Page 1

50

SA

FO

U

CO

N

DOMENI

N D E D 18

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19

SAN DOMENICO UPPER SCHOOL CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 1


Table of Contents Graduation Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Academic Policies and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 English & ELL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Performing Arts (Music, Theatre, & Dance) . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Philosophy, Ethics, and World Religions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Physical Education & Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Social Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Visual Arts & Digital Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 World Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 LEAF & STEM Excellence in Education and Fostering a Sense of Purpose. As you peruse the course catalog, you will notice two distinct badges next to some of the classes: an engineering badge next to courses that represent STEM-related programming (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) and a leaf badge next to the courses that represent LEAF-related programming (Leadership, Environmental, Advocacy, Focus). LEAF designated courses provide students with a coherent understanding of the interconnectedness of economic, social, and environmental issues and directly address these issues through the lenses of social justice and sustainability. The STEM designation highlights elective offerings that allow students to take a deeper dive into science, technology, engineering, and math—subjects collectively known as STEM (U.S. Department of Education). For more information about these programs, click here. Please note: This course catalog provides a listing for 2018-2019 course offerings. Any course listed is subject to cancellation or change at the school’s discretion. SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 2


Graduation Requirements SUBJECT English (4 years required)

GRADE 9

GRADE 10

GRADE 11

GRADE 12

English 9 (1 year)

English 10 (1 year)

English 11 (1 year)

(2) one-semester English electives, AP Language (1 year),

or ELL Literature & Composition (1 year) and Language Arts (1 year)

or ELL Language Arts

or AP Language (1 year)

or AP Literature (1 year)

World Languages (completion of level 3 in a world language required)

World Language (Mandarin or Spanish) (1 year)

World Language (Mandarin or Spanish) (1 year)

World Language (Mandarin or Spanish) (1 year)

World Language (Mandarin or Spanish) (1 year)

History (3 years required)

Global Studies (1 year)

Europe and the Modern World (1 year)

US History (1 year) or AP US History (1 year)

Mathematics (3 years required)

Math (1 year)

Math (1 year)

Math (1 year)

Philosophy, Ethics & World Religions (4 years required)

Global Studies (1 year)

Sacred Texts (1 year)

Social Justice (1 year)

Science (3 years required)

Conceptual Physics (1 year)

Biology

Chemistry or Chemistry Honors (1 year)

Visual, Digital & Performing Arts (2 years required) (Transfer students have a one year requirement.)

Freshmen Arts Electives. (Two onesemester courses required): Dance, Music, Theatre, Visual Arts, and Film/Video Production

Visual or Performing Arts electives (2 consecutive semesters; can be completed in either sophomore, junior or senior year)

Health and Wellness (1 semester required)

Freshman Health (1 semester)

Physical Education (4 semesters required for graduation. Credits can be earned in any year)

PE

PE

PE

Two (2) one-semester Senior electives

PE

Students can satisfy the Physical Education requirement by participating in: Strength & Conditioning class; San Domenico dance class; San Domenico team sport; designated Co-Curricular course. Participation on a San Domenico team sport for a full season counts as one semester of PE credit. Strength and Conditioning, dance classes, and designated co-curricular activities follow the academic semester calendar. PE credit can also be earned in an off-campus activity with prior approval from the Director of Athletics and Dean of Academics.

Service Learning

Completion of ROSE Project required.

Students who transfer to San Domenico after beginning high school elsewhere will be assessed for graduation requirements based on the courses completed at their prior school in addition to those at San Domenico.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 3


Academic Policies & Procedures Minimum enrollment Students are expected to enroll in a minimum of five core academic courses per semester. During the Add/Drop process at the start of each semester, students will be expected to maintain the minimum number of courses on their schedule. No course may be added or dropped after the Add/Drop deadline. Any student requesting fewer than five courses in a semester must submit a request for approval to the Dean of Academics. Note: San Domenico graduation requirements are demanding and are intended to prepare graduates for success in college and beyond. Students are encouraged to avail themselves of the breadth of San Domenico’s academic program to prepare for the college admission process in senior year.

Course Request Process and Timeline Each spring, students in grades 9-11 meet with their mentors to review their course options for the following school year. An overview of the course request process is provided by the Dean of Academics, Registrar, and College Counselor in late February for the purpose of assisting students in their goal setting and decision making process. Mentors, teachers, and Department Chairs are valuable resources for students in the course request process. Each student will receive a Course Request Form from his or her mentor in early spring. Students will complete this form with assistance from their mentor giving consideration to graduation requirements, extracurricular activities, and personal interests in effort to create a balanced and appropriately challenging academic schedule. All Advanced Placement (AP) courses requires those students who are recommended for an AP course to complete an AP Contract for each AP course they plan to take. AP Contracts should be submitted at the same time as Course Request Forms. All appeals for reconsideration for an Honors or Advanced Placement course should also be submitted by the Course Request deadline. A course schedule for the following school year will be provided to students in grades 9-11 in mid-May.

Advanced Placement Courses Advanced Placement (AP) courses are college-level courses and require more work and independent study skills than other college-preparatory courses. Only students who have shown sufficient proficiency in the subject area will receive permission to enroll in AP courses. Any student taking an AP course will be required to complete an AP Contract form prior to request for entry to an AP course. All students who are enrolled in AP courses are expected to take the AP examination and pay the associated exam fee set by the College Board. A student who has an average below a B- in an AP course at the end of the first semester may opt not to take the AP exam. It is the responsibility of the student to inform their teacher and the AP Testing Coordinator of the decision to opt out by the end of January or time specified by the Registrar.

Honors courses Honors courses are accelerated courses that teach material in more depth and require an effort and commitment similar to AP classes.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 4


Academic Policies & Procedures Placement Criteria for AP and Honors Courses Our goal in working with each student to plan his or her course of study is to provide a challenging curriculum that is appropriate to the student’s level of skill development and preparation. For a student to receive a recommendation for placement in an Honors or AP course he or she: • Have demonstrated strong performance in previous subject-related courses. These minimum prerequisite grades are generally in the B+/A- range. However, specific grade cut-offs will vary depending on the course. For more information on the required prerequisite grades, please see the individual course descriptions and/or contact the Department Chair of the appropriate academic discipline; • Must demonstrate disciplined work and study habits. This includes a history of submitting assignments on time, demonstrating the ability to work independently, arriving on time for class and not having excessive absences, actively and meaningfully participating in class, and acting as a role model for other students; • Must have the current teacher in that subject area recommend the student. As part of the course placement recommendations, both the student’s overall academic performance, as well as these specific criteria, are considered when determining the most appropriate educational plan. Please note that scheduling limitations may restrict a student’s placement into an Honors or AP course.

Questions About Placement for Honors or AP Courses Any student who has a question about placement is encouraged to discuss the course recommendations with their current teachers and mentor. If a student ultimately chooses to appeal a placement recommendation, then they must complete the Honors and AP Appeal Form (available in the Upper School Office). Generally, the Dean of Academics will notify students of a decision within 14 days of submitting their appeal. If the placement decision requires consideration of a student’s spring semester grade, then the student will be notified by the end of June.

Note on Grading for AP and Honors Courses Honors courses and AP courses receive an additional 1.0 GPA point provided the student earns a grade of C- or higher for the course. For example, a student who earns a B+ in AP Biology will receive GPA points of 4.3. A B+ in the non-AP/Honors Biology course would receive GPA points of 3.3 GPA.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 5


English The curriculum of the English Department reflects two fundamental assumptions: • That the ability to express oneself clearly in writing and speaking is an essential skill, and • That reading a wide range of literature expands a person’s understanding of the world and of oneself. To this end, English classes are intended to help each student develop skills in thinking, reading, writing, speaking, and listening through the study of works with literary integrity from a variety of British, American, and World Literature. In developing these skills, students are prepared to meet the demands of college work.

Courses English 9 10 credits/year Required for all 9th graders English 9 introduces students to further mastery of reading, writing, and developing the habit of critical thinking. Students examine a wide range of texts from different literary genres: poetry, fiction, drama, and the essay. Students learn to annotate and analyze texts and to identify themes and employ literary devices. English 9 emphasizes the essential elements of expository writing, especially sentence and paragraph development. Our texts explore the universal concerns of humanity as expressed by he authors and the relevance of those concerns today. English 10 10 credits/year Required for all 10th graders This tenth grade English course builds on the skills that are taught freshmen year, preparing students for more advanced reading and writing, as well as further developing class discussion and presentation skills. Through a study of various literary forms, students will develop a broad yet concrete understanding of the purposes to which literature shapes our understanding of identity. Literature will focus on a variety of genres including novels, plays, short stories, poetry, and nonfiction, exploring European and Western culture. Students will frequently practice critical writing and annotated reading skillbuilding in preparation for their junior year and beyond. English 11 10 credits/year This two-semester college-preparatory American Literature course provides Junior-year students with a variety of reading, writing, and presentation experiences requiring critical thinking and text-based analysis. We will read a wide variety of genres of American literature, including novels, drama, poetry, short stories, and essays, in order to develop an appreciation of the breadth of American writing. Students will develop competence in the elements of literary style, structure, and interpretive response. Students will write in a range of forms and on an assortment of topics throughout the year, in both formal writing and impromptu in-class essays and reading responses. This course will focus on what the British writer D. H. Lawrence called “Classic American Literature” as well as writings from the twentieth century and beyond, examining how America promised its people the freedom to pursue happiness and the ways in which America has succeeded or failed to live up to this promise.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 6


English English Electives English electives are semester-long courses that are tailored for seniors. Placement depends on student choice, enrollment, and departmental approval. Please note that scheduling conflicts might limit student choice. Reading and Writing Mystery and Crime 5 credits/semester “A mystery is more than a novel, more than a compelling account of people whose fate engages us. The mystery is a way of examining the dark side of human nature, a means by which we can explore, vicariously, the perplexing questions of crime, guilt and innocence, violence and justice” (Sue Grafton). This course will introduce the genre of crime fiction, clarifying its basic formulas and examining its various types of “heroes”: the secret agent, the hard-boiled detective, the police inspector, and the amateur sleuth. Themes of the course may include the idea of justice; the shifting nature of the hero; debates about corruption, inequity, discrimination and exploitation; fear of the underclass and foreigners; women cast as the “victim”; the masculine hero; the use of disguise; true crime; and competing political forces in the Cold War. Literary works by authors such as Sue Grafton, Erik Larson, Stephen King, Dennis Lehane and Martin Cruz Smith will be studied. Existential Literature 5 credits/semester Cross-listed with Philosophy, Ethics & World Religions Department. This course satisfies one semester of senior English AND PEWR credit. What exactly is the meaning of life? Why do you get up early every morning, come to school and work throughout the day, rehearse or practice or meet with a group after school, stay up really late to complete hours and hours of homework and then do it all again the next day? Why are limitless possibilities both exciting and terrifying? Why are there days where everything makes perfect sense and then an hour later it’s totally weird and you can’t understand a darn thing? The answers to all of these will be answered in this course. Maybe. This course will help you explore and examine Existential philosophy as we wrestle with questions of purpose and existence. We will attempt to accept answers without proof. We will argue the hopelessness of life while simultaneously discussing the happiness of it. We will revel in the paradox. Our readings are varied and may include works by Sartre, Kierkegaard, Camus, Martel, and Kafka. Written work will be comprised of shorter, more frequent responses and longer, process essays. In addition to our discussion of literature, this course includes lm study where we will examine several modern movies through an existential lens. By the end of the semester we will know more. And we will have even more questions. Modern and Contemporary Literature: The Journey Ahead 5 credits/semester Journeys have always served as metaphors for self-discovery, as one embarks on a quest to complete something that is missing. Along the way, we are challenged, strengthened, and helped by others to reach the destination, emerging as transformed individuals. In this course, we will explore modern and contemporary works of fiction that focus on physical as well as spiritual journeys. This course may include Cormac McCarthy’s The Crossing, Charles Frazier’s Cold Mountain, Patrick White’s Voss, and Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. This course has a strong film component, as we compare and contrast film versions and thematic representations of the works covered. Senior Composition: Writing Into the World 5 credits/semester SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 7


