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Photo Courtesy of Sumner LeVeque

Fee Hikes And Protests To Ring In The New Decade By TRACI GARLING LEE Out on Ring Road, the competing cries of Korean barbecue sales fill the air. Students laugh as they pass one another to class, texting on their cell phones and blasting music from their iPods. Inside the Cross Cultural Center, the atmosphere is different: It’s quiet, but there’s a feeling of despair and desperation in the room amongst the small handful of students gathered. “We can be visible,” says Emmeline Domingo, her pleading voice breaking through the stillness of the room as all eyes face her. “Let’s be visible.” It’s November 16th, the fifth of seven scheduled teach-ins preceding the UC Regents’ November 18th and 19th meeting at UCLA in which they voted, 11-1, for a significant mid-year fee increase, raising UC tuition by over $1,000 by the end of the 2010 school year.

Emmeline, a third-year Literary Journalism and Sociology student, is part of a group of students working with student governments across the UC system to educate the public on the Regents’ decision to raise fees. The fee increase will put tuition over $10,000 at the start of the 2010-2011 school year, not including include textbooks, housing and other living expenses. Yudof believes that the fee increase “is designed to provide access, maintain quality and stabilize the fiscal health of the university.” However, the quality of the universities has been suffering. At UCI alone, many lecturers have not been hired back, employees and staff members are continuing to be laid off, professors and employees have been hit with furloughs and pay cuts, classes and discussions have been cut, many student services’ hours have been reduced dra-

matically and programs are still being cut. And it doesn’t stop there, teach-in leaders emphasize. The quality of the universities will continue to decline and these irreversible fees will pile see NEW on page 3

TURN THE PAGE: WHO IS JESSE CHENG? GOOD EVENING UCI! STUDENT RECOMMENDED FACULTY AND MORE

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Letter From the editor

PRESIDENT’S UPDATE: Graduates or Inmates - The Future of UC By MEGAN BRAUN ASUCI President “Whose University?” – “Our University!” This was the chant that echoed off the walls of Covel Commons at UCLA on November 17 and 18 as the UC Regents met to discuss a historic 32% fee increase. After two days of angry protests, intense debate, and a handful of arrests the UC Regents voted to increase fees by 15% or $293 for Winter, Spring, and Fall 2010 quarters, bringing annual undergraduate tuition to $10,302. Outraged students staged a series of demonstrations across the state- at Berkeley students gathered outside the Chancellor’s house, at Santa Cruz they took over a building, and at Irvine they rallied outside Aldrich Hall, the administration building. These actions prompted news coverage from the New York Times, LA Times, The Wall Street Journal and CBS. But as the dust settles, the fees increases remain. Before students can attempt to offer a solution, they have to understand how the UC arrived at its current dilemma. The state cut $813 million from the UC budget in 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. Additionally, the state has reneged on its promise to fund enrollment growth, so the UC is overenrolled by 14,000 students, forcing the campuses to cover the costs out of their own budgets. In order to compensate for close to a billion dollars in cuts the UC has implemented a system wide hiring freeze and furlough plan to cover a quarter of these costs. Increased student fees will cover another quarter and budget cuts on campuses, such as the cut to five NCAA sports at UC Irvine, will cover the remainder. The hiring freeze precludes campuses from filling positions that becomes vacant due to resignation or retirement. This has resulted in hundreds of vacant staff and faculty positions which have led to a reduction in services and course offerings. The furlough plan implemented a system wide 4-10% salary reduction depending on the pay grade, which is to be offset by unpaid vacation/furlough days. These two measures will lead to approximately $200 million in salary savings. This decision angered much of the faculty, prompting a system wide walkout on September 24th. While many empathize with faculty and deplore the practice of salary reduction, it must be noted that without these reductions, those costs would have been met through additional student-fee increases. While the recent fee increases seem particularly onerous, the UC has demonstrated its commitment to low-income students by revamping the Blue & Gold Program- now anyone whose parents make less than $70,000 will not have to pay fees. But this leaves the middle class most vulnerable. Those students are the forgotten victims, whose parents make too much money to qualify for financial aid, but not enough to send their

