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Port Latta, Emu Bay & Burnie Substations – Circuit Breaker & Disconnector Replacements

POWERCOR NETWORK SERVICES

Environment Management Plan

REV NO.

DATE

Draft

29 Jun 09

Burnie EMP.doc,

REVISION DESCRIPTION For Comment and implementation

APPROVAL

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................... 3 2. ENVIRONMENTAL COMMITMENT ............................................................................................ 3 3. LEGISLATION AND INDUSTRY STANDARDS ......................................................................... 4 4. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES .................................................................... 6 5. ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES.................................................................................. 13 6. INDUCTION AND TRAINING .................................................................................................... 17 7. MONITORING AND AUDITING ................................................................................................. 18 8. REPORTING.............................................................................................................................. 18 APPENDIX A ................................................................................................................................. 20 APPENDIX B ................................................................................................................................. 21 SAMPLE INDEX OF POWERCOR ENVIRONMENT MANUAL .................................................... 23

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1. INTRODUCTION Powercor Network Services is committed to an effective and comprehensive Environmental Management Plan for refurbishment and construction activities on the Port Latta, Emu Bay & Burnie Substations Circuit Breaker & Disconnector Replacement Project for Transend. All activities will be carried out so as to protect the health and safety of employees, contractors, customers, and the community while paying proper regards to protecting the environment. The Powercor team is committed to ensuring that its activities and those of its subcontractors do not pose a risk to the environment. The team will endeavour to conduct its operations in a manner that is environmentally responsible and fully appreciates the requirements to manage the client’s assets and to remove the potential for environmental risk. In addition, the team is well aware of its social obligations and the consequential legal implications should failure in this area occur. The team will work cooperatively with environmental regulatory authorities, including the Environmental Protection Authority and Local Council and will willingly consult and inform the community and stakeholders about the Team’s activities. The Team will exercise diligence when providing its services and will undertake its work activities in a manner that is consistent with the principles of ecologically sustainable development and continuous improvement.

2. ENVIRONMENTAL COMMITMENT 2.1 Policy

Powercor’s commitment to responsible environment management is outlined in the following policy statement. Powercor will: √ conduct all operations in accordance with legislation, government policies and planning approvals; √ responsibly minimise adverse environmental effects by operating the distribution system at an efficient level of performance and by balancing short-term and longterm costs; √ design and implement new programs and works to responsibly minimise adverse environmental effects and to maximise favourable effects where possible; √ provide information to and consider input from the community on significant environmental matters relevant to Powercor activities; √ work within a framework of sustainable development by using resources in a manner which maximises their value to the community and to future generations; √ periodically review existing operations and identify opportunities to: √ reduce adverse environmental effects; √ improve the environment affected by Powercor works; √ use resources more efficiently; √ minimise the generation of waste products; and √ Report annually on environmental performance and compliance. 2.2 Environmental Objectives Primary Goal

The Primary Goal of the plan and associated procedures is to assist in maintaining the highest environmental standards. Objectives

The objectives of this plan are to: Burnie EMP.doc,

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√ √ √

Meet or exceed all legal and regulatory requirements for environmental management and protection; and where these are lacking or insufficient to protect the environment, apply standards which will ensure that the environment is protected; Maintain an awareness within the team of the responsibility of the team and all employees to ensure protection of the environment; Regularly review the teams operations to identify and assess the environmental impact associated with those operations; and Implement and maintain management systems, programs and procedures to ensure the environment is protected including the control of discharges and other waste emissions, which may harm the environment.

Our commitment to the environment is as important as our commitment to other business objectives on the project. PROJECT ENVIRONMENTAL OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS

The Team has set the following Environmental Management objectives and targets for the project.

OBJECTIVES

TARGETS

Conduct all activities in a proactive and responsible manner, so as to negate the need for attendance and/or involvement of environmental regulatory authorities.

No warnings or fines

Undertake construction and installation activities without the occurrence of any major environmental impacts.

No major environmental impacts attributed to either the teams or their Subcontractors construction activities.

Undertake construction activities in a responsible manner so as not to generate complaints from the community, client, or other occupiers on the site.

No complaints lodged directly with the Team, or the EPA, and Local Council, about the Team’s construction activities.

The achievement of these targets are considered important key performance indicators of the projects success environmentally, and as such, are reviewed at the appropriate project meetings. The Project Manager shall ensure that adequate resources are in place across the project in order to meet the objectives and achieve the targets that have been set.

3. LEGISLATION AND INDUSTRY STANDARDS 3.1 LEGISLATION

Key legislative requirements of relevance to the project are detailed in the Federal and State, acts and regulations listed below. Acts – Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protection Act 1984 Disability Discrimination Act 1992 Acts – State Aboriginal Relics Act 1975 Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Control of Use) Act 1995 Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Tasmania) Act 1995 Building Act 2000 Dangerous Goods Act 1998 Burnie EMP.doc,

