Austin Home Fall 2021

Page 1

AUSTIN HOME Inspiration For Your Space

SNEAK PEEK

A glimpse at the stunning properties on this year’s AIA Austin Homes Tour

CHEF’S KITCHEN

Inside restaurateur Lou Lambert’s urban cabin Austin & The Hill Country

2021 AIA AUSTIN HOMES TKTK TOUR PREVIEW 00_Cover.indd 3

7/28/21 11:52 AM


AUSTIN HOME Inspiration For Your Space TKTK

Fall 2021 / Vol. 15 / No. 1

7/28/21 11:52 AM

00_Cover.indd 4


1-41_FOB.indd 1

7/28/21 11:54 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 2

7/28/21 11:54 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 3

7/28/21 11:54 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 4

7/28/21 11:54 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 5

7/28/21 11:54 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 6

7/28/21 11:54 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 7

7/28/21 11:54 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 8

7/28/21 11:54 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 9

7/28/21 11:54 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 10

7/28/21 11:54 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 11

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 12

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 13

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 14

7/28/21 12:32 PM


1-41_FOB.indd 15

7/28/21 12:32 PM


1-41_FOB.indd 16

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 17

7/28/21 11:55 AM


Conte 18 1-41_FOB.indd 18

Editor’s Letter

46

Austinticity

50

Indoors

Elements Hand-thrown ceramics and other decor in a new home goods line; a chic retail renovation for Four Hands Home’s headquarters By Lara Hallock

A new mixed-use community is an artistic addition to Bouldin Creek By Laurel Miller

This supergroup build in West Austin pays homage the city’s musical heritage By Chris Warren

54

My Space

58

History in the Making

Restaurateur Lou Lambert finds his second home on Castle Hill By Laurel Miller

A historic Clarksville bungalow becomes greater than the sum of its parts By Laurel Miller

TOBIN DAVIES

30 44

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

7/28/21 11:55 AM


ents 68

The Great Wide Open Outdoor spaces unite the living areas of this retreat in Cedar Creek By Chris Warren

TOBIN DAVIES

76

Natural Selection The landscape sets the stage for a modern Rollingwood tree house By Anna Mazurek

84

Grand Tour

88

Best Architects

90 96

Resource Guide

(Fall)

Preview the 2021 AIA Austin Homes Tour

The top architects in the Austin area

Curtains

On the cover Cedar Creek home by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects. Photograph by Tobin Davies

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

1-41_FOB.indd 19

19 7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 20

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 21

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 22

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 23

7/28/21 11:55 AM


Austin & The Hill Country E DITOR IAL Editor-in-Chief Lara Hallock Contributing Writers Anna Mazurek, Laurel Miller, Chris Warren ART Creative Director Sara Marie D’Eugenio Art Director David G. Loyola Contributing Photographers Tobin Davies, Robert Gomez

OPEN SK Y MEDIA CEO Todd P. Paul President Stewart Ramser Vice President of Sales Julie A. Kunkle Editorial Director Rebecca Fontenot Cord Director of Operations Hollis Boice Audience Development Director Kerri Nolan EVE NTS Events Director Macaulay Hammond

DIGITAL ACCOUNTING Digital Manager Abigail Stewart Digital Media Coordinator Rosie Ninesling

Accounting Manager Sabina Jukovic

ADVE RTISING BUSINESS Publisher Stewart Ramser Associate Publisher Julie A. Kunkle Digital Sales Manager Misty Pennock Senior Account Executive Tina Mullins Account Executives Dana Horner, Mike McKee, Christina Olivarez Ad Sales and Sponsorship Coordinator Jillian Clifton

Mailing address 1712 Rio Grande St., Ste. 100 Austin, TX 78701 Phone (512) 263-9133 Fax (512) 263-1370 Subscription inquiries (818) 286-3160 or subscriptions@austinhomemag.com Advertising inquiries advertising@austinmonthly.com Job inquiries jobs@austinmonthly.com Letters to the editor editor@austinhomemag.com Story ideas ideas@austinmonthly.com Postmaster Send address changes to Austin Home; P.O. Box 15815; North Hollywood, CA 91615-5815

© Copyright: Austin Home is published by Open Sky Media, Inc. The entire document of AUSTIN HOME is © 2021 by Open Sky Media, Inc. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the express written permission of the publisher. Editorial content does not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publisher of this magazine. Editorial or advertising does not constitute advice but is considered informative. AUSTIN HOME is locally operated.

24 1-41_FOB.indd 24

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 25

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 26

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 27

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 28

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 29

7/28/21 11:55 AM


Editor’s Letter

Born and raised in Austin, I’ve watched the city’s transformation for years.