English In this semester-long, composition course, students will grow in two particular areas: clear and coherent writing and rhetorical analysis. At the end of this course they will be better thinkers and will be able to express themselves with clarity. This course will help students to become more economical writers, who use every word for a designed and effective purpose. In doing so, their purpose will become clearer. From a stylistic perspective, students will learn to vary their sentences and become more selective in their syntax (word order). Moreover, their ability to integrate rhetorical and figurative devices will add polish to their writing. The subtitle for this course is “Writing into the World,” a phrase borrowed from the late American essayist Terrence Des Pres. The goal is to engage the world as a writer, acting as a witness. Writings will come from history, politics, psychology, neuroscience, literature, and philosophy. Creative Writing 1 and Creative Writing 2 5 credits/semester Students may take both Creative Writing 1 and 2 or either semester of Creative Writing Creative Writing 1 and Creative Writing 2 together comprise a yearlong senior creative writing class that relies heavily on the reading of literary modes and techniques in each genre. Students will read a variety of published memories, stories, essays, and poems in studying craft and how writers add layers of meaning to their writing. The course is designed to help students develop the skills for understanding and analyzing the art and craft of writing fiction, literary nonfiction, and poetry. Students will develop critical editorial skills for their and their peers’ work and to articulate how a particular work is successful and how to make it stronger. Class time will be spent discussing the assigned readings, doing writing exercises, and participating in workshops. The Human Condition 5 credits/semester Cross-listed with Philosophy, Ethics & World Religions Department. This course satisfies one semester of senior English AND PEWR credit. This course begins by asking a fundamental question: What is a human being? Although this is decidedly not a theoryfocused course, our purpose is to study the existential features of human-ness. If we were to label this course, we might call it philosophical anthropology. Literature – both imaginative and philosophical – will be our locus for understanding human being-in-the-world. Each reading will introduce a different challenge or aspect of human-ness. We begin by asking, what is distinctive about a human being as different than other beings or things? How do human desires imply agency? This highlights a few key existential features and spotlights the concept of identity. One prominent contemporary philosopher offers this: “To have an identity is to know ‘where are you’re coming from’ when it comes to questions of value, or issues of importance. Your identity defines the background against which you know where you stand on such matters.” Through the readings we will gradually unfold a concept of the self. Those readings will raise some serious questions about our human condition, such as nihilism, alienation, authenticity, autonomy, freedom, and teleology. Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Kafka’s Metamorphosis, Camus’s The Stranger, and two Tolstoy novellas will help explore the nature of being human. Political Philosophy 5 credits/semester Cross-listed with Philosophy, Ethics & World Religions Department. This course satisfies one semester of senior English AND PEWR credit.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 8


English Which form of government should we endorse? Plato in The Republic and his student Aristotle held definite views about that question, views today we may be unwilling to support. Although much has changed since third century BC, philosophy continues debating the question. Given that the past century may have been humanity’s worst with regard to violent oppression from totalitarianism, reflecting on that history from a moral perspective may help us understand what is required of a “good” citizen. For example, what are we willing to accept to live the life we now or expect to enjoy? Is the “good” our common good or just my individual good? Furthermore, given the 20th century’s brutal history, how can we protect ourselves from its reenactment and promote the good? This course explores – from a philosophical perspective – tyranny and related forms of authoritarianism. Readings will be philosophical, literary, political, and personal. We will study important dissident voices, such as Andrei Sakharov and Vaclav Havel, literary writers, such as George Orwell and Alexander Solzhenitsyn, and witnesses to that violence, such as Primo Levi. The guiding text for this course will be Yale historian Timothy Snyder’s On Tyranny, a short but powerful reminder of the imminent danger tyrannical predispositions present. Ethics of Community: Inclusion and Exclusion 5 credits/semester Cross-listed with English Department. This course satisfies one semester of senior English and PEWR credit. How do we create and define community, and on what basis do we determine who is included and excluded? What is the proper role of loyalty, and how do we determine the obligations of individuals to their communities? How do the communities that we are part of—or excluded from—shape our moral sense and worldview? How do we find or describe place when nothing fits? How do we negotiate community when displaced? How do we remember? How does what we remember shape and alter our communities as well as create new ones? Over the course of the semester we will engage with texts across a variety of academic disciplines and genres. A short sampling: Night by Elie Wiesel, Tribe: on Homecoming and Belonging by Sebastian Junger, Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson and more short stories and poetry. Ethics: Consumerism, Materialism and Ecocide (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester Cross-listed with PEWR Department. This course satisfies one semester of senior English and PEWR credit. To what extent am I responsible for the ecological health of the planet and the lives of others? How will I (must I?) live simply so that others may simply live? How will I be more rather than have more? These are a few of the many questions we will be exploring in this one semester Ethics/English course for seniors. Author of one of our texts, The Cry of the Earth, Mary Evelyn Tucker says, “This new era requires a change of consciousness and values – an expansion of our worldviews and ethics.” As the world population grows, we are manufacturing goods and consuming natural resources at an unsustainable pace with serious consequences. In this course, we will ask essential questions: What are the stories we tell each other and ourselves about success? What is the relationship between our “material success” and our identity? We will use the framework of the Earth Charter as a guide. A sampling of the case studies includes: • Dakota Access Pipeline and its effect Native Americans • Flint Water Crisis • Fence Line Communities - Oil and Gas industry’s effect on African Americans • Factory Girls: From Village to City in a Changing China Women in Literature (not offered in 2018-2019) SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 9


English 5 credits/semester This course is designed for students who are interested in examining the roles women have occupied in literature, both as writers and as protagonists. Emphasis will be placed on literature that develops protagonists and explores literary themes that focus on women’s experiences. The theme of this course is “the individual and the community.” This theme allows students to consider a variety of topics concerning women, such as how women cope with obstacles and loss, how women look for power, and how women form community. Female authors and protagonists from the Americas, post-WWII will be the focus of this course. The literature will include a variety of genres, such as short stories, novels, non-fiction and poetry, the emphasis to be determined by the instructor. Literary works by authors such as Toni Morrison, Alice Munro, Geraldine Brooks, Barbara Kingsolver, and Nora Ephron will be studied. Utopias & Dystopias: Literature on the Future (not offered 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester Students in this course will read a variety of authors’ visions of the future world and society, some transfiguring familiar settings into futuristic dreams, while others’ reveal nightmare visions of what is to come. Discussions will analyze the cultural and political messages behind these authors’ depictions, and determine their accuracy, if any. Films will complement reading, and also be a basis for student analysis and writing. Texts studied in this course might include the following or similar works: Fahrenheit 451, Dune, Dandelion Wine, A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Ursula LeGuin’s “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas,” Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery,” Cory Doctorow’s “Anda’s Game,” Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaiden’s Tale, and P.D. James’ Children of Men. Philosophy (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester Cross-listed with Religious Studies. This course satisfies one semester of senior English AND Philosophy, Ethics & World Religions credit. What is philosophy for? The answer lies within the name itself. The word philosophy comes from the Ancient Greek word φιλοσοφία (philosophia), which literally means “love of wisdom.” We will explore the discipline of philosophy from its roots in antiquity to its role in our world today. Along the way we will discover ways philosophy can offer insights into the most meaningful facets of our lives: relationships, education, work, money, and belief itself. Throughout the course we will experiment with practices philosophers have developed to cultivate greater happiness and harmony within oneself and society. American Drama: The Dream Defined (not offered 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester What is the American Dream? How does it shift over time and according to society’s or the individual’s hopes, needs, or desires? This course will focus on analysis of American drama in terms of how the American Dream is unattainable for the characters within the play, and how the very existence of the dream creates unhappiness. In addition to exploring topics like character development, plot points, theme, and symbolism, this course will also include some critical theory, cinematic techniques, film production, and visual styles as we view the critically acclaimed film adaptations of these plays. In addition to in-class discussion of the dramatic works we will also focus on various forms of writing, including research, film critique, and analysis. This course may include the following plays: A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, Long Day’s Journey into Night, and A Raisin in the Sun.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 10


English Non-Fiction Reading and Writing/Media Literacy (not offered 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester How does news become news? What gets coverage and what doesn’t? Who decides and how? What’s real? What’s a hoax? What’s bias? This course teaches students the vital skills and critical thinking habits needed to understand and evaluate information in the media, and to perceive the political and social effects of biased and fake information. Making choices about what media to consume isn’t easy, nor do consumers naturally intuit truth from fiction. Often this seems to be a passive, rather than intentional, process. Students will learn a variety of tips and techniques for identifying biased and false information, as well as how to cross reference and fact check. Research, comparison, and analysis of international media sources will add context. Asian/Asian-American Literature (not offered 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester This course explores the rich treasury of Asian literature as produced in-country and literature from immigrants from Asia to Europe and to the U.S. Some questions studied and explored are: What images of Asia are portrayed through Asian Literature, and what are the “subjects” Asian and ex-pat Asian writers are preoccupied with? In Asian cultures, what is literature “for”? What role does the writer or poet take in ancient Asian culture, and what role do they take today? Students will research and share literature education in Asian countries to get the perspective of their peer students’ experiences in Asia.

AP Courses Advanced Placement English Language and Composition 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Completion of English 10 with a grade of A- or above and excellent critical reading and writing skills, and class participation skills; recommendation of 10th grade English teacher, and approval of department chair. Please also see AP Placement Criteria. AP Language and Composition focuses on a rigorous study of expository and persuasive writing, with an emphasis on the argument. As a first year college composition course, students will learn to “write effectively and confidently” (College Board) and to read analytically. Importantly, this course will take a rhetorical approach, emphasizing strategies foundational for understanding and for communicating coherently. The primary goals of the course, derived from the College Board’s AP English Course Description, are: 1) by reading a wide variety of excellent prose writing, students will develop into skilled readers of prose in a variety of disciplines and rhetorical contexts, 2) by modeling their own writing on what they have read, students will develop skills as writers in a variety of rhetorical methods and on a variety of subjects, effectively using the strategies of skilled writers to communicate their purposes, and 3) students will become committed to the process of revision in their writing through writing, editing, and revising drafts. Furthermore, students will read a wide variety of prose nonfiction that demonstrates not only the clarity and coherence of that form but its stylistic beauty. After enrolling in the course, students sign a contract and agree to meet all course requirements, including summer assignments. English (AP): Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Completion of AP Language and Composition with a grade of B+ or above and excellent critical reading and writing skills, recommendation of 11th grade English teacher, and approval of department chair. Please also see AP Placement Criteria.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 11


English This course is designed to prepare students for college-level literature and writing, while indirectly preparing them for the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition. We will look closely at how to read, interpret, and appreciate literature. We will examine the concepts of tragedy and comedy, and the themes of fate and free will as presented in various works and genres. We will read classic, modern, and contemporary poetry as well as longer works of fiction. While the course organically prepares students for the demands of the AP Lit examination through the regular practice of close readings and annotation, analytical discuss, and writing practice, we will also prepare for the exam through regular timed writings and test practice as the exam approaches. This course requires a considerable reading load and demands a serious commitment from students both in and out of class. After enrolling in the course, students sign a contract and agree to meet all course requirements, including summer assignments.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 12


English Language Learners (ELL) The English Language Learners (ELL) program’s focus is on developing students’ linguistic, cultural, and academic competence -- the skills and knowledge necessary for success not only at San Domenico, but also in American academic environments in general. First year international students who place into the program will receive comprehensive language and academic skills instruction in preparation for full immersion in the college preparatory curriculum the subsequent year.

Courses Literature and Composition 10 credits/year Literature and Composition is the freshman English class for international students who require additional support in achieving academic reading and writing fluency. Through an introduction to American short stories and novels, students gain valuable historical and cultural knowledge while developing the analytical skills that deepen personal connections between the reader and stories. Elements of literature such as plot, point of view, character, and theme are covered along with composition instruction focusing on the structure of the paragraph and the academic essay, sentence structure and academic vocabulary, as well as writing in online modalities. Overall, the class is designed to develop academic language skills, cultural context, competence in literary analysis, knowledge of writing with and for technology, and the students’ ability to work both independently and cooperatively. Language Arts 1 10 credits/year Language Arts 1 supports international students in developing the linguistic, academic, and cultural skills necessary for success in all of their classes, including note-taking and discussions in an American school setting. Students receive instruction aimed at increasing their academic vocabulary acquisition, as well as skills in oral communication and pronunciation, reading comprehension, grammar and composition, and research, through non-fictions texts and digital media exploring US history and culture. Language Arts 2 10 credits/year Language Arts 2 supports international students in mastering the linguistic skills necessary for success in all of their classes. Students receive instruction in advanced academic vocabulary acquisition, advanced grammar structures, reading academic non-fiction, oral communication and presentation skills, and research skills. The focus of instruction is on developing the skills necessary for successful completion of assignments from San Domenico courses in the humanities and sciences.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 13


Mathematics The Mathematics Department seeks to encourage students to learn and apply concepts of mathematics through interesting and challenging course work provided at each level of instruction. The major goal of teaching mathematics is for each student to gain knowledge and skill in the field in accordance with her ability. Students should continue in upper division courses beyond the three-year requirement in order to prepare themselves for any major for which mathematics is a prerequisite.

