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show daily the mart – monday, june 12, 2017

pleats, please

the a-list

when: 3:00–5:00PM who: J+J Flooring Goup

What’s the buzz at Buzzi? Smocked pendants and sconces, for one. This being BuzziSpace, the light fixtures absorb sound as they illuminate—an ideal solution for open-plans spaces or wherever you need to dim the din. Martin Lesjak and Anastasia Su of 13&9 mined traditional sewing techniques for the series, which the company dubbed BuzziPleats in its usual naming convention. Upcycled PET felt is fashioned into lightweight circles reminiscent of an Elizabethan ruff, in three diameters ranging from 32 to 63 inches. space 10-111

what: Form + Finish cocktail party where: space 10-118 when: 3:00–5:00PM who: Skyline Design

what: Cocktails with Suzanne Tick where: space 1060 when: 3:30–5:30PM who: Okamura

what: Happy hour and sushi bar where: space 11-124

when: 3:30–6:30PM who: Mayer Fabrics what: Cocktail party where: space 1173 when: 4:00–6:00PM who: 3form

what: Material solutions and sips where: space 10-142 when: 4:00–6:00PM who: Davis Furniture

what: Aperol spritz cocktail party where: space 3-115

The enveloping sides of Lievore Altherr’s Cila chair for Arper cosset and protect. The shapely plastic shell comes in six colors (with optional cushion) or fully upholstered. Which to choose? space 339

when: 4:00–6:00PM who: Luna Textiles what: Martini party where: space 10-106

swerve alert!

when: 4:00–7:00PM

who: Arcadia and Encore Seating what: Cocktail party where: spaces 340 + 336

Parallelograms and fine lines carve a zigzag path through Lift, a performance seating fabric exceeding 100,000 double rubs. The kinetic pattern from CF Stinson blends post-industrial recycled nylon, cotton, rayon, and recycled polyester. Choose from seven colorways, most combining subtly mid-century hues. space 10-150

when: 4:00–8:00PM who: Andreu World what: NeoCon fiesta where: space 10-132 when: 4:30–6:00PM who: Rottet Collection

what: Cocktails with Lauren Rottet

and Interior Design’s Cindy Allen

where: space 3-107, RSVP required,

melody@rottetcollection.com when: 4:30–6:30PM who: Global Furniture Group what: Cocktail party where: space 1035

when: 4:30–6:30PM who: Wolf-Gordon and Vescom what: Showroom party where: space 10-161 when: 5:00–6:00PM who: Trade Commission of Spain

in New York

what: Cava and tapas where: space 7-10058

easy like…

Monday morning? Indeed! Allsteel’s casual-cool Vicinity

lounge chair, envisioned for office cafés, brings chillaxing to the workweek. You can comfortably slouch or sit upright on the low-slung seat, masterminded by Mitch Bakker of Michigan’s Ida Design. Sitting on a crisscrossing tubular-steel base (offered in seven finishes), the plywood shell can be veneered or partially or fully upholstered. Round out the vignette with coordinating tables, stools, or stacking chairs. space 1120

lounge lizards Boundary-free offices require seating that can handle myriad needs. Toan Nguyen reconciles that dichotomy with his Dual lounge chair for Teknion’s Studio TK. Molded in urethane foam, over steel, the organic profile and gently pitched back encourage relaxation while enabling effortless interaction. The duality idea extends to covers, as the shell and seat can sport contrasting shades of fabric. space 1044

Where can you check out the hottest new launches? At Interior Design SELECT partner showrooms. Turn to page 98 for a complete list of manufacturers, or follow signage displayed throughout the Mart.


BREAKING NEWS NEWS 1 Breaking News 3 Today’s Top Picks 4 NeoCon Seminars, Designer Highlights 8 Snap Shot: Fantoni Group 12 IIDA Awards Winners PRODUCTS 3RD FLOOR 22 Boss Design 24 Bernhardt Design 26 Herman Miller 28 Nienkämper 30 Kielhauer

S H O W D A I LY 2 0 1 7

6TH FLOOR 36 Innovations

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7TH FLOOR 38 Marset 10TH FLOOR 50 BuzziSpace 52 Andreu World 54 Skyline Design 56 Carnegie Fabrics 64 Designtex 66 Patcraft 68 Sandler Seating

11TH FLOOR 76 FilzFelt 78 West Elm Workspace with Inscape 80 Designtex 82 Koleksiyon

welcome to neocon 2017 We are thrilled to welcome you to NeoCon 2017, where you will experience what’s new and what’s next in commercial design—from every angle. For almost five decades, NeoCon has served as a launchpad for innovation, offering ideas and introductions that shape the built environment. With more than 500 exhibiting companies and thousands of new product introductions, you will find unparalleled access to the latest and best solutions in commercial design. The industry’s definitive gathering place, NeoCon is also the ultimate one-stop destination for educational growth, design inspiration, and endless networking opportunities with existing colleagues, new collaborators, and the design community’s key players. We extend our gratitude to the NeoCon Advisory Council for their invaluable feedback and support, and to Interior Design magazine for publishing the official Show Daily and Show Directory—both essential tools for navigating the show. Enjoy this year’s NeoCon, and save the date for next year’s 50th Anniversary: June 11-13, 2018! —The Mart/Vornado

