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S&W Editorial Board

Volume 10, Issue 7

for your infor mation

Editor in Chief Patricia Di Pietro dipiep@rpi.edu Managing Editor Daniel Hakimi hakimd@rpi.edu Business Manager Nikhil Deshpande deshpn@rpi.edu Composing Editor [vacant] Photo Editor Norbert Szmyt szmytn@rpi.edu

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It’s all fun and games until someone’s in a full nelson Magazine Information

Statler & Waldorf Room 3314, Rensselaer Union 110 8th Street Troy, NY 12180 sw@union.rpi.edu Volume 10, Issue 7, 1 Printing Tuesday, February 15, 2011

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A re-enactment of the annual postelection point and laugh

Cover: Natt Phenjati Fortnightly Foto: Kayla Baltunis Staff Photo: Norbert Szmyt Last Exit Before Toll: Natt Phenjati

Statler & Waldorf is published fortnightly while classes are in session by the students of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute under the authority of the Rensselaer Union. It is provided to the community at no charge. Opinions expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of the Statler & Waldorf staff or Editorial Board of Statler & Waldorf, the Rensselaer Student Union or Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Pieces in the Humor section are satirical in nature and do not necessarily refer to real places or people. These pieces are for entertainment value only. The Editorial Board reserves the right to edit all submissions in compliance with the Statler & Waldorf Style Guide. All submissions for selections should be sent to sw@union.rpi.edu. All submissions are due the Monday before publication. Please see our webpage: http://sw.union.rpi.edu for more information.

News Analysis Editor John Wallace wallaj3@rpi.edu Culture Editor Kayla Baltunis baltuk@rpi.edu Humor Editor Andrew Bishop bishoa2@rpi.edu Editorial & Opinion Editor Andrew Carl carla@rpi.edu Selections Editor Breanna Brown brownb4@rpi.edu Web Master Bobby Ferris ferrir3@rpi.edu

S&W Staff Darcie Cook, Lydia Cordero-Campis, Harrison Dean, James Fagan, Zack Fishman, Patrick McAndrews, Adam Miller, Natt Phenjati, Paul Rapoport, Jared Salvadore, Dan Scheffler, Ben Scheiner, Tripp Spivey, Robert Stewart, Rory Thrasher


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I Guess We Have to Start Somewhere by Patricia Di Pietro

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Definitely not a part of my original plan, but hey, change is exciting. Let’s ease into the new semester with a few things that may take a little getting used to. New faces replace some of the old, and even a new color issue takes over for this week. Don’t forget to take a look inside for the winners from our annual Photo Contest. You can even e-mail us to let us know what you think. All of our e-mails are right over in the Editorial Box. Speaking of e-mailing us, please do.

All we do is sit here waiting for your input, really. Also keep an ear out for our wrap party so you can hang out with us and talk about the issue. As I let you go, let me share something with you. You may not know it, but you’re holding our 100th issue. Yeah, we have been around 10 years and distributed tens of thousands of copies of Statler & Waldorf all over campus. Pretty impressive, huh?

2 News Analysis

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2 Meatless Mondays

4 Culture

4 “The Beast” 5 Beer Review: Winter Ale - Brooklyn Brewery

6 Feature: Photo Contest

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12 Easy A, Tough Crowd

14 Selections 14 Artist Spotlight 16 Photo Contest Honorable Mentions

Inception wants its set back

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10 Humor 12 Editorial & Opinion

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ave you ever noticed that there is no such thing as a successful introduction? Maybe you’ve seen me, maybe not. Maybe I have even attempted to persuade you into submitting to Selections (the most likely route). Either way, I’m here, and will be for a year. I guess we could talk about me. Well, I have always enjoyed writing, and couldn’t make it a week at RPI without feeling a little lost. So I joined S&W. Stuck around. And now I’m Editor in Chief.