Math Course Sequence The mathematics sequence of courses begins with Algebra 1 followed by Geometry, Algebra 2, Precalculus, AP Calculus and Statistics/AP Statistics. Each student entering San Domenico will be given a placement test. The Placement Test, previous math teacher recommendation, and a student’s transcript will be considered to make the most appropriate placement in a course where the student can be successful and appropriately challenged. Students who take Geometry in their freshman year are typically eligible to take Calculus in their senior year. AP Statistics may be taken after or concurrently with Precalculus, but should not be taken in place of Precalculus. Students planning to take the AP science courses in their senior year would benefit from taking AP Statistics in their junior year. All math students are required to have a TI-83 Plus or TI-84 Plus graphing calculator.

Courses Algebra 1 10 credits/year This course provides a formal development of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for students to succeed in advanced courses. Students will develop algebraic skills and apply them in a wide range of problem-solving situations. The concept of function is emphasized. Topics include operations with real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, relations and functions, polynomials, rational expressions, and nonlinear equations. The Algebra 1 Advanced course covers the same material as in Algebra 1 but in more depth and at an increased pace. Geometry 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Grade of C- or above in both semesters of Algebra 1. Geometric figures, primarily in two dimensions, are studied using multiple perspectives. Exploration and inductive reasoning accompanies a traditional Euclidean approach of deductive reasoning and formal proof. Coordinate geometry and transformations are also used to study congruence, similarity, symmetry and other properties of geometric figures. Realworld connections are made and algebra is reviewed and applied. Algebra 2 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Grade of C- or above in both semesters of Geometry. This course is designed to build on algebraic and geometric concepts. It develops advanced algebra skills such as systems of equations, advanced polynomials, imaginary and complex numbers, quadratics, probability and data analysis, and includes an introduction to the study of trigonometric functions, and series and sequences.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 14


Mathematics Algebra 2 Honors 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Grade of B+ or above in Geometry and approval of Department Chair. Please also see AP/Honors Placement Criteria. This course is designed to build on algebraic and geometric concepts, and delve into them more deeply and with more rigor than in the College Prep Algebra 2 course. This course is paced to prepare students for Precalculus Honors and, eventually, AP Calculus. It is assumed students will pursue a college major heavy in mathematics or science. It develops advanced algebra skills such as systems of equations, advanced polynomials, imaginary and complex numbers, quadratics, probability and data analysis, and includes an introduction to the study of trigonometric functions, and series and sequences. Precalculus 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Grade of C- or above in both semesters of Algebra 2. The focus of this course is on understanding the fundamental concepts of algebra, trigonometry and analytic geometry. Students will learn how algebra and trigonometry can be used in real-life problems. Throughout the course, numerical, graphical and algebraic methods will be emphasized. Precalculus Honors 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Grade of B+ or above in Algebra 2 Honors and approval of Department Chair. Please also see AP/Honors Placement Criteria. The focus of this course is on understanding the fundamental concepts of algebra, trigonometry and analytic geometry. Students will learn how algebra and trigonometry can be used in real-life problems and important themes of calculus will be introduced in a conceptual manner. Throughout the course, numerical, graphical and algebraic methods will be emphasized. The pace and rigor of this course prepare students for Advanced Placement study of mathematics. AP Calculus (AB) 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Grade of B+ or above in Precalculus Honors and approval of Department Chair. Please also see AP/Honors Placement Criteria. This course is equivalent to the first one and one-third semesters of the typical three semesters of college level calculus. Topics studied include limits, methods of differentiation and integration, and applications of differentiation and integration. At the end of the course students are required to take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB test offered by the College Board. AP Calculus (BC) 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Grade of B+ or above in Precalculus Honors and approval of Department Chair. Please also see AP/Honors Placement Criteria. This course is equivalent to the first two semesters of the typical three-semester college level calculus. Topics studied include all of the AB topics, listed above, as well as improper integrals, series and sequences, and parametric, vector and polar equations. BC students will be expected to complete a summer assignment covering the first chapter of the textbook, which is a review of Precalculus. At the end of the course students take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC test offered by the College Board.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 15


Mathematics Introduction to Statistics 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Student must have completed Algebra 2 or Algebra 2 Honors with a C- or better. This course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based, college course in statistics. The four major themes of the course are exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. AP Statistics 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Grade of B+ or above in Algebra 2 Honors or in Precalculus and approval of Department Chair. Please also see AP/ Honors Placement Criteria. This course is equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based, college course in statistics. While similar to Introduction to Statistics, this course is more rigorous and faster paced and requires students to take the AP Statistics exam offered by the College Board in the spring. Multivariable Calculus 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Calculus BC and consent of the Instructor This course is the culmination of the standard college calculus series and undertakes the study of vectors in two and three dimensions, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and multiple integration. Applications include calculating surface area, centers of mass and centroids, and optimization in several variables. Where else will you get to study wrinkled and bumpy spheres? AP Computer Science Principles 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2 and consent of the Instructor AP Computer Science Principles offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, cybersecurity concerns and computing impacts. The course also gives students the opportunity to use current technologies to create computational artifacts for both self-expression and problem solving. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 16


Performing Arts Please note: Courses designated “VPA” may be used to satisfy the second year Visual and Performing Arts requirements.

Music Courses Music Appreciation and Performance 3 credits/semester This course is open to Grade 9 students only. This class is one component of the visual and performing arts program in the freshman year. Through the exploration of music across various cultures, students will learn the fundamentals of the structure and organization of musical sound, the role of musical notation, and the tools of improvisation and composition. San Domenico Singers 6 credits/year Pass/Fail only This course is open to all students. Previous experience in vocal or choral music is helpful but not required for participation in San Domenico Singers, the school chorus. A member of San Domenico Singers needs to have a good singing voice, a good ear, and a love and enthusiasm for singing in choir. The Singers perform music of all styles and periods, including works by Vivaldi, Bach, Mozart and Haydn to music of modern composers such as Copland, Bernstein, Britten and Sondheim. Each year, the Singers’ repertoire ranges from Gregorian chant to contemporary popular music, from Elizabethan madrigals to world music. Special care is taken to instruct each member of the chorus in the development of good singing techniques through proper diction, breath support and control, vocal placement, and poise. The Singers participate in the annual “Vivaldi at San Domenico” concert, the traditional Christmas Tableaux and the May Pavilion Concert, which provides a joyous finale for the year. San Domenico Singers typically meets three times a week – Monday, Wednesday and Thursday – from 3:15 to 4pm. Longer rehearsal times and extra rehearsals are scheduled the week or two before major performances. San Domenico Camerata 6 credits/year Pass/Fail only This course is by audition only. The San Domenico Camerata is a select group of singers devoted to learning and performing challenging choral music. The Chamber Singers learn music from many varied time periods and of many different styles, including chants, motets and madrigals from the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods; choral art songs and part music from the Classical, Romantic and Modern periods; a cappella jazz and pop music; and music from non-Western repertoires such as Chinese, Korean, Japanese, African and Latin-American music. Members are selected by an audition in which abilities in reading and sightsinging music as well as advanced vocal and choral skills will be tested. Singers in Camerata will be expected to participate in all San Domenico Singers concerts as well as concerts of their own. Camerata will perform at least twice off-campus during the year, including a concert tour. AP Music Theory 6 credits/year VPA credit For permission to take this course, please consult the Director of the Music Conservatory.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 17


Performing Arts In preparation for the AP Music Theory exam, this course will develop a student’s ability to recognize, understand and describe the basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a musical score. Through listening and creative exercises, sight-singing, and written analyses, the course will use a variety of music to teach the terminology and concepts integral to a foundation in common-practice musical understanding. In addition to technical knowledge and skills, students will gain exposure to and familiarity with a wide variety of musical literature, and the ability to apply their knowledge and skills to it. Band Workshop 6 credits/year The Band Workshop class is a comprehensive and sequential course for students who want to study and perform contemporary popular music. The course is open to all instrumentalists and vocalists but focuses primarily on guitar, drums, bass, keyboards and vocals. Students in the class form groups to rehearse and perform a variety of contemporary music from the 50’s to the present. Groups are comprised of two to ten students. Students explore a wide range of musical styles, composers, instrumental combinations, arrangements and difficulty levels from a vast repertoire of contemporary music. The Band Workshop curriculum is structured into units. Each unit culminates with at least one formal public performance. At the beginning of each unit, groups are formed. The group under the direction of the instructor selects several pieces of music from a variety of contemporary music. At the start of each unit each group selects a leader who keeps a daily log of the activities of the group. Student groups meet bi-weekly to perform their pieces in an open critique format to analyze performances and give feedback to help improve performance skills. During the course of the year, students will progress through units that include performance practice, improvisation, transcribing, music theory and ear training. As part of the course design, students will explore a variety of cultural styles that influenced each period of contemporary music. Students will have the opportunity to create original compositions that reflect the cultural styles and periods. Students may additionally focus on acoustic music, ear training, singing and learning to play secondary instruments. As part of the class, one day a week students study music theory and composition at one of three levels. Theory teaches music vocabulary, structure, form, analysis, history and composition. Music History and Performance (not offered in 2018-2019) 6 credits/year VPA credit This course is open to 10th -12th grade students. For some instruments, prerequisites may be required; consult the Director of the Music Conservatory. Students must also concurrently enroll in one of the following: San Domenico Music Conservatory Private or Ensemble Lessons, San Domenico Singers, Virtuoso Program Chamber Music, Orchestra da Camera or Sinfonia. This course encourages historical awareness of style as developed through history, and the knowledge of the lives and output of featured composers. The history component of the course emphasizes sociopolitical influences on composers and their music. Students will develop an understanding of music theory. The Music History and Performance course supports the development of technical and musical skills on a chosen instrument through weekly one-hour private lessons or ensemble coaching with a member of the Conservatory faculty, along with daily independent practice. Performance experience is gained in school recitals, festival recitals and studio master classes. Collaborative skills will be gained through ensemble study and performance experience. Conservatory Private Lessons 3 credits/semester This course is open to all students. For some instruments, prerequisites may be required; consult the Music Conservatory. SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 18


Performing Arts Pass/Fail only Students taking Private Instruction are invited to participate in the Conservatory’s recital series and to use the Conservatory’s facilities for private practicing. This course is Pass/Fail only. A fee is charged for private instruction. The fee includes one lesson each week, except for days when school is not in regular session. Ensemble: Chamber Music, Piano Ensemble, Flute Choir or Classical Guitar Ensemble 1 credit/semester Prerequisite: Participants must be taking private lessons on their individual instruments. This course is a weekly chamber ensemble for students of string and wind instruments, piano and guitar. Repertoire is chosen according to the particular instrumental combination participating and sessions are scheduled around ensemble members’ schedules. A fee is charged for group instruction. The fee includes one coaching each week, except for days when school is not in regular session. Sinfonia 6 credits/year This course is open to all students by audition. Previous experience on a string or wind instrument is required. San Domenico Sinfonia is a chamber orchestra for San Domenico student string and wind players who have at least 1-2 years previous experience on their instrument. The Sinfonia rehearses twice weekly and performs chamber orchestra repertoire with an emphasis on music from the baroque and classical periods. Students hone their ensemble skills while improving their rhythm, intonation, and expressive potential on their instrument. The Sinfonia orchestra performs several times a year in Music Conservatory concert programs, Masses and Commencement, and other school functions. Virtuoso Program 10 credits/year VPA credit Students seeking admittance into the Virtuoso Program should apply to the Virtuoso Program Director. The Virtuoso Program faculty committee will decide upon a student’s acceptance to the Program. Minimum practice requirements: fourteen hours individual weekly practice (exclusive of orchestra/quartet/ensemble rehearsals). Participation in the one-hour weekly Music Seminar is also required, as is an annual Jury evaluation of fifteen minutes or more of memorized solo repertoire. In addition to acceptance following a highly competitive audition program, to qualify for admittance in the Virtuoso Program, string students need to be members of the Orchestra da Camera and a Virtuoso Program Chamber Music Ensemble. Note: Virtuoso Program students are required to enroll in each year: VP Chamber Music Orchestra da Camera Virtuoso Program For Virtuoso Program violinists, violists, cellists, and bassists who study with a San Domenico Affiliate Teacher, a fee helps to cover overhead costs SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 19


