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February 2016 Shevat/Adar I 5776

WILLIAM SHATNER

at Temple Bat Yahm p. 38

Packing More than Just Lunch with Women’s Philanthropy

T KIDS? GO

MAGAZINE OK

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Something We Call Love

INSID


TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH PRESENTS

ADULT EDUCATION Saturdays 9:00-10:00 a.m. Bagels & Torah (led by Dr. Jake Sapiro) Monday, February 8, 7:00 p.m. “Origins of the Jewish Calendar” (taught by Sam Prum) Saturday, February 13, 12:00 p.m. “Grasping Reform Judaism” Lunch ‘n Learn (taught by Rabbi Nico Socolovsky) Sunday, February 21, 5:30 p.m. Film Night: “Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem Monday, February 29, 7:00 p.m. “Judaism and Women” (taught by Sam Prum)

An Inspiring and Inclusive Congregation Your Jewish home away from home!

Contact the Temple office for details and RSVP: (714) 871-3535 or info@tbtoc.org Temple Beth Tikvah 1600 N. Acacia Avenue Fullerton, CA 92831 www.tbtoc.org

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Calling all Jewish High School Juniors and Seniors – Are You Prepared for College?

PUT “KNOWLEDGE FOR COLLEGE” ON YOUR TO DO LIST. This program will EMPOWER you to effectively deal with the rising anti-Israel and anti-Jewish sentiment that many college campuses are experiencing due to the growth of the BDS Movement. Over the course of FOUR Sunday evenings, you will meet other Jewish teens and learn about: • What is the BDS Movement? • What’s the Big Deal with this Israeli/Palestinian Conflict? • How do I deal with Anti-Semitism on campus? • How should I handle and analyze Biased Media Reporting?

February 28, 2016, 5:00PM at University Synagogue (dinner included)

Knowlege For College Knowledge For College is partially funded by the Jewish Community Foundation of Orange County.

March 6, 2016, 6:00PM at Congregation B’nai Israel (snack included) March 13, 2016, 6:00PM at Congregation B’nai Israel (snack included) March 20, 2016, 6:00PM at University Synagogue (snack included) To register or for more information, contact Rabbi Robin Hoffman at Congregation B’nai Israel: (714)-730-5161 or rhoffman@cbi18.org

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THE BIG REUNION revisit. reunite. reminisce. Temple Beth Emet's 60th Anniversary Sunday, March 13, 2016 11:00 am Champagne Brunch at Anaheim Marriott Suites - Chapman & Harbor Entertainment by Jazz Soloist Victoria Goodman Deadline for ad submissions is February 26th. 1770 W. Cerritos Ave 路 Anaheim, CA 92804

Honoring Founding Members and Lou Abramovitz & Jordan Silverberg For advertising rates & registration information, contact us: Temple Beth Emet tbeanaheimshul@gmail.com www.tbe-oc.org/reunion (714) 772-4720

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inside VIEWPOINT

LIFESTYLE

20

54

The Things We See

O.C.’s Fresh Faces

24

56

Embrace Your Waves

Reconnecting with My Heritage

26

57

Are You Jewish?

The Inexplicable “Strangers to Family” Phenomenon

FEATURES

58

Israel Scene

JLIFE | Shevat/Adar I 5776 | FEBRUARY 2016

Fresh Orange Jews

On the Lighter Side

A Place to Call Home

Israeli Guy

A Family of 50…in 10 days?

32

24

History/Blogs

Why connect to our past?

Orange County’s Jewish History & The Blogosphere

36

IN EVERY ISSUE

Ancestral Memories

Finding My Roots

16

How one girl traveled across the country to appreciate what was right down the street.

Letters/Who Knew Words from our Readers

38

18

Temple Bat Yahm Presents William Shatner

57

First & Foremost What’s in A Name?

Sharing highlights from his 50-year friendship with Leonard Nimoy.

52

40

O.C. Jewish Scene

From Across the Globe

News & Jews

60

Beth Jacob’s Gala Honors a Diverse Group of Women

Seniors Calendar Fitness, Education & More

62

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

42

Advertising Index

“Hershey Felder...is American Music!”

Look inside for Kiddish, our insert publication, right after page 32.

A don’t-miss show!

43

Crossword

48

On the Edge

44

Cooking Jewish With Judy Bart Kancigor

48

28 On the Cover

Out & About A Guide to O.C. Fun

Something We Call Love Packing More than Just Lunch with Women’s Philanthropy Page 43


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Create a buzz with your own original content!

Publish and share your thoughts, news, pictures or videos with the Orange County

It’s as simple as 1,2,3! 1. Go to www.jlifebuzz.com 2. Click on ‘Submit an Article’ 3. Fill in the necessary information

Jewish Community.


LIVING TRUSTS When to Review & Why to Update BY ROB STODDARD

W

e have done thousands of administrative reviews of living trusts for almost twenty years. These items may be of some help to you.

Remember, an IRA account is FULLY taxed to heirs. There are ways to eliminate the taxes in the IRA code that you should be aware of.

Four Common Problems with Living Trusts

Successor Trustees

1)

Assets not owned by the Trust or properly “Funded”

2)

“Successor trustees” unable to perform/incorrectly chosen

3)

“Agents” for powers of attorney chosen incorrectly

4)

No clear cut distribution plan for heirs

Examples of the Above Four Common Problems “Funding” Your home: the deed must be recorded at the county in the name of the trust. In our opinion, it must also mention the dates of any restatements and be titled so as to take advantage of the stepped up basis. We find less than ½ homes are properly funded. Bank and Broker Accounts (Non-IRA): these must also be titled in the name of the trust to avoid problems. TIP: IRA accounts do not get titled in the name of the trust. However we see many clients making a huge mistake by making the trust a beneficiary.

We have found many couples chose successor trustees in their age group. This is a problem as they may be unavailable or incapable when the time comes. Other families chose one of their children. This can be problematic for the family after both parents are gone. “Agents” for Powers of Attorney Two Types Health Care: Again, many documents have agents selected that are out of the area. It is important that you have a LOCAL agent until your loved ones can be there for you. These “health care” agents do not have any access to financial accounts. Financial Power of Attorney: Chose wisely. These agents are given 100% access to 100% of your assets including your home while you are permanently or temporarily incapacitated. Distribution Plan Most families want an even split to their families and often a bequest to an entity such as their Temple or favorite charity.

Caution must be imposed here as there will be large amounts of cash given to heirs that may or may not know how to handle a lump sum as well as spendthrift heirs. Should you chose to leave money to grandchildren, this must be clearly addressed As a Final Note In our opinion you should know what the real taxable events are at your passing. Just because you have a living trust there are taxes. There are actually five different taxes that can come into play when the final spouse passes. We suggest you have these numbers run for you to see if you can reduce the cost to your family at your passing. Drafters of trusts or tax preparers are normally not licensed by the State of California to run these number and present to you. If any of the terms above are unfamiliar to you, or you cannot define them, that is an additional reason to review your document with a knowledgeable planner. It is our experience that an independent third party review is prudent. Should you want additional information, please feel free to contact our office for a no charge consultation at 949.218.9036 or thestoddardgroup.com. LDA#381

ADVERTORIAL

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PUBLISHER | MODY GORSKY, LLM, MBA PUBLISHER | MARK EDELSTEIN PUBLISHER | MOTAN, LLC PUBLISHER EMERITUS | DR. MARK MOSS MANAGING EDITOR | TRACEY ARMSTRONG GORSKY EXECUTIVE EDITOR | LISA GRAJEWSKI, PSY.D. EXECUTIVE EDITOR | FLORENCE L DANN CONTRIBUTING EDITOR | TANYA SCHWIED CONTRIBUTING EDITOR | PERRY FEIN FOOD EDITOR | JUDY BART KANCIGOR EDITORIAL INTERN | HANNAH SCHOENBAUM CREATIVE DIRECTOR | RACHEL BELLINSKY PHOTOGRAPHER | CHARLES WEINBERG CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MARTIN BROWER, MERAV CEREN, ADAM CHESTER, FLORENCE L DANN, ROBIN DAVIS, PH. D., RABBI DAVID ELIEZRIE, HARRIETTE ELLIS, JUDY FLORMAN, STEFANEE FREEDMAN, LISA GRAJEWSKI, PSY.D., EVE GUMPEL, CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, DVORAH LEWIS, CARINE NADEL, PAMELA PRICE, NAOMI RAGEN, MAYRAV SAAR, RACHEL SCHIFF, TANYA SCHWIED, ANDREA SIMANTOV, DALIA TAFT, TEDDY WEINBERGER COPY EDITOR JOSH NAMM CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS/ARTISTS RACHEL BELLINSKY, ALLEN BEREZOVSKY, PEPE FAINBERG, JANET LAWRENCE ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES DIANE BENAROYA (SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE) MARTIN STEIN (SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE) EDITORIAL (949) 230-0581 (TRACEY ARMSTRONG GORSKY) OR (949) 734-5074 EDITORJLIFE@GMAIL.COM ADVERTISING (949) 812-1891, MODY.GORSKY@GMAIL.COM CIRCULATION & SUBSCRIPTIONS MODY.GORSKY@GMAIL.COM, (949) 734-5074 ART ART@OCJEWISHLIFE.COM JLIFE IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY ORANGE COUNTY JEWISH LIFE, LLC 1 FEDERATION WAY, IRVINE, CA 92603

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Jlife is published monthly by Orange County Jewish Life, LLC. Subscription rate is $24 for one year (12 issues). Send subscription requests to Jlife, 1 Federation Way, Irvine,CA 92603. Jlife is a free and open forum for the expression of opinions. The opinions expressed herein are solely the opinion of the author and in no way reflect the opinions of the publishers, staff or advertisers. Orange County Jewish Life, LLC is not responsible for the accuracy of any and all information within advertisements. Orange County Jewish Life, LLC reserves the right to edit all submitted materials, including press releases, letters, articles and calendar listings for brevity and clarity. Orange County Jewish Life, LLC is not legally responsible for the accuracy of calendar or directory listings, nor is it responsible for possible postponements, cancellations or changes in venue. Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to Orange County Jewish Life, LLC become the physical property of the publication, which is not responsible for the return of such material. Orange County Jewish Life, LLC is a member of the American Jewish Press Association and the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. All contents © 2014 Orange County Jewish Life.

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Estate Planning & Being Jewish:

IS THERE A CONNECTION? By Scott Feig, J.D., M.A. Attorney at Law FeigLawFirm.com 949.689.9715

In the end, being Jewish is personal. It is these personal aspirations which often guide many of our daily decisions, including estate planning decisions. At FEIG Law Firm, we listen, evaluate, and prepare the appropriate estate documents to carry out your balancing needs. Such includes:

S

o, you ask, is there really a connection? Of course. It may make sense to first ask: Do I have an Estate? Most likely, yes. Don’t be fooled by those infamous scenes on T.V. programs, or movies, where the lawyer reads the Last Will and Testament of the deceased uncle to the surviving members of the family—each member on the edge of his/her seat wondering whether he/she was left the uncle’s millions.

that your family will be well cared for and not burdened with the expense, frustration, and delay often associated with incapacity and death. Your estate plan may be as simple as ensuring that your brother receives your ‘69 Camaro and your son receives your well cared for coin collection. Or, your estate plan may be more complex to ensure that your special needs child will receive your assets, without threatening any government benefits.

Estate planning is so much more. The starting point often begins with the following inquiry: Do you have children or grandchildren, own a home (or pay a mortgage, which is a more accurate question), a car, jewelry, golf clubs, tools, a business, a guitar, how about something that fits in a box? You see where this is going. But, then the more serious question, a special needs child? If so, then you likely need an estate plan.

As for being Jewish, the starting point is halakha, Jewish law. But such personal belief and observance varies tremendously. We see this play out in our daily lives: For some, it is unthinkable to drive on Shabbat. And then there are others who do not even think twice about driving out to the Spectrum or Fashion Island to meet up with friends for good food and fun on Friday nights, but they could not fathom eating on Yom Kippur. And, yet, there are those who always drink a cup of hot coffee on Yom Kippur morning.

An estate plan brings peace of mind knowing that you have taken prudent steps to ensure

ADVERTORIAL

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Probate avoidance, which is expensive, time-consuming, and public.

Ensuring your children’s welfare and education are provided for after you pass, including giving finances to them in increments based on age, need, and defined incentives.

Reduction and/or elimination of death taxes (federal estate tax).

Pre-appointing a guardian for your children should you unfortunately pass before they turn 18.

Special Needs Planning, for children and grandchildren.

Pre-appointing someone you trust to manage your finances, and even your healthcare decisions should you become incapacitated.