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Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994 Environmental Management and Pollution Control Amendment (EPA) Act 2007 Environmental Management and Pollution Control (EPA) (Consequential Amendments) Act 2007 Fire Service Act 1979 Forest Practices Act 1985 Forestry Act 1920 Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995 Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993 Litter Act 2007 Mineral Resources Development Act 1995 National Parks and Reserves Management Act 2002 Nature Conservation Act 2002 Plant Quarantine Act 1997 Poisons Act 1971 Pollution of Waters by Oil and Noxious Substances Act 1987 Public Health Act 1997 Radiation Protection Act 2005 Sewers and Drains Act 1954 State Policies and Projects Act 1993 Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 Water Efficiency Labelling and Standards Act 2005 Water Management Act 1999 Weed Management Act 1999 Workplace Health and Safety Act 1995 Regulations Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Control of Use) (Agricultural Spraying) Order 1996 Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Control of Use) Regulations 1996 Fertilizers Regulations 2005 Building Regulations 2004 Plumbing Regulations 2004 Dangerous Goods (General) Regulations 1998 Dangerous Goods (Road and Rail Transport) Regulations 1998 Environmental Management and Pollution Control (Distributed Atmospheric Emissions) Regulations 2007 Environmental Management and Pollution Control (Miscellaneous Noise) Regulations 2004 Environmental Management and Pollution Control (Waste Management) Regulations 2000 Environment Protection (Domestic Solid Fuel Burning Appliances) Regulations 1993 Environment Protection Policy (Air Quality) 2004 State Policy on Noise (draft only) State Policy on Water Quality Management 1997 General Fire Regulations 2000 Forest Practices Regulations 2007 National Parks and Reserved Land Regulations 1999 Wildlife Regulations 1999 Radiation Protection Regulations 2006 Water Management Regulations 1999 Water Management (Safety of Dams) Regulations 2003 Weed Management Regulations 2007 Weed Management (Declared Weeds) Order 2001 Weed Management (Declared Weeds) Order 2005 Workplace Health and Safety Regulations 1998

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4. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES Specific and comprehensive guidelines in this section of the plan will address specific environment issues such as; • • • • • • • • •

Environmental Impact assessment Site accommodation Oil and chemical Management Handling of Plant, Materials, Hazardous Substances & Waste (Sediment Water) Excavation Vehicle Access Restrictions Flora and Fauna Training and Inspection processes Incident and Emergency response

SITE ACCOMMODATION.

Powercor site accommodation will be located inside the LLG boundary. This will be the site where all materials and deliveries will be made, and facilities will be provided to ensure storage of hazardous materials is kept to a minimum. STORAGE & HANDLING OF PLANT, MATERIALS & WASTE

Plant, materials, hazardous substances & waste will be stored in properly built and bunded storage areas to prevent fires, explosions, leaks, spills, and associated surface contamination and pollution. Where bunded areas are not available, Powercor will consider either storing off site, or the creation of temporary bunding. Responsibility

Personnel in charge of receiving plant, materials & waste must ensure all material is appropriately stored in accordance with this procedure. The Project Site Leader shall be responsible for ensuring that all necessary works and equipment are in place and resources are made available to maintain the facilities and equipment in good working order. Chemical and waste storage requirements should comply with relevant local regulations. As a minimum, facilities and practices should comply with requirements of the EPA bunding and storage guidelines and Dangerous Goods Regulations, as detailed below. Chemical and Waste Handling Requirements

• • • • • • • • • •

Storage areas should segregate incompatible chemicals and wastes, such as flammable goods and oxidising agents, or flammable goods and poisons. A Spill Kit with containment, clean-up material and equipment should be present on site Do not mix different waste types in the same container. Nominated personnel shall be made responsible for checking Do not stack containers, unless absolutely necessary. Drums shall only be stacked to a maximum of (2) high. Containers should always be stored on pallets. Provide sufficient space between pallets to allow easy access. Do not put liquid wastes in drums with removable lids. All waste drum lids and bungs must be kept securely closed when not in use. Clean the outside of waste and partially used drums before handling. Burnie EMP.doc,

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Storage Areas

• • • •

• • • •

Chemical and waste storage areas should be bunded. Buildings containing oil filled equipment should have bunds fitted across doorways. Storage areas should be maintained in a tidy fashion. The storage area should comply with dangerous goods requirements, for example, fire proof rooms or solvent cabinets for flammable goods and secure cabinets and rooms for poisons. The bunded area should be free from cracks, which may result in leakage. If drums or containers are to be stacked, then a barrier should be erected which prevents the drums from falling outside of the bunded area. Ideally, external storage areas should be covered to prevent the ingress and possible contamination of rainwater. Uncovered external bunded areas shall be fitted with either a MANUAL pump or a MANUALLY controlled valve to drain stormwater from the bund. The valve and pump switch shall be LOCKED in the OFF position. External bund valves or pumps shall only be opened to drain CLEAN stormwater, draining and re-locking bund valves and pumps.

Chemical Management

While chemicals may be used their storage in the workplace should be kept to a minimum. They should be kept in an area where a spill will not enter a stormwater system or leave the site. Waste Management

All waste material generated in the workplace or in the field should be placed in secure and correctly labelled containers. Filled waste containers should not be stored in the workplace. Once filled, the containers should be transported directly to a bunded storage area. Wastes should not be allowed to stockpile in storage areas. Once sufficient wastes have been generated to warrant removal, wastes should be removed for treatment or disposal by an EPA approved waste contractor. PCB’s / contaminated oil etc SHALL NOT to be transported off site by any Powercor or Subcontractor vehicles. Contact must be made with the Client environmental Manager/Officer to have any contaminated oil and equipment disposed of appropriately. Signage

All storage areas should be appropriately placarded if necessary, in compliance with dangerous goods requirements. Inspections

Internal and external storage areas should be inspected at least monthly, to ensure there are no spills, any waste storage drums are in good condition and bund drain valves are locked closed. Site inspections are to be carried out monthly, to ensure that materials are not being stored in non bunded areas. REFUELLING AND MAINTENANCE OF MACHINERY

Refuelling of plant/machinery/vehicles on site is to be avoided where possible. Under no circumstances must such refuelling occur within 30 metres of a watercourse.