Performing Arts of the music building, practice rooms, piano tuning, artist concerts, library string quartet music, and performance guidance. VP Chamber Music 2 credits/year Required of all Virtuoso Program string students. Prerequisite: Consent of the Virtuoso Program Director. Each string group is coached one hour weekly and rehearses as a group a minimum of one hour per week. Ensemble skills commensurate with string quartet performance are stressed. Studying much of the world’s greatest chamber music on a one-to-one basis builds a strong sense of tonal and rhythmic awareness and a deep understanding of compositional techniques and fosters a lifelong appreciation for chamber music. In rehearsing together participants learn the art of collaboration. Orchestra da Camera 6 credits/year Required of all Virtuoso Program students. Open to all students playing string instruments by audition only. Occasionally wind players are invited to participate. Please contact the Orchestra Director for more information. The Orchestra specializes in music for strings. The Orchestra performs three formal concerts annually—in October, February, and May—as well as other performances at various times during the year. Concerto soloists are chosen to perform for each orchestra concert with auditions held periodically during the year. Works must be played from memory and should include a cadenza. The Virtuoso Program faculty committee will take into consideration the performance experience of each applicant. Advanced Vocal Ensemble 6 credits/year Open to students by audition only. Pass/Fail only Advanced Vocal Ensemble (AVE) studies advanced harmonization and ensemble technique, and is an audition-only class consisting of Middle and Upper School students. The ensemble performs at the Middle School December and May performances, Upper School Conservatory recitals, and numerous off-campus performances throughout the year. Pass/Fail only. SD Rocks 6 credits/year Open to students by audition only. Previous experience in voice, guitar, bass, drums, or keyboard required. Pass/Fail only This evening class is open to Upper School students for credit and may include additional students from the community as well. SD Rocks is a band workshop class where students will work together with the director to build a performance-ready set list of popular songs, ranging from current hits to classic rock, pop and soul tunes. The group performs at Upper School assemblies and periodic off-site performances. Class meets Wednesday evening from 7:00-8:30pm. Pass/Fail only. Raise Your Voice! 6 credits/year Open to students by audition only. Previous vocal experience required. Pass/Fail only SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 20


Performing Arts This evening class is open to Upper School students for credit and may include additional students from the community as well. Raise Your Voice is a vocal workshop that focuses on advanced harmony as well as songwriting. The ensemble works to prepare a performance-ready set list of original and cover songs from contemporary genres and participates in a number of performances on and off campus throughout the year. Class meets Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7:00-8:00pm. Pass/Fail only.

Theatre Arts Courses The Theatre Arts Program offers a comprehensive interdisciplinary study of performance art. The program is designed to build self-confidence in all arenas of performance and public speaking. The program provides opportunities for students with a beginning interest in theatre to that with advanced-level training. The program teaches voice and diction, theatrical movement, dance, stage combat, musical theatre, monologue, scene study, improvisation, Shakespeare and classical theatre history. Theatre Arts students are expected to study all areas of technical production, including set, lighting and costume design, sound, stage makeup and some basic film techniques. There are extensive reading assignments from various plays. Theatre Arts 1: Freshman Theatre 3 credits/semester This course is open to Grade 9 students only. Theatre 1 is an acting course, with an emphasis on developing comfort on stage and spontaneity. We will develop our skills with improvisations and acting exercises; students will also learn and perform a monologue for the class. By the end of the course, students should understand how to: create a character in a play; listen and react on stage; identify the basic elements of theatre production and theatre etiquette; be comfortable and confident taking part in school productions, acting classes, and public speaking in classroom situations and beyond. This course is taught in both fall and spring semesters. Theatre Arts 2: Contemporary Acting 6 credits/year VPA credit This is a course in Acting. In this course you will learn essential acting tools to create characters, and we will be working on scenes and monologues continually throughout the year, with each module introducing new skills and polishing those you have already learned in previous modules. We will be focusing on contemporary realism in comedy and drama, and will also do a module on Shakespeare, and a module on sword fighting for the stage. We will work together to develop an acting process for you, based primarily on the concepts developed by Constantin Stanislavski. Each acting assignment will have specific instructions, and everyone will receive acting coaching as students work on the assignments. Theatre Arts 3: Advanced Acting 6 credits/year VPA credit Prerequisite: Completion of Theatre 2 or department approval. Theatre 3 is an Advanced Acting Class focusing on deepening and fine-tuning performance skills developed in Theatre 2. Units of study will draw upon Contemporary plays, Classic American plays by authors such as Arthur Miller, Lillian Hellman, and Tennessee Williams, High-Style Comedy/Farce, and Shakespeare. Actors benefit from classical training as well as contemporary, and a strong base in classical acting (specifically Shakespeare) is essential for students auditioning for training programs in universities and conservatories, as well as summer theatres. Acting skills developed in the course are applicable to musical theatre performance as well. The emphasis of the class is on performance; the students will develop their acting skills by performing monologues and scenes and practical analysis of the characters and texts performed. Towards the end of the year, students will have an evening SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 21


Performing Arts Showcase performance, performing a selection of their scenes and monologues from the course. Theatre Honors 6 credits/year Prerequisite: Theatre 2 with a grade of B+ and audition. VPA credit In this honors-level course, students will achieve a high level of skill in the art of acting through a deep understanding and experience of the aesthetic processes of the art. Working in a variety of genres, each unit is devoted to a specific historical period, cultural context, and genre, as exemplified in a specific play or plays. In addition to performing scenes or monologues from the plays, students study the context from which the play emerged. Writing assignments will involve an analysis of each play, of the character the student is portraying, and will contextualize the play historically. Each unit of study has a performance objective and an analytical objective. The culminating project for the first semester is a deep character study and performance; the second semester will culminate in a capstone project performance as required by UC Theatre Honors courses. The course will use a college-level text. This course is in accordance with UC Honors requirements, and may be taken in place of Theatre 3, or after a student has completed Theatre 3. Admission is by audition only. Theatre Arts 4: Directing (Not offered in 2018-2019) 6 credits/year VPA credit Theatre 4 is a directing class, designed to give students the background and skills necessary to select, design, cast, and direct a one-act play. The first semester focuses on preparing students to direct, centered on the questions: What is a director? What does she/he do? What does she/he need to know about theatre to direct a play? We will study and practice script analysis & breakdown, director’s concepts, staging techniques, and coaching actors. The second semester focuses on producing the oneact plays selected by the students and approved by the instructor: all the elements of design; analysis of selected one-acts; designing sets, lights, costumes, props, sound; casting, directing, and presenting the individual plays as part of an evening of one-acts. The course is project-based; students will do extensive scene work in class the first semester to learn and practice their directing skills; the second semester is devoted to understanding and creating the production elements, directing, and presenting the one-act plays. Each director will select a one-act play to direct, subject to approval of the instructor. Prerequisites: Theatre 1, Theatre 2, or approval of the instructor. This course is open to juniors and seniors. Stage Art: Hamilton (The Musical) (not offered in 2018-2019) 6 credits/year Open to grades 10-12; course may be repeated since the central play will change year to year This is an introductory course offering an overview of all of the aspects of theatre. We will explore theatre through directing; set, costume, makeup, light, and sound design; stage management; playwriting & dramaturgy; history; movement and acting. This is an active course, and you will work on all of the areas studied. In the spring semester, we will integrate our knowledge through the examination of a landmark production. This year we will study and analyze the blockbuster Broadway production Hamilton, gaining a greater understanding of the significance of this production in the context of theatre as a whole. Several faculty members will teach the course from Theatre and Dance Departments, as well as guest instructors. This is not a performance course, but an overview of all of the arts of theatre. SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 22


Performing Arts This yearlong course is open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors, and may be repeated. The central play will change every year; students who have taken the course previously will be trained as mentors for the newer students. No prerequisite required. Technical Theatre 3 credits/semester Open to all Upper School students; requires after-school, evening, and weekend hours. VPA credit Students in this course study the craft of technical theatre. Students will learn the principles of stage management, publicity, and producing, and will design and implement stage lighting, costumes, sets, sound, props, and make-up. Work will include focusing on particular areas of interest in San Domenico theatrical productions. Upon approval Technical Theatre is available as Independent Study. Performance Workshop 3 credits/semester Open to all Upper School students; requires after-school, evening, and weekend hours. Two major Upper School productions are staged each year: a musical and a play, with full costumes, make-up, sets and lighting. All Upper School students in good academic standing, regardless of participation in Theatre Arts classes, may audition for roles or apply for production positions in lighting & sound, set design, costuming, or stage-management. Rehearsals are mandatory and grades are assigned on the director’s evaluation of commitment, performance, and attitude.

Dance Courses The San Domenico Upper School Dance Program offers a comprehensive training program in modern dance, ballet, hip hop, and choreography, taught by professional teachers and choreographers. The four-year program provides opportunities to explore dance from first steps through the college level, with classes offered five days a week for the serious dance student. The primary focuses of the Dance Program are technical training, performance, and choreography; students are provided with a foundation in technique through which they learn to express their own ideas and stories through choreography and performance. In higher level classes, students can expect to: 1. Investigate the roots of different dance forms by learning about the key figures and eras of dance history; 2. Create and perform their own dances, while learning about the elements of lighting, costume design, projection, and soundscaping; 3. Learn the fundamentals of teaching dance and leading rehearsals, with opportunities to teach students in the Lower School and lead classes for their peers. In addition, students get opportunities to take master classes with teachers in a variety of dance forms, including Flamenco, Bollywood, Hip Hop, and West African, as well as take field trips to see professional dance concerts, and perform off-campus. Dance classes meet during the school day as well as after school. Most dance classes are eligible for PE Credit. Dance 2, 3, & 4 are eligible for VPA Credit.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 23


Performing Arts Dance 1 3 credits/semester PE Credit Open to Grade 9 students only. This course is an introduction to dance technique, choreography, and performance. Students learn the fundamentals of modern dance, ballet, jazz, and hip hop dance, while rehearsing for a final performance at the end of the semester. Students also develop and teach basic dance lessons to students from the Lower School. Dance 2 6 credits/year VPA Credit/PE Credit Prerequisites: Completion of Dance 1, or permission from instructor Students expand upon their knowledge of dance technique, while exploring the elements of dance composition. Students engage in creative exercises that investigate the basic components of choreography, as well as help develop the student’s unique voice in dance-making. Students work in pairs or small groups to choreograph dances to be performed at the end of the school year. Students are also given assignments including journal entries, reflections, choreography projects, video viewing, sketching, and observations. Dance 3 6 credits/year VPA Credit/PE Credit Prerequisites: Completion of Dance 2, or permission from instructor Students continue to build upon their technical and expressive skills, and are expected to be proficient in terminology and execution of ballet, modern dance, and jazz technique. Students continue to develop their own pieces of choreography, to be performed at the end of the school year. In addition, students study the history and theory of western and non-western dance forms through reading/written assignments, video viewing, and performance critique. Dance 4 6 credits/year VPA credit/PE Credit Prerequisites: Completion of Dance 3, or permission from instructor Students progress intensively into the knowledge and practice of advanced/pre-professional level dance through rigorous training in modern dance, ballet, and composition. Students continue to develop their own piece of choreography, to be performed at the end of the school year. Students also plan and teach dance classes to their peers, as well as create a personal dance portfolio, including artist biography, curriculum vitae, headshot, and professional/educational goals. Students are given experience in audition settings in preparation for next steps to the collegiate or professional level.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 24


Performing Arts After School Dance Classes: (Class days and times subject to change) Beginning Pointe Mondays, 3:15 - 4:00 pm **not eligible for PE Credit Prerequisite: by invitation only Hip Hop Mondays, 4:00 - 5:45 pm PE Credit/Year-long Pass/Fail only Open to all levels Performance opportunities Intermediate Ballet Tuesdays, 3:15 - 4:45 pm PE Credit/Year-long Pass/Fail Prerequisite: 2 years experience in classical ballet, or permission from instructor Performance Opportunities Dance Ensemble Wednesdays & Fridays, 3:15 - 6:00 pm PE Credit/Year-long Graded Prerequisite: By audition only; students are required to take ballet Dance Ensemble is the premier performance dance group on campus. Dance Ensemble meets after school, and membership is by audition only. Members perform at special school events, dance festivals, and at the annual Spring Dance Concert, in the styles of modern dance, jazz, and ballet.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 25


Philosophy, Ethics, and World Religions

The Philosophy, Ethics, and World Religions courses study cultural thought and belief systems, historical events, theological concepts, and philosophical issues and movements. Students explore principles of decision-making, inquire into the spiritual dimensions of life, and develop their understanding of the meaning of interconnections with self, with others, with God, and with the universe. Course offerings honor the diversity of beliefs within the context of the Dominican tradition.

