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April 2015 Nisan/Iyar 5775

Relational Judaism

The Power of One on One

Feeling Stressed? It May Not Be So Bad Making Us Proud Former TVT Student Receives Military Award

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inside 56

JLIFE | Nisan/Iyar 5775 | APRIL 2015

LIFESTYLE

In Memoriam The Legacy of Allan Fainbarg

54

No Peace in Our Time What are the prospects for a Palestinian state?

VIEWPOINT

20

57

Israel Scene Language 101

Lives Renewed

22

A Visit to the Samueli Holocaust Memorial Library

What to Expect…

58

On The Lighter Side

12

Nice Jewish Boys

24

Brains, Brawn, Brotherhood

Israeli Guy Medical Care in Israel

60

Fresh Orange Jews O.C.’s Fresh Faces

FEATURES

34

61

It May Not Be So Bad

To Be Jewish

35

62

Former TVT Student Receives Military Award In Israel

Orange County’s Jewish History & The Blogosphere

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

IN EVERY ISSUE

Feeling Stressed?

Making Us Proud

Rachel Goes Rogue

History/Blogs

38

12

With Judy Bart Kancigor

Is Shul The New Kale?

42

16

A Guide to OC Fun

Words From our Readers

44

52

Pesach Prep

O.C. Jewish Scene

46

64

Ben Lesser- Living a Life That Matters

Fitness, Education & More

First & Foremost

Cooking Jewish

Letters/Who Knew

Out & About

News & Jews

Crossword

Seniors Calendar

Book Review

66

Advertising Index

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43 Look inside for Kiddish, our insert publication, right after page 34.

26 On the Cover

Relational Judaism The power of one on one–focusing on interpersonal relationships.


PUBLISHER | MODY GORSKY, LLM, MBA PUBLISHER | MARK EDELSTEIN PUBLISHER | MOTAN, LLC PUBLISHER EMERITUS | DR. MARK MOSS MANAGING EDITOR | TRACEY ARMSTRONG GORSKY EXECUTIVE EDITOR | LISA GRAJEWSKI, PSY.D. EXECUTIVE EDITOR | FLORENCE L DANN GEN Y EDITOR | RACHEL SCHIFF CONTRIBUTING EDITOR | TANYA SCHWIED FOOD EDITOR | JUDY BART KANCIGOR EDITORIAL INTERN | HANNAH SCHOENBAUM ART DIRECTOR | RACHEL BELLINSKY CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MARTIN BROWER, MERAV CEREN, ADAM CHESTER, FLORENCE L DANN, ROBIN DAVIS, PH. D., RABBI DAVID ELIEZRIE, HARRIETTE ELLIS, JUDY FLORMAN, STEFANEE FREEDMAN, LISA GRAJEWSKI, PSY.D., EVE GUMPEL, CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER, DVORAH LEWIS, CARINE NADEL, PAMELA PRICE, NAOMI RAGEN, MAYRAV SAAR, RACHEL SCHIFF, TANYA SCHWIED, ANDREA SIMANTOV, DALIA TAFT, TEDDY WEINBERGER COPYEDITOR JOSH NAMM CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS/ARTISTS RACHEL BELLINSKY, ALLEN BEREZOVSKY, PEPE FAINBERG, JANET LAWRENCE, CHARLES WEINBERG ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES DIANE BENAROYA (SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE) MARTIN STEIN (SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE) EDITORIAL (949) 230-0581 (TRACEY ARMSTRONG GORSKY) OR (949) 734-5074 EDITORJLIFE@GMAIL.COM ADVERTISING (949) 812-1891, MODY.GORSKY@GMAIL.COM CIRCULATION & SUBSCRIPTIONS MODY.GORSKY@GMAIL.COM, (949) 734-5074 ART ART@OCJEWISHLIFE.COM JLIFE IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY ORANGE COUNTY JEWISH LIFE, LLC 1 FEDERATION WAY, IRVINE, CA 92603

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FIRST & FOREMOST

IS SHUL THE NEW KALE?

Regular Synagogue Attendance Makes Us Healthier BY LISA GRAJEWSKI, PSY.D.

AN APPLE A day may keep the doctor away; but it looks like synagogue attendance may be doing the same thing. According to Jeff Levin, Ph.D. Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health at Texas’s Baylor University, going to synagogue makes a difference in the health of Jewish Americans. Five large Jewish urban communities provided data that found “Adults who affiliate with a Jewish religious denomination and attend synagogue report significantly better health than secular or non-practicing Jews.” The data was the first of its kind to pull from large American Jewish communities–previous studies had looked at Israelis and smaller Jewish communities in the United States or Jewish communities in the United Adults who Kingdom. And this study attend did not discriminate among synagogue the sects. Whether subjects report attended a shul, synagogue, significantly or temple, affiliated Jews from Orthodox, Conservative, our level of stress. Sustained better health. Reconstructionist and stress has been found to raise Reform reported better health cortisol levels, a hormone than non-affiliated Jews. Additionally, those that has been shown to impact our immune who may not be regularly affiliated but system and lead to deleterious effects on attended synagogue infrequently were found everything from wound healing to bone to report better health. growth. In short, too much stress may make It makes sense that attending synagogue us sick. provides an increase in our physical wellbeI am not a physician, but I know lowered ing. When we go to synagogue we are social, stress and better health are positive points. our surroundings are familiar, we are among And as a psychologist, I know that when people we care about, and all of this lowers people have less stress they certainly feel 12 APRIL 2015 |

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Model synagogue Tzedakah boxes. The Sarajevo haggadah

better. So, why not test the study? Imagine giving up your gym membership, throwing away your Bullet Juicer, kicking off the running sneakers, and joining your local synagogue–or at least trying out a Shabbat service. At the very least you will get a smile from your rabbi. A Lisa Grajewski, Psy.D. Is a licensed psychologist with JFFS and an adjunct instructor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. She has been a contributing writer for Jlife Magazine since 2004.


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The First Rabbi Haim Asa Memorial Lecture Sunday, April 26, 7:00 p.m.

Temple Beth Tikvah, 1600 N. Acacia Ave., Fullerton

Rabbi Haim Asa

Join us for our

Golden Jubilee Celebrating 50 Years as the Center of Jewish Life in North Orange County May 2, 2015 An elegant evening of dinner and dancing with many memories commemorating 50 years of service, community, and Jewish life. For tickets and more information contact: (714) 871-3535 info@tbtoc.org www.tbtoc.org 14 APRIL 2015 |

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Rabbi Shlomo Riskin

“BUILDING BRIDGES: MOVING BEYOND DENOMINATIONAL JUDAISM” Guest Speaker: Rabbi Shlomo Riskin - Chief Rabbi of Efrat, Israel Free of charge. Open to the public. Please RSVP to: info@tbtoc.org or 714-871-3535 This lecture will spearhead a unique relationship between Temple Beth Tikvah and the Zemer HaZayit congregation in Efrat, Israel which will have a synagogue building constructed and dedicated in memory of Rabbi Asa, Rabbi Emeritus of Temple Beth Tikvah. For information about the synagogue building project visit www.buildzemerhazayit.org


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LETTERS

Kvetch & Kvell Is it any wonder that President Barack Hussein Obama dislikes Netanyahu? For Mr. Netanyahu possesses all the qualities that Mr. Obama lacks! Netanyahu is honest, forthright and competent. He loves his country, knows who its enemies are, and refuses to coddle them. If there is one common thread when an individual of the Jewish faith speaks the truth, it brings the closet anti-Semites out of the closet. If that is an unintended consequence of Mr. Netanyahu’s speech, then so be it!

HELLO AND WELCOME? One of the very few good things House Speaker John Boehner has done in his leadership role was to invite Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to address Congress. The American people— as well as Congress—have every right to hear what Mr. Netanyahu has to say. For contrary to what the ACLU and other far-left hypocrites would have us believe, free speech applies not just to our enemies, but to our friends as well! And make no mistake about it, Mr. Netanyahu is America’s friend—and perhaps our only true friend—in the Middle East today. Prime Minister Netanyahu is

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu makes me proud to be an American of the Jewish faith. So if Barack Obama doesn’t have the common decency to welcome you, I will. Welcome to America, Mr. Netanyahu. Shalom! The Honorable Eddie Rose Former Laguna Niguel City Councilman “A Voice—Not an Echo” Our apologies to Temple Beth Tikvah. In the last issue we stated that Rabbi Teri Appleby will be taking the position as full-time rabbi. She currently holds the position as Interim Rabbi. — Ed.

We welcome your letters! Email editorjlife@gmail.com with your feedback. 16 APRIL 2015 |

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PHOTO BY ZACH DALIN

absolutely right! Trusting Iran to abide by its promise to curtail its nuclear capability is reminiscent of the Allies trusting Hitler and Nazi Germany to keep its word prior to World War II. Allowing Iran to get nuclear weapons would be inviting a second Holocaust.

Who Knew? Recently, American pop star Katy Perry visited the site of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Nazi death camp. Perry, 30, visited the site after performing the previous night at the Krakow Arena in Poland as part of her Prismatic World Tour. She posted a photo of the prisoner barracks on Instagram with the caption, “My heart was heavy today.” Perry also quoted from the memorial plaque at the site and added a quote from Spanish-American writer George Santayana: “The one that does not remember history is bound to live through it again.” Source ­— JTA


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Israel Scene | BY ANDREA SIMANTOV

VIEWPOINT

Language 101

LOW-FAT, NO-SUGAR, MOSTLY VEGGIE COOKING AND OVER SHABBOS WE DON’T WATCH TV OR DVD’S. 20 APRIL 2015 |

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WHEN MY STEPDAUGHTER and son-in-law need a well-deserved weekend alone, my husband and I stay in their large, child-friendly house and do the grandparent thing. My secret pleasure is puttering in their well-appointed kitchen versus my pre-state scullery. Their house is crammed with toys, games, nonnutritious snack food and resembles Disney World. Neighborhood friends come over and they attend youth meetings and play groups while I read books, take walks and keep things orderly. It is easy being a grandma on the foreign turf. One day, however, the dreaded call came. “The girls want to stay with you for Shabbos.” Clearly someone dialed the wrong number because no one under the age of 58 could possibly find our home scintillating for even 25 minutes, much less 25 hours. We have two bedrooms, the second of which is stacked floor to ceiling with cartons that represent yet-to-be-unpacked parts of co-joined lives. Low-fat, no-sugar, mostly veggie cooking and over Shabbos we don’t watch TV or DVD’s. Nestled between two of Jerusalem’s most dangerous eastern neighborhoods, we’re careful when crossing streets: Border Patrol jeeps drive fast. Because of the spotty security situation, children don’t play in the streets unsupervised. In my own defense, I creatively raised six children by cutting sandwiches into teddy-bear shapes, prefreezing juice boxes for picnics, supervising themebirthday parties and more craft-projects than I can remember. Schoolbags contained hidden encouragement notes stating things like, “I’m proud to be your mom” and/or “I believe in you!” Many nights I’d fall asleep with a freshly showered tadpole or three, dozing off to the prose of “Goodnight Moon,” “A Napping House” or “Corduroy.” Why the hesitation? Their kids don’t speak English! My Hebrew is good enough as long as three or four bi-lingual adult sabras are nearby for translation purposes. But with a husband in synagogue most of the day and me unable to tell the “Stone Soup” story without making it sound like the Charles Manson

DRAWING BY PEPE FAINBERG

Welcome to Love

trial is a task that leaves me feeling uneasy. The three who were coming don’t read yet which meant–gasp –interaction! Did I say, “Help!”? We had a blast. Mattresses on the floor, the dog slept with them and we had a tea party on the patio – using real bone-china and cloth napkins. I unpacked a stack of my children’s favorite books and the girls performed the stories they imagined were being told. Some interpretations were spot on; others were better. Junk-food wasn’t missed as we dined on homemade apple-chips and prepared a sumptuous kiddush with fresh tahini, roasted beets, gravlax and organic crackers. We made “Ants on a Log” with black-raisins and peanut butter I’d whipped up just before they arrived. Moral of the tale: Love doesn’t need words and fun transcends language. The size and/or condition of one’s home are equally unimportant. Indeed, “insight” can be discovered when “fear” is tossed aside, making room for “wisdom.” A New York-born Andrea Simantov is a mother of six who moved to Jerusalem in 1995. She frequently lectures on the complexity and magic of life in Jerusalem and can be contacted at andreasimantov@gmail.com.