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Dumping of oils on the site is prohibited, and all waste oils or fuels must be removed from the site and disposed of by an approved contractor for Hazardous/dangerous goods in accordance with the relevant regulatory authority guidelines. Responsibility

The project Manager will be responsible for ensuring that this procedure is complied with. Procedures

When refuelling on site, care must be taken to avoid spillage. It is preferred that refuelling occurs off the LLG site. Vehicles leaking fuel or oils must be prohibited from the site. EXCAVATION

Excavation of soil can result in sediments, which may enter the sites storm water system and exit the site. Excess sediments are detrimental to any organisms living in waterways, therefore, their generation should be minimised. The following minimum procedures shall be followed. Further information can be obtained from the EPA Sediment control guidelines. Responsibility

The Project Manager will be responsible for ensuring that this procedure is complied with. Procedures

For short excavation works lasting less than 1-2 days in duration, all efforts should be made to carry out the works during dry weather periods. Upon commencement of major excavations, a bund or system of channels should be constructed around the perimeter of the area, which stops rainwater leaving the excavation area and entering the storm water drains. Rainwater collected from an excavation site should be directed or pumped to a grassed area, which is approximately equivalent in size to the site being excavated. The water should be spread along the uphill side of the grassed area via slotted agricultural pipes If sufficient grassed area is unavailable, then hay bales should be used to construct a retention area on a smaller grassed area. Soil removed from the excavation should either be transported immediately or stockpiled in an area where rainwater does not enter the stormwater system. Run off should be treated as described above. Construction should be scheduled so that bare soil is only left exposed for the absolute minimum period of time.

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To Stormwater Star Pickets

Hay Bales Water Flow From Excavation VEHICLE ACCESS RESTRICTIONS

Access to the work site shall be confined to defined roadways and the substation yard itself. This approach will minimise damage to adjacent fauna/flora/native vegetation, and will mitigate transfer of noxious weeds or substances. Responsibility

The Project Site Leader is responsible for the access of vehicles to and from the site and the requirement that they only access areas of the site that is relevant to the work they are to perform. Control

The Project Site Leader or his delegate will have day to day accountability for the movement of vehicles within the site and ensure that vehicles do not enter unauthorised areas, or other work sites within the substation site. All workers inducted into the project will be informed of the boundaries of the work area and informed of their requirement to remain within the site. Any request to access areas outside the defined areas of the site must be endorsed by the Project Site Leader and a diary entry made relating the requestors, name, reason for access, time, date and expected duration off the site. This diary of requests will be made freely accessible to Transend to monitor compliance in this matter. WASHING TRUCKS AND OTHER VEHICLES

All vehicles prior to entering/exiting the works (when approved by the Project Site Leader) must wash the vehicle wheels and under bodies. The hard standing area is an exception to this, as this area is clean and designed specifically for loading/unloading. The purpose of this exercise is to eliminate the risk of transferring any fungus or soil disease entering or being removed from the site. Truck wash facilities used should only be those which comply with EPA requirements. Responsibility

Implementation of this procedure is the responsibility of the Project Site Leader. Burnie EMP.doc,

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Vehicle Wash Procedure

• • • •

All vehicles should be washed at a commercial vehicle wash or like facility where proper wastewater disposal takes place. Vehicles should only be washed in a designated bunded area where waste is collected, treated and disposed of in a proper manner. Detergents shall not be used to wash vehicles, as they emulsify oil and grease, unless the vehicle wash facility is connected into the sewerage system. Vehicle must be washed in a manner to ensure all soil and vegetation is removed from the wheel arch, mudflaps, tyres and under body of the vehicle.

Waste Disposal

Wastewater collected from vehicle wash operations shall be disposed of by one of the following options: • •

Disposed of by EPA licensed waste contractor Passed through a suitably designed triple interceptor trap followed by a coalescence plate separator and then discharged to trade waste. Sludge collected in pits or triple interceptor traps should be periodically removed by an EPA licensed waste contractor.

PROTECTION OF FLORA AND FAUNA

All native flora and fauna are protected, and this protection must be given due regard by the entire project team. Responsibility

The Project Site Leader is responsible for compliance with protection of local flora and fauna. Control

No firearms will be permitted on site. No plants or vegetation adjacent to (outside) the site boundary will be interfered with. Works must be carried out to minimise disruption to native animals, and feeding of such animals if prohibited. Removal of dangerous species from the work site must be handled in the appropriate manner by wildlife rescue services. Lighting of fires will be prohibited. Domestic rubbish must be effectively controlled and disposed of. Waste bins must be provided, and all rubbish removed on at least a weekly basis. ABORIGINAL RELICS OR ARCHAEOLOGICAL MATERIAL

Powercor has assumed that such materials do not affect this site. It is understood that disturbing or removing such items is illegal. Any discovery of such items on the site will be reported immediately to Transend and relevant authorities. Disturbing of any such materials will be prevented by the erection of appropriate barriers. NOISE CONTROL