Courses Global Studies (See Social Studies Department for course description) 10 credits/year Required for all 9th graders Sacred Texts 10 credits/year Required for all 10th graders The Sacred Texts course satisfies the second year of the four-year graduation requirement for Philosophy, Ethics, and World Religions. This class will examine the philosophies and theologies found in the sacred texts of the world’s major religions. What do these texts have in common? What is the unique message of each text? What does each text teach about the purpose of life? Readings will include selections from the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures, the Quran, the Bhagavad Gita, the Buddhist Sutras and the Tao Te Ching. This class will build on the history and culture of world religions learned freshman year in Global Studies. Students will continue to develop skills that include critical reading, analytical writing, decoding symbol and metaphor, and learning to apply those insights into one’s life. As a final component of this courses, the students will take the teachings they have learned in the sacred texts and share them with the community through various Campus Ministry activities. Social Justice 10 credits/year Required for all 11th graders In this yearlong course students examine contemporary Social Justice topics through the lens of Catholic Social Teaching and the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights. After studying the principles of human dignity, solidarity, the common good, participation, subsidiarity and the role of government, the class focuses on current Social Justice issues such as the food system, the working poor, immigration, and women’s empowerment in the developing world. Students will develop a variety of active skills through practice in civil discourse, research, writing, individual and team project work, debates, and presentations.

Electives: Open to Seniors Only The Wisdom of Chaos 5 credits/semester While humans have had to deal with chaos since ancient times, only recently has science recognized it as a fundamental force in the universe. Chaos theory, originally used to understand the movements that create thunderstorms, raging rivers, and hurricanes, is now being applied to everything from medicine to warfare to social dynamics and theories about how organizations form and change. Chaos is evolving from a scientific theory into a cultural metaphor. As a metaphor it allows us to query some of our most cherished assumptions and encourages us to ask fresh questions about reality. Our modern

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 26


Philosophy, Ethics, and World Religions

society has been obsessed with conquering and scientifically controlling the world around us. However, chaotic, nonlinear systems - such as nature, society, and our individual lives - lie beyond all our attempts to predict, manipulate, and control them. Chaos suggests that instead of resisting life’s uncertainties, we should embrace the possibilities they offer: • Be Creative: how to engage with chaos to find imaginative new solutions and live more dynamically. • Use Butterfly Power: how to let chaos grow local efforts into global results • Go with the Flow: how to use chaos to work collectively with others • Explore What’s Between: how to discover life’s rich subtleties and avoid the traps of stereotypes • See the Art of the World: how to appreciate the beauty of life’s chaos • Live Within Time: how to utilize time’s hidden depths • Rejoin the Whole: how to realize our fractal connectedness to each other and the world. • If you have ever felt your life was out of control and headed towards chaos, science has an important message: Life is chaos, and that’s a very exciting thing. Zen Buddhism 5 credits/semester Zen is a school of Buddhism that developed in China. According to legend the Buddhist monk, Bodhidharma, brought Buddhism from India to China, where it mixed with Taoism and become known as Chan. The word Zen is derived from the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese word Chan, which in turn is derived from the Sanskrit word dhyana. Dhyana can be approximately translated as “meditative state.” During this course will we learn about the background and history of Zen and explore its principles and practices – many of which can be found in a range of art forms, such as haiku, landscape painting, the tea ceremony, rock gardening, and calligraphy. Ethics and Theater as a Way to Engage in Civil Discourse 5 credits/semester Theater is a very powerful teaching tool; a theatrical performance is a compelling way to engage students in what can amount to a controversial topic. Students will explore a contemporary ethical issue from the perspectives of academic inquiry and performance. Students will investigate the topic themselves through research and class discussions. Students will lead discussion sessions for their peers. This course prepares students to take on roles of responsible and informed citizens and to work cooperatively in a safe environment. In the course students will reflect upon and explore topics and engage in media literacy through fiction, poetry, music, non-fiction and news sources. This play is part of a series of Theater/Ethics courses that explore topical issues of our time. Previous productions and corresponding topics include: • The Laramie Project (2018): Hate Crimes and Discrimination • The Exonerated (2014): Justice System and Death Penalty • Bang Bang You’re Dead (2013): Gun Violence and the 2nd Amendment • The Laramie Project (2012): Hate Crimes • Dead Man Walking (2011): Death Penalty Ethics in Science and Medicine 5 credits/semester Prerequisite: Biology Nanotechnology, Genetically Modified Food, the right to die, designer babies, and genetic testing are all topics being debated in new legislation and in the news today. These are a few of the many ways in which science and medicine are rapidly transforming how we are able to interact in our world. It will take a new generation of ethically aware scientists and

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 27


Philosophy, Ethics, and World Religions

technically informed citizens to lead the global community through the challenges we will face in the twenty-first century. It is essential to reconcile innovations in science with our responsibility to seek health, prosperity, equity, and dignity for all on a sustainable basis. Participants in this leadership seminar will form a comprehensive list of possible topics to explore. We will then select those that we are most interested in digging deeply. Students and teachers will work together to research new technologies and scientific research as well as on the moral, religious, and philosophical foundations of these innovations. The goal is to help students form a thoughtful appraisal of the impact of these technologies on society and human experience. In our informal debates and small-group discussions we will explore many compelling questions. Ethics of Community: Inclusion and Exclusion 5 credits/semester Cross-listed with English Department. This course satisfies one semester of senior English and PEWR credit. How do we create and define community, and on what basis do we determine who is included and excluded? What is the proper role of loyalty, and how do we determine the obligations of individuals to their communities? How do the communities that we are part of—or excluded from—shape our moral sense and worldview? How do we find or describe place when nothing fits? How do we negotiate community when displaced? How do we remember? How does what we remember shape and alter our communities as well as create new ones? Over the course of the semester we will engage with texts across a variety of academic disciplines and genres. A short sampling: Night by Elie Wiesel, Tribe: on Homecoming and Belonging by Sebastian Junger, Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson and more short stories and poetry. International Relations I: Politics & Religion in the Modern Middle East 5 credits/semester Cross-listed with the Social Studies Department. This course is eligible to fulfill one semester of the PEWR graduation requirement. (See Social Studies Department for course description) Ethics: Consumerism, Materialism and Ecocide (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester Cross-listed with English Department. This course satisfies one semester of senior English and PEWR credit. To what extent am I responsible for the ecological health of the planet and the lives of others? How will I (must I?) live simply so that others may simply live? How will I be more rather than have more? These are a few of the many questions we will be exploring in this one semester Ethics/English course for seniors. Author of one of our texts, The Cry of the Earth, Mary Evelyn Tucker says, “This new era requires a change of consciousness and values – an expansion of our worldviews and ethics.” As the world population grows, we are manufacturing goods and consuming natural resources at an unsustainable pace with serious consequences. In this course, we will ask essential questions: What are the stories we tell each other and ourselves about success? What is the relationship between our “material success” and our identity? We will use the framework of the Earth Charter as a guide. A sampling of the case studies includes: • Dakota Access Pipeline and its effect Native Americans • Flint Water Crisis • Fence Line Communities - Oil and Gas industry’s effect on African Americans SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 28


Philosophy, Ethics, and World Religions • Factory Girls: From Village to City in a Changing China

Existentialism (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester Existentialism represents a long tradition in the history of philosophy in the West, extending back at least to Socrates. Its focus is on the proper way of acting rather than on an abstract set of theoretical truths. While the supreme value of existentialist thought is commonly acknowledged to be freedom, its primary virtue is authenticity. Throughout this course we will explore the existentialist themes of freedom, alienation, meaning and authenticity found in philosophy, literature and film. Stoicism (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 Credits/semester Stoicism is a school of philosophy that flourished throughout the Roman and Greek world. Stoicism asserts that our path to happiness is found in accepting this moment as it presents itself. Stoicism reminds us of how unpredictable the world can be. How brief our moment of life is. Stoicism doesn’t concern itself with complicated theories about the world, but with helping us overcome destructive emotions and act on what can be acted upon. It’s built for action, not endless debate. The Bible as Literature: Hebrew Scriptures (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 Credits/semester The Hebrew Scriptures (the “Old Testament”) are among the enduring classics of Western Civilization, and as such form one of the major sources of inspiration and reference for much of Western literature and philosophy, and even the Qur’an. Think just of the opening words of Melville’s Moby Dick, “Call me Ishmael.” In this course, we will study important themes, persons, and the archetypal stories of the Jewish scriptures by reading selections from several of the major books of these Scriptures: Genesis, Exodus, Deuteronomy, Joshua and Judges, Ruth, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, Psalms, Wisdom, Job, and the prophets Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Hosea. Particular attention will be give to the various literary forms of these writings: myth, legend, poetry, short story, and history. The books will be discussed in the context of the different historical periods in which they were written; and the Biblical influence in later narrative, philosophic, and artistic traditions will be considered. The Bible as Literature: Christian Scriptures (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 Credits/semester A new literary form: the Gospel! We will begin our exploration of the Christian Scriptures (the “New Testament”) by reading one of the four Gospels in its entirety, four of the most influential sacred scriptures ever to be written. We will consider the life, ministry, and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth in the context of Judaism and the Roman Empire of the 1st century CE. Particular emphasis will be placed on the literary devices included in the Gospels, including myth, parable, Jewish Midrash, poetry, apocalyptic, and history. We will study the continuation of a Gospel-like narrative in the Acts of the Apostles, and the literary form of the classical letter found in the “epistles.” Finally, we will discuss the highly symbolic and dramatic form of apocalyptic of the Book Revelation (Apocalypsis in Greek), with consideration of various methods of interpretation of such literature. Philosophy (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester Cross-listed with English. This course satisfies one semester of senior English and Religious Studies credit. What is philosophy for? The answer lies within the name itself. The word philosophy comes from the Ancient Greek word SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 29


Philosophy, Ethics, and World Religions

φιλοσοφία (philosophia), which literally means “love of wisdom.” We will explore the discipline of philosophy from its roots in antiquity to its role in our world today. Along the way we will discover ways philosophy can offer insights into the most meaningful facets of our lives: relationships, education, work, money, and belief itself. Throughout the course we will experiment with practices philosophers have developed to cultivate greater happiness and harmony within oneself and society. History of Christianity (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester This course is designed as an introduction to the history of Christianity and the Christian churches from its beginnings in the apostolic period to its most recent expressions in the twentieth century. Emphasis will be on the three major divisions within Christianity: Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and the Protestant denominations. Major movements, leading personalities, theological developments and religious trends will be examined with the aim to understand the broad spectrum of Christianity throughout the world.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 30


Physical Education & Health The Physical Education & Health program is designed to promote within students a sense of respect and responsibility towards themselves and their bodies and an appreciation of individual and group achievement. It provides students the opportunity to participate and develop skills and knowledge in team, individual, and lifelong activities that may be an ongoing lifelong interest. It is also designed to help students appreciate the value of fitness throughout their lives.

Requirements All students are required to participate in the equivalent of four (4) semesters of Physical Education and 1 semester of Health. Participation in one season of a San Domenico School sports team is equivalent to one semester of PE credit. PE credit can also be earned by successful participation in Strength & Conditioning (after school), a San Domenico dance class, or an approved off-campus independent study. All PE courses are offered as Pass/Fail only.