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LETTERS

A GLIMPSE INTO ONE FAMILY From Ms. Beatrice Wachs, Laguna Woods Dear Editor, Enclosed is a printout of an email sent to me by my 29-year-old granddaughter, Aliza, who lives in the Katamon section of Jerusalem with her husband and two sons (ages four and seven years old). To Our Dear Family and FriendsThere are so many things to share with you. This is a great opportunity to share our latest with you in terms of the security situation here which I’m sure is not felt the same here in Israel as it does abroad. The terror wave has indeed caused us to reconsider our schedule, shopping places, etc. On Sundays we even considered staying home… in the end we didn’t and I’m glad for that. Eventually, we realized that life just cannot stop. We must continue with our schedule albeit quite cautiously. Many people have a little tear gas

bottle or are walking around with some visible fighting instrument. I saw a lady walking around with a big rolling pin sticking out of her bag. People have aluminum bats and other interesting inventions. It has subsided a bit, but I still see the tear gas containers in people’s pockets. During the first few days, caution was so high anyone who got on the bus would scan all the passengers, while all the passengers scanned the people boarding. There is still much alert and security, but it does not affect our nerves as much. We stay away from suspicious looking youngsters and from places of contention. Life is more real now, more connected, more appreciated… happier (believe it or not)… … On a positive note, we thank G-d have been maintaining, more or less, a busy and happy lifestyle and try to impart positive outlook lessons to the kids, which surely will help them in the future… Love from all of us, Aliza

We welcome your letters! Email editorjlife@gmail.com with your feedback. 16 FEBRUARY 2016 |

Jlife

PHOTO BY ZACH DALIN

Kvetch & Kvell

Who Knew? Making his father Kirk Douglas proud we’re sure, renowned actor, producer, and UN Messenger of Peace Michael Douglas and former political prisoner, recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal, and Chairman of The Jewish Agency for Israel Natan Sharansky appeared on three US university campuses to speak with students about Israel and current-day anti-Semitism. Douglas and Sharansky visited Brown University on January 28, Stanford University on February 2, and the University of California at Santa Barbara on February 3. The program, “Jewish Journeys: A Conversation with Michael Douglas and Natan Sharansky,” is co-hosted by the Genesis Prize Foundation, Hillel International, and The Jewish Agency for Israel, as well as the local Hillels on each campus Brown RISD Hillel, Hillel at Stanford University and Santa Barbara Hillel. The panelists also addressed the topic of tolerance and inclusion in the Jewish community worldwide. Now that’s a son to be proud of!


FIRST & FOREMOST

WHAT’S IN A NAME? Reflection of the past. BY FLORENCE L. DANN

“.. THE TALMUD TELLS US us that parents receive one-sixtieth of prophecy when picking a name.” When I was born, my parents decided to name me after my paternal grandmother, “Fagaleh,” true to the Ashkenazi tradition. In Hebrew School I was known as Tzeporah, and in the secular world I was/am Florence. The naming of a Jewish child is a most profound spiritual moment. The Sages say that naming a baby is a statement of her character, her specialness, and her path in The Sages say life. (If that’s the case I am that naming a bird–maybe meant to soar a baby is a or fly to or from–whatever statement of her that means.) But in realcharacter, her of the time. Then in Genesis ity, my Jewish name was to specialness, and 35, he has another encounter honor my late and unknown her path in life. with G-d and it then begins grandmother who had a very to call him Israel in the text. difficult life and died at a But not all the time. young age. Genesis then switches back and forth According to the Talmud, at the beginning of life we are given a name, and at the end between those names at this point. From Gen of life, a “good name” is all we take with us. 35:21 to the end of Genesis, he is called Jacob Furthermore, the Talmud tells us that parents about 35 times and Israel about 39 times. receive one-sixtieth of prophecy when picking Maybe it is because the text is a compilation a name. An angel comes to the parents and of different written accounts, or what is far whispers the Jewish name that the new baby more interesting - perhaps it is because we are all a composite of personality traits and will embody. So names are a significant part of our tradi- characteristics. Later in Genesis when Jacob is prepartion. In the Torah, names and their meanings often are reflective of deeper meanings. Let’s ing to die, Joseph brings his sons Ephraim and Manasseh for a blessing, he crosses his take a look at some of those names. When born, Jacob is given the name hands giving Ephraim the first blessing, even “Jacob” meaning, “trickster, supplanter, heel though Manasseh was the first born, Joseph grabber.” After he wrestles at Jabbok, he is attempts to correct him. But Jacob says, renamed “Israel” meaning “strives with G-d.” “No—I know who they are.” However, the text still calls him Jacob most According to Rabbi Jonathan Sachs, 18 FEBRUARY 2016 |

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Jacob’s blessing of Ephraim over Manasseh had nothing to do with their ages and everything to do with their names. Joseph names his first son Manasseh—forgetting—because he wished to forget the pain of his years in servitude; but names his second son Ephraim because at that point in his life, he wishes to remember his heritage and his family. The child of forgetting (Manasseh) may have blessings. But greater are the blessings of a child (Ephraim) who remembers the past and future of which he is a part. So how do our names remind us of our family’s past and, by extension, our heritage? Fagaleh connects me to my paternal grandmother and Tzeporah to Moses’ wife. Not too shabby. A Florence L. Dann, a fifth year rabbinical student at the Academy for Jewish Religion in LA has been a contributing writer to Jlife since 2004.


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| FEBRUARY 2016 19


Israel Scene | BY ANDREA SIMANTOV

VIEWPOINT

The Things We See The labels we create in our minds.

DRAWING BY PEPE FAINBERG

MY FAVORITE TEACHER once pointed out that we don’t only choose our battles, we also choose where to show kindness. This lesson made a great impact on me because, despite having a mind like a sieve, I saw it in the relationships around me. If I loved someone who was a nosy-body and spoke loudly, I’d say, “She’s the life of the party” and “She loves people.” But if someone I disliked possessed the same qualities, I might say, “What a yenta” and “She sucks the air out of the room.” Same qualities, but the reaction had less to do with the person and more to do with me. Someone recently sent me a YouTube video experiment of six photographers assigned to create a portfolio of a man named Michael. The twist was that each photographer was told a different background story. Respectively, the bio-data they were given included self-made millionaire, life-saving hero, ex-inmate, commercial fisherman, psychic and former alcoholic. The photographers were told to flesh out the essence of the subject. Still not knowing the truth—Michael is none of those things—they described their experiences as “really intense,” “intimidating,” and “very open.” The powerful depictions that resulted appeared to be shots of different men. At 5:30 a.m. every morning, my husband and I observe a ritual of drinking coffee on the glassed-in patio. Even on winter’s bitterest days, I turn on an electric heater, light a small lantern and we talk about the day ahead. This routine is ironclad, ensuring that no matter what uncertainty awaits us “out there,” the day is already a winner. Aching joints and all, enveloped in trust, appreciation and prayer for the other’s success, we can face a challenging world. Mountains, desert and minarets pepper the landscape, but I often miss this. Instead, my eyes are drawn to a brightly lit kitchen in the building across the alley. For years I have only seen the hands and arms of the woman

THIS IS WHO SHE IS BECAUSE THIS IS WHO I NEED HER TO BE. 20 FEBRUARY 2016 |

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who, at that ungodly hour, lovingly prepares food for the day ahead; hands knead bread and dust flour on chicken cutlets. She is immaculate and wipes the counter between each chore, washing her hands in the stainless steel sink. She is young, so her arms and hands are firm. She is married, a mother and her crack-of-dawn kitchen routine is rife with love. She is religiously-observant because she never missed a night of placing the Chanukah candles at the window ledge. She is Sephardic and votes the same way I do. This is who she is because this is who I need her to be. Perspective is subjective. Someone else might observe the hands of a recent widow/job-hunter/transsexual/ newlywed/left-wing activist, Arab/Christian, etc. (My husband doesn’t know which window I’m talking about.) Is seeing what we want to see a bad thing? No, it’s just a thing. But ascribing holiness to our individual biases is where we may get lost. We’re responsible for choosing the slant of the “stories” we encounter. A New York-born Andrea Simantov is a mother of six who moved to Jerusalem in 1995. She frequently lectures on the complexity and magic of life in Jerusalem and can be contacted at andreasimantov@gmail.com.


On the Lighter Side | BY MAYRAV SAAR

VIEWPOINT

Embrace Your Waves My Hair–and My Lips–Are Curled in Joy

I APPRECIATE WHAT CURLY LOCKS REPRESENT: A TRULY PLURALISTIC SOCIETY THAT EMBRACES A DIVERSE IDEAL OF BEAUTY. 24 FEBRUARY 2016 |

WHILE MY ESTEEMED colleagues at this here publication are focusing their attention this month on Jewish roots, I have to admit I’m more interested in Jewish bangs. After a way-too-long hiatus, curls twirled back in fashion in 2014, posing new challenges for hairdressers from New York to Los Angeles (OK, maybe not from New York to Los Angeles. Maybe just in New York and Los Angeles). As I operate on the “broken clock” theory of hair fashion (by keeping my hair perpetually curly, I’ll be in vogue twice a decade), I figured my hipness would run out when the clock struck midnight on Jan. 1, 2015. But it didn’t. For a whole additional year, curly hair was a thing. Natalie Portman, Sarah Jessica Parker and Mila Kunis all wore their hair any which way it fell, and it fell gloriously, wildly, Jewishly curly. I used to feel personally affronted when my Jewish sisters would straighten their hair. I felt it was an act of pileous assimilation, second only to the nose job in identity effacement. But motherhood has softened me to all manner of behaviors, and I’ve come to realize that it’s none of my damn business how someone wants to wear her hair, worship her G-d or assert her identity. Still, I feel more than a twinge of pride every time curls come back into fashion. Seeing fashion stories gush about cute curls fills me with an almost nationalistic pride. So when I started perusing the February issues of top fashion magazines at my local nail salon and found that curls are in style for a THIRD year, I nearly leapt from my chair before my French pedicure was dry. (Yep, French pedicure. Broken clock. You’ll see.) Not only are members of the tribe sporting curls, so are non-tribesladies (but naturally curly) celebrities like country singer Cam and pop sweetheart Selena Gomez. People magazine dedicated a significant amount of ink to the “curly shaggy bob” that Jennifer Lopez sports on Jlife

“Shades of Blue,” a hairstyle that looks remarkably like my own. I rejoice in other people’s curls not just because I like having people ask me who perms my hair (um, G-d?). I also appreciate what curly locks represent: A truly pluralistic society that embraces a diverse ideal of beauty. Outer beauty, it is my hope, that will lead to inner beauty. While I’m not naïve enough to think that Beyonce’s bangs will bring an end to the BDS movement, I like to think that curls could put a little kink in anti-Semitism. If hate is just fear of the other, how much better off will we be when we’re not the only “other” drying our hair upside down with a diffuser? So here’s to another frizzy, kinky, wild wonderful year! Who knows what it could bring? A Mayrav Saar lives in Los Angeles with her husband, her children and her moisturizing hair care products.


Israeli Guy | BY TEDDY WEINBERGER

VIEWPOINT

“Are you Jewish?” No one asks you this in Israel.

IT DOES NOT FOLLOW THAT SECULAR ISRAELI JEWS NECESSARILY HAVE STRONGER JEWISH IDENTITIES THAN DIASPORA SECULAR JEWS.

SINCE MOVING TO Israel in the summer of 1997, I cannot recall a time when I have uttered the following three words: “I am Jewish.” The most obvious reason for this is that here, no one ever asks me: “Are you Jewish?” In America, I was frequently asked this question. I would respond in the affirmative. I sort of miss this verbal exchange. I was always happy to tell someone that I was Jewish. For one thing, I could answer the question with absolute certainty. Unlike the questions “are you religious?” or “are you Orthodox?” which, before answering, I felt compelled to launch into a short dissertation concerning how I defined religion and Orthodoxy, I felt no compunction in responding to the question of my Jewishness with a simple “yes.” But the main reason I miss this question is that I feel good about being Jewish and the question gave me an opportunity to verbally embrace my Jewishness. Life in Israel has, paradoxically, removed Jewishness from the day-to-day template of my being. Of course, I know that I am still Jewish, but being Jewish in America was part of my front-brain consciousness, much like my being a man; now, however, my Jewishness has receded into the background. My Jewishness has become a fact of my life similar to such facts as my having ten toes and two eyes. It can now be understood why those Jewish Israelis who are secular sometimes have extremely weak Jewish identities. In Israel, where one is almost never called upon to say “I am Jewish,” ethnic consciousness is intertwined with religious consciousness in a much stronger way than it is in the Diaspora. And when there is no religious identity here, it can happen that there is little Jewish identity. While it is a truism that only in Israel can secular Jews perpetuate themselves (whereas outside of Israel the next generation tends to assimilate into the majority culture), it does not follow that secular Israeli Jews necessarily have stronger Jewish identities than secular Diaspora Jews.