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Memo from the Editor:

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Photo: Norbert Szmyt

Meatless Mondays Coming to a Dining Hall Near You by John Wallace

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ithin the next year, Sodexo, the Frenchbased institutional food provider which currently supplies RPI’s dining halls, luncheonettes, and events, will be adopting the Meatless Monday initiative. According to Inhabitat.com, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization “estimates nearly one-fifth of the man-made greenhouse gases that are accelerating climate change; an estimated 1,800 to 2,500 gallons of water go into a single pound of

beef.1” Sodexo will be implementing the initiative this coming fall semester. Although heralded by some, particularly environmentalists, this initiative may come at a frightful cost. In the first place, it reeks of trendiness; the Trayless Tuesday fad adopted at RPI a few years ago was a resounding failure, due in no small part to the logistical concerns of hot plates and the design of the Commons trayveyor. Shortly thereafter, a non-Sodexorecognized “Forkless Friday” campaign suddenly occurred, which was never formally explained or fully eliminated and,

indeed, still manifests itself with obnoxious regularity around the 6 pm dinner rush. Secondly, one must consider food quality. Hospitality Services has a long tradition of generating inedible food products and forcing them on hapless RPI students. The milk in any RPI dining hall regularly tastes sour or plasticky, and as senior Emily K. noted, “I found caterpillars in two salads during NRB. I’ve avoided them ever since.” The balance of food products provided on this campus are made using subpar materials and too many spices, and then “blackened” to a state of utter


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environment.’ By not providing meat one day out of the week, the corporation gets an added chance to pad its chief executives’ salaries at the cost of its ‘patrons.’ Admittedly, it means less money going towards agribusinesses, which is about the only bright spot in the entire deal. If, however, Sodexo subcontracted to local businesses wherever possible, the company would be kicking back

1 http://inhabitat.com/food-provider-sodexo-startsmeatless-mondays-nationwide/ 2 Boiled cornmeal masquerading under an Italian name. 3 http://www.emorywheel.com/detail.php?n=28038

For more news, including landlord practices to look out for, check out our website sw.union.rpi.edu

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very little to the factory farms in the first place. What exists here is nothing more than big businesses behaving badly. Although ‘big business’ is not necessarily a bad thing in its own right, ‘bad business’ most assuredly is. Here is a corporate cobweb to rival anything spun during the Gilded Age; yet, its benefits to anyone except the oligarchs are minimal to nonexistent. Sodexo’s wholesale adoption of Meatless Mondays, though ostensibly to benefit ‘the environment,’ is really nothing more than shameless greenwashing. Its actual benefits

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“ One cannot willingly believe that Sodexo is making this decision simply ‘to help the environment.’ ”

are negligible. Dietary choices must be made by individual consumers, not by corporations. People who deliberately eat garbage when other, tastier options are available must face the consequences themselves. The primary entities at fault here are the food providers and the ‘mass media,’ which blindly touts any ‘sustainable’ concept to come down the pike until a new one comes along. Yes, Meatless Mondays are in vogue at the moment. The lowcarbohydrate diet was also in vogue, until it was discovered that it could lead to dehydration and gout. A far greater gain could be made simply by quietly phasing in quality food made with quality ingredients; although certainly not as glamorous and fashionable as the Meatless Monday, this move would certainly be a giant leap in the right direction. However, this will come at the cost of Sodexo’s fat profit margins. Ultimately, though, it is inevitable that the Meatless Monday will, within the next few years, be consigned to the ash heap of dietary history. How soon that occurs, though, is up to the individual consumers.

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carbonization before being allowed to get all leathery sitting on chafing dishes. As a side note, the spike in ‘ethnic’ food served at colleges cannot be equated so much to cultural exchange as the fact that in the United States, ‘ethnic,’ in the context of foodstuffs, has come to mean ‘cheap, spicy, and plentiful.’ Haute cuisine Française is also an ethnic food, but it will be a cold day in hell before Sage offers bœuf a la Bourgignon instead of ‘polenta2’ as a ‘menu option.’ On another note, this plan has major health risks. Not everyone can eat soy, that fundamental staple of the ‘vegetarian’ diet. Many are allergic to it; some abstain from it based on personal values. It is, after all, the ultimate ‘fake food,’ being, fundamentally, nothing more than bean glop dressed up to look like something else. To that end, soy is about as honest a food as ‘margarine’ or ‘coffee sweetener.’ Furthermore, the effects of the phytoestrogen compounds found in soy on human physiology has not been fully researched and is not yet understood; however, it is known that a marked increase in breast and pancreatic cancers occurs in lab rats exposed to soy products. The only options for those who do not eat soy, then, are wilted salads, bread-andbutter sandwiches, or starvation. One must also consider this campaign, most importantly, based on the organization whence it comes. Sodexo, with regard to the rights of its workers, makes Zimbabwe look like a laborer’s paradise. Workers are frequently exposed to unethical and dangerous working conditions.3 One cannot willingly believe that Sodexo is making this decision simply ‘to help the