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see PRESIDENT on page 7

Let’s face it. UCI and its students have certainly seen some better days. When we all began the new year, much like the momentous collective epiphany we had on January 1, 2000, we realized this wasn’t any ordinary new year. We were on the cusp of something else entirely, something that we and only we were a part of - something that will define us for generations to come. Back in 2000, we were tossing around high fives and drinking in the birth of a new millenium, all the while bemoaning our obvious lack of jet packs, hoverboards, and personal Rosiethe-Robots. This time around, it’s the birth of a new decade, but nothing like the 1990s, ‘80s, ‘70s..etc. Today in 2010, I doubt the real gravity of the fact that we have passed through this millenium’s first decade has really hit anyone. When it happened, people were a bit perplexed. What will we call it in the future? The ‘10s? The Noughts? The Oughts? The O-10s? Naming is partially how we as humans define objects. Decades are what define generations. I personally do not want my generation remembered for Twilight, Coco vs. Leno, Friendster vs. MySpace vs. Facebook vs. Twitter, or any one of the umpteen pedantic fads we’ve borne throughout the years. Of course, we are also the first generation to elect a black president, the first generation to run its culture almost exclusively on the internet, and the first generation to seriously address issues like abortion and gay marriage. Like our parents and their parents before them, life has placed our youth in our hands and demanded that we do something with it. I don’t want to sound too much like a speaker at Nickelodeon’s Kids’ Choice Awards, but what we choose to do with our youth will have its reverberations in the future of our children and our planet. Our protests, our music, our time here at UCI are merely the seeds we plant for the fruits of our future. As its new editor, I wanted The “Vine to remind you, the students of the University of California, Irvine, that its administration - at least its student administration - has not forgotten about them. Lest you forget, the ASUCI are the associated STUDENTS of UCI , meaning we, like you, endure the struggles of a University stuck in the economy’s muck as well as partake in the solidarity of its student body in these trying times.

Here’s hoping for a light at the end of this decade,

Sandeep Abraham Editor-in-Chief


Photos Courtesy of Sumner LeVeque

PROTEST- continued from page 1

up, making the public education of the UC system inaccessible to many. As the November voting date neared, attendance at the teach-ins rose dramatically. On the final November 18th teach-in at ICS 253, following the first day of protests at UCLA, the classroom was packed with students both sitting and standing. ASUCI Executive Vice President Sarah Bana encouraged students to handwrite letters to the Regents explaining how the fee increase affects their lives and secondyear Business Information Management major Shacole Hamlett asked everyone to consider the bigger picture about UC Regent President Mark Yudof’s plans. “Yudof says he’s going to raise one billion dollars in fundraising,” adds Shacole, “but that’s highly improbably it will happen.” In addition to fundraising, Yudof has proposed the Blue and Gold Opportunity Plan, which was also passed at the Regents’ November meeting. Under the

Blue and Gold Opportunity Plan, families with an income of under $70,000 a year will have the total sum of their tuition money offered to them in a combination of grants, work study and loans. “This is just another way in which the middle class is becoming extinct,” comments third-year Studio Art major Natalie Paredes about Yudof’s plan. Natalie, who receives financial aid from the Veteran’s Administration, says that although she has yet to feel the effects of the increase personally, she cannot ignore the strain put on the rest of the community. “I really feel for the students because this is not the way for [the Regents] to treat the people who are paying them.” Now that the vote has happened and the 32% fee increase is in place, students have begun a string of protests and rallies to put pressure on the legislature and Regents and to build momentum towards a march on Sacramento. “We need everyone to make a stand,” says Shacole. Despite the fee increase and the arrests of the recent months, the hope for change is not lost amongst student activists. “Change never, ever happens in a snap. It took people of color decades to get civil rights in this country. It will take decades for people to understand that education should be a right for everyone,” says Emmeline confidently. “But in order to get the wheels turning, we have to start now.” For more information, please visit www. asuci.uci.edu/about/budget/

