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Egypt and the Ancient Near East

25. Imperium Persarum in viginti Provincias sortitum a Dario Histaspis filio Moll, Herman Copper engraved with hand colour London: Printed for the Proprietor Carington Bowles, at his Map and Print Warehouse, No. 69, St Paul’s Church Yard. MDCCLXXXIV [1784] 155 x 226 mm A map of the ancient Middle East, from Bowles’ Geographia Classica, or the Geography of the Ancients, as contained in the Greek and Latin Classics. The map depicts the Persian Empire at the time of Darius the Great, with particular reference to the system of provinces that he established to better administer a sprawling empire of many different nations and peoples. Each region is outlined in hand colour, as are mountain ranges. Areas outside the control of the Great King are outlined in green. Darius I of Persia was the third Great King of the Achaemenid Empire, succeeding Cambyses, son of Cyrus the Great, following a coup against Cambyses’ successor, whom Darius alleged was an imposter.

Under Darius, the Persian Empire reached its greatest extent, controlling an area stretching from Libya and Thrace in the West to the borders of modern-day India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan in the East. His administrative reforms included the introduction of satraps (local governors), a unified monetary system, road networks, extensive building projects, and the recognition of Aramaic as the official language of his empire. In the classical tradition, he is best known for his unsuccessful campaign to suppress the Greek cities involved in the Ionian revolt. The Persian defeat at Marathon marked the emergence of Athens as the pre-eminent cultural and political power in classical Greece, though its impact in the Persian Empire Condition: Central vertical fold as issued. [41361] £150

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Mapping the Ancient World  

A catalogue of some of the finest examples of sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth century cartography of the Ancient Mediterranean. Mappi...

Mapping the Ancient World  

A catalogue of some of the finest examples of sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth century cartography of the Ancient Mediterranean. Mappi...

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