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Taming “The Beast” by Kayla Baltunis

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or each of us, there is that one place filled with sweet nostalgia. When you revisit such a place, all memories return. You have every minute detail of it ingrained into your mind. There is a story behind every nook, every corner, every room, or every road. For me, Killington Ski Resort in Vermont has always been that one place. I’ve been going to Killington (now referred to as “The Beast”) almost every year for as long as I can remember. I tend to prefer it over most mountains in the northeast because it makes for a great weekend trip; it is one of the largest ski resorts in the northeast, providing a wide variety of trails with varying difficulties. Plus, I don’t have to dip out as much cash and traveling time as flying out west to the Rockies (it’s only two hours from Troy!). Here is a list of must-hit trails and locations at Killington: A Football Field-Wide Needle’s Eye When I start out on the mountain, I always hit Needle’s Eye first. It’s an intermediate (blue square) trail that’s great for getting my legs moving. It’s one of the widest trails on the mountain, and it’s steep to the point where I can cruise down with no problems, and without hitting anybody. Needle’s Eye is awesome for both beginners and experts; the only difference is the rocket-fast speed the experts like to get on it.

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(It’s Always Sunny at) Bear Mountain Afterwards, I like to head to Bear Mountain; it’s one of the five mountains

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of Killington, and I only have to take one chair lift to head over there from Needle’s Eye. For one reason or another, Bear Mountain is always sunny. The rest of Killington can be miserable in fog, ice pellets, and freezing cold weather, but Bear Mountain is sparkling in the sun, welcoming its visitors and spreading happiness all around. That is not to say, though, that its trails are going to greet you pleasantly. Most of Bear Mountain contains either blue squares or black diamonds, but I highly enjoy it nonetheless. Mother’s “Wildfire” Wildfire is one of the awesome trails on Bear Mountain. Although the trail is not steep, it can easily become vicious, filled with moguls (enormous snow bumps) to navigate through. A signature moment that I remember on this trail was my dad bringing my mother, who absolutely despises moguls beyond belief, on it. I sat back and laughed, along with several others on the lift above the trail, as my mom threw her poles in fury and screamed at the top of her lungs, “I hate this!” Maybe it was a bit more scary than funny at the time. Outer Limits After Wildfire – and after letting my mother relax in the lodge for awhile – the rest of my family and I head to another great trail on Bear Mountain: Outer

Photo: Kayla Baltunis

Limits. It’s one of my favorite trails on the mountain. It is also the most well-known trail at Killington, since it’s the steepest mogul trail in New England. The trail is hitor-miss, because it can either be in great, powdery shape, or icy, hellish shape. I tend to shoot for the former, which provides an excellent workout for the legs and a much needed food break afterwards. Other Great Trails There are a few other awesome trails that I like to ski on the mountain, which include the following: Great Eastern, Great Northern Cruise Control, The Stash (Terrain Park) Superstar, Eastfall Ovation, Double Dipper Whether you’re a skier, snowboarder, beginner, expert, mogul lover, cruiser lover, terrain park lover, or half pipe lover, Killington has something for everyone. The memories I have collected over the years from Killington are invaluable. I definitely recommend taking a weekend trip there; after just two days, you may have collected quite a few memories, too.


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by Breanna Brown

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seen or talked with them if it had not been for orientation. However, I would have to say that my favorite moments from my experience didn’t include being a leader amongst a large group of people who look up to me, or even going on a late night scavenger hunt with my fellow advisors. For me, one of the best moments was sitting in the lounge with a few students after the day’s activities and listening to comedians on an iPod, with one of the students nearly dying from laughter. Or when the freshmen finished registering for classes and they were thrilled; I felt a sense of accomplishment for guiding them through what we all know to be a very stressful situation. Moments like these make me want to repeat the whole experience over again, which I actually plan on doing. My journey begins yet again at the informational meeting on the 22nd, and I can hardly wait to see what the future holds.