Excessive and intrusive noise is considered an environmental hazard, and must be avoided It is well known that exposure to high noise levels can cause hearing damage and deafness and it is now common practice to protect workers from such noise as part of any occupational health and safety program. The effect of lower levels of noise on workers and others in the community Burnie EMP.doc,

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outside the workplace is more difficult to assess but can be at least extremely annoying and distracting, and can possibly contribute to stress. The effect of off-site noise from industry or construction sites on nearby properties will depend on the use of the property and the existing background noise. Obviously, uses such as residential, schools and hospitals are quite sensitive to noise, while other industries, shops and recreational areas may be less sensitive. Sensitivity to noise levels is also time dependent as background noise levels are generally lower at night, and industrial noise is therefore more pronounced. The Project Site Leader is responsible for assessing and controlling noise from a site. Responsibility

The Project Site Leader is responsible for minimisation of noise pollution. Powercor will comply with Environmental Pollution Control Act as it relates to noise levels. Control

Noise levels must be managed to remain under industrial standards measured at the boundary. •

• • • •

Noise levels from the Powercor construction work site shall be maintained within acceptable limits, having regard to the range of activities which may occur, and the variable sensitivity of such activities to noise. Planned construction and worksite activities will not cause undue nuisance or annoyance to residential dwellings or other noise sensitive environments. When undertaking planned works activities should not occur outside hours where such works would cause a nuisance to noise sensitive environments: Beneficial uses defined as being normal domestic and recreational activities including, in particular, sleep in the night period, shall be protected. If complaints from the public or notices from the EPA about noise are received, these should be copied to the Powercor Environmental Manager, Client representative, and entered in a register to be kept at the site. The register should include details of follow up action taken, and whether such action was successful in alleviating the problem. Copies of notices from the EPA or other authorities should be forwarded to the Powercor Environmental Manager and Client representative.

LIQUID SPILLS EMERGENCY CONTAINMENT & CLEAN UP

In the instance of a spill or similar incident/emergency, appropriate control and clean-up procedures need to be put into place to avoid soil contamination, or the material entering the stormwater system. This procedure covers the spillage of material both on and off-site. Responsibility

The Project Site Leader is responsible for ensuring this procedure is put into place and appropriate equipment and training is provided. Site Containment Procedure

Contamination of soil or waters both on and off-site should be avoided at all cost. Off-site contamination, which is often accessible to the public, may require a higher level of clean up within a shorter time frame and therefore has the potential to be more costly. The following procedures and works should be put into place to avoid soil contamination: •

All storage areas containing chemicals or oil filled plant should be bunded and ideally have impervious base.

All packaged or bulk goods unloading areas should be bunded, or have a system to prevent any spillage contaminating soil or entering the stormwater system.

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Sites should have a system to block the drain/s exiting the site in case of major spillage or fire.

Absorbent material should be available to control spills and personnel appropriately trained (refer to 'Control and Clean-up of Minor Liquid and Solid Spill' and 'Emergency Response Equipment and Material' environmental procedures)

Drains from areas containing oil filled equipment should either be sealed, or be directed into imperviously lined pits. The pits should be of sufficient capacity to hold the largest oil volume plus 5 minutes of firewater.

Buildings containing oil filled equipment should have bunds fitted across doorways.

In The Event Of an Accidental Spill:

SPILL RESPONSES

Spill response consists of three elements: 1.

Controlling the spill;

2.

Containing the spilled material; and

3.

Cleaning-up the spilled material.

Powercor will ensure an oil spill kit is retained on site during the period of the contract works. This kit will be to the standard defined in Powercor’s Environment Management Manual. DUST CONTROL

Cleared soil, excavation and large numbers of vehicle movements may generate dust, particularly if the weather is dry. Dust can be dangerous from a safety viewpoint as it may obscure the vision of vehicle drivers, and may also create a visual impact. Dust may settle on adjacent properties and be carried some distance by wind. Responsibility

The Project Manager will be responsible for ensuring that this procedure is complied with. Procedures

Powercor Project Site Leaders will be responsible for ensuring that their works and associated construction activities do not generate excessive visible dust in the air that gives rise to nuisance dust on the construction site, and/or that crosses works area boundaries. or short excavation works lasting less than 1-2 days in duration, all efforts should be made to carry out the works in a manner that will reduce the generation of dust. Powercor or contractors vehicles required to transport soil will ensure that open load carrying area do not cause visible plumes of dust from the vehicle. Loads shall be covered by a clean tarpaulin, in circumstances, where dust is likely to be generated from the transport of material. The tarpaulin shall be properly secured and shall extent at least 300mm over the edge of the sides and tailboard. Dust is readily controlled on access tracks by the use of water sprinklers over the main areas of vehicle traffic. In longer construction periods, laying of screenings over main access tracks may be worthwhile. If conveyors are used to transfer soil, wind boards shall be fitted. Conveyor transfer point and /or hopper discharge areas shall be enclosed to minimise the emission of dust. All conveyors carrying materials, which create dust, shall be totally enclosed and fitted with belt cleaners. Soil removed from the excavations should either be transported immediately from the site, or stockpiled in a protected area where the potential to create dust is minimised. If dust is Burnie EMP.doc,