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On the Lighter Side | BY MAYRAV SAAR

VIEWPOINT

What to Expect… When You’re Expecting Grandparents YOU’RE PREGNANT! CONGRATULATIONS! You and your partner are anxiously anticipating the arrival of… grandparents. Grandparents will coddle, coo and adore your progeny into a bubbly froth of happy baby love. They will also elevate the stressfulness of any infant-related situation to prescription-necessitating heights. You don’t have to let it. While there is a lot of truth to the old saw that grandparents and grandchildren get along so well because they share a common enemy, with these helpful insights you will be well prepared to handle anything Bubbe and Zeide throw at you: All criticism of your parenting skills masks their shame. Your parents know they messed up. They see evidence of it everyday, from your brother’s decision to give up law school for a life of street busking to your melodramatic sister’s enduring singlehood to the way you, well, let’s not talk about you right now, dear. You’re expecting! The point is, your parenthood is an opportunity for grandparents-to-be to vindicate themselves. They will justify the choices they made by belittling yours. So remember: it’s not really about you. It’s about them. And, truth is, you probably are doing it wrong. (You’re kids will be sure to tell you all about it in 30 years.) How you talk to your parents is how your children will one day talk to you. Don’t believe me? Reflect back on how your parents spoke to and about their parents when you were still in short pants and see if the formula holds. Yep, that’s what I thought. Keep it nice.

“DUDE, DON’T HOLD THE CHILD UPSIDE DOWN BY HER ANKLES.” 22 APRIL 2015 |

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The loudest, largest, most obnoxious toy that you would never-ever want your child to have. That’s what they’re going to buy your kid. There are myriad ways to stem the tide of unnecessary junk: Amazon wish lists, baby registries, a compilation of favorite stores and a very strong admonition to purchase gift cards. But the junk will still arrive. It just will. Say thank you. Let junior play with it. Then when grandpa goes home, and junior goes to bed, throw the crap out.

Don’t argue with your spouse about parenting in front of your parents. Just as your kids will exploit disagreements between mommy and daddy, grandparents also need to be presented with a united front. Any fissure in the fortress invites the jackhammer of intergenerational intrusion. So save the “Dude, don’t hold the child upside down by her ankles” comments for after grandma has left the room.

Thank them. When you’re wiping poop off your child’s neck, while doing the seventh load of vomit-filled laundry in the middle of the night, send mom a text to say, “Thanks. Parenting is hard. I realize now just how much you did for me, and I am so grateful.” Or better yet, write a column to that effect and have it published in a magazine that all her friends read. Your choice. And, again, congratulations! A Mayrav Saar is a freelance writer and mother of three.


Israeli Guy | BY TEDDY WEINBERGER

VIEWPOINT

Medical Care in Israel Warning: you may turn green with envy.

YOU HAVE AN EXCELLENT CHANCE OF BEING SEEN IMMEDIATELY. 24 APRIL 2015 |

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EVERY CITIZEN IN Israel is entitled to choose between several state-subsidized health-maintenance organizations. I am in the Maccabi HMO. When we first moved here, with five children between the ages of two and nine, I was completely stunned by my children’s doctors visits. In the States, I had to phone our pediatrician days in advance of a check-up, and then I had to set two hours aside for the visit (including the car-ride to and from the doctor’s office, the minimum half-hour wait, and the various “stations” for measuring my child’s temperature, weight, and eyesight). In Givat Ze’ev, a bedroom community, family doctors hours are conveniently arranged from 7-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m. Even for routine visits, it’s standard procedure to call for an appointment about an hour before you want to come in (this is especially true for the morning hours). The system works like this. For example your child wakes up in the morning, doesn’t feel well and you need to take them to the doctor. You wait until 7:00 and call for an appointment. You get an appointment for, say, 7:50. At 7:45 you leave your house, walk up the hill (if you live on my block) and arrive exactly on time. You have an excellent chance of being seen immediately. Harvey, our friend and doctor, will typically diagnose the problem very quickly (surprise surprise: ear infection) and give you a prescription for penicillin. By 8:05 you will be walking down the block to the pharmacy. Most medicines routinely

prescribed will cost the minimum co-pay amount of about $4. You get the first dose of penicillin into your child with the spoon and water that you’ve remembered to bring, tell your child that they’re soon going to feel much better, kiss them goodbye, and while you walk back home, they walk five minutes to school, in time for the end of morning prayers at the public religious school of Givat Ze’ev (okay, okay, if the kid really doesn’t feel well, you can take them home with you). I should mention that the HMO’s are on a quarter system. After you go to an internist once during the quarter and have your eight shekels ($2) co-pay debited from your account, you are not billed again until the next quarter’s visit—no matter how many more times you see your internist that quarter. This is the reason why it’s possible to draw a bell-curve of Harvey’s moods throughout the year, with the high points being at the beginning of every quarter—when everyone he sees is a paying customer. Harvey, who is from England, which has its own form of socialized medicine, always jokes with me: “You Yanks! You can’t get enough of the medical system here. You just love it, don’t you?” Yes. We do. A Teddy Weinberger, Ph.D., is Director of Development for a consulting company called Meaningful. He made aliyah with his family in 1997 from Miami, where he was an assistant professor of religious studies. Teddy and his wife, Sarah Jane Ross, have five children.


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COVER STORY

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COVER STORY

Relational Judaism The Power of One on One BY FLORENCE L. DANN

T

oday anyone interested in Jewish learning can find most everything on the Internet including independent rabbis and teachers to perform weddings, train b’nai mitzvah students and conduct funerals–a sort of fee-for-service practice or what some call “transactional Judaism.” So why join a synagogue? “Once upon a time, rabbis and Jewish educators held exclusive access to the wealth of Jewish practice and tradition,” writes Dr. Ron Wolfson author of the book “Relational Judaism”–a book that has synagogues taking a look at how they have been “doing business.” People are not joining synagogues the way they used to and Wolfson attributes that to a membership model that is no longer sustainable. He suggests we move toward “relational Judaism” a term that refers to a Jewish life based on community connections on a deeper interpersonal level. It is the kind of model Chabad has been following for years. Instead of asking for dues up front, Chabad offers hospitality and programming first– determining what the community needs and wants. Then they ask for money and people respond. Most of their funding comes from those grateful for their relationship with the Chabad rabbi and his wife and family, almost always non-Orthodox Jews. And it works. It is estimated that Chabad raises well over

$1 billion annually. Just about every synagogue in Orange County has embraced the idea of “relational Judaism” tailoring it to their particular congregations. In this article we focus on what the Reform and Reconstructionist synagogues are doing. A future article will look at the steps the Orthodox, Conservative and unaffiliated congregations are taking. “You can fill a calendar with programs,” said Miriam Kaufman Van Raalte, Executive Director of Temple Beth Tikvah, “but if people don’t connect with people then they leave feeling empty.” “It’s not enough to have a beautiful campus,” said Scott Seigel, President of Temple Bat Yahm. “If you come to services, programs and events, and yet never meet anyone, you will never feel as though you are a part of something.” “People will come to synagogues, Jewish community centers, federations, and other organizations for programs,” writes Wolfson, “but they will stay for relationships.” He goes on to say that there is nothing wrong with programs but serious thought has to be given to figure out how the experience will offer participants a “deeper connection to each other, with the community and with Judaism itself, otherwise it will likely be another lovely evening, afternoon or morning with little or no lasting impact.” Seigel goes on to say, “We need to give congregants

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COVER STORY

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT:

a reason to connect furInterim Rabbi Appleby at Temple Beth Tikvah ther to our temple comRabbi Leah Lewis, Rabbi Richard munity and to hear their Steinberg and Cantor Arie Shikler stories.” For a weekend in at Shir Ha-Ma’alot February, Wolfson visited, Scott Siegel and Ron Wolfson at Temple Bat Yahm spoke and worked with Bat Yahm’s membership and board. “At our next board meeting we asked what resonated with the individual board members,” said Seigel. “The members all shared their ideas.” What came out of that was a time set aside each week where congregants could come into the sanctuary, hold the Torah and share their personal Jewish journey with other members.” “At Shir Ha-Ma’alot we have a series of pre-onegs,” said Rabbi Leah Lewis. “People Peter Levi of Temple Beth El of South who have something in common, like those Orange County. “We decided to make who had been on an Israel trip, maybe they Shabbat the emphasis and wanted it to be are longtime members, parents of our junior about celebrating this holy time together.” congregation or new memAnd so began “Shabbat bers, meet with either Rick Chai” —a Shabbat-based “WE NEED (Rabbi Richard Steinberg) or religious school model that TO GIVE me. We mostly listen to what meets two Friday afternoons they want or are looking for CONGREGANTS a month and includes comA REASON in the synagogue.” This also munity Shabbat services. gives them the opportunity TO CONNECT Pre-onegs are held after to meet each other and initiFURTHER” school at 5:30 and before ate or renew relationships. services. “Now everyone has Pre-onegs are also a part such a great time,” commented Levi, “that of a program at Temple Beth El of South some of our families stay even after services Orange County. “About five years ago we have formally concluded.” realized we weren’t doing any favors hav“We also developed a second Shabbat for ing religious school on Sunday,” said Rabbi empty nesters,” said Levi, “who are connect28 APRIL 2015 |

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ing as individuals. Our BOOMERS group (Being On Our Midlife Energized Renewal journey) consists of a dynamic group of lay people working on social and intellectual activities to address the needs of adults who are looking forward to 30 or more years of active life. Addressing the needs of special groups within a congregation is also a significant part of this relational approach. University Synagogue in Irvine has had a very strong chavurot program for almost 20 years that has resulted in lifelong friendships with new members being welcomed into existing chavurot or forming new ones. “And then of course there are Shabbat Continued on page 30


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COVER STORY Continued from page 28

dinners,” said Rabbi Arnold Rachlis of not have known each other very well. They to open the ark for Aleynu. University Synagogue, “an almost sure fire were asked to discuss what brought them to “After several of our leadership returned way to get people together.” The dinner the synagogue as well as what they would from the Union for Reform Judaism begins by folks introducing themselves, like to see implemented at Beth David. “It Conference in San Diego where Wolfson finding common interests and breaking may not have been terribly creative,” said spoke about Relational Judaism, we were all bread together. “By the end of the eve- Myers, “but it was hugely successful.” But very enthusiastic about it,” said Van Raalte. ning, they have traded stories and look that’s the point. “The first thing we did was provide name forward to seeing each other Relational Judaism isn’t tags for every member which are put out at future synagogue events.” “TIME AFTER about new programs or every Shabbat. Name tags are also presented “We were delighted to disTIME PEOPLE innovative ideas. “What we as gifts to each bar and bat mitzvah. The cover how phenomenal our learned from Ron and the name tag recognizes each member as part of STAYED FOR Shabbat dinners turned out the community. to be,” said Lewis. “Time HOURS AFTER book,” said Rachlis, “is that “We also reach out and make phone calls it’s not about ten new things after time people stayed for THE DINNER a few times a year to say hello,” said Van to introduce to the congregahours after the dinner and Raalte, “and thank them for being part of AND THESE tion, but to do many of the these relationships were being RELATIONSHIPS things we have been doing in the congregation.” translated into friendships.” Every University Synagogue member is WERE BEING a more intensive way, bringing Some Shabbat dinners are also called several times a year. “We don’t TRANSLATED in the one on one connection. call asking for money,” said Rachlis, “but at one of the rabbi’s home We also began to recognize just to wish happy holidays and ask how and others were dedicated INTO to a particular demographic: FRIENDSHIPS” the value of small events.” people are doing; do they have a place to go women, teenagers, etc. Rachlis points out “how for Thanksgiving or Pesach.” “I am always thinking of very conscious we are about how we greet But it’s not just about reaching out to ways to get people connected,” said Rabbi people.” Greeters are at the outer doors to our membership. It’s also about outreach Nancy Myers of Temple Beth David in help direct people through the building into the community. Temple Beth Sholom, Westminster. At one congregational meet- (not just at the sanctuary door). During the which is in the process of rebuilding after ing Myers did a mixer in the middle of the service, new people or visitors are a horrific fire, is focusing on buildmeeting. Everybody got a card with a Judaic asked to stand up and introduce ing a center for Jewish life in symbol, and had to find other people with themselves and then given a Orange County. “The narraFROM the same symbol. Groups consisted of peopart in the service; they are tive now,” said Bill Shane, LEFT TO RIGHT: ple who usually didn’t sit together and may Executive Director, “is about usually called up to the bima Rabbi Rachlis at University Synagogue Rabbi Nancy Meyers at Temple Beth David