start the day right Get your daily dose of inspiration by attending the keynote presentations, hosted by three luminaries. Kicking off the series today is Arianna Huffington, who founded internet media phenomenon Huffington Post and, more recently, the well-being and productivity platform Thrive Global. Cited by Time magazine as one of the world’s 100 most influential people, the Center for Public Integrity board member has appeared on the Forbes Most Powerful Women list and authored 15 books, including the best-selling The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night At a Time. How can we create sustainable cities and healthier buildings by studying microbes? This and other questions will be addressed by Tuesday’s special guest: TED senior fellow Jessica Green, a renowned scientist at the frontier of bio-inspired design. As founding director of the Biology and the Built Envi­ ronment Center and cofounder/CTO of Phylagen, a DNA data harvesting and analytics company, Green investigates how the microbial blueprint of our bodies, homes, cities, and forests impacts our world. She works closely with architects and engineers to advance an understanding of how microbial communities assemble, interact, evolve, and influence public health. Speaking on Wednesday is Chicago-based architect and professor John Ronan, founding principal of John Ronan Architects, which was an Obama Presidential Center finalist. The winner of numerous awards and competitions, Ronan was included in the Architectural League of New York’s Emerging Voices program. Exploring materiality and atmosphere, Ronan’s work has been exhibited internationally, including at the Art Institute of Chicago.

Keynotes will be held at the NeoCon Theater at Motorola on the Mart’s 19th Floor. Admission is free for registered attendees.

OUTSIDE THE MART 90 Dining Guide 102 City Arts

MONDAY 11:30AM: ARIANNA HUFFINGTON

TUESDAY 8:30AM: JESSICA GREEN

WEDNESDAY 8:30AM: JOHN RONAN

SAFCO PRODUCTS: MOBIS II, SPACE 331

Interior Design’s fourth annual HiP at NeoCon Awards (Honoring Industry People and Product) kicked off last night with designers and manu­ facturers receiving their awards during the magazine’s exclusive Giants celebration. Stop by the HiP winner and honoree showrooms to see what’s HiP at NeoCon 2017! The full list will be published in Tuesday’s Show Daily.


TODAY’S TOP PICKS

BERNHARDT DESIGN:

SNOWSOUND: DIESIS, SPACE 7-5022

KNOLL TEXTILES: ALTER EGO AND FEELING PLAID, SPACE 1111

D.L.COUCH: RADAR BY SOURCE ONE UPHOLSTERY, SPACE 11-113 3FORM: CHROMA REFLECT, SPACE 10-142

EDWARD BARBER AND JAY OSGERBY

VITRA: PACIFIC CHAIR, SPACE 1192

JOE GEBBIA, TIFT MERRITT, AND TERRY CREWS, TURN TO PAGE 24...


SEMINARS/HIGHLIGHTS

MONDAY, JUNE 12 9:30–10:30AM

Fractal Geometry—Putting the Arch Back in Architecture Douglas Boldt, AIA, senior project architect, Moody Nolan (Chicago) 9:30–10:30AM

Hospitality Comes to the Office Lauren Rottet, FAIA, FIIDA, NCARB, founding principal and president, Rottet Studio (New York) 11:00AM–12:00PM

Empathy + Design: When Service Design Meets Interior Design Christina Donaldson, IIDA, LEED AP ID+C, design strategist; Mike McKeown, strategy director; both Gensler (Dallas) 1:00–2:00PM

Competitive Interlligence: Technology as Both Disruptor and Enabler Jim Thompson, AIA, director of design, Little (Charlotte, NC); Jeff Gunther, founder, Metaform (Charlotte, NC) 2:30–3:30PM

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The Resilience Factor—Commerical Interiors, Climate Change, and Occupant Well-Being Jon Penndorf, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, senior associate, Perkins+Will (Washington)

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2:30–3:30PM

A Designer’s Guide to Product Licensing Alexander Lamis, FAIA, partner, Robert A.M. Stern Architects (New York) 2:30–3:30PM

Rise of Human Factor Pam Light, FIIDA, NCIDQ, LEED AP, regional leader, workplace, HOK (Culver City, CA); Brad Liebman, LEED GA, regional leader, workplace, HOK (St. Louis) 4:00–5:00PM

Unoffice the Office: Creating a New Typology Based on Emotional, Intellectual, and Physiological Response to Place Shannon Gaffnery, AIA, IIDA, founder/co-managing partner, SkB Architects (Seattle); Jim Brett, president, West Elm at Williams-Sonoma (San Francisco); Jim Stetler, CEO, Inscape (Flaconer, NY) 4:00–5:00PM

Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital—A New Paradigm in Rehabilitation Care Annetha McLellan, IIDA, NCIDQ, LEED AP BD+C, health-care leader; Tom Penney, AIA, central region leader; both DLR Group (Omaha); and Paul Dongilli, president and CEO, Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital (Lincoln, NE) Seminars are $70 and require registration. Check the NeoCon Show Directory for locations.