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The above discussion helps explain an interesting phenomenon concerning the hundreds of young secular Israelis who fan out across the globe each year to work in Jewish summer camps, schools and community centers. These youngsters often report that in the Diaspora they are given a precious gift: they experience their Jewishness for the first time in their lives. Once they are back in Israel, where no one will ask them “are you Jewish?” what they do with this gift is up to them. They might allow their Jewishness to recede into the backdrop of their lives, or they might look toward an aspect of Jewish tradition to deepen it. But please just do me one favor: make sure that they do indeed come back—we need them here in Israel. A Teddy Weinberger, Ph.D., is Director of Development for a consulting company called Meaningful. He made aliyah with his family in 1997 from Miami, where he was an assistant professor of religious studies. Teddy and his wife, Sarah Jane Ross, have five children.


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COVER STORY

Presents

Something We Call Love

Packing More than Just Lunch with Women’s Philanthropy Lisa Grajewski, Psy.D.

L

aura Schroff opens her book, An Invisible Thread: The True Story of an 11-YearOld Panhandler, a Busy Sales Executive, and an Unlikely Meeting with Destiny, with a proverb that underscores the strength of Women’s Philanthropy in Orange County. Indeed, beyond friendship and good deeds, the scope of the work of Women’s Philanthropy of Jewish Federation & Family Services (JFFS) stretches far and wide. Whether it is a knitting group, reading volunteers, a genuine smile, or writing a check, it is in the act of doing and the depth of passion and dedication which is the thread that connects Women’s Philanthropy, as reflected in the message for this year’s Women’s Voices luncheon: “AN INVISIBLE THREAD: Women’s Philanthropy is your link to community, lasting friendships, and the opportunity to do the extraordinary.”

28 FEBRUARY 2016 |

Jlife


COVER STORY

“An invisible thread connects those destined to meet, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. The thread may stretch or tangle, but never break.” - Ancient Chinese Proverb On March, 14, 2016, Schroff will be the keynote speaker at the Women’s Philanthropy of Jewish Federation & Family Services’ Women’s Voices Luncheon. A former advertising sales executive, Schroff ’s story speaks to the power of small acts of kindness. As with the opening proverb, the final words in Schroff ’s book are both striking and fitting: “[I learned] the true definition of ‘lunch in a brown paper bag’… the bag is only brown paper, but what’s put inside is something we all call ‘love.’ I hope it will inspire you to think about how small acts of kindness can make a difference.” Without a doubt, one can also look at the work done by Women’s Philanthropy through the same lens: the many acts of loving kindness by Orange County’s Jewish women have an impact beyond measure. The Women’s Voices luncheon, the largest annual daytime gathering of Jewish women in Orange County, has honored women since 1987 and boasts top keynote speakers. This year the luncheon will honor another woman who has taken the opportunity to do the extraordinary, Toni Mandel McDonald. In addition to being this year’s Woman of the Year, Toni is the daughter of Women’s Voices 2002 Woman of the Year Natalie Mandel (z”l). Says McDonald, “This is the luncheon’s first Dor v’ Dor (generation to generation) honor--it is very exciting for me!” In addition to being excited about the award, McDonald expressed being “thrilled and surprised.” This is not McDonald’s first

Women’s Voices luncheon. For 10 years she and her husband of 26 years, Terry, have donated beautiful floral arrangements for the Women’s Voices luncheon tables. In addition, McDonald began attending Women’s Philanthropy luncheons with her mother. It was her mother who taught McDonald about philanthropy. When her mother passed away, McDonald stepped into the role, “Not a breath went by before I stepped in.” According to Women’s Philanthropy President, Lori Schwartz, “Toni is so committed to our community as evi-

denced by her support of so many nonprofit organizations. Her dedication to the Women’s Philanthropy Board and to Mandel House is inspiring. Her drive to give back to this community is limitless.” Not only has McDonald learned about philanthropy, she has learned how to be a friend. “I’ve made friends I never thought I would have… Women’s Philanthropy has opened up a whole new world for me, and given me an entirely different life than what I could ever have had.” McDonald comes from a family of philanthropy. Raised in California, she is a third generation Californian and the daughter of parents who believed in supporting the community. Sadly, her parents passed away in 2006. “When my father passed away he wanted money to go to people with [special needs].” McDonald, her husband Terry, and her brother Richard Mandel (along with his wife Andi) decided to create a home for Jewish people with special needs; they were instrumental in establishing the Mandel House (Orange County’s first Jewish residential home for adults with special needs). “It is a dream come true!” says McDonald. A dream in which she and her family continue to stay involved. McDonald does not limit her time to JFFS; she is also a Heritage Pointe board member and Friends of Orange Coast Interfaith Shelter board member. Toni supports Working Wardrobes, Barclay Theater, the Community Scholar Program, Laguna Playhouse Youth Theater, Jlife

| FEBRUARY 2016 29


COVER STORY

Women’s Philanthropy Board Member Toni McDonald.

Author Laura Scroff shows off her book AN INVISIBLE THREAD: Women’s Philanthropy is your link to community, lasting friendships, and the opportunity to do the extraordinary.

and Chabad of San Clemente & Newport Beach, and is a member of Temple Beth El and Temple Beth Sholom. When asked if she read the book, McDonald replied with an emphatic “YES.” Not only did she enjoy the book, she shared that during her time as a substitute teacher she worked with disadvantaged children, volunteering to help children read after a long day of teaching. And the thread continues… Women’s Voices is co-chaired by Nadine Durbach and Sherri Winkler. Winkler says,

The 2016 Women’s Voices Keynote Speaker, author Laura Schroff, was chosen for her simple but insightful story that powerfully applies to the Jewish community. We all have invisible threads that allow us to connect with each other. “Hers is a very Jewish message and a universal message,” says Durbach. The book, a New York Times Bestseller, may also serve as a manual for friendship and humanity based on trust and kindness. Certainly, after reading the book it is highly unlikely that any of us will be able to walk

After reading the book it is highly unlikely that any of us will be able to walk down a street and look the other way. “It is a huge honor. I feel very committed to Women’s Philanthropy and Women’s Voices. It is a great opportunity to bring women from the broader community together for a common purpose.” In addition to bringing women together for a common purpose, Durbach believes Women’s Voices is “my generation’s responsibility to build upon what has been established. Women’s Voices is a great vehicle for purposeful and meaningful collaboration and connection to each other, to our community and to Israel.” 30 FEBRUARY 2016 |

Jlife

down a street and look the other way. It is also a reminder of the impact we can all have in someone’s life—no matter how big or small the deed. An advertising executive who launched some of the most successful start-ups in Time Inc.’s history, Schroff ’s story spans over 25 years and provides a lesson for all of us. In order to help, we have to soften our hearts and pull away from the need to look away from the dirty, disheveled and lost. When we think we have nothing in common with the panhandler or the homeless woman on the corner, that is

when we need to remember the invisible thread that connects to those so seemingly different from us and fill the proverbial brown paper bag with love. As Schroff says in her book, “We live in a cynical world, and sometimes our cynicism gets in the way of seeing things for what they are.” Acts of love and kindness and connection are what Women’s Philanthropy is all about. Last year in Orange County, Women’s Philanthropy raised over $1.5 million—25% of the total JFFS campaign, the Generations Fund—to support the organization’s work to care for people in need, to build a vibrant community, and to sustain and enhance Jewish life. Make a difference this year by joining Orange County Jewish women on March 14 at 10:00 a.m. at the Hotel Irvine. Says Schwartz, “When attending a Women’s Voices luncheon of over 750 women who are there to reaffirm their commitment to supporting the righteous work of Jewish Federation & Family Services, there is no doubt how extraordinary the women of this Orange County community are.” For more information on the Women’s Voices Luncheon, contact Eileen Garbutt at (949) 435-3484 ext. 336 or by email: Women@ JFFS.org. A Lisa Grajewski, Psy.D. is a licensed psychologist and adjunct Assistant Professor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. She has been a contributing writer for Jlife magazine since 2004.


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F E AT U R E S

Ancestral Memories Why connect to our past? BY FLORENCE L. DANN

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ORANGE COUNTY’S JEWISH YOUTH & PARENTS

FOSTERING HEALTHY FRIENDSHIPS Make Connections to Last a Lifetime KID’S SUMMER SURVIVAL KIT Stock Up On Fun with This DIY Project

Summer Camp! Detox for Kids FEBRUARY 2016


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a peek inside february 2016

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FOSTERING HEALTHY FRIENDSHIPS

SUMMER CAMP

KID’S SUMMER SURVIVAL KIT

Friendships are the foundation for social learning. Make connections to last a lifetime.

For all those little creative “geniuses” out there. The summer break is a perfect time to develop and/or hone new talents.

Whether they are off to camp or not this summer, this DIY project may come in handy for those “in case of emergency, break glass” moments.

also inside! Editor’s Note 06 Super Shabbos 07

For February Calendar Events please visit: www.ocjewishlife.com

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CAMP!

KOSHER DOG

Technological detox isn’t just for parents anymore. It’s important for kids as well.

Homemade dog treats – Don’t forget your furry little sous chef.


SPECIAL NEEDS CHILD? Estate Planning for Families with Children

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EDITOR’S NOTE

kiddish

PUBLISHER ORANGE COUNTY JEWISH LIFE EDITOR IN CHIEF TRACEY ARMSTRONG GORSKY, MBA CREATIVE DIRECTOR RACHEL BELLINSKY COPY EDITOR JOSH NAMM CONTRIBUTING WRITERS TAMMY KECES,, M.A., AUDRA MARTIN, LISA MONETTE, SUE PENN, M. ED., HANNAH SCHOENBAUM ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES DIANE BENAROYA (SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE) MARTIN STEIN (SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE) EDITORIAL

H

ello and welcome to the newest issue of Kiddish

magazine. Ok so we know it seems a little crazy to be thinking of summer in February. Especially

this year when we have been hit with the

“Godzilla” of El Ninos. Rain, mud and even more rain have given “Slip ‘n Slides” a whole new meaning. However, the rain will pass, the skies will clear and soon enough you will find yourself scrambling to fill those long summer break days. One way to keep your kids active and engaged this year is through summer camp. There are many opportunities and options

(949) 230-0581

TARMSTRONG24@GMAIL.COM ADVERTISING (949) 812-1891

SALES@OCJEWISHLIFE.COM ART

ART@OCJEWISHLIFE.COM ORANGE COUNTY JEWISH LIFE AND KIDDISH ARE PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY

out there. Here in Orange County we actually have a lot of

ORANGE COUNTY JEWISH LIFE, LLC

great options. There are horse camps, drama camps, Junior

1 FEDERATION WAY, IRVINE, CA 92603

Lifeguard programs and of course, Jewish Camp! Whether it’s a day option or a sleep-away camp, camps that focus on Jewish learning are a wonderful way to educate your kids about their heritage. They are also a way for them to meet new people and make friends to last a lifetime. Start thinking about your plans now, because the break will be here before you know it.

— Tracey Armstrong Gorsky, Editor in Chief

Editor Tracey Armstrong Gorsky is the managing editor for Jlife and former editor and writer for Making Waves, Pet Product News, Veterinary Practice News and Surfing Magazine. She brings over ten years of writing and editing experience to Kiddish magazine and holds a Masters in Business Administration.

OCJL is published monthly by Orange County Jewish Life, LLC. Subscription rate is $24 for one year (12 issues). Send subscription requests to OCJL, 5665 Oberlin Dr., Ste. 204, San Diego, CA 92121. Orange County Jewish Life is a free and open forum for the expression of opinions. The opinions expressed herein are solely the opinion of the author and in no way reflect the opinions of the publishers, staff or advertisers. Orange County Jewish Life is not responsible for the accuracy of any and all information within advertisements. Orange County Jewish Life reserves the right to edit all submitted materials, including press releases, letters, articles and calendar listings for brevity and clarity. OCJL is not legally responsible for the accuracy of calendar or directory listings, nor is it responsible for possible postponements, cancellations or changes in venue. Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to OCJL become the physical property of the publication, which is not responsible for the return of such material. Orange County Jewish Life is a member of the American Jewish Press Association and the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. All contents © 2014 Orange County Jewish Life.


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ACROSS 2. ‫( נהר‬23:31) 4. ‫( שן‬21:24) 6. ‫( לבד‬22:19)

DOWN 1. ‫( ארבעים‬24:18) 3. ‫( לפני‬21:1) 5. ‫( יד‬21:12) 7. ‫( אכל‬24:11) 8. ‫( שור‬21:32)

BUEDLO

NLTEOS

HATO

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(Hint: Laws of Damages, Parsha Mishpatim, Ch. 22, verses 4-8)

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(scramble)

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WORD CMRLESAB

• ֿThe teacher yelled at you for talking when you weren’t. • Your lunch was missing from your locker.

Can you judge these situations favorably?

you be the judge

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4

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Check your answers at: www.thefamousabba.com/mishpatim

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2

1

Complete the crossword by translating each Hebrew word into English. Use the parsha reference for help.

CROSSWORD

• A Jew lending money to another Jew. (22:24) • The Shabbat of the week and of the years. (23:10)

Act out these scenes with friends and family:

PARSHA SKIT ideas

Courage: Befriend another child that doesn't have many friends.

good trait OF THE MONTH

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WORD FIND

Find the bold italic words on this sheet. The unused letters spell a secret message!

