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drinking tour a chelsea sanders application

This application was an exploration of alcoholic beverages from around the world and all the information surrounding them. I explored the history, production processes, indgredients and food pairings for each country’s national beverage. For this prototype I focused on the drinks of the USA, Mexico and France.

S

vodka T�iple Distilled RUSSIA

LIMONCELLO

Italy

Gin IMPORTED

THE UNITED KINGDOM

WHISKEY IRIS H W HIS K E Y

Chelsea Sa nders IR EL A N D

please enjoy


drinking tour

map

drinks

food pairings

ingredients


COCKTAILS

united states

bourbon history

• • • • • • • • • •

Bourbon Lancer Four Horsemen Kentucky Mule Louisville Cooler Manhattan Midnight Cowboy Mint Julep Nixon Old Fashioned Three Wisemen

BRANDS

food pairings

ingredients

production process

• • • • • • • • • •

Bulleit Evan Williams Four Roses Jim Beam Knob Creek Maker’s Mark Old Crow Rebel Yell Wild Turkey Woodford Reserve


COCKTAILS

mexico

tequila history

• • • • • • • • • •

Acapulco Chupacabra El Diablo La Pinela Margarita Matador Paloma Tequila Sunrise Tequila Sunset Toreador

BRANDS

food pairings

ingredients

production process

• • • • • • • • • •

Casa Noble Cazadores Corazon Don Julio El Jimador Jose Cuervo Patron Sauza Tenoch Vida Tequila


COCKTAILS

france

champagne history

• • • • • • • • • •

Apricot Sunray Champagne Fizz Cherub’s Cup Elderflower Cocktail French 75 Ginger Sparkler Kir Royale Lanesborough Mimosa Royal Rose

BRANDS

food pairings

ingredients

production process

• • • • • • • • • •

Castalane Duval-Leroy Henriot Jacquesson Louis Roederer Mercier Moët & Chandon Mumm Perrier-Jouët Thiénot


history history The name of the spirit derives from its historical association with an area known as Old Bourbon, around what is now Bourbon County, Kentucky (which was named after the French House of Bourbon royal family). It has been produced since the 18th century. Bourbon’s legal definition varies somewhat from country to country, but many trade agreements require the name bourbon to be reserved for products made in the United States. On May 4, 1964, the United States Congress recognized bourbon whiskey as a “distinctive product of the United States.” Most brands are produced in Kentucky, where bourbon production has a strong historical association. Iron-free water that has been filtered through the high concentrations of limestone, unique to the area, is often touted by bourbon distillers in Kentucky as a signature step in the bourbon-making process. It has been reported that 97% of all bourbon is distilled and aged somewhere near Bardstown, Kentucky.

production process


history history Bardstown, Kentucky, is home to the annual Bourbon Festival held each September, and has been called the “Bourbon Capital of the World” by the Bardstown Tourism Commission and the Kentucky Bourbon Festival organizers who have registered the phrase as a Trademark. The Kentucky Bourbon Trail is the name of a tourism promotion intended to attract visitors to six distilleries in Kentucky: Four Roses (Lawrenceburg), Heaven Hill (Bardstown), Jim Beam (Clermont), Maker’s Mark (Loretto), Wild Turkey (Lawrenceburg), and Woodford Reserve (Versailles). Tennessee is home to other major bourbon producers, though three of the four main producers don’t call the finished product bourbon. Jack Daniel’s is a notable example. But the methods for producing Tennessee whiskey fit the characteristics of bourbon production, and “Tennessee whiskey” is legally defined under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and some other laws (such as the law of Canada) as the recognized name for a straight bourbon whiskey produced in Tennessee. Some Tennessee whiskey producers point to their use of the Lincoln County Process, a charcoal-filtering process, to draw a distinction between Tennessee whiskey and bourbon. But many bourbons are charcoal-filtered (for example, Ezra Brooks Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey and Old Heaven Hill), and not all Tennessee whiskey producers use the Lincoln County process.