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COVER STORY Continued from page 30

the people and what we are going to be as a community. It might take the form of the rabbi going on a retreat with students in New York or doing a Shabbat service at someone’s home.” “We received a grant called ‘Beyond the Walls,’” Shane said. “It is about building community in other areas—having programs where people are and not necessarily within synagogue walls.” However, when people think synagogue, they think dues. Membership dues have always been a stumbling block for the organizational structure of the synagogue. On one hand it is necessary; on the other hand it can turn people away. When Sam Backer, President of B’nai Tzedek in Fountain Valley was asked about relaCLOCKWISE FROM tional Judaism, he said, LEFT TO RIGHT: “The one thing that came Rabbi Cohen at Temple Beth Sholom to mind was the elimination of dues. To make Rabbi David N. Young at B’nai Tzedek membership more enticRabbi Levi and congregants ing and welcoming, the at Temple Beth El board voted last October to do away with required dues, implementing a program called Brit Kehilla which asks members what their commitment will be.” While it is too soon at this point to see results, as of January 1, B’nai Tzedek has seen an increase from 60% of its membership, which puts them at 90% of their necessary funding from dues. “In an indirect way we removed the obstacles to membership,” said Van Raalte. “We don’t have a dues structure for either high holidays or temple membership. Congregants received letters expressing our appreciation for their membership and how much we appreciate them. They were Jewish’ and aging baby boomer/empty nestasked to pledge what they could. “So far it ers opt out.” It’s all about perceived value. “There is certain model that people cling has been very successful.” University Synagogue has a sliding scale to,” said Seigel, “to determine success we based on income that remains confidential count the number of members, make calls while other synagogues are looking at new and invite people to Shabbat or a program. But I have come to understand that it is ways to manage their financial obligations. But as Wolfson says, “All this begs the the relationships that attract people to our central question facing Jewish institutions: congregations.” “I don’t think the idea of relational ‘What’s the value-added of joining?’ If the ‘offer’ of affiliation is not truly attractive, the Judaism is new,” said Levi. “From the time membership base will continue to narrow of the destruction of the temple it has as young people find alternative ways to ‘do been about Jews working with and relat32 APRIL 2015 |

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ing to each other.” However, in our world today, we have lost that urgency and are not always panim el panim, “face to face with each other.” “In our rush to turn out numbers,” says Wolfson we lost sight of our real goal. “It’s not about gaining more members; it’s about gaining more Jews.” A Florence L. Dann, a fourth year rabbinical student at the Academy for Jewish Religion in LA has been a contributing writer to Jlife Magazine since 2004.


“A Night at the Races” – April 25 • “Live” Horse Racing • Racing Prizes • Dinner & Drinks • $5,000 Vacation Raffle • Silent Auction Visit our website, or call for details.

www.cbtfv.org · 714-963-4611

9669 Talbert Avenue · Fountain Valley, CA 92708

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F E AT U R E S

FEELING STRESSED? It May Not Be So Bad BY LISA GRAJEWSKI, PSY.D.

THE TANACH SPEAKS of mental health, specifically in Proverbs, which says, “Anxiety in the heart of a person causes dejection, but a good word will turn it into joy.” The Hebrew for this is: Da’agah belev ish yashchenah, vedavar tov yesamchenah (Proverbs 12:25). Some interpret the passage to mean that speaking about one’s anxiety can help relieve anxiety. As a psychologist I am inclined to agree with this wisdom of King Solomon. But more recent research tells us that anxiety or stress may not be all bad. In fact, studies show that a certain level of acute (short term) anxiety can increase performance, allow us to adapt, or act as a 34 APRIL 2015 |

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motivator to “get things done.” Apparently, it is what we believe about stress that does us in. According to health psychologist Kelly McGonigal, belief in harmful stress, not stress itself, is the deleterious health risk. McGonigal found that according to research done at the University of Wisconsin, what we believe about stress–especially if we perceive it as a “bad” thing–kills over 20,000 Americans each year. But let us get back to “using a good word to turn it into joy.” We know that according to a study by Jeff Levin, Ph.D. at Baylor University, Jews who attend synagogue are healthier than

Jews that do not attend synagogue. One of the reasons for this may be the same reason that anxiety is not all bad: oxytocin. When one is stressed the body releases the hormone oxytocin (AKA, “The Cuddle Hormone”), which compels us to seek support; oxytocin is also released when we hug someone. According to McGonigal, “Your stress response has a built-in mechanism for stress resilience–and that mechanism is human connection.” We connect when we go to synagogue. In seeking out our friends, fellow members of the tribe, and social support, we are increasing our oxytocin levels, which in turn lowers our levels of anxiety and/or stress. McGonigal referenced another study by the University of Buffalo that discovered that every major stressful life experience increased an adult’s risk of death by 30 percent. However, that was mitigated when they spent a significant amount of time helping others. If you are feeling stressed out, do a mitzvah! You might live longer by helping others live better. According to McGonigal, “Caring creates resilience.” There is good news here. Firstly, stress is not all bad. At certain levels it acts as a motivator. Secondly, what you believe can change your experience of stress. Again, McGonigal notes that when one “chooses to view the stress response as helpful, you create the biology of courage.” We experience this biology of courage in our own community when we rally together for Israel when there is a crisis; or when a member of our community is in need and we pool our resources to get him or her through the catastrophe. If we change what we believe about stress maybe we can learn to see stress as a friend. Try it out–the next time you feel stressed out, ask for a hug–there is now proof you can live longer, even with stress. A Lisa Grajewski, Psy.D. Is a licensed psychologist with JFFS and an adjunct instructor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. She has been a contributing writer for Jlife Magazine since 2004.


F E AT U R E S

MAKING US PROUD Former TVT Student Receives Military Award In Israel BY LISA GRAJEWSKI, PSY.D.

WHILE MOST 20-YEAR-OLD young an action without Israeli casualties. adults in the United States are worrying about Elbaz was raised in a home steeped in Jewish getting to class on time, some are working, and and Israeli culture. Despite the “All American” a few may be starting a family. Sahar Elbaz is veneer (he loves the Denver Broncos and busy being decorated by IDF Chief of Staff Lakers) Elbaz grew up knowing he would Lieutenant General Benny Gantz and Defense serve in the IDF. His father served and all Minister Moshe Ya’alon for action he took dur- of the children (he has one older and one ing last summer’s Operation Protective Edge. younger sister) learned a love for Israel that Like most soldiers in Israel, Elbaz was created a direct connection to their homeland doing his duty for Israel. But he is not like (Elbaz’s older sister is serving in the IDF and most soldiers in Israel—he is a Lone Soldier his younger sister plans to serve as well). (a soldier with family living outside of Israel) But despite serving himself, the senior Elbaz and an American citisays having a child serve zen. Born in Denver, in the IDF is tough on Colorado to Israeli parparents. “You do not ents, Elbaz was raised hear from your child in Orange County and for weeks at a time,” he graduated from TVT in And though says. But the Israeli and 2012. Following graduSahar has a lot of Jewish community in ation, he made aliyah Israel is very supportive family in Israel, you to Israel and eventually of soldiers. “And though miss your parents. joined a special unit in Sahar has a lot of family the IDF trained in desin Israel, you miss your ert and urban warfare. parents,” says Elbaz. Elbaz was called for active duty during a The young soldier’s family is very proud of his family vacation in Israel to fight in Operation award. However, it is clear they care even more Protective Edge with the elite Givati Brigade. During the war, he took action that earned that he is safe for now. Thanks to the Libi him the Chief of Staff Citation (HaRamatkal). Fund (the official fund that supports the IDF) His action saved the lives of fellow soldiers the Elbaz family was able to attend the award and killed four terrorists. According to Elbaz’s ceremony in Israel. As a Lone Soldier, The father, Shimon Elbaz, his son was rather prag- Libi Fund brought the family from America matic about the action. “He had to act,” says to Israel ensuring that Sahar was temporarily the senior Elbaz. “It was kill them [the terror- a soldier who was not “lone.” “We are very ists] or they were going to kill his friends and proud of him,” says his father. The Orange County Jewish Community is him.” He also said that this is the first time the Chief of Staff Citation has been awarded for proud of him as well. A

Sahar with his mom after receiving his award.

Lisa Grajewski, Psy.D. Is a licensed psychologist with JFFS and an adjunct instructor at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. She has been a contributing writer for Jlife Magazine since 2004.

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PHOTO BY MICHAEL BENNETT KRESS

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Crunchy Quinoa with Sweet Potatoes and Cranberries

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Flourless Chocolate Cake with Marshmallow Icing

PHOTO BY MICHAEL BENNETT KRESS

Quinoa is the greatest new addition to the Passover pantry.

PASSING OVER UNHEALTHY Check out the new items to enjoy this year. BY JUDY BART KANCIGOR

If you never thought you would hear the words “healthy” and “Passover” in the same sentence, think again. “Quinoa is the greatest new addition to the Passover pantry,” says Paula Shoyer, author of “The New Passover Menu” (Sterling Epicure, $24.95). Gluten-free and high in protein, quinoa is a rich source of B vitamins, iron, magnesium, phosphorus and zinc. And although it resembles some Passover forbidden grains, it is considered a pseudocereal and is actually related to beetroots and spinach. Because of its high protein content, quinoa is even being considered by NASA as a possible crop in their Controlled Ecological Life Support System for longterm space flights, but we love it as a welcome source of variety for the eightday holiday. “It finally received definitive rabbinic approval for Passover in 2014,” notes Shoyer, “after a rabbi was dispatched to Peru and Bolivia to see how quinoa is grown. He learned that quinoa grows at very high altitudes, while the grains that are

prohibited on Passover are grown much farther below it. The authorities concluded that there was no risk of intermingling.” Pictured here with Shoyer’s Crunchy Quinoa with Sweet Potatoes and Cranberries are her Roasted Peppered Carrots, another healthful and vibrantly colored addition to your Passover table. To prepare the dish, cut twelve large carrots into matchsticks, toss with 1 1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, and roast at 400°F., stirring once or twice, until you can just pierce them with a fork: about 25 minutes. It is Passover after all, and the old adage “everything in moderation” comes especially to mind for those mindful of their health and weight when faced with the endless and tempting Passover dessert buffet. What is it about the restrictions of Passover that seem to challenge Jewish bakers to create ever more unusual and satisfying desserts? “Passover is the holiday when you have to be a home baker,” Shoyer explains. “Even major cities have few

bakeries, if any, that sell Passover desserts, and if they do, they are usually not worth eating. The packaged Passover cakes and cookies often taste like cardboard. If you want flavorful Passover desserts, you have to bake them yourself.” Fortunately Shoyer, a graduate of the Ritz Escoffier pastry program in Paris and widely known for her previous baking books, “The Kosher Baker” and “The Holiday Kosher Baker,” has provided a wide variety of Passover choices in her new book, including Triple Chocolate Biscotti, Glazed Chocolate Fudge Sponge Cake, Pistachio and Strawberry Roll, Pear Frangipane Tart and Cheesecake with Roasted Cashew and Chocolate Crust. “Flourless chocolate cake is ubiquitous at Passover, but I began to tire of the same recipe year after year,” recalls Shoyer, who adorns this version with a lovely, comforting marshmallow topping. And, bittersweet chocolate is loaded with antioxidants, so enjoy!

Crunchy Quinoa with Sweet Potatoes and Cranberries Serves 6–8

“My husband, Andy, eats quinoa for breakfast with blueberries all Passover long,” says Shoyer. “This dish is a great combination of color and texture.” 1 cup quinoa, rinsed 2 cups water 1 teaspoon salt, or more to taste, divided use 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes 7 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided 4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons honey 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

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The old adage “everything in moderation” comes especially to mind for those mindful of their health and weight.

1/3 cup pine nuts, toasted 1/3 cup dried cranberries 3 green onions, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices

1 Preheat oven to 400°F. 2 Place quinoa in small saucepan with

water. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer, covered, 15 minutes, or until water evaporates. Stir in 1/4 teaspoon salt. Off heat let quinoa sit, covered, at least half an hour. Quinoa may be cooked 2 days ahead and refrigerated, covered.

3 In roasting pan, toss sweet potato cubes with 1 tablespoon oil and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Roast 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until cubes can be pierced with fork. Set aside.

4 Dressing: In small bowl, whisk together

remaining 6 tablespoons oil with vinegar, honey, cumin, cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper.

5 Assemble: Use whisk to break apart any

clumps of quinoa; transfer to large bowl. Add dressing; whisk well. Add sweet potatoes, pine nuts, cranberries, green onions and salt to taste, if needed. Mix gently. Serve at room temperature.

Flourless Chocolate Cake with Marshmallow Icing “Here, I’ve dressed up this classic dessert with a sweet cooked icing that perfectly complements the bitter chocolate cake,” says Shoyer. CAKE: 1 teaspoon oil, for greasing pan 10 ounces bittersweet chocolate, roughly chopped 1/2 cup (1 stick) margarine 6 large eggs, separated, whites at room temperature (see note) 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa 1/2 cup sugar

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ICING: 1 cup sugar 1/4 cup warm water 2 large egg whites, at room temperature 1 tablespoon honey Dash salt

1 Preheat oven to 350°F. With parchment

paper, trace and cut out a circle around bottom of 9- or 10-inch springform pan. Grease bottom of pan with 1/2 teaspoon oil. Press parchment circle on top. Grease top of parchment circle and sides of pan with remaining oil so finished cake will easily slide onto serving plate.