New this year, Interior Design and the Mart bring you Block Party @ NeoCon, held Tuesday at 5:00PM on the Mart’s South Drive. Come mingle with industry players and celebrate another successful NeoCon. Tickets: $40 at the door.

in the fold Many great designs begin on paper. This one began with paper. “It’s born from the idea of creating a chair as if it were a folded sheet of it,” Interior Design Hall of Famer Patricia Urquiola says of the inspiration for Nuez, her new seating range at Andreu World. The upshot is obvious, as the injected thermoplastic shell gently bends to cradle the plush upholstery, available in an assortment of fabrics or leathers. Base options are: aluminum four-star, five-star with casters, steel sled, or oak legs. Space 10-132

flex plan As creative director of the Luum Textiles brand at Teknion, Suzanne Tick flaunts flexibility with Focus In, a multipurpose family tailored for the workplace, which calls for products with “an agility that supports various activities,” she explains. Six com­ plementary patterns include Knurl, a mini-print arising from the exaggerated texture of polyester, nylon, cotton, and acrylic; Outpress, featuring curvilinear lines that join and split across the polyestercotton ground; Navigate, a woolnylon blend inspired by grids; and Amalgam, constructed from a multicolored polyester typically used in footwear. Space 1048

As paperless offices proliferate, the size and scale of storage evolves. Estudio Enblanc partners Paula Aloy Fortea and Jose Aranda Almiñana keep pace with shifting stash through Hold Daily, a mobile auxiliary furniture series for Systemtronic. Sheet steel finished in textured white polyester forms the cabinet’s rectangular frame, available with a shelf and locking door, or simply an open shelf. With robust 3-inch-diameter casters, it stands 14 by 19 by 36 inches. The optional storage box, 9 inches square and 19 high, comes in five colors. Through Magnusson Group. Space 1170

minding the store

luum


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SNAP SHOT INTERIOR DESIGN

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fantoni group SPACE 7-10034 The seed for Hub sprouted from Bruno Munari’s Abitacolo “combination” bed, a multitasking 1971 design that mapped out spaces for the different activities in a teenager’s day: rest, play, study. Matteo Ragni adultifies that concept with what he calls a “four-poster table— a mini-loft where one can work, rest, and feed on ideas and good food.” The modular milieu measures 63 inches square and comes with optional casters and privacy flaps plus an overhead canopy incorporating LED strips. The electrical supply channels through the hollow metal frame (powder-coated in matte white epoxy) to operate the lighting. A central panel in the particleboard or faced MDF tabletop can be removed to provide data and power access—or to accommodate a potted plant or tree.


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IIDA awards gensler Hyundai Capital Services and Hyundai Card Co., Seoul, South Korea When your company is huge, your conference center needs to make a big

statement. So double that impact for a facility shared by two huge companies, Hyundai Capital Services and Hyundai Card Co. in Seoul, South Korea. But when Gensler principal Philippe Paré initially saw the double-height, 6,250square-foot space, it had the feel of a tired high-school auditorium, a vibe not precisely befitting the futuristic Hyundai aesthetic. After Paré’s remodel, the inspired result is part theater, part light-and-space installation in the James Turrell or Robert Irwin vein. Enveloping the oblong volume, pristine white acoustical plaster recalls the seamless backgrounds used in photo shoots. Apertures in the plaster not only accommodate HVAC needs but also house recessed LEDs that conjure the effect of glowing arches. Darker touches act as a counterpoint. Charcoal-gray needlepunched carpet demarcates the audience zone, while sound-dampening gray felt sheathes the rear wall. The stage is so minimalist as to seem almost an abstraction. In lieu of a traditional platform, glossy white epoxy floor paint simply replaces the carpet. Close to the stage, chairs form rows for company-wide meetings. Behind the chairs, benches roll out from their hiding place, a tall blackened-steel structure that runs almost the entire width of the back wall. Also housing audiovisual equipment and a pantry and supporting a state-of-the-art seminar venue on top, this impressive multitasker is nicknamed the Machine. —Edie Cohen MIRKO WANDERS; JOANNE CHAN; TINA ROTHERMUND; AMY POKAWATANA; MARISSA TANGATUE; SHAWN SHIN; JULIA PARK; FERNANDO FLORES; SHUN NAGASAKA: PROJECT TEAM.

NACÁSA & PARTNERS

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IIDA AWARDS Remember the Chicago pop-up ShopWithMe, featured in this

S H O W D A I LY 2 0 17

magazine last year? Giorgio Borruso Design’s prefabricated, flexible, mobile unit presented a seamless melding of physical and virtual retail, thanks to technology developed by the company WithMe. The next phase in the concept’s evolution is MARS, as in Micro-Automated Retail Store. Like its predecessor, MARS is customizable and modular. It can be as small as 100 square feet, with rectangular volumes added in 10-square-foot-long increments. Forming the walls and ceiling, vertical fins of painted marine-grade plywood alternate with clear acrylic panels. “The fins are straight on the inside, to support shelving, and contoured on the outside,” Giorgio Borruso explains. Technology enabling touch-screen browsing is embedded in mirrored wall panels. Wiring runs underneath the flooring, which is birch plywood. So are the benches and display fixtures.