history history For the creation of bourbon, there are many conflicting legends and claims, some more credible than others. For example, the invention of bourbon is often attributed to a pioneering Baptist minister and distiller named Elijah Craig. Rev. Craig (credited with many Kentucky firsts, e.g., fulling mill, paper mill, ropewalk, etc.) is said to also be the first to age the distillation in charred oak casks, “a process that gives the bourbon its reddish color and unique taste.”Across the county line in Bourbon County, an early distiller named Jacob Spears is credited with being the first to label his product “Bourbon whiskey.” Although still popular and often repeated, the Craig legend has little actual credibility. Similarly, the Spears story is a local favorite, rarely repeated outside the county. There likely was no single “inventor” of bourbon, which developed into its present form only in the late 19th century. Essentially any type of grain can be used to make whiskey, and the practice of aging whiskey (and even charring the barrels) for better flavor had also been known in Europe for centuries, so the use of the local American corn for the mash and oak for the barrels was simply a logical combination of the materials at hand for the European settlers in America. Distilling probably arrived in what would later become known as Kentucky when Scottish, Scots-Irish, and other settlers (including, English, Irish, Welsh, German, and French) began to farm the area in the late 18th century. The spirit they made evolved, and became known as bourbon in the early 19th century due to its historical association with the geographic area known as Old Bourbon.


history history A resolution of the U.S. Congress in 1964 declared bourbon to be a “distinctive product of the United States.” That resolution asked “the appropriate agencies of the United States Government... [to] take appropriate action to prohibit importation into the United States of whiskey designated as ‘Bourbon Whiskey.’” Federal regulation now defines “bourbon whisky” to only include “bourbon” produced in the United States. On August 2, 2007, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution sponsored by Senator Jim Bunning (R-KY) officially declaring September 2007 “National Bourbon Heritage Month”, marking the history of bourbon whiskey. Notably, the resolution claimed that Congress had declared bourbon to be “America’s Native Spirit” in its 1964 resolution. However, the 1964 resolution had not actually contained such a statement; it had only declared bourbon to be a distinctive product identifiable with the United States (in a similar way that Scotch whisky is considered identifiable with Scotland). The resolution was passed again in 2008.


history Tequila is a spirit made from the blue agave plant, primarily in the area surrounding the city of Tequila, 40 miles northwest of Guadalajara, and in the highlands (Los Altos) of the western Mexican state of Jalisco. Mexican laws state that tequila can be produced only in the state of Jalisco and limited regions in the states of Guanajuato, Michoacán, Nayarit, and Tamaulipas. Mexico has claimed the exclusive international right to the word “tequila”, threatening legal actions against manufacturers of distilled blue agave spirits in other countries. Tequila was first produced in the 16th century near the location of the city of Tequila, which was not officially established until 1656. The Aztec people had previously made a fermented beverage from the agave plant, which they called octli (later, and more popularly called pulque), long before the Spanish arrived in 1521. When the Spanish conquistadors ran out of their own brandy, they began to distill agave to produce North America’s first indigenous distilled spirit.

production process


history Some 80 years later, around 1600, Don Pedro Sánchez de Tagle, the Marquis of Altamira, began mass-producing tequila at the first factory in the territory of modern-day Jalisco. By 1608, the colonial governor of Nueva Galicia had begun to tax his products. Spain’s King Carlos IV granted the Cuervo family the first license to commercially make tequila. The tequila that is popular today was first mass-produced in the early 19th century in Guadalajara, Mexico. Don Cenobio Sauza, founder of Sauza Tequila and Municipal President of the Village of Tequila from 1884–1885, was the first to export tequila to the United States, and shortened the name from “Tequila Extract” to just “Tequila” for the American markets. Don Cenobio’s grandson Don Francisco Javier gained international attention for insisting that “there cannot be tequila where there are no agaves!” His efforts led to the practice that real tequila can come only from the State of Jalisco.


