-of-the-year carnival. Hosted a fall and winter literacy night and presented strategies to parents on how to support their children at home. Students also shared activities with their parents that demonstrated their literacy skills. Many students and families participated in our after-school mileage club that partnered with the National Fuel up to Play 60 initiative. Jena Lawson, 4th grade teacher, received the prestigious Teacher Fellowship from the Herb Kohl Educational Foundation.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

STETTIN ELEMENTARY

109 North 56th Avenue, Wausau WI 54401

Kelly Halvorsen, Principal stettin.wausauschools.org

Literacy

By the end of the 2015-16 school year, 88% of all students will meet or exceed benchmark expectations in the area of reading, as indicated by the spring 2016 AIMSweb Universal Assessment. Results Stettin exceeded this goal and ended the school year at 94%.

Math

By the end of the 2015-16 school year, 85% of all students will meet or exceed benchmark expectations in the area of math, as indicated by the spring 2016 AIMSweb Universal Assessment. Results Stettin met this goal and ended the year at 85%. Action steps implemented to reach our end-of-year performance levels • Continued to grow professionally in our understanding of best practices in the area of learning to read. This included the integration of our Science of Reading training, along with the core literacy programs of Superkids and Wonders. • Provided instruction within the RtI framework. Students received solid core universal instruction. Tier 2 supports and Interventions were provided when core instruction was not sufficient. Tier 3 supports and interventions were added as a third layer as needed on an individual basis. • Weekly progress monitored to further diagnose differentiated needs and planned instruction to match needs. • Weekly PLC meetings at grade level to plan ongoing targeted instruction utilizing Superkids/ Wonders. Twice each month (every 10 instructional days) there was a collaborative PLC including ELL/interventionist. • Collaborative RtI Team supported collaborative problem solving specific to individual students and their increasing literacy skills. • Teachers considered literacy data for individual students (as grade level teams) and determined an area of focus for individual SLOs (Student Learning Objective) and PPGs (Professional Practice Goal). • Continue to expand our knowledge of materials and resources through Superkids, Wonders, Wonderworks, the WSD Education Department, WSD Language Arts Leadership Team, and WSD Reading Specialist.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

STETTIN ELEMENTARY

Goals for 2016-2017

Education

We will examine the details within Reading and Language Arts. While the overall percentage was quite high, we will look for specific areas within that may be a weakness for our school or particular grade levels. For example, while our blended score reveals 94%, upon a deeper review of R-CBM data specifically, we are closer to 80%. We will also examine our school-wide writing scores, which do not trend as high as the reading specific scores.

Additional Success at Stettin •

Recognized by the Department of Public Instruction as a School of Merit for our work in PBIS (Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports).

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

MONTESSORI CHARTER SCHOOL 3101 North 13th Street, Wausau WI 54403

Michael Wridt, Principal montessori.wausauschools.org

Wausau Area Montessori Charter School (WAMCS) delivers a first class holistic education tailored to individual student needs creating lifelong learners and leaders. From the moment we meet our students we seek to understand who they are as individuals and support them in their learning based on their ability. We strive to help them embrace their internal drive to learn and to acknowledge that they can succeed on their own at their own pace. Social structures and interactions develop communication, collaboration, and perspective transforming learners into leaders. Wausau Area Montessori Charter School is a K-6 public school within the Wausau School District with an anticipated fall 2016 enrollment of 145 students. Through a curriculum that blends Montessori philosophy and researched based instructional methods and materials each aligned with Wisconsin state standards and Common Core, students in multi-age/grade classrooms exercise both freedom and responsibility in the pursuit of mastery learning during long blocks of open work time. At the heart of the school culture is a traditional Montessori emphasis on global awareness and peace studies. Guided by DPI-licensed and Montessori-trained teachers, students learn in small group or individual lessons covering all content areas complemented by lengthy periods of independent work time. Teachers guide a holistic curriculum encompassing math, geometry, language arts, reading, writing, history, geography, and science as components of a cosmic education that also includes peace, grace, courtesy, independence, interdependence, global consciousness, technology, art, and music. Emphasis is placed upon building and maintaining a school culture of kindness, respect, responsibility, and productivity.

School Improvement Plan

Over the past year the WAMCS staff and Governance Council have worked diligently to implement our school improvement plan and we looked at many factors including: operations, strategic planning, curriculum, assessment, behavior and academic interventions, financial planning, accountability, data management, and governance. As we looked at each of these areas, our focus was always on student learning. Our school improvement plan focused on two areas: 1. Further development and refinement of our guaranteed and viable curriculum. 2. Further development of our Virtues Program. As we look to the future, we will continue to be true to the Montessori philosophy and maintain high expectations for our students focusing on the whole child developing superior academic and character building skills.

SMART Goal

The WSD Education Department’s long range goal is to create and implement a guaranteed and viable curriculum (GVC) for English Language Arts (ELA) which will result in 80% of students achieving proficient or advanced on the state assessment by spring 2018. WAMCS also has this long range goal and we have set incremental growth goals for the percent of students performing proficient or advanced as follows: 60% by the end of the 2015-2016 school year; 70% by the end of the 2016-2017 school year; and 80% by the end of the 2017-2018 school year.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

MONTESSORI CHARTER SCHOOL

Current assessment data suggested the following goal: By the end of the 2015-2016 school year each grade level will have a set percentage of students meeting or exceeding AIMSweb Spring Reading grade level benchmark targets as outlined below: Kindergarten - 90% (we achieved 82%); 1st grade - 88% (we achieved 94%); 2nd grade - 89% (we achieved 88%); 3rd grade - 90% (we achieved 94%); 4th grade - 94% (we achieved 100%); 5th grade - 88% (we achieved 100%); and 6th grade - 100% (we achieved 100%).

Education

At the heart of improving student academic performance is our ability to regularly monitor and intervene with students who are struggling to meet day-to-day academic standard requirements. Student improvement over the course of each year is related to the Montessori learning approach and its natural ability to academically intervene. Students not meeting benchmark targets in fall will be the staff’s intensive focus while they continue to monitor existing students to meet WAMCS’s school-level objective. Students have shown their performance on AIMSweb must be monitored and reevaluated throughout the school year to ensure a continued increase in improvement. For this reason we cannot just focus on the students that did not meet benchmark in Fall. We must focus on all students and adjust when necessary to meet each students needs.

Accomplishments • • • • • •

Renewed our Charter with the Wausau School District for 5 more years. Collaborated with Wausau East students to design, build, and install a reading loft in the 2nd-3rd grade classroom. Added a daily heartbreak for our students during their morning 3-hour work time. Our full-time aide obtained a Montessori teacher certification. Completed 1 to 1 chromebook rollout in grades 2-6. Our Parent Connect organization continued its outstanding contribution to our family environment hosting the following events: Family Fall Picnic, Fall Color Walk, Halloween Game Night, Soup Night, Movie/Popcorn Night, Holiday Concert, Valentine’s Dance, Peace Concert, Bowling Fun Nights, Talent & Art Show, Family Water Park Night, and the Last Day of School Picnic. Next school year Parent Connect plans to support or sponsor additional events such as the National Day of Service, International Peace Day, Grandparents Day, and two Community Service Action Weeks.

Goals for 2016-2017 • • • • • • •

Welcome 145 students. Welcome a new teacher. Add additional Chromebook to maintain our 1 to 1 environment in grades 2-6. Renew our Strategic Plan. Continue to evaluate expansion to 8th grade. Evaluate options to enhance our Montessori environment at Horace Mann. Implement a Montessori Learning Management System.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

HORACE MANN MIDDLE SCHOOL 3101 North 13th Street, Wausau WI 54403

Dr. Julie Sprague, Principal horacemann.wausauschools.org

Horace Mann Middle School, home of the Eagles, offers a comprehensive education for students in grades 6-8. Every day we live our mission and vision, Student Learning - Whatever It Takes! We have teams at each grade level who are committed to helping our students achieve their best academically, behaviorally, and socially. Horace Mann is proud to host a wide range of extra-curricular activities: athletics, drama, Study Zone, music and talent venues, Quiz Bowl, forensics, and student council are simply a few. Eagles of all ages work together to make Horace Mann a wonderful, progressive, united school community.