Contributors: Sandeep Abraham Daniel A. Anderson Megan Braun Jesse Cheng Emmeline Domingo Traci Garling Lee Sumner LeVeque Monica Thelin Michael Wong Editors: Sandeep Abraham, Editor-in-Chief Megan Braun, ASUCI President Kristin Oto, ASUCI Services Vice President Sandy Winslow, ASUCI Director

ASUCI G244 Student Center University of Califonria, Irvine Irvine, CA 92697-1375 (949) 824-5547 fax (949) 824 - 2010

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He's Jesse Cheng

By Jesse Cheng, Student Regent and Emmeline Domingo, his intern

As Student Regent, Jesse strives to reach students on their level. What better way than with Twitter, our newest social networking fad? But forgive our disrespect of the word limit, k?

Jesse Cheng: My understanding of the role of the Student Regent: To tell people things that they do not want to hear. For instance, during the November Regents meeting where the 32% fee increase was passed, I had to walk out to the crowd of student protesters, and tell them that the Regents had just passed the 32% fee increase. This is something they did not want to hear. Emmeline_Domingo: Jesse Cheng walks out of UCLA’s Covel Commons in November in a stylish suit and a striped skinny tie, clutching his laptop bag, and into the crowd of protesting students, completely incognito. He watches his fellow students chase each of the UC regents as they exit the grounds, surrounded by guards. Jesse, a regent himself, walks by unscathed and unprotected. This is Jesse’s modus operandi as the student regent, an open target, in between, and somewhat unseen. Jesse Cheng:Then, I had to walk back into the building to the UC Board of Regents, and tell them that students were blockading the majority of exits from the building. Which is something that I trust they also did not want to hear. So, then, the key to being a good Student Regent: To tell people things that they don't want to hear, and stay alive while doing it. Emmeline_Domingo: At UCI however, Jesse rarely goes unnoticed. He’s the guy walking around campus, wearing a sweater vest over a dress shirt, waving to friends with one hand, and holding coffee with the other. But don’t let the professional attire and big smile fool you, Jesse is more than an aspiring politician. Jesse Cheng:The issue for me, however, has become that there have suddenly become so many issues that students and administration don't want to hear. And so you can imagine how the stress associated with my public safety has drastically increased. Unfortunately, there are some things that simply need to be said. Our legislators have forgotten about us. Emmeline_Domingo: Between regent meetings, appointments with legislators, talks with the administration, and campus organizing, Jesse has very little time to study. When he does squeeze in some time to prioritize, what stands well above booking flights, writing editorials, giving interviews, and studying, are his friends’ birthday parties. When he’s not shaking hands with important people, Jesse is with his friends posing for MacBook photos, or watching YouTube videos of the Korean boy band Super Junior, trying to learn all the dance moves to their hit song “Sorry Sorry.” Jesse Cheng:This is not to say they are not doing anything. There are many things they do remember. They remember job creation. They remember prisons. They remember water bonds and the budget deficit and the next election. And when I go visit these local legislators, these are the things I hear. But they have forgotten about us, the students of California. And so in many ways, they've forgotten about the future. Emmeline_Domingo: A peek into the student regent office will reveal a bookshelf of binders filled with policy breakdowns, campus agendas, books on Asian-American history, foamy toy swords, and junk food. Two shelves uncomfortably hold various bags of chips, crackers, and candy. On the desk are empty cups and bottles of soda, juice, and coffee, but not water. Jesse does not drink water. Jesse Cheng:I go to these legislators with a team of students, alumni, and staff from UC Irvine. Kathy Elier, Director of Government Relations; Ed Ruskin, UCI Alumni; and Sarah Bana, ASUCI Executive Vice President. We ask them how they plan on saving the University of California, they talk to us about job creation. We ask them about CalGrants, they say they'll think about it. We remind them how many students vote at UC Irvine, they remind us how many other people there are in their district. Our legislators have forgotten about us.