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giorgio borruso design Borruso has collaborated with the real-estate investment trust Macerich on the rollout. This 300-square-foot version appeared at a Los Angeles shopping mall, Santa Monica Place. There are six more elsewhere in the city in addition to units in Chicago, Washington, New York, and Portland, Oregon. Their smaller size, compared to the ShopWithMe pop-up, is designed with the common areas of shopping malls specifically in mind. In other words, these MARS landings are meant to activate spaces that are high-traffic but underused. —Edie Cohen

BENNY CHAN/FOTOWORKS

MARS, Los Angeles


3RD FLOOR

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boss design SPACE 359

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Having already blazed a path across Europe, winning accolades in the process, Trinetic is now ready for its U.S. debut. The design’s standout is its ergonomic profile, with three independent pivot points and a flexible seat and backrest combining to form a task chair that intuitively “follows” rather than resists the user—no manual intervention required. The result? Better comfort and better support.

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3RD FLOOR REVERB

VERSE

bernhardt design

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SPACE 399

IBIS

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“The project resulted from a mix of commitment and a passion for creating” Music, sports, and technology are not realms usually associated with design talent.

But Bernhardt Design president Jerry Helling leaves no discipline unturned. To launch his Creative Project, he enlisted a trio of diversely talented friends. Tift Merritt, for starters, is a Grammy Award–nominated singer-songwriter who likes to handcraft guitar straps from fabric and trims she’s accumulated on tour. For her namesake series for Bernhardt Textiles, she edited that vast collection down to six patterns. They include Reverb, a wavy stripe in a rayon-polyester, and Verse, woven from multiple fibers on recycled nylon to recall vintage ribbons. Former professional football player Terry Crews, a prolific illustrator and Egypt-ophile, contributed the Ibis sofa, Lily Pad chair, and Aire bench. Finally, Airbnb co-founder Joe Gebbia, who studied at the Rhode Island School of Design, revisited his roots with Neighborhood, a 38-module range including seating and tables configured like building blocks.

JOE GEBBIA, TIFT MERRITT, TERRY CREWS

NEIGHBORHOOD


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“We thoughtfully updated the chair based on the latest research around the science of sitting”

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Launched 23 years ago, the Aeron task chair is a true design classic—but that doesn’t mean Don Chadwick, co-designer with Bill Stumpf, couldn’t think up some improvements. A full two years of research went into the relaunch, with a slimmer tilt mechanism that offers smoother operation. The chair’s signature Pellicle elastomeric suspension now covers eight latitudinal zones across the seat and back, enhancing ergonomics. For better spinal support, the PostureFit SLTM system includes sacral and lumbar adjustments. Three proportionate sizes meet the needs of all body types while still allowing for standardized dimensions: 41 inches high, 27 wide, and 17 deep. And three colorways— graphite, carbon, and mineral— ensure this updated classic will always look timeless.

herman miller SPACE 321


S H O W D A I LY 2 0 17

3RD FLOOR

“We brought LolliPop back because it was one of the most successful designs of its time and easily updated with today’s technology”

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niemkämper SPACE 365 In 1963, Robin Bush designed a seating system for the Toronto International Airport. An instant classic, LolliPop is now being reintroduced to celebrate the manufacturer’s upcoming 50th anniversary. A steel frame (in brushed finish or black powder-coat) supports oversize tandem seats whose backs reference the titular candy. Wood cushioned with soy foam can be covered with black leather, as in Bush’s original iteration, or fabric in any color of the rainbow. In two-, three-, or four-seat configurations.


3RD FLOOR

“Movement can speak as loudly as words”

keilhauer

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United in the belief that physical movement is essential for communication and concentration, Eoos partners Martin Bergmann, Gernot Bohmann, and Harald Gründl conceived Luno, an oversize lounge chair that allows for multiple functions and postures. “We lean back when relaxed; we lean in to show interest,” Bohmann explains. The interior and exterior shells—of soft and rigidfoam, respectively— are fitted together in a unique assembly process. The four-star base comes either in aluminum, polished or powder-coated gray, or in ash hardwood, with 10 finish choices.

LUNO

HARALD GRÜNDL, MARTIN BERGMANN, GERNOT BOHMANN

BOTTOM LEFT: ELFIE SEMOTAN

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SPACE 373


6 CEO RUDY MAYER, VP OF SALES MICHAEL FREEDMAN, VP OF OPERATIONS ALEX MAYER

6TH FLOOR

“A specific artist will often be a jumping off point for us, but while developing the design, the process takes over. You have an idea, but the physicality of the material has a life of its own”

innovations SPACE 6-130

The wall covering specialist contemplated fine art

S H O W D A I LY 2 0 17

making in devising its spring launches, comprising 10 graphically forward collections. To wit: Watercolor, whose large-scale brushwork was conceived as an homage to the gestural abstractions of Pat Steir. Its energetic vertical composition is digitally printed on a combination of polyester and cellulose (with nonwoven backing). The 52-inch wall covering is available in eight colorways, from intense vermillion to the more pasteltoned viridian.

TOP: PAUL GODWIN PHOTOGRAPHY

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7TH FLOOR

7

marset

SPACE 7-10058

At the Trade Commission of Spain in New York pavilion you’ll discover three introductions from Marset, including Copérnica, a series of desktop and standing

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lamps that play with counterweights. The mixed materials—like steel and aluminum—are accented by pops of color ranging from red and gold to duck-egg blue. As conceived by Spanish design duo Jaume Ramírez and Josema Carrillo of Ramírez i Carrillo, the lamps are sculptural and minimalist, more than a little Calder-esque—and entirely worthy of a place in any design-minded office.

