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Egypt and the Ancient Near East 21. Ægyptus sicut in Libro Herodoti secundo describitur Moll, Herman Copper engraved with hand colour London: Printed for the Proprietor Carington Bowles, at his Map and Print Warehouse, No. 69, St Paul’s Church Yard. MDCCLXXXIV [1784] 225 x 154 mm A map of ancient Egypt, from Bowles’ Geographia Classica, or the Geography of the Ancients, as contained in the Greek and Latin Classics. The map depicts ancient Egypt, as described by Herodotus in the second book of his Histories. The coasts of Egypt and neighbouring regions are outlined in hand colour, as are forests, oases, and mountain ranges, and principle cities have been picked out in red. In the bottom right corner of the plate is a smaller boxed map of the Delta. At the time in which Herodotus was writing, Egypt had been under Persian control for almost a century, following Cambyses II success against the Late Kingdom pharaoh Psamtik III at the Battle of Pelusium. Herodotus’ description of Egypt in his second book, while problematic, provides some of the very first accounts of Egyptian religion, culture, politics, and daily life. Herodotus (c.484-425 BC) was a Greek historian from the Ionian city of Halicarnassus, now Bodrum, in modern Turkey. His Histories, the first known work to approach a historical subject from a position of enquiry, earned him the title of ‘Father of History.’ The Histories sought to trace the origins of the 5th century BC Persian Wars, drawing upon Greek geographic and ethnographic knowledge of the Persian Empire. Condition: Central horizontal fold as issued. Minor time-toning to margins of sheet. [41374] £75

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Mapping the Ancient World  

A catalogue of some of the finest examples of sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth century cartography of the Ancient Mediterranean. Mappi...

Mapping the Ancient World  

A catalogue of some of the finest examples of sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth century cartography of the Ancient Mediterranean. Mappi...

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