Courses Freshman Health 3 credits /semester Pass/Fail only Required for all 9th graders Health is a required one-semester course for all freshmen. This course includes such topics as body image, emotional health and stress, relaxation techniques, human sexuality, mental health, nutrition, and a review of chemical dependency. PE Sports 3 credits/semester Pass/Fail only Students who participate on a school sports team qualify for PE Sports. PE Sports is offered as Pass/Fail. One season on a school sports team is equivalent to one credit of PE.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 31


Science The Science Department offers a challenging array of college-preparatory laboratory classes, all of which stress observation, laboratory skills, and problem solving. Classes involve analysis and discussion of scientific phenomena, and prepare students to make informed decisions on environmental issues and technological advances.

Planning your science course of study Students are strongly encouraged to take as challenging a science program as possible. Those hoping to pursue a science major in college are advised to study science during all four years at San Domenico. Students who wish to double in science in a given year must have excellent grades and a strong work ethic. In addition, doubling in science requires the approval of the Science Department Chair and the Academic Dean. Among the junior/senior offerings are rigorous electives and AP courses, which have a narrower focus than the core science courses and require students to apply skills learned in previous science and math classes. It is recommended that students take the three foundational courses before taking Advanced Placement courses.

Courses Conceptual Physics 10 credits/year Required for all 9th grade students This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) Physics is an exciting journey to discover the rules that govern the universe. This course emphasizes conceptual comprehension, critical thinking, scientific inquiry and investigation skills necessary to understand these rules. We will develop these skills as we explore motion, forces, momentum, energy, and properties of matter. Course work will be presented through experience-based activities, as well as through group and class discussions. Biology 10 credits/year Required for all 10th grade students This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) This course is a comprehensive survey of topics in biology and includes such topics as ecology, cellular biology, biochemistry, genetics, evolution, classification of living things, human physiology and anatomy. The goal of the course is for students to increase their understanding of the living world so that they can find patterns, analyze information, and ask educated questions. Students will read current news and discuss issues of medicine, health, biotechnology and the environment. Teaching techniques include lecture, discussion, labs, projects, papers and activities. Tests are typically given every 2 or 3 weeks and there is at least one project or paper assigned every few months. Chemistry 10 credits/year Open to grades 10, 11 and 12. Prerequisites: completion of, or concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2. This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) This course presents the principles of chemistry and helps students gain a strong foundation in scientific literacy. Major goals are to stimulate interest in science and to encourage a spirit of inquiry. The course covers the basic properties of matter, solids, liquids and gases, the atom, the chemical families, the Periodic Table, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, and includes laboratory techniques and keeping comprehensive laboratory records.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 32


Science Chemistry Honors 10 credits/year Open to grades 10, 11 and 12. Prerequisites: concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2 honors or higher; A- or above in previous science and math classes and recommended by the Science Department. Please also see Honors Placement criteria. This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) This course is recommended for serious science students with a strong background in mathematics and who are interested in a rigorous, in-depth chemistry course. The concepts in this course focus on both quantitative and qualitative descriptions. Among the topics studied are atomic theory, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, thermodynamics, solutions, and the different phases of matter. Lab work and keeping a lab notebook are important components of the course. AP Biology 10 credits/year Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry with A- or higher in both, and recommendation by the Science Department. Please also see AP Placement criteria. This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) This is a rigorous college level course that requires students to apply skills learned from their previous science courses with a more in-depth, critical focus. AP Biology is designed for academically strong students with a keen interest in the biological sciences, and a willingness to devote at least 1-hour daily of after-school time for independent content study. The topics covered include biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, heredity and molecular genetics, biotechnology, evolution, the diversity, structure and function of organisms, populations and ecology. The course includes hypothesis-based laboratory experiments that mirror those performed in introductory biology courses offered at most universities. AP Chemistry 10 credits/year Prerequisites: Completion of Chemistry Honors, with a grade of A- or above and recommendation by the Science Department and concurrent enrollment in Precalculus Honors or higher. Please also see AP Placement Criteria. This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) The AP Chemistry class is designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory chemistry course usually taken by science and engineering majors in their first year of study. It is also for the student who desires to take a second year of chemistry in high school. The student is expected to have a solid background in the basic principles of chemistry prior to taking this class. This is a rigorous elective with a tighter focus than the first year Honors Chemistry classes. Topics covered in the first year of honors chemistry class are briefly reviewed, but not stressed. “How to” problem solving, equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics, and acid base chemistry will be covered in great depth. Laboratory work is also stressed, as much of the AP exam covers laboratory techniques and procedures. AP Environmental Science 10 credits/year Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry with a grade of B+ or higher and Science Department recommendation. Please also see AP Placement criteria. This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) This course is the equivalent of a semester-long college course and requires a rapid pace of one chapter every 1 to 2 weeks. Students will be responsible for working independently and mastering complex concepts. All course tests are in the style of the AP exam and happen every two weeks. In addition there are projects such as creating a website, class presentations SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 33


Science such as debates, and labs. Environmental science is a dynamic subject matter, which is continuously evolving as scientific understanding, technological advances, and political responses change. In order to explore these concepts students will gather information from many disciplines across the sciences including earth science, basic chemistry, geology, and ecology as well as economics, sociology and social justice. Students will investigate the Earth’s resources (energy, water, air, soil/land, forests, wildlife/wilderness) and their management, as well as issues caused by waste and human population pressures. The class will explore both the foundational concepts and the interconnections between many of the problems as well as the solutions. AP Physics C: Mechanics 10 credits/year Open to grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: completion of Conceptual Physics course or its equivalent. Completion or concurrent enrollment in Calculus AB, though Calculus BC or higher is preferred, and recommendation of the Science Department. Please also see AP Placement criteria. This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) The AP Physics C: Mechanics course is a national calculus-based course in physics. This course is equivalent to the introductory physics courses for university students that are looking towards a career in engineering or the sciences. The emphasis is on understanding of the physics concepts and critical thinking skills, and using the concepts and formulae to solve problems mathematically. Topics for the class include Kinematics, Dynamics, Momentum, Energy in translation and rotation as well as Simple Harmonic Motion and Gravitation. Laboratory work is an integral part of this course. Application of Physics in Engineering 10 credits/year Prerequisites: Completion of Conceptual Physics, completion of Precalculus This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) When was the last time that you built something? When was the last time you built something that you came up with the idea and the design for? Some people have never done this. But, those who have know the great sense of pride and accomplishment that comes with this. Think of all of the man-made items that you use on a daily basis--cell phones, bikes, and computers, even your house. These all started with people coming up with ideas, then creating a design, and finally building it. This class is about engaging in this process of dreaming it, designing it and building it. You will be presented with open-ended, design challenges and your goal will be to complete this design process, then be asked to reflect back on what you have created. You will use science to help to understand how to create something and, in turn, when you create it your understanding of how the physical world works will become more clear. Do you enjoy coming up with solutions to challenging problems? Are you creative? Do you work well with others on group projects? Do you like to engage in creating a tangible item? If so, this is the course for you! Human Biology 10 credits /year Prerequisites: Completion of Biology This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) This is a lab-based course that investigates structures and functions of the human body. Topics covered will include the basic organization of the body, biochemical composition, and major body systems along with the impact of diseases on certain systems. The course offers students an opportunity to probe topics such as homeostasis, anatomical and physiological disorders, and medical diagnosis and treatment. Students will design experiments and investigate the structure and function

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 34


Science of the human body, and test and monitor body functions such as muscle movement, voluntary, reflex, and respiratory responses. Exploring science in action students will build models to explain how systems work, work through real world cases, and play the role of bio-medical professionals to solve medical mysteries. Teacher Assistant in the Sciences 2 credits/year Open to grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry Honors. Must be approved by Science Department and Dean of Academics. Pass/Fail only A teacher assistant helps the instructor in setting up labs and performing other curricular related duties. The science instructors select the teacher assistants, but all students must receive approval from the Chair of the Science Department and the Dean of Academics. AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism (not offered in 2018-19) 10 credits /year Open to grades 11 and 12. Prerequisite: science: Completion of Conceptual Physics or its equivalent with a grade of A-. Completion or concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus and recommendation of the science department. Please also see AP Placement criteria. This course is an UC-designated Lab Science (“d”) This is a rigorous college level course that requires students to apply skills learned from their previous physical science courses with a more in-depth, critical focus. This is equivalent to a one-semester college class. This course is recommended for students who are planning careers in science, math or engineering and/or those who are just profoundly curious. This course covers Ohm’s law, resistors, capacitors, circuits, Coulomb’s law, and electromagnetism. Laboratory work requires 1/5 class periods, and students are expected to spend extra time outside of the classroom for reading, homework and, most importantly, thinking. Ecology and Field Studies (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits /semester Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. This course focuses on three major goals: to introduce students to the tools used by ecologists in the field; to model the process of science through ecological field studies focused on local ecosystems; and, to help guide students in planning and executing an ecological research project. Throughout the semester students will learn ecology through hands-on experience by observing organisms and the habitats around us as well as learn field techniques, instrumentation and methodology for field research. Finally, all students will complete an individual field research project. During this process, students will be testing ideas, collecting data, and drawing conclusions on their research. Students will also evaluate scientific papers, communicate data, and learn about the experiences of practicing researchers in the Bay Area.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 35


Social Studies The Social Studies Department curriculum is based on the belief that to understand the complexities of modern society it is necessary to understand our cultural and historical roots. Further, as citizens of the world, we must know and appreciate a variety of cultures and national backgrounds. Through their history coursework, students learn to express historical ideas clearly (verbally or in writing), understand cause and effect relationships, and develop the research skills they will use in college.

Courses Global Studies 10 credits/year Required for all 9th graders This course concurrently gives a full year of credit towards the Philosophy, Ethics, and World Religions requirement. Based primarily on the historical approach of the Big History Project, this course will introduce students to the concept of “thresholds,” developmental stages of increasing complexity that the universe and its human inhabitants have progressed through. Rather than focusing solely on a single place in history, we will take a global perspective of each of these thresholds to understand the common threads that tie humankind together across cultures. Students will be exposed to perspectives from multiple disciplines to develop an understanding of historical events. They will also learn how to critically evaluate, analyze, and synthesize primary and secondary historical, scientific, and technical texts to form well crafted and carefully supported written and oral arguments. As a foundational course, Global Studies will also focus on general academic skill development from organization to test taking strategies to reading and research. This broad approach to academic needs, as well as the study of humankind’s development, is intended to provide a solid base of knowledge and skills from which students can successfully pursue learning in all of their future humanities classes. Europe and the Modern World 10 credits/year Required for all 10th graders You are one of over 7 BILLION people living on Earth. Over 95% of the world’s inhabitants live outside the U.S. and due to their own historical experiences, they see the world in very different ways. Today we live in a “global village” connected to the rest of the world and to be successful, we need to look beyond our own life experiences to understand each other. This course aims to help students understand why other parts of the world are the way they are today, why they may have different priorities and values than we do, how we can emulate past successes while avoiding the pitfalls, and work as global citizens to create a more just and peaceful world. Through the study of colonization, the Enlightenment and age of Revolutions, industrialization, and world wars, we will consider some of the root causes of injustice in the world today and see how geography, economics, technology, and perceptions of race and ethnicity have shaped world events. US History 10 credits/year US History or AP US History is required of all 11th graders This survey course will begin with a review of American geography and the functions of the US government and Constitution. The 1800s, with its swirling debates, compromises, and events leading to the Civil War will be our main starting point. Students will study that war, Reconstruction and the postwar years, industrialization, immigration, the growth of African American culture and identity, the roaring ‘20s, and economic disasters of the 1930s. We will explore the fight for women’s rights, American wartime experiences in Europe, the conformity of the ‘50s, the Civil Rights Movement, the rebellious SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 36


Social Studies upheavals and pivotal Vietnam War era of the ‘60s and ‘70s, and the Reagan years of the ‘80s. The music, literature, art and inventions from those eras will play important roles in our study. We will always focus on the lives and values of the American people, on minority experience and culture, and on the role of women in our history. Current events and discussion are important parts of the course. Students will hone their formal research and writing skills, learn to express opinions confidently during discussion, and at all times, will question the point of view and the accuracy of what they read and learn. Assessments will include written responses, debates, digital projects, iMovies, personal inquiry projects and presentations, document-based questions, and class participation. We will look at the ways Americans define themselves, their culture, and the fabled “American Dream.” How have Americans faced the challenge of living in a “melting-pot” country? AP US History 10 credits/year AP US History or US History is required of all 11th graders Prerequisite: Completion of Europe and the Modern World with a grade of A- or above, teacher recommendation, and approval of the History Department. Please also see AP Placement Criteria. The Advanced Placement (AP) United States History course offers a rigorous college level examination of the United States from the 1400’s to the present. This course challenges students not only to consider key historic events but also to connect broad themes such as nationality, ethnicity, race, gender, class, and religion as they appear within the landscape of the nation’s past. In addition to the core text, primary and secondary readings, including excerpted works of literature, will help students develop a more nuanced perspective of US history, and exemplify professional historical interpretations and the development of culture. This course demands initiative and independent motivation, as course requirements include a considerable amount of reading, writing, and independent study.