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7TH FLOOR

sensitile systems

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SPACE 7-2022

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Resin rods pierce the terrazzo, wood, or resin panels of Pixa. When backlit by LEDs (color changing, if you desire) the surface comes alive with a tantalizing glow. Design possibilities are endless: Choose from a bevy of patterns—like the simple grid design pictured—or opt to have the illuminated rods display a company logo or name. Applications include screens, feature walls, signage…whatever the imagination can conjure.


7TH FLOOR

josé martínez medina SPACE 7-10058

FRANCESC RIFÉ

HO CUBE

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The verdict is in. Francesc Rifé Studio’s pop-up desk may be named HO Cube, the acronym standing for home office, but—given the adaptability that today’s corporate workplace demands—the concept is equally fitting for both contexts. Illuminated by an LED lamp, the unit is fully wired and equipped with file folders on the inside. On the outside, surfaces combine lacquer and wood veneer. When closed, the footprint is just 28 by 39 inches. Pair HO Cube with Tap, a wool-upholstered stool with a leather handle. The pair are debuting at the Trade Commission of Spain in New York pavilion.

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“Open, the piece speaks of practicality — closed, there’s pure geometry” TAP


10TH FLOOR

10 buzzi space SPACE 10-111

Everyone gets a seat at the BuzziTrihex table, Belgian

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designer Gerd Couckhuyt’s shapely take—a hybrid trianglehexagon—on the meeting-room staple. The streamlined blackstained ash base, a sort of inverted tripod, is strategically positioned to offer plenty of leg room, while the 84-by-76 ½-inch ash top accommodates nine people comfortably. (A larger rectangular version measuring 90 by 46 inches seats up to a dozen.) Choose walnut, natural, black, or whitewashed stain for the 29-inch-high top. Both formats are ideal for office or hospitality settings demanding the ultimate in flexibility.

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10TH FLOOR PIERGIORGIO CAZZANIGA

andreu world SPACE 10-132 A trio of introductions by Piergiorgio Cazzaniga Design are the toast

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of the town. First, the Raglan family of sofas, upholstered in leather or fabric, expands with Grand Raglan, an elongated version that appears to float over a steel plinth. Next come the Capri lounge chair and matching footrest, destined to take center stage wherever they sit. The chair (with optional arms) conveys comfort and stability, whether on a four-star aluminum or steel sled base. And the Reverse concrete conference table, with power and media connections discreetly hidden inside, is available in several dimensions.

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GRAND RAGLAN

“Capri was born from the desire to create active relaxation�

REVERSE

CAPRI


10TH FLOOR

“The patterns are designed to overlap, allowing for all manner of spatial transitions”

SHIFT GRID

skyline design

S H O W D A I LY 2 0 17

SPACE 1060

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As cookie-cutter cubicles surrender to open plans, a paradox arises. How do you make environments at once seamless and distinct? Suzanne Tick answers the question with the Transcend series of architectural glass. Fabricated using proprietary technologies, the six patterns are etched or digitally printed with geometries or textures that fade into each other, allowing the eye to transition as the body moves. Shift Grid’s seemingly random lines, for example, dissolve into the irregular stripes of Lineal Fade. The effect so captivated company executives that they made Transcend panels the focal point of a Mart showroom makeover by Range Design & Architecture.

SUZANNE TICK

LINEAL FADE


S H O W D A I LY 2 0 17

10TH FLOOR

“It’s a sound acoustical solution with artistic flair”

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carnegie fabrics SPACE 10-112

Who knew silence could speak so

loudly? Carnegie Fabrics did. The brand just expanded its Xorel Artform acoustical panel system. Two new 3-D shapes, Diamond and Square, join the original ones, giving interior designers a total of seven shapes, 19 sizes, and more than 300 standard colors to work with. There’s also a new flat shape, Plank. “This provides a truly custom install every time,” president Cliff Goldman says. Choose between two substrates: Quiet-Core, manufactured with 20 percent post-consumer recycled materials, and the tackable Mi-Core, composed of inorganic minerals and fibers.


S H O W D A I LY 2 0 17

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Head to the 10th floor to take an in-person gander at the Biophilia collection: nine textile designs that employ biomorphic patterns, tapping into our visual yearning for organic forms. Techniques like embossing and top-printing bring to life the complexity and order of natural motifs, from fractals to the Fibonnaci sequence. Constructed in polyurethane, polyester, solutiondyed nylon, and acrylic, the fabrics perform well in heavy-traffic environments to boot.

designtex SPACE 1032A


10TH FLOOR

“A simple stroke, with a simple tool, created texture that added depth, shadows, and highlights�

patcraft

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Digital shortcuts flourish, and virtual reality reigns. But a touch of craft can enhance technology. Kelly Stewart learned that firsthand in developing Subtractive Layers vinyl flooring. After attempting to create textures digitally, she switched strategies and began a series of paintings. Then she gradually scraped the paint from the canvas with small combs to produce grooved surfaces. Only at that point did computers enter the picture, as scans of the originals were manipulated and layered into final patterns. Available in 20 colors, the 12-by-24-inch tiles boast a 20-millimeter wear layer, making them appropriate for heavy-duty commercial applications.