2015-2016 School Improvement Goal Progress

Horace Mann teams and departments implemented Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) to help us advance student learning. Each PLC meets regularly to tighten exactly what it is we want students to know and be able to do and to determine how we respond when students meet our expectations and how we respond when they do not. Departments continue to build common formative and summative assessments as well, a necessary step in implementing a guaranteed and viable curriculum. Horace Mann is proud to be a Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) school. PBIS is a national, research-based program that offers explicit support and instruction for students in both academics and behaviors. Our PBIS team continues to lead us toward universal instruction in the classroom and on the playground. These universals will supplement those already in place for the hallway, food lines, and entrances. Beginning with the 2016-17 school year, every Horace Mann student will be provided an individual electronic device. Learning exists outside of our classrooms and outside of the school day. We intend to transform the learning process and provide 24/7 access to information, learning, and technology.

Our School’s Learning Objective

By the time our 6th grade class, who started in fall 2014, graduate from Horace Mann in spring 2017, 80% or more will score proficient or higher on the AIMSweb MAZE benchmark and the Scholastic Reading Inventory (SRI). We plan to achieve this goal by providing all students with a comprehensive instructional plan, complete with universal, differentiated instruction, intervention and enrichment options, and literacy practice across all curricular areas. By spring 2016, over 5% of our current 7th graders had progressed into the average range or above on the AIMSweb MAZE Benchmark, thereby helping Horace Mann reach its 80% target an entire school year ahead of time!


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

HORACE MANN MIDDLE SCHOOL

Education

In the last two years, almost 25% of our current 7th graders have moved into the advanced or proficient range on the SRI, making 42% of Horace Mann’s 7th graders proficient or advanced. We are pleased we continue to move toward the Wausau School District’s literacy goal: 80% of all students read at the proficient level.

Additional Successes at Horace Mann • • •

Inaugural year of a Board-approved block middle school schedule, doubling the number of instructional minutes in both math and English/Language Arts (8th grade). RtI (Response to Intervention/Instruction) school improvement team used data to lead staff in progress monitoring and interventions in both math and reading. 84.6% of Horace Mann’s current 7th graders scored average or above on the AIMSweb COMP Benchmark for math, and 84% scored average or above on the CAP Benchmark for math.

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Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

JOHN MUIR MIDDLE SCHOOL

1400 West Stewart Avenue, Wausau WI 54401

Larry Mancl, Principal johnmuir.wausauschools.org

Our focus at John Muir Middle School is to help all students realize their potential by implementing appropriate programming through a focus on the Wausau School District’s Shared Key Interests. This serves as our guide to meet the unique needs of early adolescents. The middle schoolphilosophy focuses on the development of “teams,” where instruction is more personalized and student intellectual, physical, social, and emotional needs are proactively met. Two teams are established at sixth and seventh grade to create the feeling of a small school atmosphere within our large school. For the first time in 2015-2016, our eighth grade class was not divided into teams to more closely model a high school setting. Our eighth grade staff continue to address the unique needs of 8th grade students as they begin their transition to high school by providing the necessary emotional and academic supports. Our building mantra of “Working Together...Creating the Future” lays the foundation for all we do to develop meaningful relationships with our students. We place particular emphasis on the transition from Grade 5 to Grade 6 so that students coming to the middle school from an elementary setting are able to dive into their studies on Day 1. Additional emphasis is given on the transition from Grade 8 to Grade 9 to provide college and career readiness skills for students exiting middle school and entering their high school years.

Our Shared Key Interests Advance student learning, achievement, and success by keeping it at the heart and as the filter for our decision making. • The following link to the John Muir Middle School Learning Objectives (SLOs) [Summary Data] is an example of our commitment and focus on student learning. These objectives were developed based on a review of student achievement data and has guided our work throughout the past school year. We expect to continue our efforts to improve student achievement in the areas of literacy and math proficiency. Utilize research-based curricula that reflect 21st Century themes and applications and are responsive to the needs and potential of all students, preparing them for a global society. • This was the first year that a revised middle school schedule was implemented. After three years of planning by a coalition of John Muir and Horace Mann Middle School teachers and administration, both schools were able to initiate additional intervention and enrichment elective opportunities for students at the seventh and eighth grade levels. Parent meetings allowed for this major change in programming to be initiated smoothly. The offering of electives at Grades 7 and 8 allowed for the improvement of student engagement. These electives focused on the college and career readiness skills of critical thinking in collaborative settings through differentiated instruction and tiered placement of students. For students who required more intense intervention, progress was regularly monitored and instruction adjusted to give all students an opportunity to close any existing achievement gap.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

JOHN MUIR MIDDLE SCHOOL

The eighth grade English Language Arts department worked through the second year of a pilot with the EngageNY(™) literacy curriculum. The EngageNY is in alignment with the Common Core State Standards and increased the rigor and relevance of the literacy curriculum. The focus of the curriculum is developing proficiencies in reading closely for textual details, making evidence-based claims, researching to deepen understanding of content, and building evidence-based arguments. The curriculum is supplemented with grammar and writing instruction. There was significant collaboration among teachers to implement the curriculum and provide the supplemental materials students needed to implement the curriculum. The middle school Math department continued its work with the Carnegie Math curriculum. The Carnegie Learning Math Series(™) was written to align with the Common Core State Standards and the Standards for Mathematical Practice. Sixth grade focuses on developing number sense; comparing quantities using ratios, rates, and percents; algebraic thinking, geometry, and statistical thinking. Seventh grade focuses on proportional reasoning, developing number sense, algebraic thinking, geometry, and statistical thinking and probability. Eighth grade focuses on algebraic thinking, geometry, and statistical thinking and probability, and revisits algebraic thinking and geometry. These courses provide research-based and engaging instruction to help all middle school students master math concepts and skills. Our Math teachers received significant professional development during the summer 2015 on best practices for implementing Carnegie and how to best teach in the 80-minute block, a new feature to our middle school schedule.

Education

Provide real-life, diverse learning opportunities with practical applications in the classroom and beyond. • Our Technology Applications classes provide experience in the use of “lean” manufacturing practices and the “flipped classroom.” • The infusion of technology is evident in our implementation of 1 to 1 applications with all seventh and eighth grade students. This enables students to be more actively involved in learning outside the classroom. It is also a tremendous asset to students and teachers as they draw comparisons and contrasts between different disciplines and real-life situations. • Under the direction of our new Out-of-School Enrichment Coordinator Gina Cornell, the John Muir after-school programming expanded to include classes in gardening, extreme robotics, cross country skiing, beading, and cooking exploration. Many new after-school opportunities will be offered in the 2016-2017 school year. • Our science students attended field trips to the Wausau West Planetarium and the Wausau School Forest and heard a presentation on electricity safety through Wisconsin Public Service. • All sixth and seventh graders, along with eighth grade band students, were treated to a concert with a popular area band and the Wausau West Jazz Band. Dubbed “Bandstock,” this annual event has become increasingly popular in each of its four years. • Our seventh and eighth grade students attended presentations sponsored by “A Walk in Their Shoes” featuring two books, A Diamond in Desert, by Kathryn Fitzmaurice, and Barbed Wire Baseball, by Marissa Moss. Both stories centered around World War II and the injustice our government bestowed upon Japanese-Americans after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Kerry Yo Nakagawa, Howard Zenimura, and Tets Furukawa shared this piece of American history with our students. “A Walk in Their Shoes” is a collaborative effort by north central Wisconsin