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generated from a soil stockpile, the stockpile should be wetted down or covered to control the emission. When possible excavation works should be scheduled so that bare soil is only left exposed for the absolute minimum period of time. If complaints from the public or notices from the EPA about dust are received, these should be copied to the Powercor Environmental Manager and entered in a register to be kept at the site. The register should include details of follow up action taken, and whether such action was successful in alleviating the problem. Copies of notices from the EPA or other authorities should be forwarded to the Powercor Environmental Manager and Client representative. Incident Remediation

All environmental incidents/spills must be responded to in accordance with Powercor’s work instruction 05-M900. A copy of the procedure is attached to this Management Plan

5. ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTING STRUCTURE

All Team personnel and subcontractors engaged by the Team have an obligation towards maintaining environmentally safe working practices. It is a condition of employment on the project that all personnel shall comply with the EMP, Environmental Technical Procedures and Specific Environmental Plan developed by the Team, in addition to all legal requirements which may apply to them in carrying out their duties.

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THE TEAM’S ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ORGANISATION AND REPORTING Powercor General Manager

PCA Environment Manager

Environmental Regulatory Authorities

Client

Ext Project Manager

Environment Protection Authority

Client Environmental Officer

Local City Council Project Manager

Client Project Manager Site Construction Mgr

Subcontractors

Project Environmental Reporting Structure (Figure 1)

ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBLITIES

Individual responsibilities with respect to ensuring environmental performance is maintained, and environmental issues are appropriately managed across the project are described over page. The descriptions include a detailed account of each person’s responsibilities in regard to environmental protection, and should be read in conjunction with the reporting structure flow chart presented in Figure 1. The Environmental Representative’s role in the management of environmental matters across the project is crucial in the Team’s success in achieving the environment objectives and targets set for the project.

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Project Manager

The Project Manager has the following particular responsibilities: Approving the EMP, Environmental Technical Procedures and Site Specific Environmental Plans for implementation; Providing adequate resources and ongoing support to ensure the respective Plan and Technical Procedures are fully implemented; Overall responsibility for environmental performance across the Project. Preparing bi-monthly reports for the Superintendent in regard to environmental performance across the project; Providing staff training on the contents of the EMP, as well as promoting environmental awareness on site (Site induction) Providing site personnel and subcontractors with environmental awareness training, over seeing environmental performance related to all construction works when appropriate. Monitoring of construction activities to ensure that no off site impacts are occurring; Project Site Leader

The Project Site Leader has the following particular responsibilities: Overall responsibility for implementation of the respective Environmental Plans and Technical Procedures with respect to environmental performance on all construction work sites; Monitor on site conditions to ensure potential nuisances, such as dust generation, does not arise; Undertaking regular site inspections; Initiating actions in the event of a fuel or chemical spill, or other unforseen incident onsite which could result in pollution; Identifying and recording environmental non-conformances and notify the Environmental Representative and Project Manager of same; Recommending improvements to the Site Specific Management Plan that may enhance the Team’s on site environmental performance. Powercor Environmental Manager

The Environmental Manager has the following particular responsibilities: Advise on development of the EMP, Site Specific Environmental Plans, and Environmental Technical Procedures and revising such documents as construction activities and environmental conditions change on the project; Identifying and designing environment protection measures to be installed on project construction sites as works progress; Providing advice on the installation of environmental protection measures in conjunction with the PM; Assisting the site supervisor to ensure subcontractor onsite environmental performance fulfils the requirements of the EMP and Site Specific Plans; Undertaking site inspections and environmental audits, as well as reviewing the actions taken in response to inspections undertaken by others; Reviewing and endorsing approval of dispositions raised on environmental management NonConformance Reports; Liaising with the EPA, Local City Council, and Transend on environmental related matters, including responding to community complaints about the Team’s construction activities, should they arise. Ensuring specific directions by regulatory Authorities, or licence and notice requirements, where applicable, are being complied with. Burnie EMP.doc,

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Liaising with the respective Project Manager and Project Site Leader to ensure that environmental monitoring/management and reporting are being carried out satisfactorily. Reviewing and commenting upon Site Specific Environmental Management Plans by Team. Project Team Members

The various Project Team Members have the following particular responsibilities onsite: Establishing and maintaining environmental protection measures on site for their particular work activities; Ensuring that the requirements of this Site Specific Environmental Plan are fully implemented; Ensuring all subcontractors have attended a site induction, and that their on site environmental performance meets the Team’s expectation; Undertaking site inspections in accordance with the site environmental inspection schedule and recording the results of such inspections on the appropriate form; Ensuring that all chemicals, including fuel and oil, are stored in accordance with what is specified in the Site Specific Plans, and that refuelling occurs in areas designated for the purpose; Monitoring of site conditions to ensure potential nuisances, such as dust generation is not occurring; Organising remediation measures, where applicable, resurfacing haul roads when deteriorated road surfaces are responsible for construction vehicle movements contaminating public roads for example; Subcontractor Obligations & Responsibilities

The Team will engage a number of different specialist subcontractors to carry out construction works across the project. Subcontractors with expertise in electrical fitting, cable hauling and jointing, fencing, concrete supply, foundations and earth works will be engaged and supervised by Team personnel. All subcontractors engaged by the Team are bound to adhere to the requirements of this Plan, as far as it is applicable to the nature and scope of their respective work. The Project Management Team members and the Environmental Representative will liaise with the various subcontractors and routinely audit their environmental performance with respect to: • Compliance with the Team’s EMP, Site Specific Plans and Technical Procedures, and • Adherence to their environmental contractual obligations. When work methods, or construction activities change on site, environmental Plans and Technical Procedures will be revised to reflect such changes. Where a non-conformance is detected, an appropriate disposition plan to rectify the problem will be implemented immediately whenever possible. However where urgent action is required, construction activities will either cease, or be limiting until the remedial works are implemented to the Team’s satisfaction. As stated above, subcontractors are required to implement the requirements of this and other environmental plans produced by the Team, as well as fulfilling their environmental contractual obligations. Where the subcontractor fails to meet such obligations and environmental performance is being compromised, the Team will carry out the necessary works (and back charge the cost to the subcontractor).