history Although some tequilas have remained as family owned brands, most well-known tequila brands are owned by large multinational corporations. However, there are over 100 distilleries making over nine hundred brands of tequila in Mexico and over 2,000 brand names have been registered. Due to this, each bottle of tequila contains a serial number (NOM) depicting in which distillery the tequila was produced. All authentic, regulated Tequilas will have a NOM identifier on the bottle. Because there are only so many distilleries, multiple brands of tequila come from the same location. The NOM applies to all processes and activities related to the supply of agave, production, bottling, marketing, information and business practices linked to the distilled alcoholic beverage known as Tequila. Tequila must be produced using Agave of the species Tequilana Weber Blue variety, grown in the federal states and municipalities indicated in the Declaration. TMA (“tristeza y muerte de agave�) is a blight that has reduced the production of the agave grown to produce tequila. This has resulted in lower production and higher prices throughout the early 21st century, and due to the long maturation of the plant, will likely continue to affect prices for years to come.


history Champagne is a sparkling wine produced by inducing the in-bottle secondary fermentation of the wine to effect carbonation. The term “Champagne” is used to refer to wine produced exclusively within the Champagne region of France, from which it takes its name. The Champagne winemaking community, under the auspices of the Comité Interprofessionnel du Vin de Champagne, has developed a comprehensive set of rules and regulations for all wine produced in the region to protect its economic interests. They include codification of the most suitable growing places; the most suitable grape types (most Champagne is a blend of up to three grape varieties, though other varieties are allowed); and a lengthy set of requirements specifying most aspects of viticulture. This includes pruning, vineyard yield, the degree of pressing, and the time that wine must remain on its lees before bottling. It can also limit the release of Champagne to market to maintain prices. Only when a wine meets these requirements may it be labelled Champagne. There are many sparkling wines produced worldwide, yet most legal structures reserve the term “champagne” exclusively for sparkling wines from the Champagne region, made in accordance with Comité Interprofessionel du Vin de Champagne regulations. This legal protection has been accepted by numerous other countries worldwide. The United States acknowledges the near-exclusive nature of the “champagne” term and bans the use from all new US produced wines.


history history The Romans were the first to plant vineyards in this area of northeast France with the region being cultivated by at least the 5th century, possibly earlier. Wines from the Champagne region were known before medieval times. Churches owned vineyards and monks produced wine for use in the sacrament of Eucharist. French kings were traditionally anointed in Reims and Champagne wine was served as part of coronation festivities. Contrary to legend and popular belief, Dom Perignon did not invent sparkling wine. The oldest recorded sparkling wine as invented by Benedictine Monks in the Abbey of Saint Hilaire near Carcassonne in 1531. Over a century later, the English scientist and physician Christopher Merret documented the addition of sugar to a finished wine to create a second fermentation. Although Dom Perignon did not invent Champagne, he did develop many advances in production of the drink, including holding the cork in place with a wire collar (muselet) to withstand the fermentation pressure. In France, the first sparkling Champagne was created accidentally. Champagne did not utilize the mĂŠthode champenoise until the 19th century.

production process


history history In the 19th century Champagne was noticeably sweeter than the Champagne of today. The trend towards drier Champagne began when Perrier-Jouët decided not to sweeten his 1846 vintage prior to exporting it to London. The designation Brut Champagne, the modern Champagne, was created for the British in 1876. The village of Champagne, Switzerland has traditionally made a still wine labelled as “champagne”, the earliest records of viticulture dated to 1657. In an accord with the EU, the Swiss government conceded in 1999 that by 2004 the village would phase out use of the name. In April 2008 the villagers resolved to fight against the restriction following a Swiss open-air vote. The government organization that controls wine appellations in France, the Institut National des Appellations d’Origine, is preparing to make the largest revision of the region’s legal boundaries since 1927, in response to economic pressures. With soaring demand and limited production of grapes, Champagne houses say the rising price could produce a consumer backlash that would harm the industry for years into the future. That, along with political pressure from villages that want to be included in the expanded boundaries, led to the move. Changes are subject to significant scientific review and are said to not impact Champagne produced grapes until 2020.


production one

mix dry ingredients A mixture of dried corn and grain mix is combined thoroughly.

ingredients

two

milling dry ingredients Mixture is ground into a fine powder in grain mills for faster cooking.

three

mashing The corn and grain powder is combined with spring water and cooked.


production four

fermentation Yeast is added to the mash and the mix sits for approximately four days.