The Torah details the law of a Jewish slave. If someone hurts another person on purpose, he is punished. If it was done by accident, there is a place to which he can run for safety and to seek refuge. The Torah tells us not to hurt a mother or father or to kidnap another person. If an animal hurts a person more than once, then the owner of the animal will be punished. Jews are commanded not to leave open pits in the ground, not to steal animals, and to make sure their animals don’t cause any damage. HaShem also gave the laws of borrowing and lending objects to other Jews. A Jew is told to be extra nice and help converts, orphans and widows and to extend interest free loans to other Jews. Judges must be honest at all times. Jews are permitted to work the land for 6 years and the 7th year is Shabbat for the land. HaShem tells the Jews to come to Him for Passover, Shavuos and Succot. HaShem says He will help remove the people currently living in Israel so the Jews can live there. The Jewish people agreed to everything that HaShem said and declared “We will do and we listen ”. Moshe went to the top of the mountain to receive the stone tablets.

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weekly chinuch podcast - over 100 posted! parsha + chinuch < 5 minutes www.thefamousabba.com/podcasts

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The Gemara details the laws of damages in:

gematria

• Into which blessings of the Shemoneh Esreh is "Al Ha-Nissim" inserted into on Purim? • True or False: One should recite 4 blessings at a meal consisting of water, spaghetti, meatballs, and green beans.

HOLY TEMPLE

SPRING

blessings

MATZAH 5

spot the difference

A shochet's knife An apple on a tree An orange on a table Your pet’s food

Which one is different? (Hint: The 3 Pilgrimage Festivals, Ch. 23)

• • • •

Muktzeh is something that is not “prepared” for use before Shabbat and can’t be moved during Shabbat. Are the following items muktzeh?

SHABBat

Share two things that made you think about HaShem this week.

WEEK IN REVIEW

SUPER SHABBat SHEET 27 SHEVAT 5776 PARSHAT MISHPATIM


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FEBRUARY 2016

kiddish

Fostering Healthy Friendships Make connections to last a lifetime. BY TAMMY KECES M.A.

can last for a summer or for a lifetime.

“Make new friends, but keep the old. One is silver and the other’s gold.“

Regardless of the context, encouraging healthy friendships in your child’s life can prove to be a critical factor in his or her development, and this starts in the very earliest years. During a classroom meeting at Irvine Hebrew Day School (IHDS), students were asked, “What does it mean to be a good friend?” A brainstorming session about the do’s and don’ts of being a friend revealed how kindergarteners and first graders view friendship: Friends “play together,”

F

“say nice things to each other,” “help each

riendships can form

other feel better” and “take turns;” friends

spontaneously or over time; they

also “don’t leave people out,” “act bossy”

can develop with classmates,

or “say mean things.” While these young

teammates, work or at our

children perhaps use basic language

places of worship; can be based on

and simple illustrations to express their

mutual interests or a shared history; and

ideas, they actually demonstrate a


kiddish

9

FEBRUARY 2016

Who’s got two thumbs and lots of new friends? This guy!

deep understanding of the principles of friendship. Friendship provides more than

meaningful and respectful relationships. IHDS students are taught to check

a playmate. Friendship is the foundation

in with themselves during challenging

for respectful communication, positive

moments and ask, “Am I being a good

interpersonal skills, empathy, emotional

friend right now?” If we ask ourselves

support and moral development.

the same question during our vulnerable

This idea is expressed perhaps with

moments we can effectively be the role

greater sophistication by Rabbi Raphael

models our children need for a lifetime

Pelcovitz and Dr. David Pelcovitz (rabbi

of connection, belonging and personal

and psychologist father-son team): “When

fulfillment. Let’s set our children on

a child learns how to truly be a friend, he

the right path by actively fostering

or she is acquiring the invaluable ability

friendships filled with humor, trust, honest

to relate to the different needs and views

communication, patience and respectful

of others, from a position of respect and

listening, which define our healthiest and

understanding. Learning to embrace a

most fulfilling relationships. ✿

friend’s perspective and set aside our own needs and views are invaluable tools in a child’s development.” Just as our IHDS students suggested, friendships lay the foundation for healthy, empathetic,

Tammy is a proud mother of three children ages 19, 17 and 13, the Principal (last month principal was spelled principle) of Irvine Hebrew Day School and a Certified Positive Discipline Trainer.

FRIENDSHIP IS THE FOUNDATION FOR RESPECTFUL COMMUNICATION, POSITIVE INTERPERSONAL SKILLS, EMPATHY, EMOTIONAL SUPPORT AND MORAL DEVELOPMENT.


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FEBRUARY 2016

kiddish

Summer Camp Use the break to develop new talents. BY SUE PENN

Who knows what talents lie hidden in your little geniuses?

S

ummer camp provides us the

movie or baseball game. Others use

for some, sleep away camp is not for

wonderful opportunity to

this time to attend speciality camps, to

everyone. Orange County is blessed

allow our children to develop

hone their talents and passions without

with a variety of excellent Jewish day

and pursue their passions.

the restraints of school work. I’ve seen

camps and with a little bit of research,

During the school year, so much of their

kids create artistic masterpieces, master

you are sure to find the right one for

time is spent on structured activities,

chess and even build websites or learn

your children.

reinforcing school work or concepts,

how to code over the summer.

perfecting that pitch, practicing the

Research tells us that Jewish

Whatever you choose to do in the summer, I encourage you to give your

flute, and pursuing our dreams for

summer camp is one of the largest

children some choices. Let them follow

the them. Allowing our children the

influences in building a positive Jewish

their dreams, pursue their passions and

freedom to choose what they would

identity. There are a variety of excellent

learn that there is more to an education

like to do in the summer, is a gift we

Jewish summer camps, locally and a

than school! ✿

often forget to give them.

little further away. They allow kids to

Some children choose to do

soak in their Jewish culture, learn new

nothing—to stay at home and enjoy

Hebrew songs, eat traditional Jewish

unstructured time, go on play dates,

food, and most importantly, develop

visit grandma and attend the occasional

life-long friendships. Although exciting

Sue Penn is a mother of three, Director of Congregational Learning at University Synagogue, president of Jewish Reconstructionist Educators of North America and a member of the Jewish Educators Assembly.


Now Enrolling Kindergarten–3rd Grades

CONTEMPORARY JEWISH EDUCATION EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING POSITIVE TEACHING PHILOSOPHY A rich learning experience that includes: • Engaging Academic Rigor and Social Emotional Learning • Dynamic Torah Education and Hebrew Immersion • Small Student-Teacher Ratio and Individualized Learning • Affordable Tuition • Before and After School Care Available • Partnering with Families and Open Communication • Instilling Pride and Connection to Jewish Heritage

949-478-6818 www.irvinehebrewday.org

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FEBRUARY 2016

kiddish

Kid’s Summer Survival Kit Stock up on fun with this DIY project. BY KIDDISH

right! This Kid’s Summer Survival Kit is

Summer will be here before you know it.

packed full of fun activities to get the kiddos outdoors and even has a couple activities for those rainy days. There are plenty of fun activities to choose from, but you don’t have to include everything, especially depending on the age of the child. Perhaps you can create a basket of activities based on your child’s favorite thing to do. Create a basket that focuses on that particular theme or activity and you’ll be the coolest cat in town. First create your foundation/base with a great basket or catch all. One idea

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is to utilize plastic beach baskets that

super easy project is definitely going to

jump rope is one way to promote good

help you, and them, kick off the Summer

physical exercise. You’d be surprised just

hether you have

originally come with sand toys. (Walmart

young children, or

is a great place to find budget-friendly

grandchildren, or nieces

options). Get active by including props

and nephews, this

to get those young bodies moving. A


kiddish

13

FEBRUARY 2016

Grab some colors and let their inner artists loose.

how much “mileage” you can get out of a simple stop watch as well. And don’t forget the band-aids! Despite all your “kid-proofing” efforts you know that they are bound to fall down and scrape a knee. Sidewalk chalk and bubbles are

Kid’s id’s Summer Survival Kit ✔ BEACH BASKET

always popular. They are good for both

✔ BEACH TOWEL

physical and mental activities (remember

✔ BUBBLES

hopscotch)? And for those crafting cuties of yours there is a great product called

✔ JUMP ROPE

Melty Beads. They are fun to make and

✔ SIDEWALK CHALK

also great for fine motor skills…shhh we

✔ COLORING BOOK OR DRAWING TABLET

won’t tell the kids they are learning at the same time. If the weather acts up, a coloring book and/or drawing tablet and crayons work great. They can be a alternative when they {or you} need a

✔ CRAYONS

quiet moment as well. Rounding out the

✔ MELTY BEADS

basket with a cool pair of sunglasses and

✔ SUNGLASSES

a beach towel to lay on the ground. There it is, super easy and filled with fun. ✿

✔ BAND-AIDS

YOU’D BE SURPRISED JUST HOW MUCH “MILEAGE” YOU CAN GET OUT OF A SIMPLE STOP WATCH.


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FEBRUARY 2016

kiddish

Camp! Detox for Kids BY AUDRA MARTIN

We could all use an excuse to unplug.

technology builds bridges and creates efficiencies. Clearly, it is an important part of our lives. Several decades ago, television was “the” only technology option. It was a distraction. Nowadays our kids have smart phones, tablets, laptops and more. As media multiplies, it is increasingly more important that we construct and provide non-media based learning and social opportunities. As a result, we need

F

or nearly my entire life, I’ve been involved with Jewish

every single day. Currently, the American Academy

camps. I attended them, was a

of Pediatrics (AAP), recommends a

counselor and now direct the

maximum of two hours per day of high-

JCC’s summer camp program. You could

quality media material for children, and

definitely say “I drank the Kool-Aid.” So,

no screen time at all for children under

you’d think this article would be about

two years old.

my favorite topic, camp. It is not. I am going to write about a topic we are all familiar with: technology. According to Common Sense

My intent is not to demonize media, as that certainly would make me a hypocrite. I use various media extensively for many reasons, but specifically to

Media, tweens (8-12 years old) log six

work and connect with family and

hours of media time a day, 4 ½ hours for

friends. Remember the days “way back

entertainment… seven days a week, 52

when,” when we had to count the long-

weeks a year. Teens log in nine hours…

distance minutes of phone calls? Today,

to set boundaries. In one word: we need CAMP. At camp, children make new friends, test limits and learn that “I can” is more powerful than “I can’t.” They develop selfesteem and gain a sense of independence and community. They play, explore, run, jump and swim. They scream, laugh and sing. They unplug. They simply unplug. Camp is essentially a technology detox for our kids. ✿ Audra Martin has worked with children in the JCC field for over 18 years, she is the Director of Children and Camp at the Merage JCC. Contact Audra at audram@jccoc.org.


15 kiddish FEBRUARY 2016

CONTESTS

15 kiddish

kosher dog HOMEMADE DOG TREATS

Directions

1.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, wheat germ, yeast, and salt; set aside

2. Place oil in a large bowl. Add stock and flour mixture in three alternating batches, beginning and ending with stock. Mix well.

store in an airtight container at room temperature. If you don’t feel like baking at all, buy a box of your dog’s favorite treats and simply dip them into dog treat icing in any color you like (we like white and blue colors). Fido’s Frosting brand Royal Icing for Dogs will dry hard and shiny and does not require refrigeration.

3. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out dough to about 3/8-inch thick. Shape biscuits using a dog-bone-

I

f you’re like us, your pets are a part of your family. Don’t forget to show your four-legged friend some love with these tasty homemade dog treats.

Ingredients Makes about 5 dozen 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 cup wheat germ 1/4 cup brewer’s yeast 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 tablespoons canola oil 1/2 cup low-sodium canned chicken stock, plus more for brushing

shaped cookie cutter or by cutting around a store-bought dog bone with a butter knife. (Make biscuits that are appropriate for your dog’s size.)

4. If desired, you can spell out your dog’s name or a message in the dough with a toothpick (wet the toothpick first so it won’t stick).

5. Transfer to parchment-lined baking sheets. Repeat with remaining dough.

6. Bake biscuits 10 minutes. Brush with stock; rotate baking sheets, and bake 10 minutes more. Turn off oven, leaving door closed. Let dog biscuits stand in oven to dry completely, about 1 1/2 hours. Wrap as a gift, or

Be our next winner! Our pets are definitely part of our families, and here at Kiddish magazine we want to know what your four-legged friends are up to. Please send a picture of your pooch to editorjlife@gmail.com and tell us what they love to do in our wonderful Orange County neighborhood (a picture at the location is even better). Pictures of kitties are welcome too! We’ll pick a winner each month and put their picture in the magazine.