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6. INDUCTION AND TRAINING EMPLOYEES AND TRAINING

As previously stated a high standard of environmental performance should be the responsibility of all Team and subcontractor’s employees working on the project. The Team expects both management and staff to not only perform their duties at their respective levels, and in accordance with the appropriate environmental laws, but to exceed such standards where the opportunity permits. Where there are no regulatory requirements relating to environment protection, the Team will develop and apply standards, which will ensure that the environment is adequately protected. An integral part of successful environmental management is training of construction personnel, and promoting environmental awareness. Employees and subcontractors will receive appropriate environmental training which include such topics as:• • • •

An understanding of the Project Environmental Policy, Objectives and Targets Overview of the Team’s E.M.Plan. Aspects of significant environmental risk on the project Emergency preparedness and response procedures

This training will include the following:• • • •

Importance of conformance with the environmental plans and procedures Significant environmental issues and potential impacts of work activities Consequences of departing from specified operating procedures EPAs role in assessing the Team’s environmental on site performance, including the Authority’s powers with respect to entry and requests to sight records The Project Manager will be responsible for the implementation of any appropriate environmental training across the project.

INDUCTION

All employees and contractors working on the site will be inducted, in accordance with the information listed in the above section entitled Training. Site induction procedures are also specified in Powercor’s Health & Safety Plan. DISCIPLINE

Where employees negligently disregard environmental plans and procedures issued by the Team, or fail to take steps to protect the environment by not adhering to instructions issued by the Environmental Representative, the procedures documented in the Team’s “House Rules” and “Termination of Employment” shall be implemented. When a member of a subcontractor’s workforce is found to be in breach of the project environmental plans or procedures, the employer will be directed by The Team to remove that person from the project. The above rules apply equally to management personnel of both The Team and its subcontractors.

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7. MONITORING AND AUDITING INTERNAL AUDITS

Where the potential for environmental incidents to occur on the project, measures to minimise, or eliminate such hazards will be implemented by the Project Team. This will be achieved by identifying and addressing such issues in the planning stage of the project. With the commencement of construction, routine site inspections and will be undertaken by the Team’s Environmental Representative, Project Site Leader and Site Supervisors, with scheduled audits being carried out periodically by the Environmental Representative. Environmental inspection checklists will be incorporated into the respective work plans to be developed for each component of work, as will an environmental audit schedule. Powercor has an established process for reporting on conformance and rectifying any nonconformance detected within the internal inspection/audit process. This process is detailed in the Powercor Business Management Framework. It is a requirement that each step in the process be completed within a reasonable time. Failure of an employee to execute a responsibility will be dealt with in accordance with Section 6 of this Environment Plan. EXTERNAL AUDITS

As outlined above the Environmental Representative will carry out environmental audits across the project as construction work progresses. The internal audits may be supplemented with External Audits as a further check of responsible environmental management. Environmental audits will be carried in accordance with the Project’s Quality Management System, with all necessary rectification actions being undertaken in accordance the processes outlined previously. Powercor’s Quality Plan details the process involved in rectifying any non-conformance during construction activities. It is a requirement that each step in the process must be completed within a reasonable time. Failure of an employee to execute a responsibility within a reasonable time will be dealt with in accordance with Section 6 of this Environmental Plan.

8. REPORTING The management of incidents on this project having an impact on the environment will be managed and documented in accordance with documented procedures. In the event of an incident occurring during the course of construction on the project, the Project Manager is to be immediately advised of the incident, and appropriate actions implemented to correct the incident. The procedure will in general follow the following methodology: Step 1Describe the Incident Step 2Fix the Problem (remedial action) Step 3Identify contributing factors Step 4Take Corrective Action to eliminate contributing factors √ Generate possible corrective actions √ Select the Corrective Action √ Plan and communicate the Corrective Action √ Implement the Corrective Action Step 5Evaluate and follow-up

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The line of communication that is to be adhered to in reporting and rectifying an environmental incident is as follows;

Comments

Action Step 1. Project Manager advised of incident.

Project Manager to notify;

-

Emergency Services Client Representative Environmental Adviser

2. Project Manager, Project Site Leader to review incident, with advice from Environmental Manager, and determine corrective action. 3. Project Manager implements action.

Project Manager notifies Client Representative of actions being implemented

4a If step 3 successful -

Project Team prepares full report for all stakeholders and regulatory authorities. Project Team also review environment plan to ensure incident is not repeated.

4b If step 3 unsuccessful -

Project Manager to convene action meeting, with advice from Environmental Manager, to determine solution. Escalation of response as required. Action returns to action step number 3.