five

distillation The mash is cooked and the vapors created are collected in stills.

six

second distillation The liquid from the vapors is distilled a second time to ensure quality.


production seven

preparing barrels White oak barrels are quickly charred, for approximately twenty seconds.

eight

aging The charred barrels are then filled and stored for at least four years.

nine

bottling The bourbon is then bottled and shipped to stores for consumption.


production one

cooking Agave pi単as (the fruit of the plant) are harvested and cooked in pressure cookers.

ingredients

two

milling cooked pi単as The cooked pi単as are then milled and ground to extract the sugary juice.

three

fermentation The juice is put into vats with yeast and sits for approximately five days.


production four

Distillation The juice is cooked and the vapors created are collected in stills.

five

second distillation The liquid is distilled again, but can be up to four times, for higher quality tequila.

six a

aging: blanco Does not need to be aged, but is typically stored in steel vats for about four weeks.


production six b

aging: reposado Aged in oak barrels for at least two months but less than one year.

six c

aging: a単ejo Aged in bourbon barrels for about one year. Extra a単ejo is aged for at least three years.

seven

bottling The tequila is then bottled and shipped to stores for consumption.


production one

pressing grapes Grapes are peeled and pressed. The juice is placed in large vats.

ingredients

two

ADDING THE FIRST YEAST The first round of yeast is added and the mixture sits for about six months.

three

first bottling Sugar and yeast are added to the mixture, then bottled with a cap.


production four

aging The bottled mixture sits for at least two years to create the creamy flavor of champagne.

five

turning the bottle The bottle is turned a small amount for three weeks to get sediment down the neck.

six

freezing the yeast The neck is placed in -27ËšC brine to freeze the yeast for easier removal.


production seven

disgorging The cap is removed and the frozen yeast is forced out by existing carbon dioxide.

eight

corking Immediately after the yeast is removed, the bottle is corked to prevent flatness.


ingredients

corn

grain mix: barley, malt, rye

yeast

kentucky spring water


ingredients

weber blue agave

yeast

water


ingredients

grapes: chardonnay, pinot noir, pinot meunier

yeast

sugar


food pairings

red meat

cheese

chocolate

peaches


food pairings

red meat

cheese

seafood

citrus


food pairings

mushrooms

cheese

seafood

citrus


food pairings • • • • •

Bacon Barbecue ribs Hamburgers Pulled pork Steak

red meat

cheese

chocolate

peaches


food pairings • • • • •

red meat

Bleu cheese Cheddar Gouda Roquefort Smoked ricotta

cheese

chocolate

peaches


food pairings • blanco: Chipotle Pork • reposado: Chorizo • añejo: Steak, Barbecue ribs

red meat

cheese

seafood

citrus


food pairings • blanco: Queso fresco • reposado: Cotija, gouda • añejo: Roquefort

red meat

cheese

seafood

citrus


food pairings • blanco: Lobster, crab, ceviche • reposado: Salmon, tuna • añejo: Smoked oysters

red meat

cheese

seafood

citrus


food pairings • • • • •

mushrooms

Brie Camembert Chevre Epoisses Gruyere

cheese

seafood

citrus


food pairings • • • • •

mushrooms

cheese

Crab Lobster Mussels Shrimp Tilapia

seafood

citrus


ingredients

corn

grain mix: barley, malt, rye

yeast

kentucky spring water


ingredients

corn

grain mix: barley, malt, rye

yeast

kentucky spring water


ingredients

corn

grain mix: barley, malt, rye

yeast

kentucky spring water


ingredients

weber blue agave

yeast

water


ingredients

grapes: chardonnay, pinot noir, pinot meunier

yeast

sugar


drinks • akvavit

• cuban rum

• albanian rakia

• cypriot brandy

• arak

• genever

• barbancourt

• gin

• becherovka

• guaro

• beer

• koskenkorva viina

• borovicka

• limoncello

• bourbon

• ouzo

• brennevin

• maotai

• cachaca

• mead

• canadian whiskey

• MEKHONG WHISKEY

• champagne

• palm wine

• coconut arrack

• port wine


drinks • raki

• unicum

• rum

• vodka

• sake

• whisky

• seco • sherry • sljivovica • snaps • soju • sugarcane arrack • tej • tequila • tic tack • tuica