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JOHN MUIR MIDDLE SCHOOL

educators who hope to put a very personal face on the current events that fill the airwaves, print media, and the internet. Inform and engage the community in shaping educational strategy and formulating responses to change. • Analysis of parent and staff perceptions surveys by the John Muir Communications and Technology Professional Learning Communities fostered a web presence for all teachers called Classroom Connection, which will evolve into its Learning(™), a new learning management platform for 2016-2017. This easily-accessed information allows parents to have one place to locate critical classroom information regarding assignments and make contact with teachers outside of the class day. • Parent meetings were held District-wide and at John Muir to discuss safe internet use at the secondary level. Increased use of technology inside and outside the classroom made these sessions important as we move through and forward with the information age. • District and building technology staff were available during parent-student-teacher conferences to answer questions on 1 to 1 devices, accessing student information, and digital citizenship at all secondary buildings. Attract, retain, and develop a high quality, diverse, creative, and innovative workforce of leaders. • John Muir began the school year with changes in administrative leadership. • Larry Mancl, who previously served as Associate Principal of Scheduling, was hired to replace Dr. Dean Hess as Principal. • Mr. Mancl’s position was filled by Shane Saari, Assistant Principal and Athletics Director in the Tomahawk School District. He previously taught physical education at John Muir and served as Muir’s Activities and Athletics Director. • Amber Haluska replaced Katie Colwell as Associate Principal-Pupil Services, coming from Chisago Lakes, Minnesota. • The Muir Leadership team, comprised of building team leaders, department chairs, and building RtI, technology, PLC facilitators, and Educator Effectiveness coaches, keep the focus of our school and District Shared Key Interests at the forefront. • We were fortunate to access a District social worker to assist with an increasing student • population that includes diverse academic and social needs. • A full-time school resource officer allowed our administrative and student services staffs to have access to community resources to assist those students in need of services not available in our building. • A district-wide teacher and administrative evaluation system, Educator Effectiveness, enables us to professionally develop our classroom teachers in the areas of planning and preparation, aspects of the classroom environment, instructional strategies, and professional responsibilities. • Our Professional Learning Community (PLC) Committees continued with significant work in the following areas:


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

JOHN MUIR MIDDLE SCHOOL

• Our Assessment/Curriculum Development Committee worked on researching standards-based grading, continued work with analyzing data from formative and summative assessments, and worked on concise and descriptive report card comments.

Education

• The Scheduling Committee kept a pulse on the implementation of the new middle school schedule with a special focus on the I/E (Resource) period and the staffing of intervention and enrichment offerings. • Our PBIS Excellence Campaign became Response to Intervention-Academic (RtI-A) and Response to Intervention-Behavior (RtI-B) so that those efforts could be targeted based on student needs.

• • • • • •

• •

• The Technology Committee worked on professional development of staff in its Learning(™). This platform will allow all teachers to create and maintain an online presence accessible to students, staff, and parents. • The Communications Committee spent its first year studying ways to improve how we as a staff communicate with the community, parents, students, and each other. The first step taken was a review of a recent survey of parents, students, and staff to identify ways to reach our stakeholders in a professional and meaningful manner. Email etiquette for our building was created and shared with staff. The method of scheduling parent-student-teacher conferences and the facilitation of those conferences will be the focus of this group for 2016-2017. Evidence of the quality of our staff is demonstrated in many ways. The following are examples of outcomes that have occurred because of the high level of staff professionalism and dedication to the needs of our students: Karen Zuidema, Music Teacher, was selected to be a member of the 2016-2017 WSMA Festival Music List Selection Committee. Brian Bauer, Business Education Teacher, was featured in the publication City Pages regarding his financial literacy training with CoVantage Credit Union and was included on a WSAW Channel 7 spotlight. Randy Erdman, Science Teacher, received a $250 Facebook Challenge grant from the WSD Foundation for innovation in the classroom. Paula Reed, English/Language Arts Teacher, completed the renewal of her National Board Certification. Ann Viegut, Social Studies Teacher, serves on the WSD Foundation Board and completed the National Geographic Educator Certification Program. Ann was also selected as a National Geographic Educator of the Week that included a video and story recognition on the National Geographic Web Page. In addition, Ann recently completed the renewal of her National Board Certification. School Resource Officer Kevin Cornell received the Inspiration Award from the Wausau Police Department for his participation in myTEAM TRIUMPH as an “angel” who assisted a disabled athlete to participate in the Madison Ironman Competition. Patty Zemke, John Muir and Horace Mann Health Teacher, was selected as Wisconsin Health and Physical Education Health Teacher of the Year for 2015-2016.

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• • • • •

Staff recognized with Caught in the Act Awards included: Cindy Bacon, Building Paraprofessional; Tina Betry; 8th Grade Math Teacher and Winter Frolic Dance Coordinator; Kevin Cornell, School Resource Officer; John Heiting, Head Custodian; Sheila Kostroski, 6th Grade Team Leader and Math Teacher; and Marcia Wood, Administrative Technical Assistant. The promotion of members of the John Muir faculty in the Wausau School District as well as other area districts. Cristy Heldt, Science Teacher, moved into a Technology Integration Specialist position with the Wausau School District. Rebekah Barbian, Library/Media Center Director, will become a Technology Integration Specialist with the Wausau School District ini 2016-2017. Ann Lemmer and Sara Stelzer will become Technology Mentors for the 2016-2017 school year to work with Wausau School District Technology staff in continuing to develop classroom technology skills. Jon Albee will assume the Team Leader role for Team 7-1 for the 2016-2017 school year.

Provide safe, secure, flexible, inviting, and well-maintained environments that nurture student well-being and enhance teaching and learning. • New landscaping was added to the front and Stewart Avenue side of our campus that included mulched flower beds with rock accents. • An upgrade to our security surveillance system was installed, allowing for continuous video monitoring of our campus. • Our cafeteria flooring received a much-needed make over with additional upgrades to the servery and cafeteria being installed this summer. • The John Muir Excellence Store and Student Council facility housed in the cafeteria was remodeled with new storage cabinetry. • New energy efficient windows, lighting, and heating system was installed in numerous classrooms during the summer of 2015. • An outdoor teaching area off of Callon Street was created by repurposing concrete patio tables. • A study is currently underway to determine the best utilization of the John Muir building footprint with an eye to future increasing student population. Identify, integrate, and expand technology to foster adaptability and maximize learning for all. • The 1 to 1 Technology Program expanded in the 2015-2016 school year with each seventh and eighth grade student receiving a Chromebook that they used both in the classroom and outside the building. Training and curriculum development continued for staff on technology integration and curriculum instructional planning and delivery. This training was concurrent with our new learning management system.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

JOHN MUIR MIDDLE SCHOOL

Interactive “Smart” whiteboards were installed in 13 classrooms to expand technology integration in individual classrooms and allow for the increased use of 1 to 1 devices.

Education

Foster mutually beneficial partnerships and collaborations that expand learning opportunities and resources. • The annual field trip to a post-secondary college continued for our students. Our 6th graders visited Northcentral Technical College, our seventh graders visited the University of Wisconsin-Marathon County, and our eighth graders once again visited the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. These trips were supported through the efforts of the Department of Public Instruction and coordinated by our Out of School Coordinator Gina Cornell. • A “Heavy Metal Tour” sponsored by Northcentral Technical College and area industrial manufacturing companies provided our eighth graders with a tour of many different local industries and information on technical careers. • Our sixth and seventh graders participated in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) festival called “Mindtrekkers” hosted by Northcentral Technical College and sponsored by Michigan Technical University that provided students with the opportunity to conduct hands-on experiments and watch demonstrations that highlighted the importance of math and science in everyday life. • For the past eight years, we have participated in Star Wars, and most recently, the Hunger Games during the month of December. Our staff and students participated in food, supply, and coin drives in an effort to fill local food pantries and provide essential health care and personal hygiene products to local agencies that included The Neighbor’s Place, Women’s Community, the Salvation Army, and the Marathon County Humane Society. • John Muir Middle School decided to hold its annual community fundraising project to direct their collective efforts toward myTEAM TRIUMPH Wisconsin Chapter - Northcentral Region located here in Wausau. Our Student Council, with the help of Out of School Coordinator Gina Cornell, embraced the idea of working toward the goal of raising enough money to purchase and sponsor a race chair to help get more local captains and angels into these events. The race chairs are costly and made-to-order, and John Muir needed to raise $5,000 to purchase a chair. Over several weeks John Muir held homeroom coin drives, fun theme days, a raffle, a wheel design contest, and spaghetti dinners. Not only did we reach our goal of $5,000, we exceeded it! • Additionally, our staff participated in the 2015-16 United Way Campaign and the Women’s Community Denim Day to model the spirit of community service for our students.