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Emmeline_Domingo: A healthy plant sits by the door with blooming white orchids. Beside the plant is a paper bag full of empty water bottles. Various products stamped with pink ribbons -- small symbols of breast cancer awareness -- sit in one corner of the room. Jesse Cheng: On the contrary, Chancellor Drake and the UC Irvine administration are very clearly aware of our existence. They see us go to class, they serve the institution we attend, and at the very least, they are stuck in the buildings that we protest.Unfortunately, they do not have control of the Sacramento budget, which has slashed around 1 billion dollars from the University over 2 years. Those that do have control of that budget, neither see nor hear from us on a regular basis. Emmeline_Domingo: The walls hold an array of art prints, and bulletin boards. On one bulletin board there is a quote by Cyrano, the same one posted on the window. "What are you saying? That it is no use? I know it! But one does not fight because there is hope of winning!” The print on the wall above the desk is of Vincent Van Gogh’s Irises, the one adjacent to it is of a family scene from March of the Penguins. Thumb-tacked to the wall beside the door are the lyrics to Jay-Z’s “Forever Young.” Then there are Jesse’s gifts - figurines of the Chinese zodiac, a blue v-neck sweater, and chocolate. The student regent’s office is nothing if not a reflection of its owner’s eclectic personality. Jesse Cheng: Which is a sincere problem. Near the end of January, the Governor's budget will come out in its first draft. If the Governor's budget does not include 900 million more dollars for the University of California, then we will be in serious trouble. And if legislators, in their negotiations over the state budget, do not insert or keep those 900 million dollars in the budget, then our trouble grows even deeper. Emmeline_Domingo: Jesse is also a spoken-word poet. The former president of Uncultivated Rabbits, UCI’s spoken word organization, Jesse’s poems are often about injustice, personal identity, and the Asian American experience. Sometimes they have “open mic” sessions on the grass outside his office. On his way out, Jesse will stop and listen for an hour, offer support, and reconnect with his roots as he listens to his own passions voiced by fellow rabbits. Jesse Cheng: So as UC Irvine students, our task now is to be heard by the Legislature in Sacramento. It is an urgent, urgent task. Rallies, protests, letter-writing are all good, but only if they are to be heard by our representatives in state government. From the activism that I've seen on campus, I have no doubt in my mind that we have no shortage of methods of being heard. But those actions must be heard by the people who hold the money that the University of California needs to continue. Emmeline_Domingo: Poetic, yes, but not very athletic. Jesse did not win many races growing up. After looking at his extensive resume, it is hard to believe that someone with so many leadership positions championed not a single athletic competition as a child, and was even bullied. The problem, he says, is competition. If told that the student regent position was a competition, “I would have lost” he states. He attributes the reason for attaining the position to words from a mentor of his, Floyd Lai, assistant director of the Cross Cultural Center, who told him that it was something he had to do, not for himself, but for his fellow students. Jesse Cheng: I know of strong student coalitions who are already organizing on our campus tactics and strategies to be heard by our legislators. I encourage those coalitions to act quickly. I know of students who participated in UC Irvine's latest budget write-in to Sacramento, and I hope those students will not hesitate to participate again. Emmeline_Domingo: “Jesse Cheng? He’s like the Chinese Obama!” is written on the whiteboard in Jesse’s office. One of his interns, Michael Karakash came in laughing one day after using Jesse’s credit card to purchase office supplies, a bookstore employee made the statement which has become a running joke within the Student Regent Office. Jesse Cheng: I also know of students who have not taken any action at all to be heard by legislators or save the University of California. And if you also know of those students, I would highly encourage you to tell them that I have an arsenal of verbal expletives that describe how quickly they need to get informed and act to save the University of California. Not only for them, but for their siblings, and their children that will follow. Emmeline_Domingo: To be Student Regent Jesse Cheng implies little sleep, constant negotiating, and compromising, but also charisma, definitely his own kind of “Audacity of Hope.” Someday we might see the name Jesse Cheng on a state ballot, but today, he is on Ring Road, mapping out poems and speeches in his head, checking out hats at the vendor fair, or in his office, sitting at the computer, hip hop playing in the background. Jesse Cheng: Because, next year, if the state budget passes and the UC's 900 million dollars is nowhere to be found, the least of my troubles will be deciding which bad news people will not want to hear. Emmeline_Domingo: An unfinished email is open on his screen. It starts “Hi mom…”