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles • cheese • desserts • fruits • other • poultry • red meat • seafood • vegetables


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles

Almonds

• cheese

Baked beans

• desserts

Black beans

• fruits

Cashews

• other

Chickpeas

• poultry

Kidney beans

• red meat

Lentils

• seafood

Lima beans

• vegetables

Peanuts Pinto beans Pistachio Soy beans


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles

Bagels

• cheese

Bagette

• desserts

Biscuits

• fruits

Croissants

• other

Loaf breads

• poultry

Noodle soups

• red meat

Pita

• seafood

Pasta

• vegetables

Rice Rice noodles Toast Tortillas


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles

Bleu: BOURBON

• cheese

Brie: champagne

• desserts

Camembert: champagne

• fruits

Cheddar: BOURBON

• other

Chevre: champagne

• poultry

Cotija: tequila

• red meat

Espoisses: champagne

• seafood

Gouda: BOURBON, TEQUILA

• vegetables

Gruyere: champagne Queso fresco: tequila Roquefort: BOURBON, TEQUILA Smoked ricotta: BOURBON


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles

Baklava

• cheese

Biscotti

• desserts

Caramels

• fruits

Cheesecake

• other

Chocolates: BOURBON

• poultry

Creme Brulee

• red meat

Flan

• seafood

Ice Cream

• vegetables

Puddings Tarts Tiramisu Vanilla cake


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles

Apples

• cheese

Banana

• desserts

Berries

• fruits

Cherries

• other

Citrus

• poultry

Coconut

• red meat

Figs

• seafood

Kiwi

• vegetables

Melon Peaches: BOURBON Pears Plums


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles

Cinnamon

• cheese

Coffee

• desserts

Eggs

• fruits

Honey

• other

Mushrooms: CHAMPAGNE

• poultry

Mustard

• red meat

Pepper

• seafood

Tea

• vegetables

Tofu


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles

Barbecue chicken

• cheese

Chicken enchilada

• desserts

Chicken tikka

• fruits

Duck

• other

Fried chicken

• poultry

Goose

• red meat

Pheasant

• seafood

Quail

• vegetables

Roast turkey Squab


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles

Bacon: BOURBON

• cheese

Barbeque ribs: BOURBON, TEQUILA

• desserts

Brisket

• fruits

Chipotle pork: TEQUILA

• other

Chorizo: TEQUILA

• poultry

Goat

• red meat

Hamburgers: BOURBON

• seafood

Lamb

• vegetables

Pulled pork: BOURBON Sausage Steak: BOURBON, TEQUILA Venison


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles

Calamari

• cheese

Ceviche: TEQUILA

• desserts

Crab: CHAMPAGNE, TEQUILA

• fruits

Mussels: CHAMPAGNE

• other

Lobster: CHAMPAGNE, TEQUILA

• poultry

Raw oysters

• red meat

Salmon

• seafood

Shrimp: CHAMPAGNE

• vegetables

Smoked oysters: TEQUILA Sushi Tilapia: CHAMPAGNE Tuna: TEQUILA


food pairings • Beans, nuts, other legumes • bread, pasta, noodles

Artichokes

• cheese

Avocado

• desserts

Bell peppers

• fruits

Carrots

• other

Cucumbers

• poultry

Leafy greens

• red meat

Onions

• seafood

Potatoes

• vegetables

Snap peas Squash Tomatoes Zucchini


ingredients • anise

• plums

• barley

• potatoes

• cinnamon

• rice

• coriander

• rye

• ginger

• sugar: CHAMPAGNE

• grain mix: BOURBON

• sugarcane juice

• grapes: CHAMPAGNE

• sweet potatoes

• hearts of palm

• water: TEQUILA

• honey

• weber blue agave: TEQUILA

• hops

• wheat

• juniper berries

• yeast: BOURBON, CHAMPAGNE, TEQUILA

• kentucky spring water: BOURBON • lemon rind


Drinking Tour iPad Application