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Enrich Excel Achieve Learning Academy - EEA Dr. Shannon Young, Principal 2607 North 18th Street, Wausau WI 54403 • eea.wausauschools.org

In the 2015-16 school year, students from all demographic areas in grades 6-12 will increase achievement levels in the area of reading as demonstrated by the following measures. 100% of students already functioning at a Tier 1 level or better will maintain a minimum of a Tier 1 level on the spring 2016 Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) assessment. Results For math, 84% of students (21 of 25) testing proficient in fall also tested proficient in spring. By the end of the school year, an additional 11 students receiving Tier 2 interventions all year tested proficient. For reading, 89% of students (16 of 18) testing proficient in fall also tested proficient in spring. By the end of the school year, an additional 11 students receiving Tier 2 interventions all year tested proficient. 75% of students functioning below the proficient level for reading and math on the MAP assessment will meet their individual growth goal each semester. The individual growth goal is designed to close the achievement gap. Results In math, 68% of students receiving Tier 2 or Tier 3 interventions met their individual growth goal. In reading, 49% of students receiving Tier 2 or Tier 3 interventions met their individual growth goal. School-wide attendance rates will increase to at least 90% per month. Results Attendance in the 2015-16 school year rose 4% to 91%. Action Steps Completed (some are ongoing) • Utilized APEX computer based curriculum and supplemental readings to allow for differentiation of curriculum for all students. • Determined placement in interventions by analyzing assessment data, progress on APEX, and credit completion. • Determined RtI Tier based on MAP testing and other assessments. • In advisory, seminars, and experiential learning classes, teachers followed reading instruction guidelines as outlined in documents provided. • Advisor and special education teacher provided individual interventions required to meet core curriculum standards and determine whether those students need individual classroom interventions.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

Enrich Excel Achieve Learning Academy - EEA

Provided specific interventions to students scoring in Tier 3B, 2B, and 3A. Provided leveled math curricula for students. Monitored progress and goal attainment by updating MAPs data worksheet. Participated in additional training on analysis of MAP data. Implemented new processes to deal with attendance issues--met with students on day of return and utilized outside resources such as truancy abatement program. Determined need for Behavior and Academic Intervention Team referral. Maintained 1.5 FTE additional staff through Title I to allow for additional help for all students and provide staff to offer multiple reading interventions. Provided professional development for ALL staff in the area of reading interventions. Completed 2 of 12 days of reading training.

Education

Goals for 2016-2017

We will remain focused on closing the achievement gap in reading by implementing new, targeted strategies. We will continue our focus on attendance, which is critical to student success.

Additional Successes at EEA • • • • • • •

Received four grants this school year, one of which was student written. Provided volunteer services to Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum for Toddler Tuesdays. Provided volunteer services to Forest Park Village through our ongoing partnership. Students participated in the mock convention held through Kids Voting. Began a lunch presentation series in partnership with United Way’s Emerging Leaders. Signed on to begin a partnership with Youth Apprenticeship beginning next school year. Graduated 5 juniors a full year early and 12 seniors on time.

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WAVE - Wausau Area Virtual Education Thom Hahn, Director of Seconary Education wsdwave.org

The Wausau School District is dedicated to offering students and families a variety of pathways and learning options to achieve our District mission to Advance Student Learning, Achievement, and Success. This past year, the Wausau Area Virtual Education (WAVE) program was begun to provide opportunities for students to choose their time and place of learning, determine the pace at which they approach their subjects, and provide them with the necessary tools to be successful in their skill development. The Wausau Area Virtual Education program enables the Wausau School District to provide online learning options for any student residing within District boundaries including: ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Relevant courses in flexible locations using an accommodating time schedule. High quality, interactive courses aligned to state and national standards. Middle school and high school level curriculum. More than 70 different course options. Semester courses for credit deficient students and others unable to successfully participate in a traditional setting. Advanced Placement (AP) courses not currently offered within the Wausau School District. A solution for schedule conflicts, homebound, home-based learners, adjudication, truancy, pre-expulsions, teen parents, and other special needs. Modified rates of learning to accommodate the student – traditional, accelerated, or extended. The experience of online learning in preparation for future training in post-secondary Education.

Wausau Area Virtual Education is in partnership with Wisconsin Virtual School and the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. All courses are aligned to national and state standards. Courses are taught by Wisconsin certified teachers and each student is assigned a Local Education Guide (LEG) from the Wausau School District who serves as the local contact and mentor for the student. This past year saw tremendous interest and growth in WAVE as we began the year with 7 full-time students. By the end of the school year, WAVE had 23 full-time and 48 part-time students taking classes virtually. Once again, for the 2016-17 school year, WAVE will only be available to students in grade 6-12 who reside within the boundaries of the Wausau School District. Greater numbers of students are looking for educational alternatives – WAVE stands ready to assist on their educational path.

WAVE Wausau Area Virtual Education


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

GOLD CARDS Free cards give senior citizens a chance to join in the fun of school once again ...

Education

What things make you smile when you think about school? Do you think of school plays, school concerts, athletic competitions? If you enjoyed any of these activities when you or your children were young and you’re 60 years or over, then you have a chance to experience it all again. Seniors living in the Wausau School District can apply for a WSD Gold Card by contacting Cassie Peck at 715-261-0505, e-mailing her at cpeck@wausauschools.org or by visiting the Superintendent’s Office in the Longfellow Administration Center at 415 Seymour Street. The Gold Card offers free admission to almost every musical, theatrical, or athletic event in the District’s schools. Those events that are not included are clearly noted on the back of the card. Gold Card holders are able to fill their evenings and weekends with great sporting events, musical performances, and exceptional middle and high school theatrical events. You can look at your Gold Card as a free lifetime pass to an entire world of high quality Wausau School District entertainment.

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WAUSAU EAST HIGH SCHOOL 2607 North 18th Street, Wausau WI 54403

Dr. Bradley Peck, Principal east.wausauschools.org

Wausau East High School, home of the Lumberjacks, has a proud and rich tradition of excellence inside and outside the classroom. East High has been a leader in the International Baccalaureate (IB) program, completing our 36th year as an IB school – the tenth oldest IB school in the nation. Currently, East has 10 full IB diploma candidates and 14 juniors; 322 of our juniors and seniors take at least one IB course. Our Academic Enrichment program works with our at-risk students guiding their learning and allowing them to reach their academic potential in the classroom. Finally, our vast array of elective classes allows our students to expand their horizons in areas of personal interest. Special programs offered at Wausau East include Project Lead the Way, a pre-engineering program; a Health Academy; Youth Apprenticeships in multiple areas; Graphic Arts; Building Trades; several art and music class offerings, along with our electives. Our students continue to reach out to the community through our Cultural Arts Festival at East (CAFÉ). This event held each May allows our students to showcase their talents in the visual arts, performing arts, technical education, Foreign Language, Southeast Asian cuisine, and Horticulture. Our athletic teams have raised money for local causes from collecting food for our food banks to raising money for cancer. Our students are leaving Wausau East High School with career and college readiness skills. The faculty at East High are also learning and growing in their skills working on a common intellectual mission, the new common core standards, common assessments, and student learning objectives and outcomes. We use assessment data to drive instruction and to answer the following questions: What do students need to know and be able to do? How will I know if they have learned it? What will I do if they don’t and what will I do if they do understand? We respond to students’ needs for learning and behavior by providing appropriate interventions.