2 Melt chocolate and margarine over

double boiler, or use heatproof bowl over saucepan filled with simmering water, whisking often until thoroughly melted. You can also microwave at 30-second increments, mixing after each heating cycle. Remove melted chocolate mixture from heat, add egg yolks and cocoa and whisk well.

3 In separate bowl, with electric mixer

on high speed, beat egg whites until stiff. Reduce speed to low, add sugar, a tablespoon at a time and mix. Then turn speed to high for 1 minute.

4 Fold egg whites into chocolate mixture

in four parts, mixing more slowly after each addition. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 35 minutes, or until cake is set when jiggled. Cake will puff up and look cracked on top, but will fall a bit when cooled. Refrigerate 4 hours to overnight.

5 To serve, open spring; remove sides

of pan. With metal flat-blade spatula, separate parchment from bottom of pan and slide parchment and cake onto serving plate. Tuck waxed paper or parchment paper under cake to keep platter clean when icing.

6 Icing: Pour a few inches of water into

bottom of double boiler or medium saucepan and bring to a boil; reduce heat to medium. Off heat, place sugar and warm water in top of double boiler, or in heatproof bowl that fits into saucepan without falling in. Whisk to dissolve sugar. Add egg whites, honey and salt; beat with hand-held electric mixer for 1 minute on medium-high speed. Place bowl over gently boiling water and beat with handheld electric mixer on high speed a full 7 minutes. Remove from heat.

7 Trim any dry pieces from top of cake. If

top of cake is uneven, place parchment on top of cake and turn over to ice bottom. With metal spatula, spread icing on sides of cake, then top. Smooth top and sides or, if you plan to toast them with a blowtorch, use small spoon to create waves or texture on top. Remove waxed paper or parchment pieces from under cake. Store cake in fridge. Use blowtorch to brown waved edges until golden-brown.

Note: To bring egg whites to room temperature in 10 minutes, separate eggs and place whites in metal bowl. Place bowl over another bowl filled with 2 inches of hot water. Stir eggs occasionally, and they will be at room temperature within 10 minutes. Adapted from “The New Passover Menu” by Paula Shoyer. Jlife food Editor Judy Bart Kancigor is the author of “Cooking Jewish” (Workman) and “The Perfect Passover Cookbook” (an e-book short from Workman), a columnist and feature writer for the Orange County Register and other publications and can be found on the web at www.cookingjewish.com.


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| APRIL 2015 41


out&about PAUL ANKA Paul Anka performs with the Pacific Symphony in the Segerstrom Concert Hall on April 9 to 11. A sensation since the age of 16, when he rocketed to stardom with “Diana,” Paul Anka today boasts a catalog of more than 900 songs, including “Put Your Head on My Shoulder,” “Puppy Love,” “Time of Your Life” and “I Love You Baby.” The legendary singer/ songwriter—has penned songs for Frank Sinatra, Tom Jones, Donny Osmond, Michael Jackson and many others.

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ARLO GUTHRIE

GUYS & DOLLS

Arlo Guthrie celebrates the 50th Anniversary of Alice’s Restaurant during a two-night performance at the Irvine Barclay Theatre on April 10 and 11. The story begins on Thanksgiving Day in 1965, when Arlo first started work on the song that took more than a year to complete. Alice’s Restaurant became an international hit and was made into a major motion picture starring Arlo himself.

Guys And Dolls will be playing at Segerstrom Hall April 14 to 19. Packed with one unforgettable song after another, including “A Bushel and a Peck,” and, of course, “Luck Be A Lady.” The show is based on the stories of Damon Runyan and features the music and lyrics of Frank Loesser, about a group of small-time gamblers and petty criminalsin New York City and the women who loved them during the late 1940’s.

CABINET OF GHOSTS

THE SECOND CITY

The Orange County Center for Contemporary Art (OCCCA) is pleased to present Cabinet of Ghosts running through April 18. This is a group exhibition, which gathers new work from artists exploring the aftermath of a catastrophe, genocide or war. How should we treat memories we leave behind–in real life, as a metaphor and/or as a tool?

The Second City’s 55th Anniversary Tour is coming to the Laguna Beach Play House April 1 through April 4. The Second City is opening up their vaults and giving you the ultimate peek behind the curtain! See the best of the best comedy created by some of the biggest names in the biz—mixed up with brand spankin’ new material performed by the red-hot talent of today!


ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE | April 2015

Lisa Loeb Grammy®-nominated Jewish singer, songwriter, reality TV star and entrepreneur Lisa Loeb will be playing at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano on April 18. Loeb’s career took off with the platinum-selling Number 1 hit song “Stay (I Missed You)” from the film “Reality Bites” in 1994. To this day, she is still the only artist to have a Number 1 single as an unsigned artist. Loeb was raised in Dallas, Texas with her mother Gail, who was the president of the Dallas County Medical Society Alliance and Foundation and her father, Dr. Peter Loeb, a gastroenterologist. All of her three siblings are also involved in the music industry: conductor Benjamin Loeb, musician Debbie Loeb and mix engineer Philip Loeb. As a child, she studied piano, but later switched to guitar. After graduating from high school in 1986, she went to Brown University, where she graduated in 1990 with a degree in comparative literature. At Brown, she and Elizabeth Mitchell formed a band named Liz and Lisa, with future singer/songwriter and classmate Duncan Sheik as a guitarist. Lisa Loeb’s foray into acting began in 1997

with cameos in television shows such as “The Nanny” and “Cupid.” She has since continued to perform and add additional television credits to her everexpanding repertoire, including appearances on “The Drew Carey Show,” “The Chris Isaak Show” and “Gossip Girl.“ In 2004, Loeb starred in the first of two television series with then boyfriend Dweezil Zappa, “Dweezil and Lisa,” a weekly culinary adventure for Food Network. Her

second show, “No. 1 Single” appeared on E! Entertainment Network in 2006 and featured Lisa’s journey to find love. Continuing her passion for music, Loeb released her first children’s book “Lisa Loeb’s Silly SingAlong: The Disappointing Pancake and Other Zany Songs” in October 2011. Known for her wit, wacky humor and creativity, the children’s songbook that featured a CD included four original silly songs plus six all-time kids’ favorites.

In 2013, Loeb released a studio album featuring Tegan and Sara Quin, called “No Fairy Tale,” and a second children’s book “Lisa Loeb’s Songs for Moving and Shaking.” Today, Loeb continues to grow as an artist and to push herself and her career forward with a creative zeal and an inner drive not often seen. Now a mom of two, she is also in the process of releasing a new eyeglass line, in partnership with Classique Eyewear.

Lisa Loeb

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CROSSWORD Feast for Your Eyes

BY: DAVID STEINBERG } EDITOR: DAVIDBENKOF@GMAIL.COM } DIFFICULTY LEVEL: MANAGEABLE

HINT: 16 ACROSS

6 Natalie Portman won one for “Black Swan” (5) 7 “Come again, rabbi?” (3) 8 ___ mode (with Ben & Jerry’s, perhaps) (1,2) 9 Hebrew for “hill” (3) 10 Brouhahas (4) 11 Make, Genesis-style (6)

30 “ . . . like ___ of bricks” (1,3)

ACROSS 1 Israel map setting (5)

31 Diamond jewel box? (2,4)

6 Nebraska city whose population is similar to that of Tel Aviv (5)

32 Non-Jewish gospels (8)

11 Gelt guru, briefly (3)

35 One of Madoff’s many (5)

14 Ten Commandments verb (5) 15 Israeli ___ (dish with diced tomatoes and cucumbers) (5)

36 *Pesach food that symbolizes the holiday offering in the days of the Holy Temple (4-6,3)

16 Jerusalem sewer scurrier (3)

42 Has chutzpah (5)

17 With 61-Across, Pesach platter where the starred foods in this puzzle can be found (5)

43 Schnook (4)

18 *Pesach food that symbolizes the clay Jews used to make bricks and mortar....... (9)

49 Order from Mt. Nebo (6)

34 Observant Orthodox Jew (4)

45 Dangers for Isidor and Ida Straus on their Titanic voyage (8) 51 Shock a gonif, perhaps (4) 52 *Pesach food that symbolizes how unpleasant the labor for the Pharaoh was (6,4)

20 Gp. that may distribute Israel maps (3) 22 Admire a menorah, say (5) 23 *Pesach food that symbolizes the Jews’ backbreaking labor for the Pharaoh (5,5)

54 Apple messaging app that existed when Ariel Sharon was P.M. (5) 56 Red Sea filler, in Nancy (3)

57 *Pesach food that symbolizes the Paschal sacrifice the Jews made before leaving Egypt (9) 61 See 17-Across (5) 66 ___ Tamid (3) 67 One might be proposed by the father of the kallah (5)

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45 “S’iz shver tzu sein a Yid” (___ easy being a Jew) (2,4) 46 Gelt hiding places (6) 47 Key used by Mahler (1-5)

13 Home to the majority of Greece’s Jewish population (6)

49 Org. concerned with MDMA smuggled from Israel (3)

19 Party without yentas (4)

50 Goes off, in Golan Heights (6)

21 Noah’s was 950 (3)

53 Pesach food chompers (5)

23 Letters describing some screens on which “Ramzor” can be watched (3)

55 “Fiddler on the Roof” buys: Abbr. (4)

24 Synagogue congregation (4) 25 Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s proceedings (4)

69 Kosher salt amt. (3)

27 Most like a dybbuk (7)

70 Literally “princess” (5)

28 Blasphemy et al. (5)

71 Costing oodles of shekels (5)

29 Ehud or Ezer (4)

DOWN

33 “The Simpsons” character Flanders who fears that his children will grow up to be Jewish Hollywood producers (3) 35 Welsh bar mitzvah recipient? (5)

3 Hebrew school pupil (3)

37 U.S. president during the Suez Crisis (3)

4 Shmaltz Brewing Company beverage (3)

38 Joan Rivers remark (4)

5 Eilat alley sights (6)

44 Isr. neighbor (3)

48 Morsel mixed with Israeli couscous (4)

68 Approaches the end of the Jerusalem Marathon, probably (5)

2 “History of ___ World: Part 1” (Mel Brooks film) (3)

41 Bar mitzvah attendee (4)

12 Israeli army unit (6)

26 World’s ___ (St. Louis event that had a Jerusalem exhibit in 1904) (4)

1 Numbers animal (3)

40 Six-Day War feature, alas (4)

39 Create a stained glass window for a temple (4)

58 Snake that, unlike the Israeli Viper, isn’t poisonous (3) 59 Brandeis Rowing Team device (3) 60 Unit 8200’s U.S. equivalent (3) 62 Like candles on a menorah (3) 63 “Chances ___” (1989 Robert Downey, Jr. film) (3) 64 Peg for Amy Alcott (3) 65 Uri Geller’s claim, for short (3)

March Answers


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BOOK REVIEW

Ben Lesser

A LIFE OF MEANING “Living a Life That Matters” by Ben Lesser BY TANYA SCHWIED

BEN LESSER IS a survivor of the Holocaust, one of the darkest periods of our world’s history. His story is one of millions, each being unique, each needing to be told, heard and remembered. Ben knows this and today dedicates his life to telling his story so that it will always be remembered. Lesser first felt compelled to write about his life as a way to document man’s inhumanity to man from an individual’s point of view. He felt it was important to provide a real-life view of history that was more intimate than the dry facts found in text books. “As the numbers of Holocaust Survivors becomes fewer and fewer,” he says, “it is our responsibility to make sure that others understand its lessons. Here are just a few of those lessons. Choose a Life of Meaning “Individuals can’t always choose what happens to them. But whether it’s a crisis or calamity, people can choose to either let it ruin their lives or to learn from it and move forward. It is essential to understand the consequences of per-

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Courtney Shepard is an aggressive and passionate advocate for her clients, and has successfully litigated cases involving: • Child Custody • Child Support • Spousal Support • Attorney Fees • Complex Business Matters

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Courtney Shepard is a Certified Family Law Specialist with a distinguished academic background. A UCLA graduate, Ms. Shepard earned her Juris Doctor degree, cum laude, from Whittier Law School.