Electives These courses are open to seniors only. International Relations I: Politics & Religion in the Modern Middle East 5 credits/year This course is cross-listed with the Department of Philosophy, Ethics & World Religions and is eligible to fulfill one semester of the Philosophy, Ethics & World Religions graduation requirement. This seminar-style course examines various aspects and dynamics of contemporary international relations. Students will study and analyze global issues with a focus on conflict, human rights, and social justice. We will examine complex institutions such as the United Nations and International Humanitarian Law, as well as current issues such as U.S. policy in the Middle East, international terrorism, nuclear escalation in North Korea, and the global refugee crisis. With each, we will consider a range of perspectives in an attempt to better understand their causes and the competing demands of various state and non-state actors, as well as consider the ethical implications of various approaches to addressing the issues, and in turn, propose potential solutions. In addition to the factual knowledge and moral deliberations surrounding each of these topics, we will also be developing important skills in historical inquiry, analysis, and crafting arguments based on evidence. Because the content of our course is going on around us daily, much of what we address will be coming from the current international headlines.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 37


Social Studies Issues in American Democracy 5 credits/semester This course is cross-listed with the Department of Philosophy, Ethics and World Religions and is eligible to fulfill one semester of the PEWR graduation requirement. This seminar style course will examine the context, mechanics, influences, and role of news media in US elections. Students will identify and analyze the factors and issues that influence contemporary politics, and develop an understanding of how the American electoral system works and why. In addition, issues like campaign finance laws, gerrymandering, the lack of women in positions of power, and foreign interference in American politics will be explored. We will look closely at the erosion of privacy and big data collection in the last decade, as well as the role “fake news” plays in crafting public opinion. Students will learn skills for the research and analysis of current news events, will frequently write to elected officials, and will create projects that teach other students about current issues affecting all Americans. International Relations II: China, Russia, and Eurasia (Not offered in 2018-20119) 5 credits/semester This course will examine various aspects and dynamics of contemporary international relations, focusing on some of the most volatile and geopolitically important regions in the world today, including China, the countries of former Soviet Union, which have risen in influence and interaction with the United States. Issues of focus will include the implementation and impact of communism on the region, as well as subsequent political and economic reforms and transformations. Assignments will include identification, research, and analysis of the challenges to stability and democratization in these countries in transition, as well as understanding the influential roles of China and Russia in economic and geopolitical systems in Europe and Asia. International Relations I is not a prerequisite. Women’s Rights in the Modern Age (1900-present) (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester After the Civil War, American women got to work demanding their rights and the vote. Central to the industrial age economy, yet denied the rights to own property, have any legal status, get medical care, or be seen as individuals with value and worth, women’s first task was to change society’s perceptions. Building on and adapting British suffrage tactics, iconic leaders Alice Paul, Lucy Burns and many others turned the American movement on its head. Were women of color left out of the process? Let’s explore that issue. After winning the vote, Paul proposed the Equal Rights Amendment, but to this day it has never been ratified. Why not? What are the objections? And why are historical, primary sources for women’s social position so scarce? We will look at how women’s status changed during the exciting, but racist, decade of the 20s, their roles in the great projects of the Depression, and how women’s status again changed after WWII, resulting in the 1950s woman who was expected to stay at home and raise her family for fulfillment. The pendulum always swings, as it did in the ‘60s era of birth control and civil rights, and the ‘70s’ revolutionary women’s movement. Where are we now, in terms of equality, representation, wages, and identity politics, and what do we still need to work on? Assignments and resources will include pertinent readings, films, and individual research projects. Civil Rights Era (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester The Civil Rights Movement is one of the most significant sources of social change in the United States during the 20th Century. This course analyzes the structure and dynamics of the movement from the viewpoints of history and social change. Students will begin with a review of the decades after Reconstruction. They will understand why the organizations and the SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 38


Social Studies civil rights leaders of the 20th century had very different views on how to achieve economic and social justice. How did WWII change the status of African Americans? We will explore the effectiveness of the strategies employed during the 1960s-70s, including such movement activities and federal government responses (from the President, Congress, and Supreme Court) as Brown v. Board of Education, the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Little Rock school integration campaign, sit-ins, the Freedom Rides, the Birmingham campaign, the March on Washington, the Selma March, the Black Panthers, the Civil Rights Act, and the Voting Rights Act. Students will be able to explain the importance of organizations, resources, and ideology to this social movement, and will explore the arguments for integration vs. separatism, and nonviolence vs. meeting violence with force. The course will use pertinent videos and readings as well as the prize-winning PBS film series, “Eyes on the Prize.” Botany of Desire (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester Based on the book of the same name by Michael Pollan, this course will look at the development of modern civilization through the lens of our relationship with plants. We tend to generally consider plants to be harmless and non-threatening, and yet history reveals that when societies have become obsessed over the beauty, taste, inebriating qualities or practical benefits of some plants, people have been willing to do whatever it takes to ensure their growth, even by going to war. We will consider how the plants we love have impacted the social, economic and even physiological well being of people throughout time. Even more importantly, we will examine how our obsession with any one particular plant can push us to extreme and ultimately environmentally harmful measures to produce perfect, bountiful crops. We will explore four case studies: how the apple traveled from Kazakhstan to eventually become the ubiquitous all-American fruit; how the Central Asian tulip sparked an economic frenzy in Holland; how the South American potato made a round trip to Ireland and back to the Americas, underwriting the Industrial Revolution as it went; and how the ancient marijuana plant from Asia is now igniting controversy in California and other states as it becomes legal. Students will complete an independent research project on a plant that is currently in high demand (avocados, almonds, tobacco, opium, etc.) and consider the full extent of its impact across all aspects of society. Course materials include Michael Pollan’s book, Botany of Desire, the PBS film series by the same name, and relevant supplementary materials on the legal, economic, civic and environmental impact of the various plants we desire. Freakonomics (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? How is the Klu Klux Klan like a group of real-estate agents? Why do drug dealers still live with their moms? These questions and many more are answered in this course, an introduction to behavioral economics. Using the writings of the Freakonomics authors Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner, we will learn how economists use data to understand the psychological, social and emotional factors that impact people’s choices, and thus, impact their economic decisions. Topics of discussion will include self-control and its impact on our consumption and savings; the role altruism plays in our economic decision making process; what drives spikes in economic growth; what happens when there are economic bubble pops; and how incentives can be a primary motivator for how we participate in markets. Economic and Financial Literacy (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester This course focuses on basic economic concepts for the real world like balancing a budget, paying rent, writing a check, writing a resume/cover letter, how to take out a loan/buy a car. Students would participate in a cost of living project in which they would be provided with a “salary range” and realistic life situation (e.g. partner, child, loans, school payment). Students would also learn basic economic concepts like supply and demand, savings, types of credit, economic theories, stocks and bonds, and competition and

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 39


Social Studies monopolies. Guest speakers from the banking and finance industry, financial management and economics community would be employed to help students see the relevant application of what we would be learning in class. AP Psychology 10 credits/year Prerequisites: Biology with a grade of B+ or higher, and History and English grades of B+ or higher in previous year. Please see AP Placement criteria. This course is open to juniors and seniors who meet requirements and receive approval from the teacher. This is the equivalent to an introductory college psychology course. This social science course explores the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. The course investigates the history of and differences between the major philosophies and approaches in the field. Students will investigate the biological basis of behavior through studies of the brain and the senses. Other topics include the nature/nurture debate of cognition, perception, emotion, learning, motivation, personality development, intelligence, social behaviors, and therapy. With so much to cover, this requires a rapid pace of one chapter every two weeks. Students are expected to keep up with the readings and participate daily in class. Students will participate in discussions, activities, and class presentations and projects. Students will continuously be tested in the style and level of the AP test on a bi-weekly basis and be expected to keep up with chapter readings and outlines. AP Economics 10 credits/year Prerequisites: Social Studies and English grades of B+ or higher in previous year. This course is open to juniors and seniors who meet requirements and receive approval from the teacher. AP Economics is a full year course that will cover both microeconomics and macroeconomics. The study of microeconomics will give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Macroeconomics will provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics and how economists use those principles to examine aggregate economic behavior. Students will learn how the measures of economic performance, such as gross domestic product (GDP), inflation, and unemployment are constructed and how to apply them to evaluate the macroeconomic conditions of an economy. The course recognizes the global nature of economics and provides ample opportunities to examine the impact of international trade and finance on national economies. Various economic schools of thought are introduced as students consider solutions to economic problems.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 40


Visual Arts & Digital Media The Visual Arts & Digital Media Department curriculum is designed to introduce students to a variety of media and new ways of problem solving, and to use the art vocabulary fluently, in both verbal and written forms. The courses emphasize authentic studio practices, which involve the development of both creative and analytical skills, as well as personal integrity, originality, thoughtfulness, and work ethic. The upper level classes promote an elevated skill level and original, high-quality art production. Small studio classes and personalized attention are central components of our philosophy and instruction. Please note: Courses designated “VPA� may be used to satisfy the Visual and Performing Arts requirement. Semester classes must be taken in sequence. Visual Arts Courses Art 1 5 credits/semester This course is open to Grade 9 students only. This class is one component of the visual and performing arts program in the freshman year. This is a standards-based visual arts course exploring the elements of art and the principles of design. This introductory course is designed to inspire an interest in art. Over the period of a semester, students will be exposed to select media as they begin to learn the fundamentals of 2 and 3-dimensional art. In this class, students begin develop perceptual skills in units that address the elements of art and principles of design. These introductory drawing, painting and sculpture assignments may include: still life, portraiture, commercial design, the study of value and color, ceramics, printmaking and more. Art 2 10 credits/year VPA credit No prerequisites This standards-based, U.C.-approved visual arts course helps students develop perceptual skills using a variety of materials and technique in units addressing the art elements and principles of design. The course concentrates on 2-dimensional art in a series of structured drawing and painting assignments and will be expected to explore a range of solutions to the given assignments. Students will develop a deeper comprehension of the elements of art and principles of design. Verbal and written critiques will expand the development of ideas and enhance student ability to talk about art. The class integrates technology, research, reading, and writing in units that include art making, art history, and cultural connections. Students may create an ongoing journal/sketchbook. Art 3 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Art 2 This course sharpens the skills and ideas learned in Art 2 through writing an artist statement, utilizing a sketchbook, and discussing and analyzing various artists and art movements. The projects allow students to envision and create artwork that is distinctly their own, with a clear point of view. Verbal and written critiques will be a dynamic method for furthering their ideas and expanding their strengths as artists. Ceramics 1/2 10 credits/year VPA credit Evening class, day and times TBD No prerequisites SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 41


Visual Arts & Digital Media Students will create a set of tiles, hand-built bottle forms, and model objects. A critique will follow the completion of each project. The students will be asked to present their work to the class or will be asked to discuss certain aspects of their work in relation to the assignment. Students will also complete a sketchbook, to be completed at midterm and the week prior to exams. Students will be expected to understand and articulate the vocabulary related to ceramic art and complete a variety of written assignments. Ceramics 3 5 credits/semester Fall only Prerequisite: Ceramics 1/2 VPA credit Evening class, day and times TBD Advanced hand building and beginning wheel-throwing techniques will be introduced. Students will focus on refining skills in both working with clay, as well as surface treatment and glazing techniques. A critique will follow the completion of each project. The artists will present their work to the class and discuss certain aspects of their work in relation to the assignment. Students will also complete written reflections as well as oral presentation on a ceramic artist of their choice. Ceramics 4 5 credits/semester Spring only Prerequisite: Ceramics 3 VPA credit Evening class, day and times TBD Emphasis is placed on working independently in a ceramic studio and on contemporary ceramics. Students will refine skills on the potter’s wheel, hand building, and sculpture. A critique will follow the completion of each project. Students will prepare a ten-minute critique of a ceramic artist of their choice and will write reflections on ceramic artists or movements throughout the semester. Photography I/2 10 credits/year VPA credit No prerequisites Students will begin the course with an introduction to the history of American photography and iconic photographers from the 20th century. Students will learn the basic functions of the digital camera while learning how to frame the image and use the “rule of thirds.” Editing applications for the iPad will be introduced, but basic editing strategies will be emphasized. Students will also analyze the works of their peers through verbal and written critiques, and deepen their engagement with problem-solving behind the lens of the camera in order to create thought-provoking images. Students will be expected to present their work bi-weekly throughout the semester. In addition, the class assessments will include presentations on artists, reading and analyzing texts, and discussions on documentary films and artists. Students will have access to digital cameras provided by the school, but a digital camera is highly recommended for this course. Advanced Art Independent Study 5 credits/semester Prerequisite: Must have completed all of the coursework in one selected area of study. Instructor approval required. SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 42