SCHOOL LEARNING OBJECTIVE (SLO) SLO #1: Each ninth grade student at Wausau East High School during the 2015-16 school year will improve his or her reading ability as determined by each student’s Lexile score: Students who scored Advanced will maintain Advanced standing; students in other categories will increase their Lexile score by 75 points or more or advance into the next category. SLO #2: Each tenth grade student at Wausau East High School during the 2015-16 school year will improve his or her reading ability as determined by each student’s Lexile score: Students who scored Advanced will maintain Advanced standing; students in other categories will increase their Lexile score by 75 points or more or advance into the next category. Staff participated in Professional Growth and Development through focused text-based questions, reading strategies, tiered instructional strategies, differentiated instructional strategies, resources such as Readworks.org, selecting appropriate text, written responses to text strategies, and development of a common rubric for responding. This will be supplemented through direct instruction at teacher training at faculty meetings, staff inservice training, and bi-weekly professional learning community (PLC) time. In addition, Wausau East’s data team developed a faculty resource that provides Lexile levels with correlating skill sets to assist teachers in developing appropriate interventions and differentiated strategies based on individual student Lexile scores. Also, many staff level Student Learning Objectives were based on content reading strategies with an emphasis on vocabulary. The data team met in January to monitor progress towards these two goals and to determine any necessary adjustments. It was determined that our school was on target and no changes were needed. End-of-the-year data revealed: For 9th grade, 56% of our students in Basic and


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

WAUSAU EAST HIGH SCHOOL

Below Basic met the SLO goal; 48 of the 86 students increased their Lexile score by 75 points or increased an entire category. For 10th grader, 62% of our students in Basic and Below Basic met the SLO goal; 41 of 66 students increased their Lexile score by 75 points or increased an entire category; and 74% of 9th graders and 73% of 10th graders showed growth in their Lexile scores of 1 or more points. When comparing the number of students in Basic and Below Basic from the fall to spring, 17 ninth graders and 13 tenth graders moved out of the categories.

Education

Next Steps: Identify students who have low Lexile scores, use diagnostic tests to identify the areas of deficiency, learn strategies to maximize student learning, and provide Tier 2 interventions that meet the needs of students. Continue to increase the knowledge of our teaching staff in effective reading strategies. Add the junior class to our SLO and continue increasing students’ reading levels as evidenced by SRI Lexile Scores.

SUCCESSES THAT SUPPORT LEARNING The Math and Science Co-Teaching programs continue to be successful for student learning. The RTI A Committee continues to refine and retool intervention forms to improve student engagement and improve overall learning. Students are held responsible for their learning and those with a D or failing grade are assigned to a resource center of that subject area. Our Academic Enrichment (AE) program serves our at-risk students. AE teachers work closely together to communicate specific concerns and work with other East staff to provide support for student learning. AE focuses on study skills, content reading strategies, work completion, and other necessary skills for school success. The 2015-16 math team participated in Wisconsin Math League contests sponsored by Beloit College and Central Wisconsin Math League contests sponsored by UW-Stevens Point. At monthly meetings the team discussed Zenos paradox, Koenigsberg bridge, mobius strips, knots, fractals, and game theory. This year, 113 students participated in at least one of the contests. Overall, Wausau East finished in the top 20 for the Wisconsin Math League and in the top 10 for the Central Wisconsin Math League, including 4th in division 1. Goals of the math team: Develop an appreciation of mathematics; Build positive relationships with others who share a common interest in mathematics; Offer an opportunity to extend learning that happens in the classroom; and, Compete with others from around the state for individual and team recognition. Key Club had 15 donors register for the ‘Be the Match’ national bone marrow registry, our student members help with Girl Scout and PTO meetings at the elementary schools, and assist the elderly in communicating with loved ones via Skype. Ten members attended the District Conference (DCON) in March. The Forensics program had another successful season. Students competed in the Sub-District and District competitions. Emma Rislove, Elizabeth Schumann, Olivia Schenzel, Clara Merkel, Lucy Brown, and Isis Hunter competed at state and each brought home awards.

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The WAHISCAN yearbook staff worked diligently to produce the 100th edition of the WAHISCAN. The result was a 263-page yearbook capturing this year’s stories, as well as the history of the past 99 years. The NTC (Northcentral Technical College) College Prep Center housed at Wausau East has proven to be a valuable resource for students as 14 students were served. The Center is a collaborative project between Wausau East and Northcentral Technical College and serves as a bridge for East students who have not met the admission cut-off scores on the required Accuplacer entrance test to be admitted into NTC. This Center allows students to complete the required remediation in Arithmetic, Reading, and Writing, all without leaving their high school. Many high school students who need the remediation do not feel comfortable going to NTC to complete the courses. The goal is to give East students easy access to college prep services and get them program ready to attend NTC in fall. East had nine students compete in the SkillsUSA Competition held at Northcentral Technical College. Ben Diny served as the Master of Ceremonies; and August Johansson received a gold medal and placed first in the Graphics Communication competition and also earned a bronze medal and placed 3rd in the Job Skill Demonstration competition. Aiden Crowley earned a silver medal and placed second in the Graphics Communication completion. The SkillsUSA team also competed at UW-Stout. August Rich, Josh Stolze, and Trevor Salber competed in team problem solving against 23 other schools; Michael McClure competed in technical drafting; Jacob Schroeder and Branden Anderson competed in the welding challenge and August Johansson, along with Aiden Crowley, participated in the Graphic Arts Advertising Design contest. August Johnansson earned a gold medal in Advertising Design. Our Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) team was trained in Tier 2 supports, and we implemented Check In Check Out (CICO) for students who needed additional support. East’s core values of Respect, Integrity, Compassion, and Excellence are further developed during home room. We created freshman only home rooms to help support the needs of freshman and incorporate ‘how we do things here at East.’ The PBIS team has worked diligently to build on the positives our students do daily through our Lumberjack Pride tickets as well as reaching our goal that every student receives a positive postcard home. The Youth Apprenticeship Program provides businesses the opportunity to prepare young people with the type of work readiness and technical skills that meet their needs. Through this program employers can hire juniors and seniors to prepare for a career while still in school. We appreciate the support of the mentors and businesses involved in the Youth Apprenticeship Program. Students participate in the following Youth Apprenticeship areas: Agriculture; Automotive; Banking/Finance; Construction; Health; Information Technology (IT); and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). In just two short years our DECA Program has evolved, grown and blown away the competition! Here are a few of their many accomplishments: Held an annual “Trick or Can” event which raised over 1,100 lbs of food for “The Neighbors’ Place;” school-wide donation to raise items to benefit the Humane Society of Marathon County; raised $686 to benefit the Muscular Dystrophy Association; visited residents at North Central Health Care several times; named the top DECA fundraiser in Wisconsin for the Polar Plunge, bringing in over $6,300 to benefit Special Olympics of Wisconsin; had two competitors, Noah Briquelet Miller and Bennet Gassner, compete at the international level; achieved Gold Chapter status through DECA Inc.; and awarded silver certification for the school store.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

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STUDENT AND ATHLETIC ACCOMPLISHMENTS •