ter rewer Win Brooklyn B by Harrison Dean

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s Old Man Winter comes rolling in with icy roads and snowball fights, so do a variety of fine spiced winter beers. Meant to warm you up when you roll through the door from the cold after a long day of work, these beers take the best of a good beer, and make them warming and homey. Brooklyn Brewery, renowned for their fantastic brown ale, offers such a seasonal delight, and I found it all too appropriate to give it a try. A brown, clear brew flows from the bottle, yielding about one finger of head in a pint glass. The first thing to hit the nose is not pleasant. It’s somewhat reminiscent of bread, but not quite as yeasty. There are plenty of spices and the alcohol is there but not blatantly obvious. And upon first sip, all of those off scents hit the tongue. This is a spicy beer, but it is not necessarily full of the right spices. The best way to describe it is burnt vegetable, like a bad squash soup. There are also hints of sage and a slightly peaty smoke, with hints of tobacco as well. And the body is rather thin – a light but present carbonation are all that really define it. The flavor makes this one a sipper, definitely not a session ale. Worth noting with this beer, though, is that temperature greatly affects the flavor. As it approaches room temperature, the malts and spices begin to overpower the burnt vegetable/tobacco flavor. If you’re going to try this one, do it at room temperature.

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lmost exactly one year ago to the day, I sat in a meeting in the Student Union. It was an informational session for being an advisor for the freshman student orientation. I applied and was ecstatic when I found out that I would have the opportunity to be a Student Orientation advisor. We all remember our orientations, whether we are seniors or freshmen who just went through the experience; it’s a very memorable event in our college lives. The people who helped us through it are, therefore, just as important. Knowing this made me slightly nervous. I had, all of a sudden, become one of the most important people that freshmen could meet; I was their guide in an environment that was completely new to them. The fear I had was soon eliminated, though; the other advisors and myself went through many sessions that prepared us for handling the responsibilities of our positions. Granted, there were long hours, but in that time I formed great bonds with the other advisors. I also had the chance to meet a great deal of freshman from all over the world; I can safely say I would have never

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: ack view - $8.99/six-p Ale

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Photo: Office of the First Year Experience

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Wayne Grout | Senior | Mechanical Engineering Custom Time Once Boston’s tallest building, the Custom House Tower now stands as a historic monument in the Financial District. The streaking contrails and contrast of neoclassical architecture to the surrounding buildings give the viewer a sense of time in an otherwise frozen image.


& Photo Contest This year Statler & Waldorf joined up with RPI’s Photo Club to organize and judge the annual Photo Contest. We received over 100 submissions with content from all over the world. The photo staff judged based on their composition, lighting, and creativity. Be sure to check out some honorable mentions in Selections and online at sw.union.rpi.edu

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Dash Bodington | Freshman | Physics

Pacific Coast I visit this part of California every year and always walk along the coast here. Most of the time clouds cover the sky and I end up walking in the dark, but when the conditions are right it is an amazing view to capture.


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Mat Sokol | Sophomore | Architecture

Night Flight An Air France 777 is pushed back out of the gate for its evening departure to Paris. Shot at f18 with a 30 second exposure.


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(Canadian) Comic Book Superheroes SuperMountie(Superman): Able to leap over tall evergreens in a single bound! Faster than a speeding New Yorker! And more powerful than an angry Moose! He always gets his man, unless said man has non-governmental health care. Then, things get complicated. Klepto the Super-Dog (Krypto the Super-Dog): SuperMountie’s pet, he has all of SuperMountie’s (relatively speaking) amazing powers. Also, he has issues with kleptomania, and is a recovering alcoholic.

about because it’s a big fucking dam in the middle of a city), is located next to the stately Blayne Pancake House.

Captain Canada (Captain Canada): TWO Captains? Really Canada, stop overcompensating.

Captain Canuck (Captain Canuck): No really, this guy actually exists. And he runs around with a maple leaf on his face. I could not make this shit up. Wikipedia it.

Lithium Man (Iron Man): He built a suit out of AA batteries that has the ability to power things that take AA batteries. Until he runs out of batteries.

Renssepedia “Rathskellar” Pronunciation key: wrath-skellar

Wolverine: No, really. He’s actually Canadian. But America taught him how to be an awesome killer and made him indestructible so we deserve some props for that…never mind. He’s all yours. Fantastic Female (Wonder Woman): Envoy to Canada from the Amazons. Her superpower is wearing a bikini in Canada, year round, and not dying. That’s about it.

BeaverMan (Batman): The Dark Knight of Ottawa, he stands watch over the fairly crime-free city with his young ward, Woody the Boy Logger. His fantastic utility belt contains such useful items as an Emergency Maple Syrup Dispenser and the Beaverrangs (they’re actually just angry beavers). His secret hideaway, the Beaver Dam (that basically everyone knows

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Alex Trebek (Alex Trebek): A hundredaire who owns Jeopardy by day, and also owns Jeopardy by night. Jeopardy is not a time share, is what I guess I’m trying to say.

much to everybody's dismay. Interestingly, they deliver food later than they are open.