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F E AT U R E S

“S

peak unto the children of Israel, and bid them that they make them throughout their generations fringes in the corners of their garments …” so that you remember. (Numbers 15:38) “The Jewish concept of generations has always played a prominent role,” writes Rabbi Berel Wein. “We are bidden to procreate and create generations, whether through actual biological children, students and disciples, intellectual works and contributions or memories carried on by friends and colleagues.” Our Torah is filled with names of the generations—connecting people and their families to the biblical story of humanity. We can either consider it as an attempt to provide an “historical” account of the lineage of our people—or, as I like to view it, as the importance of recognizing the concept of “l’dor v’dor”—passing our heritage from one generation to the next so that we remain connected through a universal memory. Jews are a people of memory. We are commanded to remember in the Torah and our shared history binds us together. Our stories, rituals and teachings, serve to connect us to each other—regardless of where we live. One aspect of these teachings and rituals is the reason behind them. If they are missing, the teachings and rituals become meaningless. The Torah instructs us to remember Shabbat, to remember that we were slaves in Egypt, and our liturgy reflects that as well.

Consider the Amidah—the central prayer to history and interpret it in terms that they and be recited three (sometimes four) times each future generations could use in the ongoing day. It begins with blessing our ancestors. development of Jewish life.” Today we read The very simple definition of ancestors is, these writings and continue to find meaning “the ones who have preceded us … typically in their messages. one more remote than a grandparent, from Knowing our past extends not just to familwhom one is descended.” While the most iarity with societal events, but to our familial obvious of them are the biological ones, for history as well. While genealogical research Jews, our “patriarchs” and “matriarchs” are had been around for centuries, it received a our ancestors as well. tremendous boost with the 1977 broadcast of The Shabbat blessings over children, “May “Roots,” the television series about the history G-d make you like Ephraim and Manasseh” of an African American family. People were and “May G-d make you like Sarah, Rebecca, galvanized to learn about their own ancestors. Rachel and Leah” remind us of the value of In my own family, many of us began passing Judaism on from one generation to constructing family trees using memories the next—and remembergarnered from stories our ing. parents and grandparents The importance of told us. For many who are remembering history cansecond or third generation not be over emphasized. of those who immigrated to The Jewish In Jewish tradition we are the United States, we have concept of asked to remember the little understanding of the positive as well the negagenerations has hardships they endured to tive events in our history. make a better life for their always played a As a matter of fact, one children and grandchildren. prominent role. could say that one of the I remember the stories my Jewish contributions to father told of the terror of a society is “an insistence on pogrom in his Russian town the importance of remembering history and of Neshem, and of his amazement the first finding meaning in it. After all, ancient Israel time he saw an indoor toilet on the grounds regarded history as so important they made of the army officer who was protecting them a record of it in their sacred scriptures. The Continued on page 35 Sages “sought to explore the meaning of this

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F E AT U R E S Continued from page 33

Researching your family’s history can be a very enlightening experience.

until they could leave for the US. But even those, whose families have lived here for many generations, often have only a vague perception of the past. In an article in The American Conservative, Associate Editor Gracy Olmstead wrote about a recent Thanksgiving family dinner in her hometown. She recalled enjoying several long visits with her grandfathers. “One is a retired farmer, the other a WWII veteran. One tells stories of battles past, seeing friends die,

watching countries battle brutally. The other shared stories of work and service in community, speaking of a time when people relied on each other for support and sustenance. Both have lived through the Great Depression and numerous wars. Both have lost many of their friends and loved ones. Their world is tinged with tragedy and hardship in a way mine has never been—yet hearing their stories gives me a deeper understanding of the world.” Olmstead adds that without a clear per-

spective of the past, “we lose a correct interpretation of the world… and we don’t have the background or context necessary to understand our own world rightly.” While we may seek to learn about past generations, in Jewish tradition “we are accountable to succeeding generations as well,” writes Rabbi Wein. “… the wisdom of King Solomon taught us that ‘generations leave and generations come but the world remains forever’—so the task to build the world physically, spiritually and socially always remains. It is the primary challenge of all generations for all time. It is also the never changing challenge that taxes our existence and makes no compromise in its demands upon us.” This is a lesson inherent in our tradition and one that we need to pass on to future generations. Source: My Jewish Leanring.com A Florence L. Dann, a fifth year rabbinical student at the Academy for Jewish Religion in LA has been a contributing writer to Jlife since 2004.

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| FEBRUARY 2016 35


F E AT U R E S

Are YOU eligible for a Birthright trip?

FINDING MY ROOTS How one girl traveled across the country to appreciate what was right down the street. BY TANYA SCHWIED

MY COUSIN: Yes, you can go on a free 10-day trip to Israel. Me: Completely free? As in—no strings attached? My cousin: Well one of your parents has to be Jewish. Me: Where do I sign up? That was the exact conversation, word for word, I had with my cousin when he told me about Birthright. I had never even heard of it, or anyone else that had actually been on this trip and thought this was too good to be true. I told my sister immediately and we made interview appointments within the week. 36 FEBRUARY 2016 |

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I should back up and note that I grew up “half Jewish half Christian” –that’s how I would describe myself to my friends and teachers. My dad is Jewish and my mother was raised Catholic. I thought I had the best of both worlds—gifts at Hanukkah and Christmas! Only one downfall, “double the guilt” (as my interfaith friend always says). Funnily enough with all this freedom there was also a huge sense of apathy. I never really connected on a spiritual level with anyone or anything in my life and lost all curiosity for it. I had to travel 7,459 miles to realize that you could be spiritual and not religious. This was a totally new

concept for me. What started as a “free trip to Israel” slowly started to seep into everything I do and has made me into the person I am today. It was a year after my mom passed away from cancer and I couldn’t be more angry with G-d (if there even was such a thing) but, standing at the Western Wall, walking in the Jewish, Muslim and Armenian quarters—seeing men, women, and children of all faiths come together to pray was incredibly moving. Ironically, it was the most peaceful place I’ve ever stood; you can feel the sense of spirituality amidst all of the history and stone. I was hooked and knew I would be back in Israel—someday. A couple years later I scrimped and saved to intern at a dance school in Tel Aviv for six months. I went back to Jerusalem and wrote a note and placed it in the cracks of the Western Wall. “Help me find my way, find a job, find purpose.” The day I flew home I had an interview with the CEO of JFFS. That was almost three years ago and I’ve been working here ever since. (Of course I also asked for a romantic relationship with a kind, smart man—still waiting on that one!) I like to think that my grandpa is somewhere smiling, thinking that his first granddaughter Tanya works at Jewish Federation & Family Services and writes for Orange County Jewish Life Magazine. I’m basically a walking ad that this Birthright thing really works, and the influence and profound effect it has had on my life and those around me is pretty amazing. A Tanya Schwied graduated from New York University, studied abroad in Israel, and currently works for the CEO and President of Jewish Federation & Family Services.


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| FEBRUARY 2016 37


F E AT U R E S

Don’t miss an incredible event with Mr. Shatner on March 6th.

TEMPLE BAT YAHM’S DISTINGUISHED SPEAKER SERIES PRESENTS

WILLIAM SHATNER Sharing highlights from his 50-year friendship with Leonard Nimoy. BY TANYA SCHWIED

“LIVE LONG AND prosper.” Fun fact—did you know that this phrase and the iconic gesture were both Leonard Nimoy’s idea, which he based on the Jewish blessing of the Cohanim? William Shatner knew this, and had many talks about spirituality and Judaism 38 FEBRUARY 2016 |

Jlife

with his longtime friend Leonard. Many of these conversations with Nimoy are disclosed in his new book, Leonard: My Fifty-Year Friendship with a Remarkable Man, which is already getting rave reviews. Over the course of half a century, Shatner and Nimoy saw each

other through personal and professional highs and lows. In this powerfully emotional book, Shatner tells the story of a man who was his friend for five decades, recounting anecdotes and untold stories of their lives on and off set and gathering stories from others who knew Nimoy well, presenting a full picture of a rich life. As much a biography of Nimoy as a story of their friendship, “Leonard” is a uniquely heartfelt book written by one legendary actor in celebration of another. Temple Bat Yahm has the distinct pleasure of hosting an evening with Mr. Shatner on Sunday, March 6th, where he will share some of these unforgettable stories about his life and his friend. Scott Seigel, President of Temple Bat Yahm, said he had been calling and calling trying to get Mr. Shatner to speak at an event, and one Friday evening before Shabbat services, Scott was walking his dog and got the call. “I have been an admirer of his career since the early days of Star Trek and followed his career path into movies, books, directing, TV and music. He is quite a talented, energetic and creative individual who simply keeps at it 100%.” Scott couldn’t be more elated to run down to services and gleefully tell Rabbi Zylberman that William Shatner will be coming down to Orange County to speak at Temple Bat Yahm. Even now, when he talks about it, he turns into a young fan and delights in the story! “All of our ticket revenue can go directly to our much needed endeavors such as our burgeoning youth program, membership activities, and as you can well imagine, our much needed security enhancements,” says Seigel. William Shatner has built a career spanning over 50 years as an award-winning actor, director, producer, writer, recording artist and horseman. He is one of Hollywood’s most recognizable figures and a major philanthropist. His accomplishments in television, film


F E AT U R E S

Don’t miss our exclusive interview with Mr. William Shatner in the next issue of Jlife magazine.

and stage are expansive. In 1966, Shatner originated the role of “Captain James T. Kirk” in the television series Star Trek. The series spawned a feature film franchise where Shatner returned as Captain Kirk in seven of the Star Trek movies, one of which he directed. As the director, Star Trek V: The Final Frontier meant quite a lot to Shatner. He will share with Temple Bat Yahm how the creation and meaning behind the film was quite a spiritual experience, considering the plot: Captain Kirk and his crew must deal with Mr. Spock’s long-lost half-brother who hijacks the Enterprise for an obsessive search for G-d at the center of the galaxy. In addition to his iconic role as “Captain Kirk,” Shatner played the title role in the hit television series T.J. Hooker before hosting television’s first reality-based series, Rescue 911. He won Emmys and his first Golden Globe for his portrayal of eccentric lawyer “Denny Crane” on both The Practice and Boston Legal. He has received four more Emmy nominations as well as other Golden Globe and SAG Award nods. Scott Seigel and Temple Bat Yahm could not be more thrilled to host Mr. Shatner for this incredible event on Sunday, March 6th, at 4:00 p.m. VIP Reception includes: Scotch and Wine Tasting, Food Stations, a photo with Mr. Shatner, and a signed copy of his latest book. At 6:00 p.m., William Shatner will recount highlights from his friendship with Leonard Nimoy. Remarks followed by Q & A will be moderated by Fox News lead anchor Christine Devine. For additional information regarding sponsorship opportunities, please contact Scott Seigel at (949) 795-5264 or SSeigel@calclosets.com. A Tanya Schwied graduated from New York University, studied abroad in Israel, and currently works for the CEO and President of Jewish Federation & Family Services.

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| FEBRUARY 2016 39


F E AT U R E S

LEFT: Hazel Dyer

PHOTO BY CHARLES WEINBERG

RIGHT: Ilana Baumgarten

FROM ACROSS THE GLOBE Beth Jacob’s Gala Honors a Diverse Group of Women BY LISA GRAJEWSKI, PSY.D.

BETH JACOB MAY have found one of the most admirable mixes for a gala. Not only are the honorees a representation of the diversity of the synagogue, but they are also demure and unpretentious as far as honorees go. The three women to be honored on Sunday, February 14 at Beth Jacob’s 2016 Gala represent the diversity and understated hard work that portrays the commitment to philanthropy in Orange County. In a synagogue that includes congregants from as far east as mainland China, and as far south as Cape Town, South Africa, Beth Jacob recognizes and provides services for the cultural differences found in traditional, Orthodox Judaism.

Hazel Dyer-Pflaum – Beth Jacob Gala Honoree Hazel Dyer-Pflaum grew up in an observant home but spoke Afrikaans, the national language, at the time, in South Africa. A first generation South African, Hazel grew up in 40 FEBRUARY 2016 |

Jlife

Cape Town and followed her three children to the United States. Jeffrey, Gary, and Carol (Shimoni) all live in Orange County and have blessed Hazel with eight grandchildren. Hazel is a fixture at Beth Jacob, not only has she been a congregant and board member, Hazel worked at the shul and retired in 2012 after 12 years. The Jewish community as always been a priority for Hazel, having worked at Tarbut V’ Torah and the JCC prior to Beth Jacob, she has been involved in many Jewish causes and is an ardent supporter of Israel. Says Hazel, “… as Jews we need Israel. I would like to see more American Jews involved for Israel.” Hazel supports other organizations as well, and has traveled to many conferences around the United States and Israel in support of AIPAC and Jewish National Fund. Locally, Hazel and her husband Peter are also very involved in Chabad at UCI and have worked

hard to keep Jewish students at UCI connected to Judaism. As both Hazel and Peter are ardent travelers, Chabad has also provided support to them as well. Utilizing chabad.org, the website has not only provided places for Friday night Shabbat dinner while overseas, but it has provided information to allow for a Jewish perspective when touring a city. Hazel is being recognized for her lifetime achievements in dedication to, and building of, Orange County and Beth Jacob Congregation Irvine Jewish Institutions. She is incredibly honored to be this year’s main honoree and looks forward to celebrating with her family and friends on February 14.