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APPENDIX A Powercor Environment Incident Report Form (to be completed by all personnel involved within 24 hours) Report Date: .................................................................................................................................. Details of Incident (To Be Completed By Party Involved in Incident) Incident Reporter's Name: ......................................................................................................................................................... Type of Incident: Injury / Spill or release / Fire or Explosion / Theft / Damage / Government or Media Involvement ......................................................................................................................................................... Date of Incident: ........................................................................................................................... Time of Incident: am/pm ............................................................................................................... Location of Incident: ......................................................................................................................................................... If incident involved a spill of material Material Involved: Volume Spilt: litres ......................................................................................................................................................... Equipment Involved: ......................................................................................................................................................... Did it get into drains: Y / N Volume Lost: litres ......................................................................................................................................................... Most Sensitive Area which may be Affected and Distance: ......................................................................................................................................................... Description of Incident: ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... External Parties Which External Parties have been informed of the Incident? (EPA, CFA, Police, Ambulance, WorkCover Authority, Water Authority, Local Council etc.) ......................................................................................................................................................... Which External Parties Attended the Incident Scene? .........................................................................................................................................................

Signature: ...........................................................

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Date: .............................................................

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APPENDIX B Incident Follow-Up Report Form Incident Location: ........................................................................................................................ Incident Date: ................................................................................................................................ Description of Incident: ............................................................................................................... CONSEQUENCE OF INCIDENT (To be completed by incident reporter’s immediate manager/supervisor) ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... Manager/Supervisor Name: ......................................................................................................... Date: ............................................................................................................................................... Where relevant, include damage, repairs, and injuries, current and future actions by authorities. RECOMMENDED ACTIONS TO PREVENT RE-OCCURRENCE (To be completed by incident reporter’s immediate manager/supervisor) ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... Cost of Recommended Actions: ......................................................................................................................................................... PROJECT SITE LEADERS COMMENTS ......................................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................................... RECOMMENDED ACTIONS (Project Site Leader to circle appropriate action and sign)

APPROVED / AMENDED AS DETAILED ABOVE / NOT APPROVED Project Site Leader: ............................................

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Date: .............................................................

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SAMPLE OF POWERCOR ENVIRONMENT MANUAL

Attached is an index from Powercor’s comprehensive environment management system. This index provides a simple overview of the structure, systems and control used. A full copy of this manual is available on request, it’s not included in this submission as we wished to keep this offer concise.

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Sample Index of Powercor Environment Manual

POWERCOR AUSTRALIA LTD ENVIRONMENTAL MANUAL

Document No: 05 M900 The following pages include an index from the Powercor Environment Manual, which is a quality-controlled document.

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CONTENTS 1. Introduction 1-1 1.1 Objectives of the Manual 1.2 Scope of the Manual 1.3 Quality Assurance and Document Control 1.4 How to Find Information in This Manual

1-1 1-1 1-2 1-2

2. Environmental Management System 2.1 Why Have an Environmental Management System? 2.2 Components of the Environmental Management System 2.3 Organisation Environmental Objective 2.4 Organisation Environmental Policy 2.5 Policy Implementation

2-1 2-1 2-2 2-3 2-3 2-4

3. Environmental Compliance Program 3.1 What is an Environmental Compliance Program? 3.2 Organisation Structure and Responsibilities 3.2.1 The Issue 3.2.2 Overview of Organisation Structure and Responsibilities 3.2.3 Corporate Responsibility 3.2.4 Risk Management Committee 3.2.5 Environmental Manager 3.2.6 Line Managers and Staff 3.2.7 Contractors 3.3 Education and Training 3.4 Internal Documentation and Reporting 3.4.1 Documentation and References 3.4.2 Communication and Reporting System 3.5 External and Community Relations 3.6 Environmental Performance Program 3.6.1 Introduction 3.6.2 Risk Assessment 3.6.3 Performance Standards 3.6.4 Environmental Audits 3.6.5 Environmental Action Plan

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3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-2 3-2 3-2 3-4 3-4 3-5 3-5 3-6 3-7 3-7 3-8 3-9 3-9 3-9 3-10 3-10 3-11

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4. Legislative Framework 4.1 Introduction 4.2 International Treaties 4.2.1 Basel Convention on the Control of Trans-boundary Movements of Hazardous Waste 4.2.2 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer 4.2.3 Earth Summit (United Nations Conference on Environment and Development) Agreements 4.3 Commonwealth Government Environmental Legislation 4.3.1 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Act 1984 4.3.2 Australian Heritage Commission Act 1975 4.3.3 Endangered Species Protection Act 1992 4.3.4 Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974 4.3.5 Hazardous Waste (Regulation of Export and Imports) Act 1989 4.3.6 National Parks & Wildlife Conservation Act 1975 4.3.7 Ozone Protection Act 1989 4.4 Tasmanian Government Environmental Legislation 4.4.1 Aboriginal Relics Act 1975 4.4.2 Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Control of Use) Act 1995 4.4.3 Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals (Tasmania) Act 1995 4.4.5 Building Act 2000 4.4.6 Dangerous Goods Act 1998 4.4.7 Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994 4.4.8 Fire Service Act 1979 4.4.9 Forest Practices Act 1985 4.4.10 Forestry Act 1920 4.4.11 Historic Cultural Heritage Act 1995 4.4.12 Land Use Planning and Approvals Act 1993 4.4.13 Litter Act 2007 4.4.14 Mineral Resources Development Act 1995 4.4.15 National Parks and Reserves Management Act 2002 4.4.16 Nature Conservation Act 2002 4.4.17 Plant Quarantine Act 1997 4.4.18 Poisons Act 1971 4.4.19 Pollution of Waters by Oil and Noxious Substances Act 1987 4.4.20 Public Health Act 1997 4.4.21 Radiation Protection Act 2005 4.4.22 Sewers and Drains Act 1954 4.4.23 State Policies and Projects Act 1993 4.4.24 Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 4.4.25 Water Efficiency Labelling and Standards Act 2005 4.4.26 Water Management Act 1999 4.4.27 Weed Management Act 1999 4.4.28 Workplace Health and Safety Act 1995 4.5 Local Government Environmental Controls 5. Environmental Issues and Risks 5.1 Waste Management 5.1.1 Waste Generation by Distribution Business 5.1.2 Waste Management Options 5.1.3 Management of PCB Waste Burnie EMP.doc,