BOTTOM: ETHAN HELM

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SPACE 10-160

KELLY STEWART


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10TH FLOOR MAC STOPA

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sandler seating Ribbed modules of polyurethane, fortified by steel, gang together to form an appropriately large seating element in River Snake. Conceived by Massive Design’s Mac Stopa, the lightweight modular stools—which are both weatherproof and flame retardant—can be configured into myriad installation patterns, suiting public spaces both indoors and out. Available in eight standard colors and a metallic silver, River Snake can also be specified in custom hues.

SECOND FROM BOTTOM: JUAN MARTÍNEZ AHIGUERA

SPACE 1099


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11TH FLOOR

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filz felt SPACE 1111

Beginning life as a university project by student designers Vanessa Busemann and Felix Zebi, Scale now joins the major leagues as a FilzFelt product making its debut right here in the Mart. Made of acoustic fiber composite faced with wool felt, the three-dimensional modules slot into one another and hold securely together by surface friction alone, mounting to walls or ceilings via magnets. Use a digital interface on the manufacturer’s website to create custom configurations: The 63 felt colors can be mixed and matched into striking patterns. Through Knoll.


11TH FLOOR

west elm workspace with inscape SPACE 1191

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Retreat from the open plan to Haus, QDesign’s homey workstation modelled on the basics of a 21st-century residence—four walls, a roof, and media access. Three sizes cater to a plethora of needs: individual concentration, meetings, confidential calls, group collaboration, etc. The Single module features an upholstered chair, sliding work surface, open-face storage cabinet, integrated task lamp, power outlets, and USB port. The Lounge has all those add-ons plus an ottoman and wardrobe with a coat hook. The Clubhouse, meanwhile, has a wraparound sofa ideal for team meetings. Welcome home!

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maharam SPACE 1188 Continuing to translate suiting concepts into upholstery fabrics, fashion icon Paul Smith debuts the five-piece Sequential Stripe collection in wool-nylon. The series’ playful linearity and bold coloration build on the theme of his previous efforts— Stripes’ compact repeats and the more expansive Big Stripe—but busts open the scale, uniting large and small in every design. Tip-top sartorial goodness, we say.


11TH FLOOR

koleksiyon SPACE 11-132 A host of newcomers by the manufacturer are on show at the Mart. Among the standouts: Studio Kairos’s Calder

(named for Alexander), which reimagines the artist’s mobile sculptures as modular, connectable seating units topped with aluminum trays for drinks or laptops. Electrical sockets are optional and can be hidden by zippers. And Metrica’s Boccaporto—pictured in Camira wool—is a sophisticated miniature work booth ideal for carving out privacy in crowded places such as airports...or, of course, NeoCon.

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BOCCAPORTO

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CALDER


DINING GUIDE

dining guide fresh pick!

Band of Bohemia [$]

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Hit up the world’s only Michelin-starred brewpub for stellar craft beers, brewed in house, and correspondingly delicious fare. See page 92 for more details. 4710 North Ravenswood Avenue; 773-271-4710.

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With all the hours you clocked traipsing the Mart, it’s no wonder your stomach is growling! But where to satisfy it? Our annual roundup of dining destinations will help you decide. [¢] Moderate. [$] Expensive.


Armand’s Victory Tap [¢/$] DINING GUIDE

Hearty Italian-American cuisine is the wheelhouse of this highly rated trattoria serving the usual (tasty) suspects. Stuffed artichokes, baked ziti, thin-crust pizzas, and other classics grace the menu. There’s also Joe Mama’s meatball salad and a pizza with garlic oil, minced clams, fontinella cheese, and basil for slightly tweaked fare. Black-and-white photos and a vast wooden bar contribute to the ambience. 1416 South Michigan Avenue; 312-566-9300.

S H O W D A I LY 2 0 1 7

Atwood [$]

INTERIOR DESIGN

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This seasonal American restaurant gets its name from architect Charles B. Atwood, who designed the 1895 landmarked Reliance Building it’s housed inside. But it is BCDG Studio that refreshed the current interiors with crisp white subway tile and tufted black-leather banquettes. As for the menu, it serves up such homey, flavorful classics as pan-seared chicken and rhubarb upside-down cake. 1 West Washington Street; 312-368-1900.

Band of Bohemia [$] Earning a Michelin star less than a year after opening is no small feat, yet that’s what Alinea alums Michael Carroll and Craig Sindelar have achieved. The brewhouse is set in an industrial brick building accessed by a sunny yellow door. The eclectic list of brewed-in-house drafts—the floral Cherry Kyoto and the black wheat ale (Sitting on) the Dark of the Bay among them—rotates seasonally and influences the food menu, which offers such delights as 30-day aged steak or braised celery root with pumpkin seeds, pecans, brown butter, leek oil, and vegetable caramel. 4710 North Ravenswood Avenue; 773-271-4710.