Photos Courtesy of Daniel A. Anderson and Emmeline Domingo

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Invite the Professors You Want To UCI By ELYSSA MARGALLO Professor Luncheons Comissioner What topics would YOU like to see offered in courses at UCI? What are YOU interested in learning about? Here at UCI, YOU have a say. The ASUCI Student Recommended Faculty Program empowers

students through the opportunity to vote to bring courses of their interest to UCI. Every year students have the chance to vote through surveys. With the requests from last year’s survey, two professors were brought to UCI to teach courses in topics as diverse as sexuality, race, gender, culture, and globalization.

Visiting professors Christine Everaert and Curt Sobolewski participated in the SRFP Professor Luncheon during week 5 of fall quarter, allowing students to get to know them outside of the classroom. It was through this discussion that they discovered their shared passion in see SRFP on page 7

Paving Memory Lane: Shocktoberfest 2010...

...Gym Class Heroes, Schwayze, and one roaring mass of anteaters... Photos Courtesy of Monica Thelin

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Presidents Update: Students and the Budget PRESIDENT- continued from page 2

children to college. For these students the promise of an affordable education is quickly becoming a distant memory and the problem is only getting worse. In the wake of this economic crisis, the UC is looking for a way to generate new income. One proposal that is catching a lot of attention is differential fees. This implies charging students majoring in certain majors like business and economics more money in educational fees because their classes are substantially more expensive. Professors in these fields demand higher salaries, class sizes are often smaller and graduates have higher earning potential. One argument in favor is that students in less expensive majors, like humanities and social sciences, should not be offsetting the cost of someone else’s education, but critics argue that differential fees may al-

low finances rather than passion to dictate students course of studies. The debate will continue as the proposal is discussed by the UC Commission on the Future. So where do we go from here? Students should acknowledge that there is no short-term solution or plan for the additional fees. Talk to Financial Aid, learn about all the funding options that exist, apply for scholarships, and consider taking out a student loan. If you think you may have to drop out of school, ask for help. The UC Office of the President has promised to evaluate the case of any student considering withdrawal and to help him or her look for solutions. While it is important to be realistic about next year, students should not take this lying down. The UC is a growth engine for California’s economy and the state needs to recognize our value. And as citizens of

this state, student have a right to an affordable public education. Make your concerns heard- write to your local legislator, attend the budget open forums on campus. ASUCI will be bussing students to Sacramento to lobby state legislators and march on the Capitol. Student activism has changed the world before and we can do it again. And as we make the argument for why California should fund colleges not prisons, our behavior should reflect the respect and sagacity we learned in school rather than the violence and disdain for order deserving of a prison cell. California needs more graduates, not more inmates. If you are interested in participating in any of the aforementioned activities and taking a proactive stance during these times, please contact Sarah Bana at executivevp@asuci.uci.edu

All Were NOT Is Just Another Brick In The Wall SFRP - continued from page 6

third gender studies, which was a focus in each of their courses this quarter. The third gender is most commonly defined as hermaphrodite since it encompasses all of the individuals who are not classified as male or female. In professor Sobolewski’s class, he discussed that there are actually a total of 5 genders, “The 5 genders just takes the classification further by bringing in male hermaphrodites and female ones as well (merms and ferms).” Professor Everaert defined the third gender in relation to the South Asian culture where it is believed that hermaphrodites are a “medium between the gods and the people.” According to Everaert, they have the ability to bless and cures the people, thus causing some to fear them. In a recent news article from CNN, it was announced that election authorities in India granted the third gender their own identity in voter rolls. Everaert and Sobolewski helped push the importance of such studies to the fore and gave them new relevance in the lives of their students. As second year sociology major Jovanna Nolazco says, these topics are “important in that it opens people’s eyes to issues that are controversial and that are typically not talked about.”