Example: Definition: The place where "Hey, man, do you want to go hunger and hope go to die. to the Rathskellar?" The "Rath" has recently begun "No, but I guess I kind of have delivering food across campus, to, huh?"

The Rathskellar’s burgers are just awful. Don’t eat them. Please.


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ussell Sage Dining Hall has a large assortment of deserts which cycle through its walls. Many are good, many are merely passable, and some few could even be called sub-par. However, no sweet post-dinner dish served within shine so brightly as Fruit of Forest Pie, Sage’s best kept secret. Many pie fillings are overly gelatinous, almost mucous-like in consistency. Not Fruit of Forest; it is filled with fruit instead of gel.

Andrew Bishop Andrew Carl Patricia Di Pietro Daniel Hakimi Jared Salvadore Tripp Spivey

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S&W Humor Staff:

Kittens are a crass act. Why are pictures of larval felines so much more popular than baby weasel photos? What fascist decided that? The weasel is the meme of the proletariat, whereas kittens are the propaganda of the bloated bourgeoisie. The time of kitten oppression is coming to an end. Their tearyeyes will no longer hypnotize the masses. Rise up and join the weasels in glorious rebellion. ¡Viva la revolución! There’s no room for your crass, kittens.

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Fruit of Forest is a class act. The crusts of most Sodexo pies come out chalky and filled with road kill. For ‘Fruit of Forest’, the crust and filling make the pie very structurally pleasing, both to the eye and palate. With a name like ‘Fruit of Forest,’ this pie would likely cause Montezuma’s Revenge. But after trying it, the most decadent of food court pies, it becomes clear that it contains real apples, mingling with a wide variety of nonsynthetic berries, all of this punctuated by the occasional non-artificial rhubarb slice. Stay classy, Fruit of Forest pie.

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ittens, you were created to be soulless killing machines. But what wasn’t predicted was how you’d stick your pompous head out of that box with the worst facial expression I’ve ever seen. Stop looking into the camera and frowning for god’s sake! Why can’t you just live a normal life? Who gave you such an inflated sense of selfimportance? I know it was the internet. You guys think you’re so important? That you’re cuter than a weasel? Fuck that. Weasels are decent people.

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Easy A, Tough Crowd by Zachary Fishman

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s we slog through the RPI curriculum we can’t help but be reminded of the taxing burdens of our classes. The continuous stream of tedious homework, the miserable 8 am wakeup calls, the twenty hour blocks of lab classes, the indecipherable language of T.A.’s, and the incessant fear of a looming test do all but drive us to insanity. However there are sweet, sweet oases in this desert of dismay. Every once in a while we students are blessed with an easy class— such as Deep Listening—where the most intense course work is quantizing sheep with eyes shut and drool dangling. One such class I encountered last semester was Molecular Biochemistry I. In the beginning it started out like any other class: lectures, notes, and of course, an overpriced textbook. Over time, though, the ease of the class became apparent. The first hour of each lecture was dedicated to reviewing the previous one, two guesses were allotted for true-false online homework questions, and the pièce de résistance was that the exams were identical to the back tests (exams from the previous year). And so, as it goes, less and less students showed up for class, the homework improved our efficacy for mouse clicking, and the exams became magnificent tools for measuring our ability to memorize a set of fifty answers.

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And I loved it. I was acing the class and had ample time to focus on other stuff—such as RPI’s most beloved pastime; sitting alone in a dark room in front of a computer screen (and you thought it was hockey!). Unfortunately this paradise didn’t last. A week before the final test the teacher alerted the class that the test was going to be changed; in other words it wasn’t going to be identical to the back test. And the reason for this, he said, was because a student had complained to the Dean of Students. I was furious. We all were. He definitely did something wrong. It was obvious. However, I felt the need to prove it, to justify my anger with a rational argument. Should be easy

enough, I thought. Everyone in the class knew what he did was wrong, so this would just be a formality of sorts. He definitely did something wrong. It was obvious. However, I felt the need to prove it, to justify my anger with a rational argument. Should be easy enough, I thought, everyone in the class knew that what he did was wrong, so this would just be a formality of sorts, for my own sanity. For starters, everyone was doing great in the class up until that point. Everyone was getting A’s and had plenty of time for other things. And if they felt they wanted to learn more they certainly had the option to. Then this student interfered, forcing everyone to work much harder and possibly affect their grades in a negative way. Perfect, this student is causing harm by hurting others’ grades. What does he gain? More motivation? HAH! If he wanted to get more motivated there are plenty of other ways besides hurting everyone’s grades. The question is: why can’t everyone get an A? Those who want to learn the material can do so and those who don’t only hurt themselves.