Bar Takito [¢] Is it Mexican you’re craving? Then get thee to this Latin shared-plate concept kitchen that draws inspiration from Mexico and Central and South America. The food is local and seasonal with inventive (but not out-there) takes on the quintessential, like an avocado margarita or the coffee-braised beef barbacoa tacos. Designed by D+K and Alex Alcott, the interiors are equal parts fun, festive, and industrial. Party time.

MONDAY 201 North Morgan Sreet; 312-888-9485.

DUCK DUCK GOAT

Bernie’s Lunch & Supper [¢/$] At Bernie’s, named after co-owner Zack Sklar’s grandfather, the servers wear tags with fake monikers like “Ethel” and “Wilbur.” So, you might expect a throwback menu but in fact the food falls loosely under the Mediterranean banner—think sweet-potato falafel sandwich. The luxe-industrial turquoise banquettes and custom brass chandeliers were masterminded by 555 International. If you strike happy hour, there’s an affordable menu of bites, which can be enjoyed on the rooftop bar, where one of the cocktails is called Weekend at Bernie’s 3. 660 North Orleans Street; 312-624-9892.

Brindille [$] You may recognize this one: It won the 2015 James Beard Foundation Award for Outstanding Restaurant Design, thanks to Bureau of Architecture and Design. Principal Tom Nahabedian, who’s a cousin of the chef, Carrie Nahabedian, outfitted the space in a serene arboreal theme (brindille is French for “twig”) of branchlike Lindsey Adelman light fixtures and walnut accents redolent of a forest. The cuisine is equally exquisite: lobes of foie gras, caviar atop Cortes Island oysters, sweetbreads with cocoa—and those are just the appetizers. 534 North Clark Street; 312-595-1616.

Cochon Volant [¢] As the general public continues its fascination with culinary culture, a trade term has entered the layperson’s lexicon: “the family meal,” which is what’s served to employees before a restaurant opens for dinner service. When chef Roland Liccioni was tapped for this all-day brasserie inside the Hyatt Centric, he thought about which meals made his colleagues in the kitchen happiest—thus the menu’s mix of comforting French classics: omelets, French dip, and steak frites. 100 West Monroe Street; 312-754-6560.


DINING GUIDE

Duck Duck Goat [¢]

Leña Brava [$]

Chef Stephanie Izard has a herd of goat-named restaurants in the West Loop. This is the most recent, and it comes with the endearingly up-front tagline “reasonably authentic Chinese.” Classics like moo shu pork mingle with such unusual takes as goat and duck skin spring rolls, glass noodles with smoked blueberries, and a miso sundae. The setting, courtesy of AvroKO, is sultry and decadent, conjuring a dreamlike version of Chinatowns across America—the perfect spot for a late-night feast.

Fire and ice is the theme of this Mexican restaurant from James Beard Foundation Award–winning chef Rick Bayless. Raw seafood is the ice, while everything else— braised short ribs, butter-roasted plantains, char-seared octopus—is cooked over a wood fire. Design Bureaux balanced the rustic cuisine with luxurious saddleleather chairs and walnut tables and made a feature of the exhibition-style chef’s kitchen, visible to all diners. It’s all enveloped in colors recalling the landscape of Oaxaca, the region that influences the mescal libations.

857 West Fulton Market; 312-902-3825.

900 West Randolph Street; 312-733-1975.

The name means love in Danish, and it is that culture’s cuisine that subtly inspires the fare at David and Anna Posey’s new eatery, where you can start with poached cod and end with a sunflower-seed parfait. Food aside, the design by Boone Interiors is also reason enough to go. It’s artsy and serene with wallpaper handdrawn by Anna, Apparatus sconces, chairs by the mid-century Danish designer Ejvind A. Johansson, and a courtyard warmed by an open fire.

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1350 West Randolph Street; 312-733-1314.

INTERIOR DESIGN

S H O W D A I LY 2 0 1 7

Elske [$]

Momotaro [$] As far as Japanese restaurants go, this one breaks the mold. Its 11,000 square feet, designed by AvroKO, offer multiple dining experiences—from the sushi bar, set in the middle of the main floor, akin to a buzzing stock exchange, to a subterranean izakaya, dedicated to craft cocktails and inspired by the back alleys of Tokyo. Food choices are equally diverse: The extensive menu offers nigiri, robata skewers, and hibachi, among countless other options. 820 West Lake Street; 312-733-4818.

Frontier [¢] Should you have time to really break away from the Mart, head on over to “the edge of civilization,” aka West Town. Your palate should have that same sense of adventure, since nature dictates what’s on the menu. There are sausages made of wild boar or venison, smoked beef-cheek tacos, and an entire section dedicated to alligator (hot fried gator legs, anyone?). Saddle up to the generous wooden bar in the rustic main dining room, or kick back in the open-air beer garden. 1072 North Milwaukee Avenue; 773-772-4322.

Imperial Lamian [¢]

Roister [$] This is a fairly casual eatery for the acclaimed Alinea Group, but it’s just as excellent—and certainly lively, even boisterous at times. The tagline is “the kitchen is the restaurant, the restaurant is the kitchen,” and chef Andrew Brochu follow suit with high cuisine rooted in primal cooking techniques. Whole chicken with chamomile, maple-poached salmon, and hearth-baked lasagna are some of the dishes on offer. Enjoy them at the usual table-for-two or sit at the bar facing the open kitchen and watch the chefs work their magic. 951 West Fulton Market; reservations via tocktix.com.