COURTNEY L. SHEPARD Law Offices of Burch, Coulston & Shepard, LLP 20281 SW Birch Street, 1st Floor Newport Beach, CA 92660

949-502-4400 www.ocdivorce.net


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sonal choices. It is possible to let tragedy or trauma become a reason to stop living. But it is also possible to live through extreme circumstances and commit to a life that has meaning. A life that matters.”

ever is in my power, whether it’s teaching or giving lectures, to speak about the Holocaust to anyone that will listen. I feel obligated and so thankful that I survived.

Work Against Hatred “We must each choose to take responsibility for living lives that work against hatred. And hatred can only exist where people are ignorant, so we must constantly provide anti-hatred education. In doing so we contribute to the healing of others.”

Did you struggle with survivor’s guilt? So many people more worthy than I did not survive. I have to give something back– I have to speak out for the 6 million voices that were silenced. That’s why I started the Zachor Foundation-zachor means to remember, to keep the memory alive. We learn from the Holocaust… these Nazis were not born Nazis they were people like you and I with loving families. In that beautiful country of Germany with all its brilliant composers and scientists, Nazism was born. Apparently there is a little bit of evil in each of us… we just have to be is the very careful not to allow it to surface. all your

The Power of Love “More than anything else, I understand the power of love to eliminate hate. The love of my parents, who were massacred by the Nazis, gave me the foundation that my life has “Life been built on. My love for them and my brutally murdered sister and brothers fills my heart to this sum of day. And in the horror of Hitler’s concentration choices.” What are some simple things we can do to camps, there was no way to even imagine that one — Albert Camus live a life that matters? I believe it is essenday I would live to find my soul mate, my best tial to understand the consequences of personal friend and the love of my life, my wife of 63 years, Jean. For us to have been blessed with our two choices. I came here at the age of 18 with no edubeautiful daughters and four amazing grandchildren is proof that cation, no money, no family. I didn’t even know the language. Some love is stronger than hate.” of these kids who I speak to have a “deprived childhood”–I believe I recently had the honor of speaking with Mr. Lesser (he said I that it’s all in your mind. If you choose to succeed in this wonderful can call him Ben). country who is going to stop you?! Any profession you choose, work In your own experience how have you learned to live with the memories? Do you have tools that help you deal every day and night? It’s still very emotional for me, but I feel compelled to talk to people about my experience. I dedicated my life to keeping this world from acquiring amnesia. I will do what-

hard, study hard and you can achieve anything. I am a symbol. With this being the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz and not a lot of survivors left to tell their own Continued on page 49

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A&E

BOOK REVIEW

Continued from page 47

personal stories. Is this the best way to continue remembering and keeping the legacy of the survivors alive? I realized live testimony is crucially important. There are so few of us left. We cannot afford to keep quiet. The world has to know ... (or) things could repeat themselves, you never know. The young people who hear us speak and read our stories are the last generation to have access to a Survivor. They are the last witnesses to truth. They will have to take on the responsibility of making sure our stories, and the lessons they teach, will live after we are gone. Some people believe that the recent resurgence of antisemitism in Europe is very similar to what was happening before the Holocaust. What can we do to raise awareness and stop the hatred? I started the Zachor Foundation in order to give the kids a

memento to remember the Holocaust. I’ve given out 150,000 pins free of charge to anyone that has listened to me speak or teaches about the Holocaust. Also, I started “I Shout Out” (www.i-shoutout.org) a call to action for anyone wanting to speak out against injustice or intolerance. Change will happen if enough people speak out. Let’s reverse the trend in antisemitism. It’s beautiful because we are different: we look and think differently. That’s what makes it interesting. For more information about Ben Lesser’s foundation go to zachorfoundation.org Also for information about Holocaust Survivor Services here in Orange County please contact Cally Clein, LCSW at (949) 435-3460, Ext. 359 / Cally@jffs.org. A Tanya Schwied graduated from New York University, studied abroad in Israel and currently works for the CEO and President of Jewish Federation & Family Services.

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News&Jews OC JEWISH SCENE | APRIL 2015

Pyramids, Pyramids, Everywhere Last week, the Arts and Humanities House at the Hebrew Academy, Huntington Beach was proud to host the grand opening of the Hebrew Academy Museum of Art and Culture for their exhibition, “Pyramids, Pyramids, Everywhere: Meeting Human Needs in Ancient Egypt and Beyond.” During the event, sixth graders served as docents to a collection of parents, faculty and community members who viewed the student-created artifacts, listened to the expert presentations on each exhibit, and participated in the Egyptian-themed photo-booth and activity center. Tours of student groups will continue this week, and visitors are welcome to join. For more information about The Hebrew Academy please visit www. hebrewacademyhb.com.

Rabbi Haim Asa Memorial Lecture The Rabbi Haim Asa Memorial Lecture, Sunday, April 26, 7 p.m., Temple Beth Tikvah, Fullerton “The Rabbi Haim Asa Memorial Lecture” will be presented by Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, Chief Rabbi of Efrat, Israel and one of the leading voices in the modern orthodox world. The lecture will be free of charge and will be open to the public at large. Temple Beth Tikvah requests that you RSVP for this lecture. Please contact the Temple at info@tbtoc. org or (714) 871-3535.

Joel P. Moskowitz, z”l (1940-2015) Our deepest sympathies go out to Ann Moskowitz whose beloved husband Joel passed away yesterday after a long struggle with cancer. Joel was a pacesetting supporter of Jewish Federation & Family Services of Orange County and was especially proud to support his wife Ann as Chair of the JFFS Passport to Jewish Life® educational grant program by establishing the Ann Moskowitz Passport to Jewish Life® Endowment Fund on July 26, 2014. Donations in Joel’s memory may be made to Jewish Federation & Family Services of Orange County, Jewish National Fund or Alfred University. May God comfort Ann and her family among the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem and may Joel’s memory be for a blessing.

A Jewish Tomorrow A whopping $81,000 was recently granted to Create a Jewish Legacy Partners. For the past 15 months, the Foundation has mentored nine local Jewish organizations to obtain a combined total of over 200 new legacy gift commitments. In partnership with the Harold Grinspoon Foundation, the Jewish Community Foundation educates and inspires our Create a Jewish Legacy Partner institutions, providing them with the training, tools and support needed to effectively engage their supporters. 52 APRIL 2015 |

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News&Jews Leonard Simon Nimoy (1931–2015)

Honoring Adrienne and Rick Matros Celebrating the theme “deeds of giving are the very foundations of the world,” the Merage Jewish Community Center will honor Adrienne and Rick Matros on Sunday, May 3 at 5 p.m. at their annual Celebration Ball. “The Celebration Ball is truly that, a celebration of our community and those that work tirelessly to strengthen the ties that bind us. Adrienne and Rick especially provide a powerful impact on the JCC, our Jewish children and the world. Their collaborative efforts inspire, invigorate and allow the Merage JCC to accomplish more for our community every day,” says Wendy Stark, event co-chair. For more information please visit www.jccoc.org/events/ijec/.

It is with a heavy heart that we say “Goodbye” to Leonard Simon Nimoy. Mr. Nimoy was an American actor, film director, photographer, author, poet, singer and songwriter. He was best known for his role as Mr. Spock of the Star Trek franchise. The character is iconic and considered to be one of the most popular alien characters ever portrayed on television. Nimoy’s character “took the public by storm,” nearly eclipsing the star of the show, William Shatner’s Captain Kirk. He passed away due to complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is survived by his widow Susan Bay and two children Adam Nimoy and Julie Nimoy.

Our Future Leaders Rep. Mimi Walters (R-45), a former city and state legislator from Laguna Niguel who was elected to Congress in November, spoke to younger students and parents and met with upper and middle school student leaders at Tarbut V’Torah (TVT) on Friday, February 20.

County Community Scholar Program This year the Orange County Community Scholar Program (CSP) celebrated their 10th Annual Dads & Kids Camping Trip “In-Tents”– their group went to Death Valley, CA! CSP brings the best adult Jewish education programs in the world to Orange County and shares the joy of Judaism with unique handson Jewish family celebration experiences. Jlife

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LIFESTYLE

NO PEACE IN OUR TIME What are the prospects for a Palestinian state? BY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER

OF ALL THE idiocies uttered in reaction to Benjamin Netanyahu’s stunning election victory, none is more ubiquitous than the idea that peace prospects are now dead because Netanyahu has declared that there will be no Palestinian state while he is Israel’s prime minister. I have news for the lowing herds: There would be no peace and no Palestinian state if Isaac Herzog were prime minister either. Or Ehud Barak or Ehud Olmert for that matter. The latter two were (non-Likud) prime ministers who offered the Palestinians their own state—with its capital in Jerusalem and every Israeli settlement in the new Palestine uprooted—only to be rudely rejected. This is not ancient history. This is 2000, 2001 and 2008—three astonishingly concessionary peace offers within the last 15 years. Every one rejected. The fundamental reality remains: This generation of Palestinian leadership—from Yasser Arafat to Mahmoud Abbas—has never and will never sign its name to a final peace settlement dividing the land with a Jewish state. And without that, no Israeli government of any kind will agree to a Palestinian state. Today, however, there is a second reason a peace agreement is impossible: the supreme instability of the entire Middle East. For half a century, it was run by dictators no one liked but with whom you could do business. For example, the 1974 Israel-Syria disengagement agreement yielded more than four decades of near-total quiet on the border because the Assad dictatorships so decreed. That authoritarian order is gone. Syria is wracked by a multi-sided civil war that has killed 200,000 people and that has al-Qaeda allies, Hezbollah fighters, government troops and even 54 APRIL 2015 |

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the occasional Iranian general prowling the Israeli border. Who inherits? No one knows. In the last four years, Egypt has had two revolutions and three radically different regimes. Yemen went from pro-American to Iranian client so quickly the U.S. had to evacuate its embassy in a panic. Libya has gone from Moammar Gadhafi’s crazy authoritarianism to jihadi-dominated civil war. On Wednesday, Tunisia, the one relative success of the Arab Spring, suffered a major terror attack that the prime minister said “targets the stability of the country.” From Mali to Iraq, everything is in flux. Amid this mayhem, by what magic would the West Bank, riven by a bitter Fatah-Hamas rivalry, be an island of stability? What would give any Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement even a modicum of durability? There was a time when Arafat commanded the Palestinian movement the way Gadhafi commanded Libya. Abbas commands no one. Why do you think he is in the 11th year of a four-year term, having refused to hold elections for the last five years? Because he’s afraid he would lose to Hamas. With or without elections, the West Bank could fall to Hamas overnight. At which point fire rains down on Tel Aviv, Ben Gurion

Airport and the entire Israeli urban heartland—just as it rains down on southern Israel from Gaza when it suits Hamas. Any Arab-Israeli peace settlement would require Israel to make dangerous and inherently irreversible territorial concessions on the West Bank in return for promises and guarantees. Under current conditions, these would be written on sand. Israel is ringed by jihadi terrorists in Sinai, Hamas in Gaza, Hezbollah in Lebanon, Islamic State and Iranian proxies in Syria, and a friendly but highly fragile Jordan. Israelis have no idea who ends up running any of these places. Well, say the critics. Israel could be given outside guarantees. Guarantees? Like the 1994 Budapest Memorandum in which the U.S., Britain and Russia guaranteed Ukraine’s “territorial integrity”? Like the red line in Syria? Like the unanimous U.N. resolutions declaring illegal any Iranian enrichment of uranium—now effectively rendered null? Peace awaits three things. Eventual Palestinian acceptance of a Jewish state. A Palestinian leader willing to sign a deal based on that premise. A modicum of regional stability that allows Israel to risk the potentially fatal withdrawals such a deal would entail. I believe such a day will come. But there is zero chance it comes now or even soon. That’s essentially what Netanyahu said in explaining on Thursday his no-Palestinian-state statement. In the interim, I understand the crushing disappointment of the Obama administration and its media poodles at the spectacular success of the foreign leader they loathe more than any other on the planet. The consequent seething and sputtering are understandable, if unseemly. Blaming Netanyahu for banishing peace, however, is mindless. A Charles Krauthammer’s email address is letters@charleskrauthammer.com.