Preceding my recent return and post as Austin Home’s

Lara Hallock, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

30 1-41_FOB.indd 30

TAYLOR PRINSEN

editor-in-chief, I had the honor of covering outstanding homes and design hotels worldwide. I also snatched up opportunities to write Austin travel pieces and extended every visit to laze in the sun and cool down in aquifer-fed swimming holes. I developed an appreciation for Austin from a larger perspective, as have the many others who’ve come to call it home. We’ve seen the offbeat town once known as “where young people go to retire” transform into a booming center of industry and design where companies flock for opportunity. Skyscrapers have sprouted, start-ups have flourished, and creativity has thrived. The AIA Austin Homes Tour, Oct. 15-18, has taken part in that growth as well. What started 35 years ago has become one of the most robust AIA tours in the country, highlighting the thoughtful designs that draw international recognition to Austin’s aesthetic. In this issue, we feature three of the impressive homes from this year’s tour: a modern tree house that mimics its surrounding landscape, a seven-acre ranch retreat with outdoor influences, and a Castle Hill home that combines the best aspects of old and new. Learn more about these residences on page 57. I’m so pleased to join Austin Home and to rejoin this unique place during such a dynamic time. If you’re in the area this September, I’d love to greet you at our Meet the Editor event; for more details, please see austinhomemag.com. So here’s to roots, here’s to change, and here’s to Austin: Let’s continue to grow together.

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 31

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 32

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 33

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 34

7/28/21 11:55 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 35

7/28/21 11:56 AM


Call for Entries Spotlighting the best in local design, Austin Home’s annual Home & Design Awards are open for submissions, Sept. 1 – Oct. 15. Winning architects, interior designers, landscape designers, builders, and artisans will be announced at an awards reception and cocktail party in February and featured in Austin Home’s Spring 2022 issue. For the competition, a panel of nationally renowned design professionals will judge entries in nearly 50 categories, including indoor and outdoor residential spaces such as bedrooms and kitchens, commercial design, and detail work. One interior design team and one architectural firm will receive coveted general excellence awards, while a “rising star” award will go to an up-and-comer with less than five years’ experience. Austin Home editors also will honor one accomplished professional with the legacy achievement award for a career of impressive work. In late fall, readers are invited to participate in the judging process by voting for the best overall home. To be eligible, projects must have been completed in the past two years (Sept. 2019 – Aug. 2021) and must be located in Travis or Williamson counties (with the exception of the Hill Country Home category). To submit a project, visit austinhomemag.com/designawards.

The Judges: Barrie Spang | Sapphire Pear | Ohio Interior designer whose projects range from homes in Cleveland to a seaside villa in Greece Brad Engelsman | BEDA| New York Architect with international recognition who has served as full-time faculty at Montana State University

Kinley C. Puzey | Onyx Design Studio | Utah Architect specializing in unique commercial and high-end residential projects & more to be announced

36 1-41_FOB.indd 36

The 2021 Winner for Full Bath by J. Fisher Interiors/Bell Mountain

MOLLY CULVER PHOTOGRAPHY

Kayla Cooper | Kayla Cooper Design | Pennsylvania Interior designer with experience in everything from clothes to cars to indoor spaces

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

7/28/21 11:56 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 37

7/28/21 11:56 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 38

7/28/21 11:56 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 39

7/28/21 11:56 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 40

7/28/21 11:56 AM


1-41_FOB.indd 41

7/28/21 11:56 AM


42-55_Accents.indd 42

7/28/21 11:58 AM


ACCENTS AUS TIN DES IGN NOW

BENJAMIN HOLTROP

Check out August Sage’s new handthrown ceramic tableware. Page 44

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

42-55_Accents.indd 43

43 7/28/21 11:58 AM


Accents Elements

O F G R E AT I M P O R T

This home goods line features earthen materials crafted by artisans across the globe By Lara Hallock

Given her background in data analytics, it’s no surprise that

Show and Tell The global headquarters and flagship showroom of Four Hands Home recently underwent a massive renovation led by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, giving shoppers an extra reason to go directly to the source of this mostly wholesale furniture and home-accessory brand. The space increased to a total of 20,000 square feet filled with design vignettes bathed in natural light from the new floor-to-ceiling windows. Along with an added outdoor furniture section, visitors can look forward to the design team’s latest release, The Collector. The series features two distinct styles: the Modern Nomad line, a softer take on minimalism, and New Forma, with bold, postmodern-inspired pieces. fourhands.com —L. Hallock

