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Caesar and the Late Republic

42. Africa ex Bello Africano C. Julii Cæsaris Moll, Herman Copper engraved with hand colour London: Printed for the Proprietor Carington Bowles, at his Map and Print Warehouse, No. 69, St Paul’s Church Yard. MDCCLXXXIV [1784] 150 x 223 mm A map of the ancient North African coast, from Bowles’ Geographia Classica, or the Geography of the Ancients, as contained in the Greek and Latin Classics. The map depicts the North Africa coast and its division into Roman provinces, following the African campaign of Julius Caesar. The provincial borders are outlined in hand colour, as are the ranges of the Atlas mountains that formed the natural border of Africa province. The Republican province of ‘Africa’ was relatively small, encompassing the territory immediately surrounding Carthage, and roughly equal to modern day Tunisia. Until the imperial period, the province was essentially surrounded by the much larger province of Numidia, which occupied the entire Libyan coast from Cyrenaica, and stretched beyond the Carthaginian coast towards the Kingdom of Mauretania, modern day Algeria and Morocco. Important cities, such as Cirta and Zama, are marked, as well as Utica, the scene of a Caesarian victory and the suicide of the Republican hero Cato. The top right corner of the plate features an inset map of Caesar’s Alexandrine campaign. Condition: Central vertical fold as issued. [41376] £50

43. Bætica sive Hispaniæ Pars Australis ut in Cæsare descripta de Bello Hispanico Moll, Herman Copper engraved with hand colour London: Printed for the Proprietor Carington Bowles, at his Map and Print Warehouse, No. 69, St Paul’s Church Yard. MDCCLXXXIV [1784] 150 x 224 mm A map of ancient southern Spain, from Bowles’ Geographia Classica, or the Geography of the Ancients, as contained in the Greek and Latin Classics. The map depicts the Roman province of Hispania Ulterior, largely consistent with modern day Andalusia, which was split in the Roman imperial period into two further provinces, Baetica and Lusitania. The borders of each are outlined in hand colour, as are the many mountain ranges in the region. Principal cities are picked out in red, including Hispalis (Seville), Munda, site of the final battle in the Civil War, and Corduba (Cordoba), hometown of Seneca. Also plotted are the towns of Italica, birthplace of the emperor Trajan, and Carmona, the Republican stronghold of Carmo. The map was intended to illustrate Julius Caesar’s Spanish campaign, a fastpaced bid to neutralise a general-less Pompeian army stationed there under the legates Petreius and Afranius. Condition: Central vertical fold as issued. [41377] £50

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Mapping the Ancient World  

A catalogue of some of the finest examples of sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth century cartography of the Ancient Mediterranean. Mappi...

Mapping the Ancient World  

A catalogue of some of the finest examples of sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth century cartography of the Ancient Mediterranean. Mappi...

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