• • • • • • •

• • •

• •

Education

The Lumberjack Girls and Boys Cross Country team had strong seasons; boys finished third in the conference while the girls finished fourth. Bryan Lemmer and Alex Miller qualified for the state meet. The Girl’s Swim team won their 13th consecutive City Meet title and finished fourth overall in the conference. The Boy’s Soccer Team won the Wisconsin Valley Conference Championship for the second time in three years. Senior Charlie Keefe was named first team all-conference. The Girl’s Tennis Team had a great season finishing second in the conference. Sophomore Sami Miles qualified for state at #1 singles and was a unanimous selection for first team all-conference. The Boy’s Basketball Team tied for third in conference play and won the Division 2 Regional Championship in WIAA tournament play. Senior JP Lacy was a unanimous selection for first team all-conference. Both the Boy’s and Girl’s Curling teams qualified for the State meet held at the new Wausau Curling Club. Freshman Josie Bartishofski finished second at the conference wrestling meet. Senior Cory Courneya, Sophomore Ben Diny, and freshman Nick Budleski finished fourth. Girl’s Hockey Co-Op Team participated in the WIAA State Championship tournament, losing in the semifinals. East was represented by seniors Elizabeth and Emily Bauer; junior Emily Geiger; and sophomores Kenna Bailey, Emelia Edmondson, Brooke Jackson, Athena Kayler, Quinn Lodholz, and Chloe Westberg; and freshmen Sarah Croker and Arianna Pfeiffer. Both our Boy’s and Girl’s Alpine Skiing teams qualified for the State meet in LaCrosse. The East/West Nordic Ski Team capped off their season with a first place finish in the Boys State Team Relay of which sophomore Victor Anderson was a team member. Sophomore Adrienne Burton finished ninth in the Girls Individual State Sprint Championship. The Boy’s Golf Team had a strong season. Junior Matt Tuman finished as conference individual champion, City Champion, and set a new course record at Greenwood Hills Country Club with a round of 66. The team qualified for the WIAA Sectional Tournament. Matt Tuman finished sixth at the WIAA State Meet. Seniors Landon Dehnel and Gabe McGinnity; Juniors Matt Tuman and Michael LaPree; and sophomore Sam Crispell all earned a spot on the Academic All-State Team. The Boy’s Tennis Team captured the Wisconsin Valley Conference Championship. Adam Schneider was the Number 2 Singles champion, while Lucas Ratanawong and Shia Vang teamed up to win the Number 2 Doubles championship. Seniors Isaac Stine and Keacha Chang, along with junior Sawyer Schlindwein, qualified for the WIAA State Meet. The Boy’s and Girl’s track teams had a very good season. Juniors Axel Treinen and Jovan Parks, along with senior Alex Miller, qualified for the state meet on the boy’s side. For the girls, sophomore Adrienne’ Burton and senior Sydney Blaskowski also qualified for the state meet. East had 24 Wisconsin Valley Conference Scholar Athletes.

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Wausau Engineering & Global Leadership Academy Timothy Fetting, Principal 2607 North 18th Street, Wausau, WI 54403 • www.wausauegl.org

The Wausau Engineering & Global Leadership (EGL) Academy is a unique charter high school providing a problem-based and project-based education with special focus on Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Global Leadership. This small high school of approximately 80 students, which opened in the fall of 2010, serves students in grades 9-12. Our small school creates an exceptional learning environment for students to develop strong relationships with our faculty and to delve deeply into the application of their learning. EGL Academy emphasizes parent and community collaboration, involvement, and participation. EGL Academy’s curriculum combines individual and group study; in-depth project research, analysis, and implementation; community services; as well as job shadowing and intern opportunities. What makes Wausau EGL Academy unique is that these 21st Century components are the focus of the school. Project learning, problem solving, technology, engineering, and following your passion are not just a course or a slice of the curriculum—they are the curriculum. Through the development of personalized learning plans, students learn to set goals. In addition, students determine what graduation standards each workshop, seminar, and project will accomplish and set off on their own path to fulfill those requirements. EGL Academy students see and experience their learning in action. This charter high school is preparing potential engineers, entrepreneurs, and members of innovative teams. To date, graduates are entering the college of their choice, many at major engineering institutions.

2015-2016 SMART Goal Work

Baseline evidence was gathered in the areas of language usage, reading, math, and science through the fall MAP assessment. Formative assessments gathered evidence in all seminars and intervention and instruction were given as necessary. The team identified the school’s greatest area of need in each area from all data available. Wausau EGL Academy will continue with data collection and analysis to guide the implementation and advancement of PBIS (Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports). With Tier 1 fidelity accomplished, the team continued towards advancing to full implementation of Tier 2. SMART Goal #1 By the end of the 2015-2016 school year, the percentage of students scoring above the 60th percentile will increase from 82% - 90% in the area of Reading and from 66% - 75% in the area of Language usage. Formative assessments will gather evidence in all seminars and interventions and instruction will be provided throughout the school year as needed. Intervention groups will be established after the first round of MAP testing in October and reorganized following the mid-year assessment in January. Students not surpassing the 60th percentile will demonstrate adequate gains as demonstrated through individual goals which can be found in their personalized learning plans.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

Wausau Engineering & Global Leadership Academy

SMART Goal #2 85% of students will measure at or above the 60th percentile by May 2016 as measured by the MAP assessment in the area of Math.

Education

SMART Goal #3 By the end of the 2015-2016 school year Wausau EGL Academy will have reached PBIS Tier 2 fidelity.

Additional Successes at EGL • • • • • • • • • •

Austin Walhof received the prestigious Michigan Technological University Merit Scholarship. Senior Victoria Neigum experienced a significant Global Leadership Experience as she traveled with the Good News Project to St Lucia on a mission trip. Several students participated in the Global Youth Summit in Milwaukee. Seniors AnnMarie McNamara and Trenton Meyers were recognized by a community panel as having the top senior capstone projects. Junior/ Senior Jacob Lasee became the first EGL Academy student to graduate in 3 years. 100% of graduates were, once again, accepted to the postsecondary school of their choice or the military. Instructor John Kozlovich presented at the Wisconsin Council for the Social Studies Conference in Madison. All students continued with the development of personalized learning plans that included both individual short and long-term educational goals, artifacts of their learning, and reflective writings. EGL has become a prime choice for many families as students from eight different school districts, in addition to students with home-school and parochial backgrounds have made EGL Academy their academic home. Thanks to various businesses and community foundations, the development of a Fab Lab at EGL has continued with the purchase and implementation of several new pieces of high tech equipment. • Each junior took the ACT exam; the scores of all students continues to be above regional and state averages. • Several students and teachers created hands-on activities for the Stettin Elementary School Science Fair.

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WAUSAU WEST HIGH SCHOOL 1200 W. Wausau Avenue, Wausau WI 54401

Jeb Steckbauer, Principal west.wausauschools.org

School Learning Objective

Wausau West had a literacy goal specifically to improve writing. By the end of the 2015-2016 school year, the 10th grade class will obtain an average score 2 points higher than they scored on the initial assessment. Additionally, 90% of all students will increase their overall score and 40% of students will have an increase of 2 or more points. Results The 10th grade class increased by 1.25 points and we were pleased to see an overall increase in writing proficiency. Sixty percent of all students increased their overall score, and 42% of students had an overall increase of at least 2 points. Action Steps • Principal and English department leader in-serviced new staff on the 6-traits rubric. • Principal and English department leader provided exercises to demonstrate the grading process and how to interpret the 6-traits rubric. • Ongoing professional development was provided to staff to monitor progress. • Students were recommended to the writing lab RtI center for additional assistance. • All students took an initial assessment to provide baseline data. • Developed and assigned one writing assignment in accordance with assignment guidelines for each course per quarter (students had a writing assignment for each class every quarter).

School Learning Objective for 2016-2017

We will continue to focus on literacy with a concentration on reading. As we identify additional strategies to use in our classrooms, we will also expand lexile testing in our 9th grade class to identify student needs and offer individual support through our RtI center.