Nicole Hassan – Adina Kaufman Eichet Chayil Award Representing two continents, Nicole Hassan is the 2016 recipient of Beth Jacob’s Adina Kaufman Eichet Chayil Award. Born in Tunis, Tunisia Nicole moved with her family to Paris at the age of six. Nicole attended Paris University and earned a degree in economics and a master’s degree in marketing and management. After working in the marketing division of a bank in Paris, Nicole taught general studies in a private Jewish community day school. In 1997, Nicole and her family moved to Irvine to pursue her husband’s business career. They joined Beth Jacob and she has since been involved in many settings, including Beth Jacob’s Board, Purim Hamentashen baking, the Beth Jacob calendar, and the Sephardic Kiddush lunch. “I am honored to receive this award,” says Nicole. “This award is very close to my heart as I was close friends with Adina Kaufman (Z”L) and have wonderful memories of working with her at all the Beth Jacob events and hosting Adina and her family at my home for Shabbat and the holidays. Nicole continues to live in Irvine with her husband and five children.


F E AT U R E S

PHOTO BY RON LEVY

The three women to be honored at Beth Jacob represent the diversity of Orange County.

Nicole Hassan and Family

Ilana Baumgarten – Community Service Award Ilana Baumgarten grew up in Santa Rosa, California, a sleepy town north of San Francisco. Her parents made it there via Montreal, Canada and raised a Jewish home that set Ilana and her family on their own respective journeys to Jewish life. For Ilana that journey took her to Irvine 17 years ago where she settled and eventually became involved with Beth Jacob eight years ago. Ilana was not involved at Beth Jacob immediately; when she became involved she taught Talmud Torah. Then she was trained to be a mashgiach by her predecessor and took over supervision of kashrut at the JCC and Beth Jacob. “I love what I do,” says Ilana. She finds the work fulfilling and it appears a natural position for someone who loves cooking. “It is a part-time position, but a fulltime commitment,” says Ilana. When asked about how she feels being honored by Beth Jacob, Ilana says “I am of two minds about being honored. I understand, but on the other hand I’m a very behind the scenes kind of person. I don’t like being the center of attention.” On February 14th, Ilana will get a break from supervision as she attends the gala to receive the Community Service Award. Ilana will be there with her husband and two daughters, age 19 and five. To find out more about the Beth Jacob Gala, go to www.bethjacobirvine.org. A Lisa Grajewski, Psy.D. is a licensed psychologist and adjunct Assistant Professor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. She has been a contributing writer for Jlife magazine since 2004.

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| FEBRUARY 2016 41


A&E

Don’t miss Louis and Keely: LIVE AT THE SAHARA at the Laguna Playhouse on Feb. 23rd.

“HERSHEY FELDER... IS AMERICAN MUSIC!” A don’t-miss show! BY PERRY FEIN

HERSHEY FELDER HAS established himself over a long career as a household name in theater and American music. His most acclaimed performances are a series of dramatizations of the lives of famous composers, cleverly utilizing the compositions of the subjects. He has showcased his remarkable repertoire of talents—writing, acting, composing and directing, to name a few—in order to bring to the stage the compelling stories of Beethoven, Chopin, George Gershwin and Irving Berlin among others. The beloved performer was born in Montreal in 1968. His parents were Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. In Montreal, Hershey attended a local Hebrew 42 FEBRUARY 2016 |

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day-school and synagogue as a boy. He later studied music and theater at the Saidye Bronfman Centre for the Arts. In school, he met his first wife who was an actress in the Yiddish Theater. Felder also worked with Steven Spielberg and the Shoah Foundation when they embarked on the extraordinarily important mission of committing to film the stories of survivors of the Holocaust. This project inspired him to cast a role for the composer George Gershwin, who, like himself, was a first generation immigrant child to Jewish refugees from Europe. George Gershwin Alone has played to sold-out concert halls and been received with rave reviews in the United States and all over the world.

In 1996, Felder was invited to perform George Gershwin Alone at the Canadian Consular Residence in Los Angeles in front of Canadian Prime Minister Kim Campbell. In an encounter that was described as “love at first sight,” the two developed a romance that would lead to marriage a year later. Hershey Felder is a fixture in the musical theater realm, but is still an incredibly humble and kind person. He has never shied away from paying proper respects and tribute to the geniuses who inspired him. In an interview given in 2014, after a spectacular performance of Maestro Bernstein, Felder said of his idols, “People want to learn, they want to know–and Bernstein gave it to them. In terms of Gershwin, the country was young, still finding its own sound—with the likes of Irving Berlin (the first American popular sound), the origins of American folk music–i.e. Blues, music brought by immigrants from Europe and Russia—George Gershwin assimilated this all into a cohesive Jazz American sound, and had technical curiousity in terms of figuring out how to push his abilities to use musical and instrumental mechanisms to do so.” Mr. Hershey Felder will be presenting Louis and Keely: LIVE AT THE SAHARA at the Laguna Playhouse, February 23rd March 26th. This production tells the story of Louis Prima and Keely Smith, the duo that pioneered the Lounge Act scene in Las Vegas in the 50s and 60s. For tickets, visit: http://purchase.lagunaplayhouse.com/ single/PSDetail.aspx?psn=4804 or call the box office at: (949) 497-2787 ext. 1. A Perry Fein is a contributing writer and editor to Jlife magazine.


CROSSWORD BY: YONI GLATT } KOSHERCROSSWORDS@GMAIL.COM } DIFFICULTY LEVEL: CHALLENGING

On the Edge

HINT: 8 DOWN

ACROSS

36 What would be hanging from this puzzle, if it were a garment

69 Shot locale for Paul Newman’s Fast Eddie Felson

14 A makolet might be one

1 Faith in G-d and Torah, to many Jews

21 Make 36-Across

48 Words of introduction for Yuri Foreman

39 Snakes in “Raiders of the Lost Ark”

70 Gets back on a good derech

8 Was punished in gan

43 The ADL, e.g.

24 Yehuda ha-Nasi and King George: Abbr.

54 Comparable to an animal that epitomizes tref

15 Unlike drilling in the Mediterranean

44 Sakharov of Jerusalem’s Sakharov Gardens

25 ISIS creates it

57 Jon Stewart reported behind one

16 Joining the army at 18, e.g.

49 Nationality of Ambassador to Israel Jakr Boon- Long

26 “The Mirror ___ two faces” (Streisand film)

58 New York county that’s home to a kosher animal city

3 Margarita Louis-Dreyfus, billionaire dubbed the Russian ___

28 Official at Bloomfield Stadium, for short

59 Test before Cardozo

30 Medit. land

64 Address ending for YU

52 Actor Glen on Benioff’s “Game of Thrones”

4 Rehovot need?

31 Makes like the face of Moses

5 Kind of joke attempted by Borat

37 Be a nudnik

65 Education basics, in grammar school but not gan

53 ___ in Uriah

6 Before, to Lazarus 7 Many a cab in Israel

38 Cat that would be of no use in Eilat

66 Did the Jerusalem Marathon

55 Shawarma rod 56 It can help you get around Isr.

8 Hillel, for one

39 Olmert was caught in one

January Answers

9 Indian tourist locale that sounds like a recently unearthed fortress in Jerusalem

40 Get back on a good derech

61 Some tosses from Cy Young winner Steve Stone

10 Chalav Yisrael source

45 Tim Whatley on “Seinfeld”, e.g.

11 Rahab ran one

46 Says the Amidah, like a chazan

33 Poor crossword solver’s need

63 Fancy car destroyed in Michael Bay’s “The Rock”

34 Like one who is visited, hopefully

12 They played “Spiderwebs” in Tel Aviv in 1997

67 Home of the El Ghriba Synagogue

35 34-Across, e.g.

68 Jerusalem Post fees

13 Nationality of some in the southwest corner of The Old City

47 East-African country whose President went to Israel for medical treatment in 1993

17 Had a siyum 18 Title for Moses? 19 “___ sher!” (“Bivadai!”) 20 What is won in the Knesset 22 “As it glared ___ the river’s waves...” Emma Lazarus 23 Opening for Annie Leibovitz 25 Airer of Noah Wyle’s “Falling Skies” 26 Jake Gyllenhaal is considered one 27 Middle, to Rabbi Sacks 29 Schmatta 32 Musician Rotenberg

50 Studio founded by David Sarnoff 51 Family or Orthodox

57 What Goldberg might call his shoulder muscles 60 Operation Solomon locale: Abbr.

DOWN 1 Building locale for a macher 2 Haman, perhaps

62 Hoffman quirk in “Rain Man”

41 Chaver, in Sicily 42 Reason for a sacrifice

Jlife

| FEBRUARY 2016 43


PHOTO BY PHILLIP MATRAI

A&E

44 FEBRUARY 2016 |

Tanta Esther Gittel’s Husband’s Second Wife Lena’s Nut Cake

Jlife


A&E

PHOTO BY PHILLIP MATRAI

A treasured recipe summons the past with all five senses.

Kugel

THE REIGNING

KUGEL Heirloom recipes with a twist. BY JUDY BART KANCIGOR

IN WITH THE old, in with the new. No, it’s not a typo. For all the hoopla over what’s new in food for 2016—plant based burgers, bone broth, matcha, coconut sugar, teff and kalettes (google them). We still crave the food of our roots, but maybe with a modern twist. Unlike a photo or even a video, a treasured recipe, passed down from mother to daughter for who knows how long, summons the past with all five senses, revealing a slice of our ancestors’ life, a cuisine borne by ingenious Jewish women within the confines of both kashrut and poverty. While the Czar and his family dined in opulent splendor on only the finest cuts, back in the shtetls our ancestors devised ways to feed their families well on what the Royal Family probably threw away. (And we all know what happened to them!) Over 300 family members contributed to

my family cookbook. Can you even imagine how many kugel recipes I received, each one a treasured family heirloom? My editor felt a dozen were enough (not counting the three more I slipped into the Passover chapter). Easy for her to say. Did she have to deal with my family? It got ugly. Otherwise perfectly agreeable cousins practically came to blows extolling the virtues of … what? We’re talking a noodle concoction here. What is a kugel, and why does one’s particular family recipe inspire such fierce loyalty? A kugel is a baked pudding with a starchy base—potatoes or noodles are most common—bound with eggs, enriched with fat (butter, margarine, chicken fat or oil), and peppered with an endless variety of colorful and tasty additions, such as vegetables, fruit and/or cheese. While today a kugel is usually served as a

side dish, in the shtetls of Eastern Europe, where meat was rare and expensive, a starchy kugel could become a filling meal. Some assembly required—true for swing sets and true for kugels—but for the most part, kugels are a snap to prepare. Once you’ve cooked and drained the noodles, you simply stir in the other ingredients and bake. According to tradition, the kugel is Sabbath fare, imbuing it with almost mystical qualities. Its origins can be traced to the Middle Ages, when it was cooked along with the cholent (Sabbath stew). In a paper entitled “Holy Kugel: The Sanctification of Ashkenazic Ethnic Foods in Hasidism,” Professor Allan Nadler discusses the symbolism attributed to this humble pudding by the Hasidic rabbis. While I doubt our bubbes had the rabbis in mind as they shopped for pot cheese, could some deeper, subconscious meaning have evolved through the centuries by osmosis? I happened to be testing a kugel recipe the day before my sister-in-law Karina’s birthday party. Not realizing the party was catered, I brought it, but no problem–caterer Cathy Giannone of It’s a G Thing Caterers generously made room for it on the buffet. While we were eating, my brother, Gary, speared a candied walnut from Cathy’s outrageous salad and said, “Can you believe how good these are? You should put them in the kugel!” I said, “Get me the recipe and I will!” And a new tradition was born. One of the first recipes I tested was Lena’s Nut Cake, which I found in Aunt Sally’s handwritten cookbook. It was a disaster! Before it hit the cutting room floor, out of curiosity I asked, “Aunt Sally, who’s Lena?” “Tanta Esther Gittel’s second wife,” she replied. The recipe here is nothing like Lena ever made. It got a major (and most delicious) overhaul, because with a name like “Tanta Esther Gittel’s Second Wife Lena’s Nut Cake,” that recipe was going in!

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A&E

According to tradition, the kugel is Sabbath fare, imbuing it with almost mystical qualities.

Tanta Esther Gittel’s Husband’s Second Wife Lena’s Nut Cake Serves 10 The toasted hazelnuts give this moist, dense cake a lovely earthy flavor, playing nicely against a delicate accent of orange. (For the glaze recipe go to www. ocjewishlife). Unsalted butter or unflavored vegetable cooking spray, for greasing pan 1 1/2 cups sugar 1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature 4 large eggs, separated 1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 1 teaspoon pure orange extract Finely grated zest of 1 orange 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for dusting pan 1 1/2 cups chopped hazelnuts, toasted 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup whole milk

1 Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease 9-cup Bundt pan, dust with flour, and tap out excess.