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There is, of course, a problem with decidedly false. The student was not the the material. Is this really so monstrous? Or this argument. If everyone got A’s, then one who changed the test; nor did he are we just a bunch of angry students who the grade wouldn’t mean anything. have the power to force the professor wanted to get easy A’s? Surely we want grades to represent to change it. That power belongs to the I think what he did was honorable how well someone understands professor. The professor simply heard and should receive our praise instead of the course material. Looking at this the student’s point and acted in the our invective. Honestly what could he broadly, an employer would expect interest of the Institute. He made the have done? Study really hard and still get an interviewee who has a high GPA decision that Rensselaer should not be a lower grade then the guy next to him to have done well in most of his/her a place where those who memorize test who memorized a set of 50 answers? courses and have a firm understanding answers get higher grades than those That seems ridiculous. He’s basically of the material they cover. Although forced into using the back tests if he Molecular Biochemistry is only wants to have a competitive class rank. one class, and employers will most “ The student was not the one He didn’t even blame anyone for using likely gloss over the grade, it is still who changed the test; nor did he back tests. He simply made the best dishonest to advertise oneself as choice he could, given his situation. He having understood the material— have the power to force the professor complained about a broken system with when in fact one does not. to change it. That power belongs to the intention to fix it. Perhaps it is implied that the professor. The professor simply students have easy classes where Got your own ethical enigmas? Think heard the student’s point and acted A’s are easy to come by and other my analysis is hogwash? Email us at classes where A’s require much sw@union.rpi.edu and let us know. in the interest of the Institute. ” more effort. Therefore, we should not meddle with these easy classes for then the balance will be thrown off. This response seemed who truly learn the material. He could reasonable—in the same way that it’s have disagreed with the reasonable to starve oneself to solve begrudged student the obesity problem. For example, say and done absolutely the test was unfairly difficult. Certainly nothing. In fact, to one should attempt to correct this condemn this student, injustice. So why not do the same we’d have to assert that when the test is too easy? complaining is unethical—in After consulting with Joe Carcosole, which case no one should have a professor of Ethics here at RPI, I realized complained about the student’s how much of a sucker I had been. The behavior in the first place. above arguments are nothing more So what are we left with, a student than red herrings. For in them we make who had admirable motives and alerted a terribly incorrect assumption: that the the professor to matters which the disgruntled student was the one who professor should have already been aware had the power to change the test. It of. And the result of this was that the exam is important to understand that this is was made to test the understanding of

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If you have read this magazine at all in the last four years, you already know Natt Phenjati. His work has ranged from many covers of S&W to the addition of abs to certain, topless S&W members. After serving S&W for many nights, Natt is moving on to pursue his dreams, as vivid and colorful as they are. For me, there is no single magic bullet for design. My creative process consists of different steps. First, I need to learn about the constraints of a project. After that, I “google” for inspiration and create mock-ups. At this stage, the quantity is much more important than the quality. Then I receive opinions from others and make adjustments. This can be the most painful step, but it is an essential one. Then I can create the work. It is not always a linear process; nonetheless, starting right at the last step is likely to end up as a big mistake. If you want to read more about me and see more of my work, please visit www.phenji.com. Last words: Don’t become an old man, filled with regret. Take a leap of faith — join S&W.


Photo Contest Honorable Mentions With over 100 submissions for the photo contest, it was hard to choose just three. The S&W staff has decided to showcase a few noteworthy photos. See the rest and visit the S&W website at sw.union.rpi.edu

1. “Fall”- Ryan Kemper 2. “July”- Mackenzie Colwell 3. “The Mountaineer”- Steven Obrzut 4. “Mount-Tremblant Bluebird Day”- Mel Diaz 5. “Dark Morning”- Ben Hunt 6. “Tacos”- Vanessa Li 7. “Kenya”- Deborah Kraft

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