Additional Successes at West

Wausau West High School was recognized as Pacesetter School in Advanced Placement by the Wisconsin Advanced Placement Advisory Council. Faculty Notes of Merit • Brad Burrill was named as Bass section coach for the WSMA State Honors Mixed Choir. • Christine Kadonsky participated in three teacher workshops. She was selected for each seminar in a competitive national application process: 1) American Revolution Institute Master Teachers Program sponsored by the Society of the Cincinnati; 2) “America’s Reconstruction: The Untold Story” National Endowment for the Humanities three-week Summer Institute. “Andrew Jackson and His Era” Weekend Colloquium sponsored by TeachingAmericanHistory. org; and 3) For her Reconstruction Institute, she wrote a visual essay that was included in the book The Untold Story: Visual Essays on America’s Reconstruction (Lowcountry Scholars Press, 2015). • Kelly Derrick scored the National AP Biology exams in Kansas City, Missouri, for the 11th year in a row. • Krista Vendetti was chosen as this year’s Community Based Big Sister, for her outstanding work with Big Brothers Big Sisters. • Nate Lemmens was named “Boys Co-Coach of the Year” for Boys Basketball.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

WAUSAU WEST HIGH SCHOOL

Student Academic Achievement • Technology Engineering and Education (TEE) students and teacher, Theran Peterson, published an article in the magazine “Pathways.” • Project Lead the Way State Leadership Team selected TEE students to be part of Wisconsin Project Lead the Way Week at the State Capitol. • Five students competed in the Regional SkillsUSA competition at NTC. Students competed in Team Problem Solving, Welding and Precision Machining. Eric Kurtzweil brought home a gold medal with a first place finish in the Precision Machining category; Jacob Wolfe participated in the Welding competition; and our Team Problem Solving group included Brad Bushman, Makeila Mueller, and Bryce Vannes. • Six students went to State SkillsUSA competition in Madison. • Clayton DeChamps competed in the SkillsUSA welding challenge at the Advanced Welding Institute in Eagle River. Clayton completed a job interview portion, written test, and welding portion. Clayton finished the welding portion in second place and finished in the overall competition which factored all three with a First place finish! For his accomplishment Clayton brought home a wire feed welder, welding kit, and a $1,000 scholarship to Advance Welding Institute. • Twenty-two students graduated from the 2015-2016 Wausau Area High School Leadership Program: Isabel Adams, Bennett Baumann, Sydney Draeger, Erin Gruber, Kainoa Gut, Mikahla Klug, Megan Kopetzky, Julia Lee, Hanna Mork,Jack Oosterhuis, Grace Schuler, Barnabas Shiferaw, Pranav Srivastava, Raquel Taylor, Edward Vaillancourt, Andrew Vehlow, Marisa Velasquez, Tyler Weisenberger, William Wendling, Sheridan Westphal, YuePheng Yang, and Pachoua Yang. • Tylar Augustine was named Valedictorian, rated in the top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and was a member of the National Honor Society. • Matthew Bagby was an Honor Roll member. • Taylor Baine was on the Honor Roll and Honor Society member. • Nicole Batterman was rated in the top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and was a member of the National Honor Society. • Lillian Battino was named Valedictorian, rated in the top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. • Sarah Bright was a participant of Youth Apprenticeship. • Davis Brinkmann was rated in the top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. • Maria Bunczak was rated in the top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, a member of the National Honor Society, and a Global Education Achievement Certificate recipient. • Emily Cattanach was named Salutatorian, rated in the top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. • Haylie Craig was a member of the National Honor Society. • James Dickas was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. • Joshua Dvorak was named Valedictorian, rated in the top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, a National Merit Finalist, and member of the National Honor Society.

Education

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Olivea Eaton was rated in the top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, a member of the National Honor Society, and a Global Education Achievement Certificate recipient. Sarah Fierek was named Valedictorian, rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Kristina Geiger was named Valedictorian, rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Ariel Graveen rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, a Youth Apprenticeship participant, and member of the National Honor Society. Levi Hafenbreadl was a Youth Apprenticeship participant. Maggie Hall rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Madeleine Helke rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Fong Her was on the honor roll. Austin Hettinga was on the honor roll. Austin Hillery was on the honor roll. Tyler Hillery rated top 10% scholastically and on the honor roll. Christina Johnson was named Valedictorian, rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Wyatt Joswiak was a member of the National Honor Society. Jared Kiepke was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Macey Kniess was a member of the National Honor Society. Elizabeth Knoll rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, a member of the National Honor Society, and a Youth Apprenticeship participant. Jordan Kowalski was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Toluwalope Lawal was on the honor roll. Chia Lee rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, was a Youth Apprenticeship participant, and a member of the National Honor Society. Peter Lee was a member of the National Honor Society. Brady Lenz rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Cindey Lokemoen was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Malee Lor was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Kiana Marr was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Madeleine Mayer rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Rhiannon McCarthy rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Johanna Michlig was on the honor roll and member of the National Honor Society. Lizzy Miller was named Valedictorian, rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Mitchell Mosure rate top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a Youth Apprenticeship participant. Karissa Murphy was named Valedictorian, rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Anusha Naik was named Valedictorian, rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, National Merit Finalist, and a member of the National Honor Society. Alex Names was on the honor roll, a Youth Apprenticeship participant, and a member of the National Honor Society.


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

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Benjamin Nichols was a member of the National Honor Society. Kelsey O’Malley was on the honor roll. Roanne Ostmann was a member of the National Honor Society. Samuel Paoli rated top 10% scholastically and was on the honor roll. Kailey Penn was rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Alexander Peters was on the honor roll. Amanda Peterson was a member of the National Honor Society. Kate Peterson was a member of the National Honor Society. Abraham Punke was a Youth Apprenticeship participant. Benjamin Rauen was on the honor roll. Daria Richardson rated top 10% scholastically and on the honor roll. Kyle Rieth rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Daniel Roth was named Valedictorian, rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Cassandra Rusch was on the honor roll. Samantha Schade was a participant of the Youth Apprenticeship program. Marlena Schlegel was on the honor roll. Cory Schlosser was a member of the National Honor Society. Aaron Schmidlkofer rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Ava Sczygelski was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Emelyn Sheehan was rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Adrianna Shelton was rated top 10% scholastically and was on the honor roll. Erik Sherfinski was rated top 10% scholastically and was on the honor roll. Shelby Spiegel was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Kylie Stubbe was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Derrick Talg was rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Marino Taylor was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Gabrielle Thao was rated top 10% scholastically, on the honor roll, and a member of the National Honor Society. Paige Tierney was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Nathan Utecht was a participant of the Youth Apprenticeship program. Kyle Uttech was a member of the National Honor Society. Aaron Wernberg was on the honor roll. Taylor Wilkowski was named Valedictorian, rated top 10% scholastically, and on the honor roll. See Xiong was a participant of the Youth Apprenticeship program. Angelina Yang was on the honor roll. Derek Yolitz was on the honor roll. Samantha Zahurones was on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. Megan Zernicke was a participant of the Youth Apprenticeship program. Abigail Zoromski rated top 10% scholastically and was on the honor roll.