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IN MEMORIAM

Allan Fainbarg

THE LEGACY OF ALLAN FAINBARG Humility, Compassion, Philanthropy BY SHALOM ELCOTT

WHEN I FIRST met Allan Fainbarg in 2004 it was at the final end of a long discussion which was part of the process concerning my relocation from Israel to Orange County. It took place with another one of our pioneering icons Arnold Feuerstein at the Mongolian BBQ in Newport Beach—a favorite restaurant of both (for $7.99 you could get all you can eat). As I sat with the two of them I realized that the Orange County Jewish Community had two philanthropists who had a keen awareness of the community’s needs and a business-like intuition of how to invest philanthropic dollars wisely while inspiring others to give. 56 APRIL 2015 |

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At the time, the Samueli Jewish Campus was under construction and the vision of Allan Fainbarg and Arnold Feuerstein went far beyond the Merage JCC buildings, and deep into servicing a wide cross section of Jewish communal needs in Orange County. I was sold. It wasn’t long before I was participating in countless meetings with organizations including the Jewish Community Foundation, TVT, Heritage Pointe, Merage JCC, Jewish Family Services, Bureau of Jewish Education, Hebrew Academy and Morasha Jewish day school. Allan was an investor in all of them and he took a personal interest in their success. He showed up

to meetings—was the first to write a check— always leading by example. Allan’s son-in-law, Irv Chase, told a great story about Allan at the memorial. A construction manager of one of the projects used to see this short man come to the job site daily, helping himself to donuts. One day the worker came by the office to receive his check and he saw the older man and asked, “Who is that man?” Chase replied, “That’s the man who signs your checks.” The worker said, “Oh I thought he was homeless and just getting a free breakfast.” That was Allan Fainbarg, unassuming and humble, he never needed special treatment. I will never forget telling my staff about how he went to the same barber for years. One day his barber talked to him about his financial troubles and how the mortgage was too much for him to pay. At that exact moment Allan walked out to his car and wrote a check to pay off his mortgage. When I was at Sandy’s before the funeral, I said there are going to be hundreds of people at his memorial because he touched so many lives. The gardener, the pharmacist, the construction worker, the caretaker and the doctors—those were Allan’s people! And those were the people at the memorial. The number of jobs he saved and scholarships given (no matter big or small) is astounding. Rob Friedman, chairman and co-founder of Auction.com, LLC, the nation’s leading online real estate marketplace, leaned into me at the memorial and said he would not be where he is today if it was not for Allan. The most important thing that he left to the Jewish Community was a family and generations of Jewish leadership in Orange County— and he understood the importance of that. That is why he invested in the JCC, Next Gen, Skillset leadership programs and Jewish Family Services. His daughter, Nancy Chase sits on the Family Services Advisory Committee because of her passion to help people, his son Steven Fainbarg is co-chair of JFFS’ Connect 2 Israel Committee, Irv Chase loves to support anything that helps young Jewish people get together, and his grandson Ryan is involved in Next Gen and Shalom Family. This is the legacy of Allan Fainbarg l’dor v’dor… From generation to generation. A Shalom Elcott is the President and CEO of Jewish Federation & Family Services. He lives in Irvine with his wife Robin. They have four children and two grandsons.


LIFESTYLE

A view of the entrance into the Library from the permanent exhibit featuring the bust of Nobel Laureate and Distinguished Presidential Fellow, Elie Wiesel.

LIVES RENEWED A Visit to the Samueli Holocaust Memorial Library BY DVORAH LEWIS

AS THE ELEVATOR doors opened, the trickling of water from the fountain outside the Sala and Aron Samueli Holocaust Memorial Library greeted me. Stepping closer, I saw it was not simply a fountain, but a sculpture honoring the children murdered in the Holocaust. Jessica Mylymuk, Assistant Director of the Rodgers Center for Holocaust Education, led the tour. Before entering the permanent exhibit, she showed me a wall with photos of survivors, members of the 1939 Society. The majority of photos have people smiling—an expression not usually shown at a Holocaust memorial. The photos taken

by Bill Aron are a part of The Indestructible Spirit exhibit offering a different representation of Holocaust survivors, displaying their resilience in spite of the suffering they faced. This ability to regain humanity is a common theme throughout the library. As I entered into the library, a bust of Elie Wiesel stared back. Every spring, this Nobel Laureate and Distinguished Presidential Fellow of Chapman University spends a week speaking to students as well as speaking at public events. On the walls surrounding the bust are pieces of art commemorating the Holocaust. The creators of this artwork

were previous winners of the Library’s annual Holocaust Art and Writing Contest, an amazing outreach program for middle and high school students. The rotating exhibit along one of the walls consists of personal possessions belonging to the same smiling survivors captured in the photos. The survivors not only donate their collections, but also their time. Some take part in the distinguished lecture series held throughout the year. Among them are scholars, filmmakers, and human rights advocates. In December 2014, the lecture series featured author of “Hitler’s Furies,” Wendy Lower. On April 16th, the Rodgers Center will present an Evening of Holocaust Remembrance marking 70 years since the liberation of the camps. Elie Wiesel is scheduled to offer reflections. This will be a ticketed event although, like other events, there is no charge. Tickets are available at chapman.edu/holocaustremembrance. The Library’s partnership with the Holocaust survivors and their families, like with The 1939 Society, contributes greatly to the uniquely warm atmosphere of the space. This feeling was a new experience for me—a feeling I had never felt before at any of the Holocaust memorials I have visited. It is not the Library’s intention to overload their guests with somberness, ultimately making it easier for them to connect and bring each one of these stories to life. For more information on the library and the programs offered, visit www.chapman.edu/ research-and-institutions/holocaust-education/. A Dvorah Lewis is a contributing writer. Jlife

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LIFESTYLE

Fraternities provide a great opportunity to make new friends.

NICE JEWISH BOYS Brains, Brawn, Brotherhood BY ADAM CHESTER

VISUALIZE THE STEREOTYPICAL male college student. Does your image match the standard views of the past, composed of privilege, prestige and ingenuity in thought? Now, take your image, and add Judaism to the picture. For many, this new conception deviates to a controversial reflection of a struggling lateadolescent working to overcome the harsh realities of hatred, oppression and racism, searching for a place to belong. With growth and progression in so many areas of our society, how is there such a significant digression in the mindset, lifestyle and general feeling of safety of our collegiate leaders of tomorrow? This paradigm shift 58 APRIL 2015 |

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seems paradoxical. Where might a student go to explore their identity, and find others who not only experience a similar reality, but also a desire to reach an improved future filled with a peaceful climate, continuity and collaboration between different racial, social and ethnic groups? For over 100,000 men in multiple countries, the panacea for battling and overcoming difficulties was found through the brotherhood of the Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity (AEPi). In Orange County, AEPi is strongly represented by three distinct chapters. Jlife met with the current leaders of AEPi, to learn how they’ve benefitted from the fraternity and how closeness in proximity has

encouraged chapter collaboration. “Originally from North Carolina, I didn’t have many Jewish friends growing up,” said Will Hyman, Master and Founding Father of Chapman AEPi. “AEPi helped me strengthen my identity and become proud to be Jewish. Now, my best friends are Jewish.” Arthur DeTalia, Lieutenant Master at CSUF, placed an emphasis on the pride he has in being Jewish and supporting Israel. “A big pillar of AEPi is advocating for the Jewish people,” said DeTalia. “Because our Jewish community is small, we put energy into the growth of Judaism on campus and strive to increase Jewish pride.” When asked about the challenges posed by the BDS movement, Aaron Daniel, Master of UCI AEPi, said, “There’s strength in numbers. We know we have the support of one another from every campus, especially when things are difficult. What differentiates us from other Greek chapters is that we’re young, educated men who aren’t afraid to take a stand against hatred and support one another and the Jewish people at all costs.” AEPi is more than a fraternity. It’s a brotherhood of ambitious men who wish to make a difference, with members who are products of Jewish empowerment, pride and perseverance, all of which are vehemently clear through their volunteer and social justice projects. Alpha Epsilon Pi breeds Jewish leadership, aids in young men discovering their full potential and helps them determine exactly where they belong. Now, imagine your stereotypical Jewish college student. A Adam Chester graduated from UC San Diego with a degree in Clinical Psychology, is the NextGen Outreach & Engagement Coordinator at JFFS, and a proud alumnus of The Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity.


NEWPORT’S “PERFECT PEDI”:

Concierge Podiatry Introduces The Medical Pedicure Local podiatrist Dr. Ivar Roth elevates the standard of foot care to a new level.

Dr Ivar Roth: The Podiacurists are trained to use binocular microscope glasses when performing their procedures. They use four unique instruments used in a Podiatrists office. These instruments are the scalpel to efficiently and effectively shave off the callouses and corns, a medical grade Tissue nipper to clip and remove deep corns, a large and powerful nail cutter for thick toenails, and a special diamond surfaced power sander with a HEPA vacuum system to remove the dust and debris to smooth the skin and nails. What advantage is there to using these special instruments? Dr Ivar Roth: Because Podiacurists are using the binocular microscope they are able to see every detail of the toes in high magnification. This enables them to provide a superior outcome because they can see everything magnified as they are working. Using the scalpel means that the callouses and corns are really removed not just the superficial layer that is removed with a file in a salon. This deep debridement of the callous means superior instant relief and a longer lasting pedicure. Does anything like this exist anywhere else? Dr Ivar Roth: The answer is NO. I have taken the skills of a licensed pedicurist, had them take the two advanced certification courses and then have taught them the podiatry skill set that I developed for them to be true professionals. What other services can the Podiacurists offer to their clients? Dr Ivar Roth: Besides the actual treatments they are in constant contact with me as I am available for any questions that they have concerning their clients care. The Podiacurists have been trained to recognize abnormal skin and nail problems, so I can be consulted chair side or they can recommend that the client be seen by me later for their concerns. This situation makes it a one stop shop for any foot issues.

From left to right: Monica, Office Manager; Dr. Ivar Roth; Gina, Podiacurist

J

Life reporters recently sat down with Dr. Ivar Roth to discuss Concierge’s Podiatry’s new EXCLUSIVE medical pedicure and what it means to have a dedicated professional offering this service.

We understand that Concierge Podiatry is offering this new service, how is it different from a standard pedicure? Dr Ivar Roth: Medical pedicures are now being offered in my office because there is a huge need for this medical based service, especially for those people who are at risk for infection. The Podiacurists in my office have specialized training in how to care for people with at risk feet. This group of patients includes those with diabetics, have poor circulation, cancer, wound care, and patients who have had transplants. Of course we also offer these services to anyone wanting that extra level of care and

sterility or are afraid of standard pedicure shops What additional training do your podiacurists have? Dr Ivar Roth: They are employees of my medical practice who have had extensive experience with the common foot conditions that I treat every day in my office. They are state registered pedicurists who have taken and passed two extra certification programs, the advanced nail and medical nail technician programs and completed 400 hours of training in my office to become Podiacurists TM. What this all means is they are like dental hygienists for the feet. The Podiacurist is additionally trained in the techniques, using the tools and instruments that a podiatrist uses. What podiatry skills and instruments do the Podiacurists use? ADVERTISEMENT

Will these premium services come at a premium price? Dr. Ivar Roth: The basic medical pedicure is $75.00, which includes cutting of the nails, and removing the corns and callouses. The feet are first soaked and cleaned and after the service a foot massage is provided, nail polish will also be applied. If a client wants a manicure, will you provide those services also? Dr. Ivar Roth: Yes, for a nominal extra charge, just let us know and we will put aside the extra time. Thank you for the interview Dr. Roth, what are your final thoughts? Dr. Ivar Roth: I appreciate the opportunity to explain and bring this new service to Newport Beach.

Concierge Podiatry is located at 351 Hospital Road Suite 407 in Newport Beach. Our Telephone number is (949) 650-1147.


LIFESTYLE

NextGen Cares Volunteers spent a lovely afternoon on Sunday, February 15 enjoying music, food, stories and laughter with CafĂŠ Europa, the Holocaust Survivor program of JFFS. This beautiful program brought together four generations of Jews in our community. On Friday, February 27, Shalom Family hosted a festive and Purim-themed Shabbat Dinner, filled with costumes, treats and games for all to enjoy! Over 70 people were in attendance. For more information about NextGen & Shalom Family, please contact us at nextgen@jffs.org. TOP LEFT: Jacob Rosenthal TOP RIGHT: Chloe Rosenthal MIDDLE LEFT: Jennifer and Ian Silvers with son Lucas MIDDLE RIGHT: Inge Papich and Adam Chester BOTTOM RIGHT: Marco Cantoreggi and Joseph Szabo

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF JACKIE MENTER OF JEWISH FEDERATION & FAMILY SERVICES

Orange Jews


LIFESTYLE

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To be Jewish—One Person’s Experience When I was little, I sat down to hear stories about strong women and men. Women whom I always wanted to meet, like Golda Meir and Hannah Senesh, but have only had the privilege of quietly weeping at their grave sites. I was educated about politics. Why the Golan is a great place to have, not only for its wine, but for its military value. My favorite Jewish “pirate,” the man always with an eye patch that I could not remember by name, but I was told was brave and strong… visually impaired like my grandfather; he became another hero in my home. Dayan. Dayan. Dayan. To be Jewish. Once a year there used to be 25 starving Schiffs gathered around a table. My grandfather would insist on following the rituals as they were to be done. We sang. My grandmother’s voice would be the loudest for “Hallelujah,” but my aunt would race through Zuzim like no one else. I aspired to read and sing with her vigor. To be Jewish At Hanukkah one year, I was four, I remember telling my dad I was not Jewish

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had a drink (you pick the poison), discussing Judaism on a local and global level, from assimilation to conversion. Two people, sixteen arguments… and many unanswered questions that linger on my mind. I challenge Torah, G-d, myself, my community, and for what? Because I’m observant. To be Jewish. I have been a member of a conservative synagogue, raised in a reform, went to an orthodox rabbi in college whom I’d call to this day with any question. I am all over the map with ideas and love for different perspectives. To be Jewish. It is not to say that we must match, can fit in a box, or can be defined as a group… we must define ourselves and reflect on those decisions. We will not agree, but we come from the same cloth, no matter the patterns. As we grow in age or in population, it is important that we recognize our differences and embrace every experience. This is what it means to be Jewish.