A restaurant group from Indonesia makes a move to North America, landing in the Windy City. The food, though, is less Balinese and more Chinese, with a special focus on chef Wang Hongjun’s lamian, or hand-pulled noodles. Instagram aficionados fixate on the colorful xiao long bao, or soup dumplings, which come in a rainbow of hues corresponding to flavors such as spicy Szechuan, crab, truffle, and Gruyère. Designed by Jakarta-based firm Metaphor, the birdcage pendant fixtures and handmade lattice screens offer a contemporary take on traditional tropes.

MONDAY 6 West Hubbard Street; 312-595-9440.

The Aviary [$] Libations emerge from smoking chests. Elixirs steep in miniature French presses. Liquor is suspended in an ice orb, ready to be cracked open and consumed. These are just some of the theatrical presentations at Grant Achatz’s cocktail lounge. Though each drink can be served à la carte, the menu’s multicourse format ($65) is encouraged, the cocktails taking on the arc of a meal: a lighter concoction to start, moving to more substantial offerings, and ending with a digestif. For $135, enjoy a five-course pairing of food and drinks. 955 West Fulton Street; 312-226-0868.

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The late Dan Kiley was the prolific landscape designer (1,000-plus projects!) behind the greenery at such mid-century icons as the Ford Foundation atrium in New York and the arcing Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in St Louis. Kiley’s gardens, plazas, and parks, whether grand or small residential commissions, are clean of line but never clinical—always humanist, considered, beautiful. He worked alongside some of the world’s most significant architects—Louis Kahn, I.M. Pei, and Eero Saarinen, among them. In this traveling exhibition, 45 newly commissioned photographs chronicle 27 of his projects. 224 South Michigan Avenue; 312-922-8687. 9AM–9PM daily.

INTERIOR DESIGN

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CHICAGO HISTORY MUSEUM

“Making Mainbocher”

Chicago-born Main Rousseau Boche (1890–1976) has a storied biography: editor in chief of French Vogue, a spy, and, focused on in this exhibition, the first American couturier. His label, Mainbocher, dressed celebrities, royalty, and socialites—he was behind Wallace Simpson’s famous blue wedding dress, which spawned countless copycats. Balancing that rarefied realm, he designed uniforms for the women’s Navy reserves and the Girl Scouts of America. Explore the brand’s legacy via the show's 30 garments, illustrations, and photographs. 1601 North Clark Street; 312-642-4600. Monday, Wednesday– Saturday 9:30AM-4:30PM; Tuesday 9:30AM-7:30PM; Sunday 12-5PM.

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: CHICAGO HISTORY MUSEUM, GIFT OF MRS. WATSON ARMOUR, III; CHICAGO HISTORY MUSEUM, GIFT OF PEGGY STANLEY; DAVID JOHNSON/COURTESY OF THE CULTURAL LANDSCAPE FOUNDATION; CHICAGO HISTORY MUSEUM, GIFT OF MRS. DOROTHY H. RAUTBORD

“The Landscape Architecture Legacy of Dan Kiley”

S H O W D A I LY 2 0 17

CITY ARTS OUTSIDE THE MART

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION


ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO

“Human_3.0 Reading List”

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: CAULEEN SMITH/THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO, PROMISED GIFTS OF HELEN AND SAM ZELL (3); THOMAS DUVAL/MUSÉE DU QUAI BRANLY-JACQUES CHIRAC; ZACHARY JAMES JOHNSTON/THE FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY (2)

Musing on our current obsession with “listicles” (10 top restaurants, 100 best films) filmmaker Cauleen Smith offers her own list: an alternative literary canon exploring race relations, institutional power structures, and social change. The series of 57 drawings of book covers are each produced in graphite and watercolor on 8½-by-12-inch graph paper. Reflecting idiosyncratic interests, Harriet Tubman and bell hooks find their place alongside a book of drawings by Yoko Ono and a scientific treatise on sea urchins. 111 South Michigan Avenue; 312-443-3600. 10:30AM–5:00PM daily; Thursday until 8:00PM.

FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

“Tattoo”

Alternatively regarded as sacred or rebellious, a sign of belonging or an expression of individuality, art, or stigma, tattoos come with cultural charge. This exhibition from Paris’s Musée du Quai Branly-Jacques Chirac charts the tattoo’s global story, from Maori moko facial examples and a 17th-century stamp for Christian pilgrims to contemporary works. There are 125 objects, including ancient artifacts and designs imprinted onto silicone models of the human body. On select dates, visitors can watch live tattooing demonstrations at the museum’s pop-up parlor. 1400 South Lake Shore Drive; 312-922-9410. 9AM–5PM daily. Clockwise from opposite top left: Dan Kiley’s Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, St Louis. Cauleen Smith’s Grapefruit (2016), The Fire Next Time (2015), and Wild Seed (2015) in watercolor and graphite. A silicone torso tattooed by Leo Zulueta. The Field Museum of Natural History's pop-up parlor. Mainbocher’s 1965 dress, tweed suit from 1954, and 1951 ball gown.


2017 show daily 1  
2017 show daily 1