Education

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Student Athletic Accomplishments • WIAA Regional Boys Track Meet at West – 3rd of 9 teams…advanced the 4x800 relay, 4x200 relay, 4x100 relay, 4x400 relay, and competitors in the Pole Vault, High Jump, Triple Jump and Long Jump. • WIAA Sectional @ DCE – Jakob Tordsen advanced in the High Jump (6’ 2”) and John Cihlar in the Pole Vault (14’ 6”), and in 2016 with the company of the 4x200 relay (Justin Rager, Matt Wittenberg, Adam Stichman and Logan Ickert with Sully Phillips and Victor Pintor as alternates. We finished 8th out of 15 teams competing with 49 points. • WIAA State Meet – Wausau West took nine Warrior men to the State meet. Jakob Tordsen (High-Jump) and John Cihlar (Pole-Vault) both gave great performances a little off their career-bests. The 4 x 200 team ran 1:30.11, this time was good enough to stand as 3rd fastest in program history behind this year’s Regionals and Sectionals marks! Matt Hass had near personal record performances in the 100 and 400, and his best Shot Put day ever with a new 12’ 5 ½” record toss! • Logan Ickert was voted Most Valuable Athlete for Boys track. • Charlie Handrick was voted Most Improved Runner for Boys track. • Jared Kiepke was voted Most Improved Field Event Athlete for Boys track. • Matt Wittenberg was voted Newcomer of the Year for Boys track. • Brady Lenz was voted Die Hard Award Winner for Boys track. • Wausau West Volleyball raised $8590.00 at Volley for the Cure. Eleven Volleyball players received Academic All State honors. The Varsity Volleyball team was recognized as an AVCA All Academic Team. • Wausau West Cheer Team competed at three competitions this year. The first was the UWSP Showtime Competition where the team took first place. Abby Haling was also recognized at this competition and received the Outstanding Athlete Award. Our next competition was Regionals where Warrior Cheer qualified for State in Madison at the Alliant Energy Center. Here they earned 6th place overall. Cheer tryouts for next season attracted many athletes (Forty-five girls tried out for the team). Twenty-two athletes made either the sideline team or the competition team for next season. Looking forward to a great year! • Wausau West Boys Soccer: Thomas Hogan was named Newsline Nine Athlete of the Week during boys soccer season. • Wausau West Girls Basketball: Caitlin Deaton was awarded unanimous First Team All Conference, Maddie Schires was Second Team All Conference and Sarah Snoeyenbos was Honorable Mention All Conference. • Wausau West Cross Country Running: Brooke Jaworski (freshman) ~ 2015 Girls Individual Wisconsin Valley Conference Champion (19:17). **She is the very first female cross country conference champion in school history. Brooke Jaworski (freshman), Mackenzie Malone (sophomore), and Emelyn Sheehan (senior) each qualified for the All-Conference Cross Country Team. Brooke Jaworski finished third in the WIAA sectional Cross Country meet (19:13), qualifying for the WIAA State meet where she finished 51st of 190 runners. • Wausau West Hockey players earning All-Conference Awards: Honorable Mention–Forward Josh Bohlin,Honorable Mention–Defenseman Nate Newman, Second Team–Forward Christian Bardarson, Second Team–Defenseman Kellen Tharaldson, First Team–Defenseman Jacob Evans, First Team-Forward Nick Techel, First Team–Goalie Jacob Warnke. Players Earning All-State Recognition: Honorable Mention–Defenseman Jacob Evans, Honorable Mention– Forward Nick Techel, Honorable Mention–Defenseman Kellen Tharaldson, Honorable Mention–Forward Cale Bowman. • Wausau West Wrestling: Brady Lenz took third at State, and Conference, Regional, and Sectional Champion. Val Kochiu 6th at state and regional and sectional champ. • Wausau West Boys Basketball: All Conference in Basketball, Jakob Tordsen-1st Team,


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

WAUSAU WEST HIGH SCHOOL

Tommy Borta-Honorable Mention, Steven Lewandowski-Honorable Mention, Mo Sykes-Honorable Mention. The Boys team was also recognized as having the highest GPA for all Division One schools in the state. They were recognized as First Team Academic All-State by the WBCA. Their overall GPA average was 3.66

Education

Clubs and Organizations Accomplishments • Students lettered in Mock Trial: Derek Talg, Aaron Schmidlkofer, Leisha Krahn, Ava Scyzgelski, James Dickas, Wyatt Joswiak, Olivia Bright, Marlena Schlegel, Joey Hitz, Bailey Schmidlkofer, Emily Cattanach. They also took second place at Regionals and made it onto State. • West’s School Store (West-Side Connection) earned National recognition from National DECA receiving Re-Certified Gold Certification based on its performance and business practices. Over 3,200 non-perishable food items were collected on Halloween during our Trick or Can event, a statewide initiative. All food items went to the Women’s Community. Thirty students advanced to the State DECA Conference where over 1,400 students competed. Eleven students advanced to the DECA International Career Development Conference in Nashville, Tennessee. Wausau West DECA was awarded the Acts of Kindness Award and Contributions to charity award from WI DECA for recognizing the benefit of service and responsibility to the community of Wausau. West DECA was also awarded the Wisconsin DECA Diamond Chapter Award recognizing its outstanding chapter commitment and support of WI DECA. • The yearbook and magazine received first place honors from NEWSPA, KEMPA, and a national blue ribbon award from CSPA. Publication Lab members received over 40 individual awards for writing, design, and photography from NEWSPA and KEMPA. • This year the 20-member West Forensics Team did well at all competitions. Each team member advanced to State competition where numerous individuals earned gold medals for flawless performances including Grace Olson for an original piece entitled “Dear Veronica Roth;” Maria Bunczak and Alexander Peters for their play acting piece entitled “The Big Bang;” and Mikayla Hoehne, Malorie Ottosen, Stephanie Fay, and Abraham Kurth for their play acting piece entitled “Bad Auditions for Bad Actors.” • National Honor Society students participated in 25 service activities, such as volunteering at the Humane Society on Saturday mornings and cleaning up the side of Highway U. Added to this are 12 flocking events that helped us raise over $330 for the Marathon County Humane Society and the West Food Pantry. NHS students demonstrated that they truly are committed to living the four pillars of the National Honor Society - leadership, scholarship, reputable character, and service. • The West Key Club attended the District Leadership Conference (DCON) and many competed for and earned awards--Josh Dvorak completed his year as District Governor; Olivia Lemke, 75 hrs. of service award, Non-Traditional Scrapbook-1st Place; Kara Nyhus, Outstanding Freshmen Service Award; Olivia Lemke, Distinguished Bulletin Editor; Johanna Michlig, Distinguished Vice President; Anusha Naik, Distinguished President; Damoon Her, trophy for his talent show performance for an audience of 800 people; Josh Dvorak, Michael Brukwicki Scholarship; and Anusha Naik, Michael Brukwicki Scholarship. • Lettering in drama: Maria Bunczak, Emily Cattanach, Cynthia Jasper, Natalie Ollhoff, Marlena Schlegel, Aaron Schmidlkofer, Emily Seanor, Alex Soukup, and Kong Meng Vang. • The Warrior Band, along with Central Wisconsin rock band HYDE, presented BANDSTOCK 2015. • Received a $230,000 grant from the Walter Alexander Foundation, Inc., to modernize the Planetarium located at West High School. The modernization project will be completed in fall and will feature a modern, tilted dome theater that will bring the audience up into the content for the ultimate live interactive experience.

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WAUSAU SCHOOL FOREST 2340 Highway KK, Mosinee WI 54455

Jerry Maney Environmental Education Coordinator 715-261-0565

SCHOOL FOREST USE June 10, 2015 to June 9, 2016 WAUSAU SCHOOL DISTRICT GROUPS Total number of groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Groups stayed overnight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Groups for day use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Total number of students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,452 (due to multiple visits, students may be counted more than once) Total number of high school teacher assistants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 717 Total number of adults. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 823 Total number of meals served. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,102 CAMP SCHOOL FOREST - SUMMER LEARNING Total number of groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Total number of students. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398 Total number of adults. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 GROUPS OTHER THAN WAUSAU SCHOOL DISTRICT Total number of groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Groups stayed overnight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Groups for day use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Different private/parochial schools from the Wausau area used the facility . . . . . 5 Total number of people using the facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 802 Total number of meals served. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 498 SUMMARY Total number of groups using the School Forest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Groups stayed overnight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Groups used the facilities for the day only. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Total number of people using the School Forest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,456 Total number of days the School Forest was in use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 Total number of weekends the School Forest was in use. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Total number of contracts made for use of the School Forest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Total number of meals served at the School Forest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,102


Wausau School District 2015-2016 Annual Report

Education

Wausau School District 415 Seymour Street P.O. Box 359 Wausau WI 54402-0359 715-261-0500 www.wausauschools.org https://www.facebook.com/WausauSchDist/ https://twitter.com/WausauSchDist https://www.instagram.com/WausauSchDist/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-qm03XJ_4EvsYrQlvzJuzQ

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2015-2016 Wausau School District Annual Report