Everaert, received her M.A. and PhD. in South Asian languages and Civilizations from the University of Ghent in Belgium. This fall quarter, she taught Hindi 1A (Fundamentals) and “Gender, sexuality, and globalization in South Asia” a global cultures course. Neema Pithia, third year biological sciences and anthropology double major who took the Hindi 1A class, was truly grateful for the opportunity to take a class related to the Indian culture. “It is really important that they brought Hindi to this school,” she says. “There is a significant Indian population here at UCI and almost no classes taught about India.” With Hindi 1A, she felt that her culture was finally being represented in the curriculum on campus. Sobolewski received his B.A. at Indiana University in Philosophy and his M.A. in Sociology at Baylor University. He finished his PhD. at Arizona State and went on to teach at 3 different schools including Pennsylvania State University and the University of Notre Dame. In his 10 years of teaching, he claims that this past quarter at UCI has been his best experience yet. Sobolewski taught Sociology of Sexuality and Mass Media in American Culture last quarter. Students were eager to comment on his classes saying that they were “interesting and informa-

tive” (Ria Tirona, psychology and social behavior senior) as well as “enlightening and culturally relevant” (Kalisha Wynn, fourth year psychology and social behavior major). Karen Gonzalez, a third year Chicano/Latino studies major, found the topics particularly enriching as they allowed her to consider topics beyond her major. The class convinced Nolazco to narrow the focus of her major to women and gender studies. These courses and professors have had a successful start this year. During the winter and spring quarters, Sobolewski and Everaert will teach more courses pertaining to similar topics but will finish their tenure at UCI at the end of the year, as per their agreements with the SRFP. However, increasingly positive student feedback might change that. When Nolazco found out that Dr. Sobolewski would most likely be gone at the end of the year, she declared “if this is the case, it would be doing a disservice to the students of UCI.” Like Nolazco, many students see the importance of the SRFP to student learning and would be upset to see the courses disappear after the professors’ leave. Even the professors agree that the time period is an issue. For more information, contact Simon Contreras at spcontre@uci.edu

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January 2010 Sun

ASUCI External Affairs ASUCI Student Services Office of the President

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4 9p ASUCI and MopTop Lobster Productions presentComedy Night @ the Pub:

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18 Martin Luther King Day No School Comedy Night @ the Pub

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By MICHAEL WONG

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SChool of social ecology representative

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The show opens to a shot of a Balboa Ave. street sign in Newport Beach, with the familiar jazzy accompaniment of the Saturday Night Live intro. The characters roll, but none of them the faces of Andy Samberg, Keenan Thompson, Chris Parnell or any of the other SNL cast members – instead, six UC Irvine students. Like SNL’s Rockefeller close-up and zoom-out, the camera pans around Newport Beach, and a voice like SNL’s disembodied announcer blares “Live from Newport Beach, it’s Good Evening UCI!” For many who watch the Wednesday night movies in HIB hosted by ASUCI, you are probably already familiar with the weekly television segment popularly known as Good Evening UCI. Creator and current Student Media Commissioner, Logan Frick has been able to capture the essence and interests here on campus with this upbeat show. Along with his co-host Steve Scifo, ASUCI’s Business Marketing Comissioner, Frick has been able to capture interesting stories on film, which voice the present issues and topics that occupy student’s minds. From sports updates to the current UC fee increases, Good Evening UCI has been able to show everyone what anteaters are thinking about. In addition to the documentation of such pressing issues, you are also guaranteed the food critiques and comedy of fourth years Tyler La Brie and Daniel Miller. This dynamic duo scours Irvine looking for the best grub joints near campus. Trying to find the best bargains and tastiest meals to satisfy their huge appetites, Tyler and Daniel have opined on places as remarkable as Tenko Teriyaki on Culver and the Sugar Shack in Huntington Beach. With their ever amusing antics and charming witticisms, it is hard not to tune in each week to see where they decide to dine next. Moreover, be it the LARPing in Aldrich Park or the next concert at the Bren Events Center, my associate Caroline Kim and I consistently bring you the latest cultural trends and phenomena sweeping UCI. Alongside with Caroline, these correspondents have successfully been able to show what is hot in the music and art scene. To watch episodes online and learn more about this show’s stars, visit them at www.goodeveninguci.com or look for them on Facebook.


The 'Vine W10