2 Remove 2 tablespoons of the sugar; set aside. Cream butter and remaining sugar with electric mixer on medium speed, scraping bowl several times, until light and fluffy, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add egg yolks, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in extracts and orange zest.

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3 Combine 1/2 cup of the flour and the hazelnuts in food processor; process until nuts are very finely ground, about 45 seconds. Transfer to bowl and whisk in remaining 1 cup flour, baking powder, and salt.

4 With mixer on low speed, add flour mixture in three additions, alternating with milk in two additions, beginning and ending with the flour. Transfer batter to a large bowl.

5 Using a clean, dry bowl and beaters, beat egg whites on medium-high speed until soft peaks form. Add reserved 2 tablespoons sugar, a tablespoon at a time, beating for 10 seconds after each addition. Then raise speed to high and beat until stiff peaks form, about 2 1/2 minutes total. Stir one fourth of beaten egg whites into batter to lighten it. Then add remaining whites in three additions, folding until incorporated.

6 Scrape batter into prepared Bundt pan and smooth top. Bake on center oven rack until top is golden brown, cake springs back when lightly touched, and cake tester comes out clean, 55 to 65 minutes. Let cake cool in pan set on wire rack for 15 minutes. Then run a knife around center and edge of cake, and turn out on rack to cool completely. Cut cake into slices, and serve.

1/2 cup (packed) dark brown sugar 1 1/2 cups walnut pieces 3 tablespoons butter

1 Spread 1/4 cup of the brown sugar on baking pan and set aside.

2 Heat large skillet (not nonstick) over medium heat. Add walnuts and toast, stirring with a wooden spoon, until fragrant and just beginning to brown, 5 to 6 minutes. Set aside. Wipe pan.

3 Melt butter with remaining 1/4 cup sugar in same skillet over medium heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Add walnuts and cook, stirring constantly, until golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Be careful not to burn them.

4 Remove walnuts with slotted spoon and roll them in the brown sugar on baking sheet, covering completely on all sides. Cool. Store in airtight container. Makes 1 3/4 cups Note: For easy cleanup, rewarm pan and caramel will come right off.

Source: “Cooking Jewish” by Judy Bart Kancigor (Workman)

It’s a G Thing Toffee Walnuts These are the richest, crunchiest caramelized walnuts that ever graced a salad…or a kugel! They’re great served as is or try them in your favorite kugel. But there’s never enough for either one, because the snackers get to them first. You can try this recipe with pecans or other nuts as well.

Jlife food Editor Judy Bart Kancigor is the author of “Cooking Jewish” (Workman) and “The Perfect Passover Cookbook” (an e-book short from Workman), a columnist and feature writer for the Orange County Register and other publications and can be found on the web at www.cookingjewish.com.


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out&about THE ILLUSIONISTSLIVE FROM BROADWAY™ Having shattered box office records around the world, The Illusionists—Live From Broadway™ is now coming to captivate Orange County with a run at Segerstrom Hall Feb. 2 – 7. This mind-blowing spectacular showcases the jaw-dropping talents of five of the most incredible illusionists on earth. Full of hilarious magic tricks, death-defying stunts and acts of breathtaking wonder, The Illusionists has dazzled audiences of all ages.

Cat Power

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LISA LAMPANELLI

R. LUKE DUBOIS

City National Grove of Anaheim presents comedian Lisa Lampanelli on Feb. 13. Her ability to make people laugh at their own stereotypes and differences helped her conquer the club scenes in both New York City and Los Angeles in a few short years. She appeared on Comedy Central’s “Last Laugh 2005” and her one-hour special, “Take It Like a Man,” was a hit with the comedy network. Her CD and DVD of the same name hit number six on the comedy charts.

R. Luke Dubois will be performing Sun, Feb. 21 at Orange County Museum of Art (OCMA) at 2 p.m. This will be an extraordinary opportunity to experience the expansive creative talents of DuBois as he displays his musical performance pieces created in collaboration with acclaimed musicians Lesley Flanigan and Todd Reynolds. The performance is included in the price of admission to the museum and is free for OCMA members.

ONE LOVE CALI REGGAE FEST

JESSICA LANG DANCE COMPANY

The Observatory in Santa Ana Presents One Love Cali Reggae Fest on Sat, Feb. 13 at 12 p.m. Headliners include Rebelution, Iration, Tribal Seeds, Pepper, Stick Figure, Fortunate Youth, KRS-One, Seedless, Shwayze. Also on stage will be Hirie, Wheeland Brothers, Pato Banton and many more!

Jessica Lang Dance Company will have a very special performance on Fri, Feb. 19 presented by the Irvine Barclay Theatre. Dance Magazine hails her choreography as “a master of visual composition.” Lang has performed at renowned venues and festivals including Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival, the Kennedy Center, and the revered Joyce Theater in New York City.


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE | February 2016

Paul Stanley’s Soul Station Original rhythm guitarist and vocalist for Kiss, Paul Stanley will bring his solo project, Soul Station, to the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano on Fri, Feb. 26. Born Stanley Harvey Eisen, he told talk show host Tom Snyder in 1979 that when growing up, he was the only Jewish kid in an all-Irish neighborhood.

Coincidently, Stanley has found himself working creatively with a few other Jewish rockers in his band, Kiss, including Gene Simmons, Bruce Kulick and Eric Singer. For over four decades, Paul Stanley has served as the on-stage ringleader and backstage prime mover for Kiss. After helping the famously facepainted rock group rise to the top of the rock world in the mid-70s with hits like, “Rock and Roll All Nite,” “Detroit Rock City” and “Shout It Out Loud.” Stanley kept the ship afloat through a series

of lineup, image and musical style changes during the 80s and early 90s—even as his longtime musical partner Gene Simmons admittedly let his attention wander into film and television projects. In recent years, he has produced and spearheaded two wellreceived Kiss studio albums—Sonic Boom and Monster, and in 2014 he released an autobiography entitled Face the Music – A Life Exposed. In addition to the concert stage, Stanley has also played to theatrical audiences in the title

Paul Stanley

role of The Phantom in “The Phantom of the Opera.” Paul was chosen to be the final Phantom in the 10-year run of the Toronto production. The show posted million dollar weekly ticket sales during his historic six-month run, during which he performed eight shows a week to nightly standing ovations. During his time in Toronto, Stanley became a spokesman for the Canadian-based About Face organization, which deals with children with facial differences and its impact on them. In this role, Stanley met and spoke with both parents and children about his own personal experience with the birth defect know as microtia, a deformity of the outer ear and an additional loss of hearing on his right side. In that role he also spoke to school classes teaching them to understand and embrace those with differences. Stanley also partnered with Simmons in the Rock & Brews franchise with an aggressive expansion plan that will see 50 restaurants operating worldwide in the next five years. In addition to serving great food and 80 craft beers in a family friendly atmosphere, Rock & Brews aims to help the communities by bringing in local produce, supporting Wounded Warriors organizations and local educational school programs. 49


News&Jews OC JEWISH SCENE | FEBRUARY 2016

PHOTO BY CHUCK WEINBERG

Cantor David Reinwald & Rabbi Heidi Cohen in front of the ark.

Temple Beth Sholom Temple Beth Sholom (TBS) has enjoyed a recent dedication of new mantles for the residence Torahs at TBS. After the recent fire Temple Beth Sholom endured and after a long remodel to correct the damage, it is wonderful to see these precious Torahs cloaked in love.

Yiddish Policemen’s Union Don’t miss the opportunity to share thoughts on this selection, for which the author has won several honors, including the 2008 Hugo Award for Best Novel. Sponsored by the Adult Program Committee at Congregation B’nai Tzedek, it will be held on the premises of B’nai Tzedek on Feb 21 at 10:00 a.m. (9669 Talbert Ave, Fountain Valley) . The book can be purchased at smile.amazon.com.

Financial Forecast for 2016? Tony Crescenzi, PIMCO’s executive vice president, market strategist and investment committee member will be the guest speaker for the Network and NextGen’s Macher’s Mark of Jewish Federation & Family Services on March 2nd, 6:30 p.m.. He will discuss the financial forecast and predictions for 2016. Crescenzi has written five books, including “The Strategic Bond Investor.” He regularly appears on CNBC, Bloomberg television and in financial news media. The Network and Macher’s Mark of JFFS brings together members of the Jewish community to expand their professional networking and to foster new business opportunities. For further information, contact Doris Jacobson at (949) 345-3484 or doris@jffs.org.

Martin Landau and Dr. Michael Berlin

Remember Martin Landau was in attendance at The OC Int’l Jewish Film Festival, preview of the film “Remember” at Regal Westpark 8, Irvine, on January 13. It is the contemporary story of Zev, (Christopher Plummer), who discovers that the Nazi guard who murdered his family some 70 years ago is living in America under an assumed identity. With help from a fellow Holocaust survivor (Martin Landau), Zev, who struggles with memory loss, embarks on a cross-country odyssey to find the former Nazi responsible for the deaths of both of their families. Dr. Michael Berlin and Landau led a discussion after the film.

Monteverdi and Rossi: Madrigals and Motets CSP members are invited to a concert and post event reception with Bishop Kevin Vann on March 12th at 8 p.m.. The program is free to $360 and above donor level members. The evening musical program, featuring the de Angelis Vocal Ensemble, is a historical “snap-shot,” highlighting the dialogue and exchange and the separate and shared musical territories of Jewish and Catholic cultures in Renaissance Italy. For more information please visit www.occsp.org. 52 FEBRUARY 2016 |

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News&Jews

Come Thrive With Us: Imagining the Jewish Future SoCal Community leaders and clergy had a unique opportunity to dialogue and “Imagine the Jewish Future” with Rabbi Rick Jacobs, President of the URJ, at an exclusive Shabbat luncheon at Temple Beth Sholom in Santa Ana on Saturday, January 23, 2016.

Snow Day at the J The winter holiday break brought snow to Orange County and to nearly 250 kids–wrapped in warm winter clothes and gloves–who are attending the Merage JCC’s winter camp. The J’s courtyard was transformed into a winter wonderland, with sledding, snowballs and snow play.

Thanks from Kuwait Kathie Wolin volunteers every week at Pretend City and collects all the children’s artwork that they don’t take home and sends to our troops serving overseas. This is a photo they sent thanking her for all she does. Go Kathie! Volunteer opportunities are available for anyone from 12 to 112! You can find out more about Pretend City at www.pretendcity. org. For information please contact our volunteer coordinator: marygrace.sanchez@pretendcity.org.

Top 100 Wines of 2015 What do Castel Petit Castel and Flam Blanc have in common? They are three of the 100 wines featured in a first-ever kosher wine top list produced by KosherWine.com, a subsidiary of The JCommerce Group. The KosherWine.com team selected the most exciting wines of the year from the thousands the site carries to put together Gary Gould its “Top 100 Wines of 2015.”

America’s First Israeli-American Community Center On Sunday, January 10, 2016, the Israeli-American Council (IAC) opened the IAC Shepher Community Center, the first Israeli-American community center in the United States, with a Grand Preview event that showcased the organization’s ambitious plans to serve as a hub for the Israeli-American and Jewish communities in Los Angeles. The new center will include recreational facilities, non-profit office space, and dynamic programming to foster connections to Israel. It is one of many new initiatives launched in recent months by the IAC, which has become the fastest-growing Jewish organization in the United States. Jlife

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LIFESTYLE

NextGen NextGen OC celebrated Hanukkah in very festive ways this past December. On Wednesday, December 9, Shalom Family collaborated with Chabad of Laguna Beach for a Hanukkah Story Hour on Jeff David, Adam Chester and Sammy Shefler

Main Beach beside the ocean Juliet Friedman and her son

and the surfboard menorah. On Thursday, December 10, over 40 Jewish young adults celebrated the holiday, complete with a “Secret Schlomo” gift exchange, at a fun Happy Hour at Date Café in Tustin.

Ben Beezy, Rosie Korman , Chase Basch and Jacqlyn Burnett

NextGen Israel Presents:

Shalom Family & JewGlue

An evening with Israeli Supreme Court Justice Dalia Dorner

& JewGlue are

Shalom Family outreach and

Feb. 17th

engagement initiatives of NextGen O.C., the young adult

department of Jewish Federation & Family Services (JFFS). For more information about NextGen and to learn about upcoming events, contact us at NextGen@JFFS. org or visit JewishOC.org/ Meg Greenberg and her daughter

54 FEBRUARY 2016 |

Sharon Don and Orr Karny

Jlife

NextGen.