4-1 4-1 4-1 4-2 4-2 4-2 4-3 4-3 4-3 4-3 4-4 4-4 4-4 4-4 4-5 4-5 4-5 4-5 4-6 4-6 4-7 4-7 4-8 4-8 4-8 4-8 4-9 4-9 4-9 4-9 4-10 4-10 4.10 4-11 4-11 4-11 4-12 4-12 4-12 4-13 4-13 4-13 4-14 5-1 5-1 5-2 5-2 5-5

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5.1.4 Waste Discharge Licenses 5.1.5 Water Discharges to Stormwater Drains or Streams 5.1.6 Water Discharges to the Sewer - Trade Waste Agreements 5.1.7 Vehicle Washing Facilities 5.2 Dangerous Goods 5.2.1 Introduction 5.2.2 Types of Dangerous Goods 5.2.3 Storage and Handling of Dangerous Goods 5.2.4 Transport of Dangerous Goods 5.2.5 Disposal of Dangerous Goods 5.2.6 Bunding of Oil-filled Electrical Equipment 5.2.7 Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) 5.2.8 Herbicides 5.2.9 Ozone Depleting Chemicals 5.2.10 Sources of Information 5.3 Site Contamination 5.3.1 Introduction 5.3.2 Regulatory Context 5.3.3 Potential Powercor Liability 5.3.4 Recommended Site Assessment Process 5.3.5 Site Remediation or Management 5.4 Noise 5.4.1 Legislative Background 5.4.2 Noise from Substations 5.4.3 Noise from Depots 5.4.4 Complaints Register 5.5 Vegetation Management 5.5.1 Environmental Impact of Vegetation Clearance 5.5.2 Vegetation Management Guidelines 5.5.3 Bushfire Mitigation Program 5.6 Electromagnetic Fields 5.6.1 Background 5.6.2 Electric and Magnetic Fields 5.6.3 Exposure Guidelines 5.7 Vehicle Emissions 5.8 Visual Impact 5.8.1 Background 5.8.2 Powerlines 5.8.3 Depots and Substations 5.9 Planning of New Works 5.9.1 Site Selection and Approvals 5.9.2 Design Considerations 5.9.3 Construction Impacts 5.10 Emergency Response 5.10.1 Introduction 5.10.2 Regulatory Context 5.10.3 Emergency Plan and Manifest 5.10.4 Emergency Procedures for Spillage

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5-6 5-7 5-7 5-8 5-9 5-9 5-10 5-10 5-12 5-12 5-12 5-14 5-14 5-15 5-16 5-16 5-16 5-17 5-18 5-18 5-19 5-20 5-20 5-21 5-21 5-22 5-22 5-22 5-23 5-23 5-24 5-24 5-24 5-24 5-25 5-26 5-26 5-26 5-27 5-27 5-27 5-28 5-28 5-29 5-30 5-30 5-30 5-31

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5.11 Efficient Use of Energy 5.11.1 Introduction 5.11.2 Energy Audits 5.11.3 Buildings 5.11.4 Appliances and Equipment 5.11.5 Vehicles 5.11.6 Alternative Energy Sources 5.12 Local Issues 5.12.1 Introduction 5.12.2 Local Environmental Issues 5.12.3 Community Concerns 6. Performance Measures and Management Actions 6.1 What is a Performance Measure? 6.2 Organisation Wide Performance Measures 6.3 Site Specific Performance Measures 6.3.1 Waste Management 6.3.2 Dangerous Goods 6.3.3 Site Contamination 6.3.4 Noise 6.3.5 Vegetation Management 6.3.6 Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) 6.3.7 Vehicle Emissions 6.3.8 Visual Impact 6.3.9 Planning of New Works 6.3.10 Emergency Response 6.3.11 Energy Use and Conservation 6.3.12 Local Issues

5-32 5-32 5-32 5-33 5-33 5-33 5-34 5-34 5-34 5-35 5-35 6-1 6-1 6-1 6-2 6-2 6-4 6-7 6-8 6-8 6-9 6-9 6-9 6-10 6-11 6-11 6-12

Appendix A - Glossary of Terms Appendix B - References Appendix C - Outline Risk Assessment Questionnaire Appendix D - Sample Environmental Performance Audit Checklist Appendix E - Example of Environmental Action Plan Appendix F - Copies of Licenses, Permits Appendix G - Model Emergency Plan Appendix H - Information on Local Issues

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