44

AUGUST SAGE: BENJAMIN HOLTROP; FOUR HANDS: CHASE DANIEL

Rowena Lei dove deep into the details when working with suppliers for her home goods line, August Sage. A designer and frequent traveler, Lei melds her two passions to source “raw and refined” goods from around the world. Take her visits to Oaxaca, for instance, where she asked various weavers about every facet of their processes—down to the diets of the sheep sheared for wool—until she discovered a women’s co-op dedicated to the art of the loom. That attention to detail is evidenced in the line’s hand-woven lumbar pillows and pillow covers. August Sage’s most recent collection, released this year, features ceramic vases and tableware made with a unique Guadalajara clay blend that results in a natural but sophisticated aesthetic. It’s Lei’s mission to bring back those handcrafted hidden gems: “I don’t do trade shows,” she says. “I always have to be on the ground. If I sit down at a restaurant and like the plate, I’ll speak with the waiter to find out where it is made. Then I go knock on doors.” augustsage.com

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

42-55_Accents.indd 44

7/28/21 11:58 AM


42-55_Accents.indd 45

7/28/21 11:58 AM


Accents Austinticity

ART IN RESIDENCE

This multi-use development is an artistic addition to Bouldin Creek By Laurel Miller

First, and you’ll discover a series of large-scale fantastical murals by local artists in celebration of the area’s indigenous wildlife. Community developer StoryBuilt partnered with Ruben Esquivel and East End Eclectic to accent Willa’s public spaces with multi-hued works portraying native flora and fauna, such as armadillos, hummingbirds, and free-tailed bats. The colorful style reminisces art by Central Mexico’s indigenous Otomi people, known for their bright, animist-centric textiles and other folk art; Esquivel chose the style as an homage to his stepfather, who is from the area’s Altiplano region.

46

STORYBUILT

Stroll the grounds of Willa, a new mixed-use urban community along South

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

42-55_Accents.indd 46

7/28/21 11:58 AM


42-55_Accents.indd 47

7/28/21 11:58 AM


Accents Austinticity

48

Clockwise from top left: Paintings by local artist Ruben Esquivel color Willa’s walls; the building has deep overhangs that double as terraces; subjects of the pieces include native wildlife; the Seeds of Change mural supports the Black Lives Matter movement.

STORYBUILT

Described as an “urban village,” Willa is one of seven such developments in Austin created by StoryBuilt—including Frank, down the street from Willa, for which HOPE Outdoor Gallery artists completed several murals. Located just four blocks from the heart of South Congress, Willa comprises ground-floor commercial spaces and upper-level residences. The latter range from studios to three-bedroom condos with clean, minimalist lines and open-plan communal rooms designed to foster conversation and connection. Units also feature floor-to-ceiling windows, engineered wood flooring in living areas, quartz countertops, and porcelain and ceramic tile. StoryBuilt is known for its emphasis on developing infill communities with distinctive architecture and a sense of place, green construction, and philanthropic initiatives. Willa (named for a team member’s gregarious Labrador retriever) is a prime example. For instance, the building’s deep overhangs, which range from 4 to 6 feet, provide a maximum amount of shade while acting as large terraces for the residences. Rain gardens on the ground floor filter and detain water before it disperses into the city stormwater system—a special consideration for a structure located so close to Bouldin’s eponymous creek. This dedication to the environment aligns with the community’s nature-themed murals, which aim to increase awareness about Austin Wildlife Rescue, a non-profit that rehabilitates and releases orphaned and injured native species. But the community’s art is also dedicated to social causes. In July 2020, StoryBuilt engaged Esquivel to create a mural at Willa’s front to honor the Black Lives Matter movement and show support for racial justice and equality. Seeds of Change, a striking work depicting a fist made of flowers, is part of a campaign with proceeds going to local social justice organizations Six Square, Austin Justice Coalition, and Waking Giants. “StoryBuilt’s name was chosen because it helped celebrate our growth and the stories of our homeowners and the communities where we build,” says Roka Music, chief brand and marketing officer at StoryBuilt. “Partnering with local street artists and rescues helps us tell those narratives.”

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

42-55_Accents.indd 48

7/28/21 11:58 AM


42-55_Accents.indd 49

7/28/21 11:58 AM


Accents Indoors MUSICAL MASTERPIECE

This supergroup build pays homage to Austin’s beat

At its best, music is a collaborative effort. All great musicians work closely with talented producers and fellow artists to create something special out of what has come before. Put simply, collaboration and freedom to innovate are essential ingredients for excellence. It is appropriate, then, that a 7,300-square-foot lake-view home called “Austin in Stereo” was the result of a collaboration of some of the city’s premier designers, builders, and craftsmen, organized by the Fern Santini Collaborative. The West Austin home embraced the idea that if you build

50

a great home, the buyers will come. A portion of its sale proceeds also went to support the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians, a non-profit that provides access to healthcare for low-income musicians. Rather than a custom home built with input from owners, the approach emphasized the instincts of its designers. “A lot of times, if you want to take risky moves with design or construction, you can’t talk a client into it,” says Fern Santini, a longtime Austin resident and interior designer. “This was an opportunity for everybody on the team to stretch creatively

DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN, COURTESY OF FERN SANTINI COLLABORATIVE

By Chris Warren

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

42-55_Accents.indd 50

7/28/21 11:58 AM


42-55_Accents.indd 51

7/28/21 11:58 AM


Previous page: Plush textures give the home a luxurious feel. This page, clockwise from top left: Prints of famous musicians cover many of the walls; Fern Santini’s design features rich colors and eclectic details; the three-story brass-and-steel staircase winds above the living area.