I am all over the map with ideas and love for different perspectives.

anymore. No other kids at school were Jewish. Christmas was much cooler. I quickly converted back to Judaism for a Hello Kitty doll house. I was easily sold. How silly and trivial religious ideology seemed at the age of four. I now would protect the ideology with my life and perpetuate it through my children. To be Jewish. At 17, my amazing and wonderful grandfather was buried. I laid with him until the shomer came and I was the one to stand over him and cover the pine box in its entirety. No stranger was going to do that mitzvah. I had been forever changed. Shiva lasts but seven short days. To be Jewish. I have led people through Israel. I have sweated with strangers on the top of Masada. Blowing bubbles where there once was war and pillage. I’ve danced in caves and had my skirt skim earth from the Syrian border to Egypt. To be Jewish. Many times I have sat with rabbis and

RACHEL SCHIFF

is an English teacher who graduated from Cal State Fullerton. She was president of Hillel, a representative of World Union of Jewish Students and a YLD intern. Currently, she is a master’s degree student in American Studies with emphasis on Jews in America.

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LIFESTYLE

ORANGE COUNTY’S JEWISH HISTORY Chaim’s Kosher Deli of Anaheim BY DALIA TAFT

BLOGOSPHERE Jlife wants to acknowledge some of the interesting blogs related to the Jewish community. Enjoy!

Shalom Newsletter, March and April 1978

THIS LOCAL AD for Chaim’s Kosher Deli & Meat Market of Anaheim appeared only twice, in the Laguna Beach JCC’s Shalom newsletter in March and April of 1978. While the shop was short lived, it was one of a number of early attempts to provide observant Orange County Jews with kosher products. Long-standing stores were Sam’s Kosher Meat Market in Garden Grove and Fairfax Kosher Meat Market in Los Alamitos. There were also several restaurants: The Better Life of Santa Ana, a strictly kosher sandwich provider in Anaheim in 1973, Ervino’s French and Italian Cuisine in Santa Ana in 1986 and Renaissance Kosher Caterers at the Garden Grove JCC in 1989. However, with the influx of more observant Jews starting in the mid 1990s, Orange County now has kosher food available at many local supermarkets, as well as the continued success of Tustin-based OC Kosher (the largest source for kosher products in the county), Laguna Hills-based Kosher Bite and numerous caterers.

Dalia Taft, archivist of the Orange County Jewish Historical Society, a Connect 2 People Initiative of Jewish Federation & Family Services, highlights images from the archives every month. For more information, please visit www.jewishorangecounty.org/historical. You can also contact Dalia at historical@jffs.org or at (949) 435-3484, ext. 167. 62 APRIL 2015 |

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JON VOIGHT SPEAKS OUT Jon Voight wants you to know that, unlike Barack Obama, he REALLY loves Israel. In a video released to the masses, the actor claimed that the President is an enemy of the Jewish state (in a “friends of my enemies” kind of way) blogs.forward.com JSWIPE SUCCESS When Michael Brand, 39, went down to Florida for vacation he never expected to meet his future bride, Samantha Rudnick, 26. Brand signed up for JSwipe, the Jewish dating app likened to Tinder, just for kicks. www.thejewishweek.com CROSS CURRENTS Orthodox Jewish Rabbis and writers on today’s issues– place a finger on the pulse of orthodoxy. www.cross-currents.com


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Jlife

| APRIL 2015 63


LIFESTYLE

WEDNESDAYS & FRIDAYS 8:45 AM Gentle Yoga Merage JCC

SENIORS

CALENDAR APRIL 2015

MONDAYS 9:00 AM Gentle Yogalates & Meditation Merage JCC 10:00 AM News & Views Merage JCC 10:00 – 11:00 AM What’s Up Bob & Ruth Wilkoff Ezra AAFC 10:00 AM Tai Chi/ Jack Finkelstein Ezra AAFC 10:15 AM Stretching/Al Talberg Ezra AAFC 11:00 AM Various Lecture Topics Ezra AAFC

64 APRIL 2015 |

Jlife

11:30 AM Drop-in Bridge Merage JCC 7:00 PM Drop-in Mah Jongg Merage JCC 7:00 PM Learn to Play Mah Jongg Merage JCC TUESDAYS 9:30 AM – 11:30 AM Learn to Play Bridge 3 Merage JCC 9:30 AM – 11:30 AM Bridge: Intermediate Supervised Play of the Hand Merage JCC 10:30 AM The View for Women of All Ages Merage JCC

THURSDAYS 9:30 AM Keeping Fit/ Mel Grossman Ezra AAFC 10:30 AM Drop-in Mah Jongg Merage JCC 10:30 AM Various Lecture Topics Ezra AAFC FRIDAYS 10:00 AM Men’s Club at the JCC Merage JCC WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM Guided Meditation Merage JCC TUESDAY, APRIL 14 7:00 PM Men’s Wine Tasting Merage JCC TUESDAY, APR. 14 & WEDNESDAY APR. 15 7:00 PM Shoah Remembered with Dr. Rachel Korazim Merage JCC FRIDAYS, APRIL 17 – MAY 8 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM Refresher Mah Jongg Merage JCC SATURDAY, APRIL 18 7:00 PM LA Zimriyah Chorale Music as Resistance and Remembrance Merage JCC

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22 11:00 AM “Writing for Reminiscences”/ Marty Silverstein Temple Beth Tikvah THURSDAY, APRIL 23 NOON Passport to Israel Lunch & Learn with Dr. Rachel Korazim Merage JCC SUNDAY, APRIL 26 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM Poker League Merage JCC The Merage Jewish Community Center is located at 1 Federation Way Suite 200, Irvine, (949) 4353400 x 303. For reservations please contact Geri Dorman, Prime Time Adult Director at: gerid@jccoc.org. The Ezra Center is located at Temple Beth Emet on Monday & Thursday 1770 W. Cerritos, Anaheim, (714) 776-1103 and Temple Beth Tikvah on Wednesday 1600 N. Acacia, (714) 8713535. Temple Bat Yahm is located at 1011 Camelback St., Newport Beach. For reservations please contact Michelle Sandler at: (714) 891-0788


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Jlife

| APRIL 2015 65


Advertising Index

65 Allan Silverman

41 Dr. Hilary Buff

25 Bubbe and Zayde’s Place

59 Dr. Ivar Roth 29 Gourmet Detective

46 Burch, Coulston & Shepard, LLP

3 Hadassah

33 Callahan & Blaine

65 Harbor Lawn

9 Chabad Of Newport Beach 2 Chapman University 3 Chapman University 13 Congregation B’nai Israel 18 Congregation B’nai Tzedek

15 Heritage Pointe Planned Giving

Jlife

6 Jewish Community Foundation 50 Jewish Federation and Family Services

68 Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust

23 Jewish Federation and Family Services

18 Israel Bonds

13 Jewish Federation and Family Services

36 Jewish Community Center

63 Dr. Blake

5 Jewish Community Foundation

29 His and Hers Hair

7 Jewish Community Center

10 Congregation Shir Ha-Ma’alot

4 Jewish Community Foundation

51 Jewish Federation and Family Services

21 Jason Novak Realtor

33 Congregation B’nai Tzedek

66 APRIL 2015 |

11 Heritage Pointe

37 Jewish Community Center

31 Klein Financial 45 Laguna Playhouse 33 Lakeview Patio

41 Live Nation

29 Temple Bat Yahm

21 Outcome Genii

17 Temple Beth David

47 Mortensen & Reinheimer PC

14 Temple Beth Tikvah

49 Mortensen & Reinheimer PC 29 949 Fitness 18 Sherri Primes 21 Soul Mates Unlimited 63 South Coast Repatory Theater 31 Spicer Financial Group 21 State Farm Jason Strakman 21 Storybook Mini Gardens 48 24 Carrots

14 Temple Beth Tikvah 21 Torah with Liora 19 Touro College 67 Tustin Ranch 21 Visiting Angels 63 XS Medical 65 Vein Doctor Clinic 14 VITAS 55 West Coast Jewish Theater 65 Zounds Audio


Jlife

| APRIL 2015 67


ORANGE COUNTY’S JEWISH YOUTH & PARENTS

Confirmation What are we confirming anyway? A Gift From the Heart Small gestures can bring big smiles.

Play With Your Food Family Meals Made Fun APRIL 2015


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3


a peek inside april 2015

also inside! Editor’s Note 06 Super Shabbos 15 For April Calendar Events please visit: www.ocjewishlife.com

07

08

A GIFT FROM THE HEART

CONFIRMATION

Small gestures can bring big smiles.

What are we confirming anyway?

12 WHEN MATZAH IS GOOD Fun in the kitchen for Passover.


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EDITOR’S NOTE

kiddish

PUBLISHER ORANGE COUNTY JEWISH LIFE EDITOR IN CHIEF TRACEY ARMSTRONG GORSKY, MBA CREATIVE DIRECTOR RACHEL BELLINSKY COPYEDITOR JOSH NAMM CONTRIBUTING WRITERS AUDRA MARTIN, SUE PENN, M. ED., HANNAH SCHOENBAUM ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES DIANE BENAROYA (SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE) MARTIN STEIN

H

ello and welcome to the new issue of Kiddish

magazine. Spring is here, and with it a chance for

(SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE) EDITORIAL

new beginnings. We also are ushering in the eight-

(949) 230-0581

day festival of Passover. “Chag kasher v’same’ach.”

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Holiday candles are lit at night, and Kiddush–the blessing over the wine–and sumptuous holiday meals are enjoyed on both nights and days. What a perfect time to introduce your kids to fun in the kitchen. The traditional Passover Seder meal brings with it so much symbolism, your kids can’t help but have fun learning what everything represents. What a great time to institute culinary family traditions. And once you’ve wet their appetite for kitchen discovery you can keep that ball rolling. The first step is to take time each week to include your family in meal planning and preparation. It can be as small as helping with the grocery list, a fun lesson in napkin origami or as

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SALES@OCJEWISHLIFE.COM ART

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large as pulling off a complete Seder feast. The point is you’re together, creating wonderful memories and showing your love with healthful home-made meals. What could be better than that? Well maybe a sweet family pooch who’s willing to snarf down any dog-friendly items that don’t pass the mustard, oops “muster.” Enjoy and Bon Appetite!

— Tracey Armstrong Gorsky, Editor in Chief

Editor Tracey Armstrong Gorsky is the managing editor for JLife and former editor and writer for Making Waves, Pet Product News, Veterinary Practice News and Surfing Magazine. She brings over ten years of writing and editing experience to Kiddish magazine and holds a Masters in Business Administration.

OCJL is published monthly by Orange County Jewish Life, LLC. Subscription rate is $24 for one year (12 issues). Send subscription requests to OCJL, 5665 Oberlin Dr., Ste. 204, San Diego, CA 92121. Orange County Jewish Life is a free and open forum for the expression of opinions. The opinions expressed herein are solely the opinion of the author and in no way reflect the opinions of the publishers, staff or advertisers. Orange County Jewish Life is not responsible for the accuracy of any and all information within advertisements. Orange County Jewish Life reserves the right to edit all submitted materials, including press releases, letters, articles and calendar listings for brevity and clarity. OCJL is not legally responsible for the accuracy of calendar or directory listings, nor is it responsible for possible postponements, cancellations or changes in venue. Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to OCJL become the physical property of the publication, which is not responsible for the return of such material. Orange County Jewish Life is a member of the American Jewish Press Association and the Jewish Telegraphic Agency. All contents © 2014 Orange County Jewish Life.


kiddish

7

APRIL 2015

A Gift From the Heart Small gestures can bring big smiles. BY SUE PENN, M. ED. Heartfelt gifts are always a welcome surprise.

heartfelt gifts represent our caring for others and make the world a better place, in some small but significant way. So it was when a new Muslim friend recently gifted me with her beautiful bracelet that I had commented on. She took it off her wrist and shared this gift from her heart, showing me that with love we can achieve almost anything. We were discussing ways to build community, to encourage interaction between our two cultures and to reinforce what a wonderful world we live in together. It reminded me that if we

O

are committed to making the world

ne of the biggest surprises

consider these gifts, research the

a better place, peace is possible. If we

for a new parent is realizing

prices and quality, think about their

care for one another, we can learn

how much their parents

usefulness and value and take pride

to live side by side, respecting each

loved them and what

in sharing something we’ve chosen for

other’s differences, celebrating our

someone we care about.

cultures and ethnicities and sharing our

unconditional love actually means when they first hold their child. That

Sometimes we surprise a recipient

love is a true gift from the heart. It holds

with a gift. We may pay for coffee for

promise and commitment. It whispers

someone behind us, drop off a bunch of

nurture and security.

flowers at a friend who’s having a tough

When we celebrate birthdays,

time, pick up the tab for a meal at a

anniversaries, weddings and holidays,

restaurant or even send an air ticket to

we give material gifts. We carefully

a relative who needs a vacation. These

material treasures—building bridges, one heartbeat at a time. ✿ Sue Penn is the mother of three, Director of Congregational Learning at University Synagogue, president of Jewish Reconstructionist Educators of North America and a member of the Jewish Educators Assembly.