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“When I called Dr. Roth for an appointment my toe nails were in pretty bad shape. Besides being ugly, they hurt. Any pressure on the nail was painful and because of this, I stopped doing activities I enjoyed. Dr. Roth’s treatment strategy has really paid off. After three months, my feet and nails feel and look great with no sign of a fungal infection. I couldn’t be happier with the result.” – S.N., Tustin

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LIFESTYLE

A PLACE TO CALL HOME Reconnecting with My Heritage. BY DVORAH LEWIS

LEFT: The only photo of family in Russia, late 19th century BELOW: Me and my great aunt Essie on the day we met, Summer 2012

ALL THAT WAS known of my great grandmother’s childhood and her family, consisted of a few sentences: her mother came to America alone with only a locket stitched in her skirt for safekeeping; she died from a backalley abortion; and her four children, including my great grandmother, were admitted into an orphanage. The desire to learn more about my family’s history stayed with me, but it wasn’t until I began my undergraduate degree at UC Irvine more than five years ago that I was able to fulfill that wish. I knew instantly that I wanted to focus my Humanities Honors thesis on my family history. Not long after I began my genealogical research, I hit an obstacle—I couldn’t find any records of my family prior to the 1930s. Through trial and error, and perhaps some luck, I stumbled across a census record of an orphanage in Philadelphia with my great grandmother and her sibling’s names. The genealogy sites could only take me so far. I had to go straight to the sources. The first source existed in the Philadelphia Jewish Archives Collections at Temple 56 FEBRUARY 2016 |

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University where I found the orphanage’s collection and other records pertaining to my family. Many of my family’s treasures lay hidden in these archival boxes, and I went on a journey to find them. The second source resided in the amazing memory of my great aunt Essie (Esther), and at 94 years old she is the eldest member of my family. I had the privilege to meet and interview her. Her memories revealed the heart of my paper: the Foster Home for Hebrew Orphans where she and her siblings grew up. A home earning the title as America’s first Jewish orphanage founded in 1855 by Jewish philanthropist, Rebecca Gratz. My thesis sought to understand not only the orphanage’s place in the history of child care, but also how it fit into American Jewish history and how it was a reflection of the Jewish community of Philadelphia. While researching, drafting, and presenting my thesis, little did I know that I was also discovering myself. My time in the archives sparked an interest in me that I never knew I had. An interest that transformed into a passion leading me to where I am today:

earning my Master of Library & Information Science at UCLA. My great aunt Essie also filled a space in my heart that had been empty for almost fourteen years since the death of my grandmother. I am honored to have her in my life and enjoy every minute with her as she helps to strengthen my Jewish identity. Take the journey for yourself—visit an archive or talk with the eldest members of your family! You may be surprised by the treasures you will find. As for me, my journey is far from over as I continue to trace my family’s history back to Russia. A Dvorah Lewis is a contributing writer.


LIFESTYLE

Making lifetime friends in less than two weeks... check!

A FAMILY OF 50…IN 10 DAYS? The Inexplicable “Strangers to Family” Phenomenon BY ADAM CHESTER

THE PLANE LANDS in Israel. After relearning to walk following 18-hours of flight, with legs sardined between a Chasidic family and 8 crying toddlers, you exit the plane. Excitedly, you begin examining your surroundings with sleep-deprived eyes and the sense of curiosity only multiple layovers, four airplane-dinners, and a foreign, yet somehow familiar country can provide. Your Birthright trip begins. You gather your luggage, take in the Tel Aviv air, and quickly transition from aircraft to tour bus with 50 strangers you’ll soon call family. Birthright Israel, the free 10-day trip for Jewish young adults ages 18-26, has been sending Jews from the Diaspora to Israel for more than 15 years. Over 500,000 participants have taken part in this life changing journey, experiencing Israel’s unique charm. Trying to explain the quick-bonding group

dynamic formed over the course of this crosscountry expedition is impossible. Until participants have experienced these 240 unforgettable hours with American and Israeli peers, the thought of turning strangers into family is inconceivable. Forming a family of 50 usually takes generations. On a Birthright trip, it only takes 10 days. Perhaps it’s the historical and sensory pleasures of Israel which spark immediate connections to the land and people: tasting the food, smelling the crisp breeze of the Mediterranean Sea and touching ancient buildings and walls. Maybe the connections originate from modern technological advancements, the sounds of bustling city streets, the soothing calmness of desert nights under a Bedouin tent (with the occasional grunt of a camel), and echoes of Jerusalem schoolchildren singing Shabbat songs. Observing the foundation of Israeli

society—made up of secular and Orthodox Jews, Christians, Muslims, and everything in between—eliminates Israel’s clouded reputation and quickly reveals the land which 8 million very diverse people call home. Birthright participants easily become enamoured with Israel and often develop a newfound passion for Judaism. The magnitude of their Jewish journey is so prodigious because they’re sharing the adventure with other Jewish young adults—and when a Jew is surrounded by other Jews, things feel… like family. A trip to Israel is possibly the most profound way for young Jews to connect to Judaism. Exploring their roots with other first-timers who understand what life’s like at home being “the Jewish kid” separates a Birthright trip from all other Israel experiences. Birthright provides a “6th sense” for participants: the feeling of Jewish pride. Jewish summer camps, High Holiday services, and lighting Hanukkah candles are wonderful activities for Diaspora Jews. But they’re not enough. To guarantee our Jewish future, we must continue sending our Jewish future to Israel. Jewish Federation & Family Services and OC Hillel coordinate community trips which, like all Birthright trips, are absolutely free! In addition to everything amazing about Birthright, OC community trips depart from LAX. And, since everyone’s from Southern California, participants return with a whole new circle of friends. Summer registration opens February 1. If you, your child, grandchild, or anybody else you know, is 18-26 years old and eligible for Birthright, contact me at Adam@JFFS.org, call (949) 435-3484, or visit jewishoc.org/birthright to learn more about an OC Birthright trip. A Adam Chester graduated from UCSD with a degree in Psychology and is the NextGen Outreach & Engagement Coordinator at JFFS.

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LIFESTYLE

ORANGE COUNTY’S JEWISH HISTORY Candles of Every Description BY DALIA TAFT

BLOGOSPHERE Jlife wants to acknowledge some of the interesting blogs related to the Jewish community. Enjoy! ASK A RABBI How Can I Honor My Jewish Heritage If I Wasn’t Raised Jewish? Robert Jacobs’ Jewish Welfare Board Card, 1946

BORN IN VERMONT in 1879, Fred Jacobs was the youngest of four children of Ellen and Alfred, a shoemaker who had immigrated from Canada. After his first marriage ended in divorce, Fred married a second time and he and his wife Alice had a son, Robert, in 1924. First settling in Los Angeles, the family moved to Santa Ana in 1931, where Fred had purchased a pharmacy at the corner of Main and First. Aptly called Jacobs Pharmacy, the business ran a series of ads through the years proclaiming that the pharmacy had “A Complete Line of Candles of Every Description.” Robert registered for the army, as soon as he turned 18, and was wounded in battle in January of 1945. It’s interesting to note that the worker consulted regarding young Robert’s medical record was Dr. Frank Schaffell, one of the founders of Temple Beth Sholom, the first synagogue in Orange County. Dalia Taft, archivist of the Orange County Jewish Historical Society - a program of Jewish Federation & Family Services - highlights images from the archives every month. For more information, please visit www.jewishorangecounty.org. You can also contact Dalia at history@jffs.org or at (949) 435-3484, ext. 167. 58 FEBRUARY 2016 |

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jewishboston.com/ Ask-A-Rabbi/blogs

WORLD JEWISH HERITAGE It’s mission is to preserve Jewish heritage worldwide and promote tourism to a variety of sites and cultural events around the world that are of great importance to the Jewish heritage continuity.

worldjewishheritage.com/blog

THE BIRTHRIGHT On transferring the untransferrable.

jhom.com/topics/firsts/ birthright.html


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LIFESTYLE

FRIDAYS 10:00 AM Men’s Club at the JCC Merage JCC MONDAYS, JAN. 11- FEB. 29 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM Mah Jongg Cards Last day of presale for 2016 Merage JCC

SENIORS

CALENDAR FEBRUARY 2016

MONDAYS 9:00 AM Gentle Yogalates & Meditation Merage JCC

7:00 PM Drop-in Mah Jongg Merage JCC TUESDAYS 10:30 AM The View for Women of All Ages Merage JCC

10:00 AM News & Views Merage JCC 10:00 AM Tai Chi/ Jack Finkelstein Ezra AAFC 10:30 AM Stretching/ Jerry Steinberg Ezra AAFC 11:00 AM What’s Up Bob & Ruth Wilkoff Ezra AAFC

THURSDAYS 9:30 AM Keeping Fit/ Mel Grossman Ezra AAFC 10:30 AM Various Lecture Topics Ezra AAFC

11:00 AM Various Lecture Topics Ezra AAFC

60 FEBRUARY 2016 |

WEDNESDAYS & FRIDAYS 8:45 AM & 10:00 AM Gentle Yoga Merage JCC

Jlife

WEDNESDAYS, JAN. 13- MAR. 2 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Learn to Play Mah Jongg Merage JCC THURSDAYS, FEB. 4 - MAR. 10 1:00 – 2:30 PM Women Artists of the Modern Era Merage JCC TUESDAYS, FEB. 9 – MAR. 22 9:45 – 11:45 AM Intermediate Bridge Six classes Merage JCC THURSDAYS, FEB. 11 - 25 1:00 – 3:00 PM iPhones Tips & Secrets Merage JCC SUNDAY, FEB. 7 4:00 – 5:30 PM Harbor Jewish Single Seniors Super Bowl Party in Newport Beach Watch the super Bowl or play table games Contact Marilyn at (949) 722-9515 or marlinda32@aol.com WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10 “Writing for Reminiscences” Marilyn Silverstein Temple Beth Tikvah SUNDAY, FEB. 21 4:00 – 5:30 PM Great Jewish Americans 101 Jewish American Contributions to Medicine Dr. Leo Gordon, Medical Advisor Cedars Sinai Historical Conservancy Merage JCC

MONDAY, FEB. 22 1:00 PM Book Club/Doris Glasser & Helen Bresenoff “All the Light We Cannot See” Ezra Center TUESDAY, FEB. 23 10:00 – 11:30 AM Books & Bagels “An Invisible Thread” by Laura Schroff Merage JCC SUNDAY, FEB. 28 9:00 – 11:00 AM Chess Drop-in & Play Merage JCC SUNDAY, FEB. 28 1:00 – 4:00 PM JCC poker League Merage JCC The Merage Jewish Community Center is located at 1 Federation Way Suite 200, Irvine, (949) 435-3400 x 303. For reservations please contact Geri Dorman, Prime Time Adult Director at: gerid@jccoc.org. The Ezra Center is located at Temple Beth Emet on Monday & Thursday 1770 W. Cerritos, Anaheim, (714) 776-1103 and Temple Beth Tikvah on Wednesday 1600 N. Acacia, (714) 871-3535. Temple Bat Yahm is located at 1011 Camelback St., Newport Beach. For reservations please contact Michelle Sandler at: (714) 891-0788 or (714) 313-2733.


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(714) 540-5554 FD#1341

1625 Gisler Avenue · Costa Mesa, CA 92626

www.HarborLawn.com

CA Lic. #0379802

Jlife

| FEBRUARY 2016 61


Advertising Index

59 A&B Home Health Care 61 Allan Silverman 39 Art Therapy OC 37 Benjies Deli 2 Bowers Museum 39 Bradley S. Erodsi Esq 61 Bright Watch Caregivers 61 Bubbe and Zayde’s Place 35 Burch, Coulston & Shepard, LLP 47 Callahan & Blaine 37 Camp Hess Cramer 4 Camp Mountain Chai

62 FEBRUARY 2016 |

34 Cavalia 25 Chapman University 5 Congregation B’nai Israel 17 Congregation Beth Jacob 15 Congregation B’nai Tzedek 12 Congregation Shir Ha-Ma’alot 41 Door Dash 55 Dr. Ivar Roth 19 Feig Law Firm 14 Feig Law Firm 7 Friends of Yad Sarah 61 Harbor Lawn

Jlife

9 Heritage Pointe 22 Jewish Community Center 23 Jewish Community Center 21 Jewish Federation and Family Services 15 Jewish Federation and Family Services 50 Jewish Federation and Family Services 51 Jewish Federation and Family Services 3 Klein Financial 31 Laguna Playhouse 59 Melvin M. Browndorf Realty

33 Mortensen & Reinheimer PC 5 Naale Elite Academy 59 Naples Vacuum Elevators 19 Outcome Genii 31 Roll Out Quick 27 Party Scapes Catering 31 Prov31wraps 15 Renaissance Club Sports 32 Sherri Primes 19 Soul Mates Unlimited 19 South Coast Repatory Theater 27 Stoddard Group

11 Stoddard Group 34 Swan Pools 6 24 Carrots 13 Temple Bat Yahm 13 Temple Bat Yahm 64 Temple Bat Yahm 3 Temple Beth Tikvah 7 Temple Beth Emet 19 Torah with Liora 63 Tustin Ranch 47 University Synagogue 47 VITAS


Jlife

| FEBRUARY 2016 63


OCJL FEBRUARY 2016  

OCJL FEBRUARY 2016

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