Visual Arts & Digital Media This course is intended for students who have completed the highest level of one of the following categories of courses offered in the Visual Arts Department: Art 3, Ceramics 3, or Photography 1. Students will broaden their scope of understanding of selected media and work on projects with intention and depth. Students will be expected to complete a minimum of five (5) projects throughout the semester, as determined by the individual student and approved by the instructor. Project proposals are due during the first week of class. Regularly scheduled critiques with the instructor will be a standard component of the class. Additionally, students will be responsible for exhibiting their work with an Artist’s Statement at the end of the semester. Public Art: Controversy, Interpretation and Implementation (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester Prerequisite: 1 year visual or performing arts class The students will learn about different contemporary art movements and artists, including muralists, “happenings”, public sculpture, and Christo and Jeanne-Claude. The students will complete a variety of projects, and possibly collaborate on a project to be implemented on campus (or community-wide, as appropriate) as a final project. Discussion and critical thought will be emphasized, as well as original ideas and creative strength. Written work and readings on contemporary issues will enhance the content of the class. Art History: From Cave Paintings to Graffiti (not offered in 2018-2019) 5 credits/semester Prerequisite: Art 2 This course introduces students to the broad range of human creativity throughout history, with an emphasis on the Twentieth and Twenty-First Century artists, art movements, and contemporary art. Students gain an understanding of the influences in religion, science, technology, and politics that affected style in art. The study of Aesthetics and the philosophy of art will enhance the students’ understanding of the artwork presented in class. Reading, lectures, video and power point presentations, as well as field trips to museums and local studios are included. Various writing assignments, class participation, and class presentations are part of the assessment. Advanced Placement Studio Art 10 credits/1 year VPA credit Prerequisites: Upper School art classes as well as a complete portfolio review with the instructor are required. Approval by Visual Arts & Digital Media Department Chair is required. Summer homework will be assigned accordingly and is part of the assessment of the readiness of the student for the course. Please also see AP Placement criteria in the course catalogue. The Advanced Placement Studio Art program is intended for highly motivated art students committed to serious study in art. The goal is to complete the outlined body of work and submit the completed two-semester portfolio on a structured timeline, creating 24 works or art that exhibit Quality (Section I), Concentration (Section II) and Breadth (Section III). The Advanced Placement student may choose a Drawing Portfolio (includes painting and drawing in a variety of media), a 2-D Design Portfolio (includes drawing, painting, digital art, graphic design, and photography) or a 3-D Design Portfolio (ceramics). Students will be responsible for the creation of a quality portfolio, digital documentation, an artist’s statement and the organization of the above for the purpose of submitting required images and actual works to the AP College Board for review and grading. Please see the Visual Arts Department chair for more information.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 43


Visual Arts & Digital Media Digital Media Courses The goal of the Digital Media Program is to study the intersection of technology and the arts, through the language of multimedia, hands-on use of 21st century technology in creative projects, and the study of the history of arts in the digital age. Film/Video Production 1 5 credits/semester Open to 9th grade students only. In this class, students focus on the art of storytelling through film. As such, students learn how to develop a story idea, script, characters, storyboard, and production schedule for the completion of a short film. In addition to the technical aspects of creating a film and/or video project, students will study various film styles. Film/Video Production 2 10 credits/year Grades 10-12 VPA credit No prerequisites This elective course is designed as an introduction, but in-depth look into the filmmaking process. From pre-production to post-production, students will learn the importance of the different jobs and roles that it takes for the completion of a short film. This includes all genres of film. Basic storytelling, including “the hero’s journey,” will also be a main point of interest during this course. No prerequisites for this class. Film/Video Production 3 10 credits/year Grades 10-12 VPA credit Prerequisites: Film/Video Production 1 or 2 This elective course is designed as an advanced and in-depth look into the artistic and different creative styles of the filmmaking process. The goal of this course is for the student to professionally tell a story through visual composition, using advanced camera and editing techniques. Students will learn the importance of producing a short film through script writing, character development, and basic storytelling. A final project will involve the production of two or three films from one written script. This will allow the students to understand how different a story can be told when different people work on it. Broadcast Journalism 10 credits/year Grades 10-12 VPA credit Prerequisites: Film/Video Production 1 or 2 This elective course is designed as a look into the world of news reporting and broadcast journalism. Students will produce short news reports every two to three weeks to show what is happening throughout the campus and community. Seeking the truth and reporting accurate and fair information, minimizing harm by treating your sources, subjects, collaborators and members of the public with respect, and being accountable and transparent by taking responsibility for your work will be the pillars to success in this class. SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 44


World Languages San Domenico Upper School’s World Language Department requires completion of a world language through level 3 for graduation. The curriculum has three objectives: • Students will achieve an advanced level of oral and written language proficiency. • Students will learn about the people, customs and histories of the target culture in order to successfully communicate with native speakers. • Students will challenge themselves to tolerate the ambiguity and imperfection inherent in the study of a second language. To meet our objectives, students learn through immersion, regular practice, and continued work with authentic resources and materials. Teachers emphasize communication over explicit grammar instruction. Language lessons are meaningful, personalized and engaging. Course levels reflect the guidelines outlined by the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Language. (ACTFL)

Courses Mandarin 1 10 credits/year This is an introductory Mandarin Chinese course designed for beginning students. No background in Mandarin is presumed or required. The course focuses on basic communication skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing standard Mandarin Chinese. In addition to the acquisition of linguistic skills, the course also aims to equip students with the skills needed to learn foreign languages in natural, authentic settings. Class work includes communicative activities, dialogues, music, movies and student-centered pair/group practice. A variety of educational and authentic materials are used to reinforce language skills. Students are exposed to Chinese culture to develop an understanding and appreciation for Chinese culture, people, customs, behavior, and traditions. At the end of Mandarin 1 students are expected to reach the novice-high level as outlined by ACTFL. Mandarin 2 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Completion of Mandarin 1 with a grade of C or above. Mandarin 2 is a yearlong course that continues the study and development of Mandarin. Students will continue to develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course emphasizes fundamental communicative-based competencies, grammar, orthography, and Chinese-language cultures. By the end of the second semester, students will write simple questions and sentences on a variety of familiar topics in Chinese. At the end of Mandarin 2 students are expected to reach the intermediate-low level as outlined by ACTFL. Mandarin 3 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Completion of Mandarin 2 with a grade of C or above. Mandarin 3 is an in-depth continuation of Mandarin 2. It is designed for students who have acquired a familiarity with Pinyin and know how to write Chinese characters in the correct stroke order. They will further expand their understanding of Chinese culture, extend their skills in grammar, and be encouraged to increase their communicative interaction with native speakers. The cultural activities are arranged to provide students with opportunities to enhance language and cultural learning. The class covers topics such as religion, music, performing arts, food, medicine, and holidays. At the end of Mandarin 3 students are expected to reach the intermediate-mid level as outlined by ACTFL. SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 45


World Languages Mandarin 4 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Completion of Mandarin 3 with a grade of C or above. Mandarin 4 students will review and refine the language learned in previous levels of Mandarin, increasing their accuracy and fluency. This course covers new topics such as shopping, vacation, the community, and includes more complicated conversations in the Chinese store. The class will engage in many communicative activities, play games, perform skits, and create projects. This class is conducted predominantly in Mandarin and students must speak in Mandarin at all times. At the end of Mandarin 4, students are expected to reach the intermediate high level as outlined by ACTFL. Spanish 1 10 credits/year Spanish 1 is a comprehensive introduction to Spanish designed for beginning Spanish students. Students will learn to understand, speak, read, and write simple questions and sentences on a variety of topics. Proficiency-based methods and authentic materials are used to teach pronunciation, conversational skills, and grammar. Spanish 1 includes an introduction to contemporary Spanish and Latin American culture. This course is taught in Spanish. At the end of Spanish 1 students are expected to reach the novice high or intermediate low level as outlined by ACTFL. Spanish 2 10 credits/year Prerequisite: completion of Spanish 1 with a grade of C or above. Spanish 2 builds on the communication skills acquired successfully in Spanish 1. Students continue to practice their communication skills through contextualized and authentic readings and listening activities. Students are able to produce more language in Spanish 2, to tell stories and recount events. Students increase their knowledge of the cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world. This course is taught in Spanish. At the end of Spanish 2 students are expected to reach the intermediate low or mid level as outlined by ACTFL. Spanish 3 10 credits/year Prerequisite: completion of Spanish 2 with a grade of C or above. Building on the language skills learned in Spanish 1 and 2, Spanish 3 students will continue to develop oral and written proficiency in the language. There will be frequent opportunities for speaking, reading, listening and writing in Spanish. As fuel for our lively conversations we will look at topics such as social media, threats to our environment, the stresses of modern life, art, relationships and current events. We will look at these topics as they relate to our own lives as well as their importance in the Spanish-speaking world. The course is conducted in Spanish and students must speak in Spanish at all times. At the end of Spanish 3 students are expected to reach the intermediate mid or intermediate high level as outlined by ACTFL. Spanish 4 10 credits/year Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 3 with a grade of C or above. Spanish 4 students will review and refine the language learned in previous levels of Spanish, increasing their accuracy and fluency. Many opportunities for speaking, reading, listening and writing in Spanish will give students the chance to practice

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 46


World Languages their language skills. Readings and other authentic materials (videos, songs, paintings, advertisements, etc.) generate lively class discussions. Some of the topics we will examine include the controversial sport of bullfighting, the Basque separatist movement, FARC and kidnappings in Colombia, Argentina’s Dirty War, immigration and more. This class is conducted entirely in Spanish and students must speak in Spanish at all times. At the end of Spanish 4, students are expected to reach the intermediate high level as outlined by ACTFL. AP Spanish Language and Culture 10 credits/year Prerequisites: completion of Spanish 4 with a grade of A- or above and approval of World Languages Department Chair. Please also see AP/Honors Criteria. AP Spanish Language is the equivalent of a third-year Spanish language college course. Students study the Spanish Language and Culture within the context of 6 large themes: Families and Communities, Beauty and Aesthetics, Global Challenges, Personal and Public Identities, Science and Technology, and Contemporary Life. Students advance their interpersonal communication with in-class conversations, spontaneous partner dialogues, and email replies. They perfect their presentational communication through speeches, debates, and cultural comparisons. They refine their interpretive communication skills through the analysis and reflection of a variety of articles and audio samples. Students are exposed to Latin American and Spanish cultures through different means including songs, movies, newspaper and magazine articles, short stories, poetry and excerpts from novels and plays. The class prepares students for the Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture Examination. Class is conducted entirely in Spanish. At the end of AP Spanish, students are expected to reach the advanced level as outlined by ACTFL. Advanced Seminar in Spanish 10 credits/year Prerequisites: completion of AP Spanish with a grade of B- or above and approval of World Languages Department Chair. Please also see AP/Honors Criteria. This course is open to all students who have completed AP Spanish successfully. The Advanced Seminar offers students a chance to delve deeply into Spanish and Latin American culture through authentic materials including but not limited to literature and cinema, organized around thematic units. A high level of communication both spoken and written from students is expected. Students will take part in a variety of activities such as debates, research, presentations, and projects. Students will continue to develop their proficiency at the advanced level as outlined by ACTFL.

SAN DOMENICO SCHOOL

2018-19 CURRICULUM GUIDE & COURSE CATALOG | 47

SD Upper School Curriculum Guide & Course Catalog  
SD Upper School Curriculum Guide & Course Catalog