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APRIL 2015

kiddish

Confirmation What are we confirming anyway? BY HANNAH SCHOENBAUM

begin to ask questions and formulate

Confirmation is a big milestone in a young person’s life.

their own opinions about religion and G-d. To give them the opportunity to ask these questions, teenagers take a series of Confirmation classes with their rabbi during their sophomore year of high school. This raises the question of what are they confirming? Confirmation is meant to solidify one’s faith in Judaism and answer any questions they may have about religion and Jewish values. By this point in their lives, Confirmation students have taken almost eleven years of science classes in which religious teachings were often disproved by science. Many students at Temple Bat Yahm admitted that they stopped

M

any preteens share the common misconception that once they finish their b’nei mitzvah, they have

completed their Jewish education, but that is not the case. The b’nei mitzvah may mark the end of childhood, but even

believing in G-d years ago, yet they all showed up to Confirmation class anyway. Following Rabbi Edward Feinstein’s book “Tough Questions Jews Ask,” Temple Bat Yahm’s Rabbi Gersh Zylberman began his first Confirmation class by asking the students how many of their peers still believed in G-d. Answers ranged from none to all of them. They

afterward, those twelve and thirteen-

concluded that kids’ beliefs were

year-old “adults” still have much to learn.

influenced by peer pressure, so it would

In their early teenage years, children

be difficult to get an accurate estimate of


kiddish

9

APRIL 2015

who truly believes in G-d. The Rabbi’s next question was taken

comfort in crisis,” he explained. “G-d never fails to attend important

straight out of Feinstein’s book. “Have you

events,” the Rabbi said to the student who

ever felt that G-d was close to you?” he

felt G-d at his bar mitzvah, “and G-d was

asked.

there when you visited Abraham’s Gate

One student said that he sensed G-d’s presence at his grandmother’s funeral. Another said that he felt G-d’s presence

because he’s responsible for the grandeur of creation.” He explained that G-d was present at

through his family as they comforted one

all the students’ important life moments.

another in an Israeli bomb shelter. One

“G-d has been present for every

girl said that as she stood at the summit

important moment, good or bad, since

after climbing a steep mountain and

the beginning of time,” he said.

gazed into the sea of clouds below, she

If G-d has been present at every

knew G-d was close. A boy said that he

event in history, why did he fail to stop

knew G-d was present for his bar mitzvah,

the bad moments from happening?

while another girl said that she felt G-d’s

To explain this delicate subject, Rabbi

presence when she visited Abraham’s

Zylberman said that first, they must look

Gate in Israel.

at mankind as a whole.

The Rabbi explained that there were

MANY STUDENTS AT TEMPLE BAT YAHM ADMITTED THAT THEY STOPPED BELIEVING IN G-D YEARS AGO.

The Bible says that people are

common themes in everyone’s answers.

“created in G-d’s image” (Genesis 1:27).

G-d was present at the funeral and bomb

This means that all humans are born with

shelter because G-d has the power to

the capacity to behave like G-d. In the

bring people together. “G-d provides

past, humans have been compared to

It is common for confirmation students to question the existence of G-d.


10

APRIL 2015

kiddish

the honorable choice when presented

Students can become the best version of themselves under the guidance of their family and clergy.

with a difficult decision. G-d may not be able to prevent bad situations from happening, but he has given humans all the tools they need to stop these situations themselves, as long as they are being the best versions of themselves. Most students began the class with the belief that G-d was unreal, yet they could all describe an experience where they felt G-d’s presence. The Rabbi realized that the way he asked the question set the stage for the answer. Rather than ending the class by asking the students if they now believed in G-d, he asked them to take notice of the times when they felt G-d’s presence at its strongest because in those moments, they were being the best both angels and animals. “I believe that humans are animals with certain angelic qualities,” said Rabbi Zylberman. Humans have a moral compass and free will, unlike animals that act on instinct. Humans know the difference between right and wrong, so every person has the ability to be the best of themselves, which has been described as angelic or G-dlike. More often than not, humans act more like animals than angels. “No matter if we are acting good or bad, G-d is reflected in us, so the way we behave is a reflection of G-d,” said Rabbi Zylberman,

THEY COULD ALL DESCRIBE AN EXPERIENCE WHERE THEY FELT G-D’S PRESENCE.

versions of themselves. B’nei mitzvot may teach kids the prayers needed to lead a service, but there are far more valuable lessons to learn as they continue with their Jewish educations. Confirmation is an important step in developing one’s unique Jewish identity. Not all Jewish people fit a specific mold. Judaism grants people the freedom to develop their own opinions about G-d and live their lives the way they choose. Through these Confirmation classes, students have an opportunity to freely express their views about religion and become the best versions of themselves,

“we are not angels, and we are not perfect,

under the guidance of their rabbi, cantor

but we can always try to be the best we

and clergy.

can be. So when your family gathers to

A child’s b’nei mitzvah may mark the

honor a lost relative, or you are standing

end of their childhood, but they still have

atop a mountain, and you feel something

a wealth of knowledge to gather in their

within yourself, you’re feeling G-d’s

Confirmation classes before taking on the

presence at its strongest because you are

responsibilities of Jewish adulthood. ✿

acting your best.” Every human is capable of making

Hannah Schoenbaum is a contributing writer to Kiddish magazine.


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APRIL 2015

kiddish

When Matzah is Good Fun in the kitchen for Passover. BY AUDRA MARTIN

Passover is a perfect opportunity to spend time together as a family.

A

ccording to Max, six years old, matzah tastes like a cracker. Sydney, 10 years old, is a bit more dramatic—and

perhaps correct—that matzah tastes like “wet paper put out to dry.” It’s true, most commercial matzah is about as tasty as the cardboard box it comes in. Making matzah with our kids has to improve the “bread that tastes like the baker failed” (Ada, 10 years old), because at least it is a fun activity and we get to talk about Jewish experiences. Below we’ve got a quick recipe. It has to be quick, because Jewish law tells us that we have only 18 minutes from the time the flour is first mixed with water to get it baked. In addition to the 18-minute rule, finding the right flour is difficult. Most grains are off-limits during Passover so finding the right Kosher flour is important. And if you are o.k. following the 18-minute rule, then here is a fun recipe to make with your kids:


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APRIL 2015

kiddish

Matzah is a perfect match for sweet toppings like Nutella.

The JCC’s team of young cooks

until the dough comes together

recommend Nutella, butter and jelly,

into a smooth ball, 1-2 minutes.

eggs, chocolate and salmon as matzah

If the dough sticks to your hands

toppings. One of our intrepid young

or the counter, add flour a

cooks even came up with sour cream and

teaspoon at a time until it is no

caviar. However, you make it, enjoy and

longer sticky.

Happy Passover! Cut the dough into 4-5 pieces

Homemade Matzah

3

and sprinkle the counter with flour. Working with one piece at a time, roll out the dough thinly. Transfer to a baking sheet and

INGREDIENTS:

prick it all over, 25 times or

2 cups flour

more, to prevent the dough

1 cup water

from puffing. Bake until crisp, 3-4 minutes.

1

Pre-heat the oven to 475°. Have ready baking sheets lined with parchment, a rolling pin and forks nearby.

While the first batch is baking,

4

prepare the second batch. Continue baking until your 18 minutes are up. ✿

Set a timer for 18 minutes. Start

2

the timer and pour the water about 1 tablespoon at a time into the flour. Combine and knead

Audra Martin has worked with children in the JCC field for over 17 years, she is the Director of Children and Camp at the Merage JCC. Contact Audra at audram@jccoc.org.

IT HAS TO BE QUICK, BECAUSE JEWISH LAW TELLS US THAT WE HAVE ONLY 18 MINUTES FROM THE TIME THE FLOUR IS FIRST MIXED WITH WATER TO GET IT COOKED.”


5

6

DOWN 2. ‫( אלף‬12:37) 4. ‫( אחת‬12:49) 6. ‫( צאן‬12:21)

ACROSS 1. ‫( לילה‬12:29) 3. ‫( מזוזות‬12:22) 5. ‫( קרא‬12:21) 7. ‫( ארץ‬12:25)

TIHGN

THAAZM

(Hint: seder)

TIEONUSSQ

ROFU

(scramble) GYETP

WEIN

___ Eat the matzah ___ Shulchan Aruch (meal)

WORD CMRLESAB

___ 2nd cup of wine ___ Eat the maror

Number the following items in the order in which they occur during the seder.

historical timeline

7

4

2

Check your answers at: www.thefamousabba.com/passover

CANDLELIGHTING IN JERUSALEM: 6:20 P.M.

3

1

Complete the crossword by translating each Hebrew word into English. See Parsha Bo for help.

CROSSWORD

At the seder, • How many blessings do we recite on the matzah? • How many times do we say the blessing for drinking wine?

BLESSINGS

Be a friend: If you hurt a friend's feelings, say sorry.

GOOD TRAIT OF THE MONTH

L H M F O S

T O L D H E

D

E E C O R E

R O F O U R

Y

B

B

G

H

J

I

C

I W H R W S

V S H K S D

R

E

B

N

I

A

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© 2015 The Famous Abba

Brought to you by:

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F

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R O S E E T

R U H E K E

A

T

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P

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S

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S

W

H

B

E

F

O

R

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P

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www.thefamousabba.com

K

N

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Y

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H

Find the bold italic words on this sheet. The unused letters spell a secret message!

WORD FIND

Moshe commanded the people to prepare for the Passover offering by taking one of the flock and putting blood on the lintel and on the doorposts. The Jews were also commanded not to leave their houses until the morning as HaShem will see the blood on the doorposts and pass over each house. Moshe also told the people to tell their children that the Passover offering is to remember that HaShem saved them. At midnight, HaShem brought the last plague upon every firstborn in Egypt. Pharoah arose and told the Jews to leave, even with their sheep and cattle. The Jews left with their matzahs and vessels and garments from the Egyptians. They went from Ramses to Sukkot with about 600,000 men. Passover was established as a night HaShem protects the Jewish people. HaShem provided Moshe and Aharon with additional laws of the Passover offering.

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PASSOVER

HALLEL QUESTIONS

PASTA FOUR

‫ש‬ +‫ק‬

‫כה‬ ‫צ‬ x‫ט÷ ד‬

‫ב‬

‫י‬ ‫ד‬ –‫ב– ו‬

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

Visit www.thefamousabba.com/chinuch-podcasts for this week’s Chinuch Podcast! Hear from a new speaker each week.

400 300 200 100 90

‫א ב ג ד ה ו ז ח ט י כ ל מ נ ס ע פ צ ק ר ש ת‬

‫סד י‬ ‫נ‬ +‫ מ‬x‫ח÷ ד‬ ‫ץ‬

This was done well before the seder.

GEMATRIA

• Your flight was delayed by three hours. • Your friend went to the front of the line at the store.

Can you judge these situations favorably?

YOU BE THE JUDGE

NISSAN

FREEDOM

Which one is different? (Hint: Passover)

spot the difference

I was put in a wicker basket in the river when I was a baby. I was the only Jew in my house while growing up. I met my wife at a well. I spoke with Pharoah and HaShem constantly. I have a sister and a brother.

who AM I?

• Rabbi Akiva, Rabbi Yehoshua, Rabbi Eliezer, learning Torah all night until daybreak. • HaShem speaking to Moshe from the bush in Parsha Bo.

Act out these scenes with friends and family.

PARSHA SKIT ideas

SUPER passover SHEET 15 NISAN 5775


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