52

and answer the question, ‘What would you do if you could do what you want?’” The many answers to that question come in a threefloor, four-bedroom home that embraces the idea that Austin’s soul is inextricably linked to music. The examples of how that idea is manifested are too numerous to list, but the highlights tell a larger narrative. For instance, the house has more than 20 signed photographs of iconic musicians, including Willie Nelson and Stevie Ray Vaughan. The wallpaper in the powder room near the library bar—the centerpiece of the third floor—is made from an Amalie Rothschild photograph taken from the stage at Woodstock. “When you walk into the powder room, you are surrounded floor to ceiling by the crowd at Woodstock,” says Santini. It’s no surprise that the home also put a premium on the artistry of design. In part, that came from the work of 12 local and six national partners who outfitted the home with tile and stone, textiles, furniture, and lighting. For example, builder David Escobedo of the Escobedo Group and his team incorporated extensive wood paneling and cabinetry throughout the house. They also installed a three-story winding brass-and-steel staircase that overlooks the home’s interior courtyard. Escobedo has worked with Santini for more than two decades. That long-term partnership meant Santini and the project’s architect, Paul Lamb, knew they could rely on the expert craftsmanship Escobedo’s team could provide. “One of the biggest compliments we get from architects and designers is that we allow them to design in a different way because of our skill set,” says Escobedo. It’s only natural the home benefits from the work of these old and new collaborators. The finished product has a creative harmony evocative of a song.

DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN, COURTESY OF FERN SANTINI COLLABORATIVE

Accents Indoors

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

42-55_Accents.indd 52

7/28/21 11:58 AM


42-55_Accents.indd 53

7/28/21 11:58 AM


Accents My Space

URBAN LEGEND

Restaurateur Lou Lambert finds his second home in a former Castle Hill guesthouse It’s easy to bypass Lou Lambert’s new home, so unobtrusive is the 1,024-square-foot Castle Hill contemporary. Tucked into a wooded hillside next to the former Graffiti Park, the cedar exterior gives the illusion of a cozy, cabin-style tree house. A custom glass-and-steel front door opens to a sunporch accented with two forest-green saddle leather chairs by Garza Marfa, a nod to Lambert’s West Texas roots. A chef/restaurateur (Lambert’s, Lou’s Bodega) and designer (it’s in the DNA; his sister is hotelier Liz Lambert, founder of Austin’s Bunkhouse Group), Lambert lives in Fort Worth, but business requires him to spend a great deal of time in Austin. In 2018, Lambert told his realtor

54

he was looking for a small house “that could function like a really good hotel suite,” he says. Lambert soon found a 1947 guesthouse that was previously part of the adjacent property. The cottage was in dire need of renovation. “Most people would have torn it down,” Lambert says. “But building homes is my side hustle.” He hired his friend Jason Binzer of Fort Worth’s Southside Design + Build to formulate a blueprint for the remodel. Because the original cottage had a tight three-bedroom interior, Binzer knocked out a wall to create an open kitchen and living room flanked by a primary bedroom

ROBERT GOMEZ

By Laurel Miller

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

42-55_Accents.indd 54

7/28/21 11:58 AM


Clockwise from opposite page: The cedar exterior; the bright living area; a breezy screened porch; the chef-inspired kitchen; the backyard dining area; wallpaper by Voutsa.

and bath at one end and an office/entertainment/ guest room with full bath at the other. He also canted the ceiling, raising it by 20 feet, and paneled it with white oak to match the walls. The light wood gives the space the easy, unpretentious aesthetic Lambert is known for. Lambert inherited his love of art—and many of his current works—from his mother. “She collected Southwestern landscapes and floral still lifes,” he says. Some of those pieces are displayed in the primary bedroom, an otherwise masculine space with charcoal walls. Echoing the botanical theme is the lower half of the accent wall in the adjoining dressing area, papered with a fantastical chinoiserie pattern. “I’m not afraid to make a statement,” he says. As a chef, Lambert had specific requirements for the kitchen. “I wanted the center room and kitchen to be open so four to six guests can just hang out, have a beer and eat. I also wanted the cooktop to be on a center island. I like to face people when I cook, so it’s interactive.” Silestone countertops frame the state-of-the-art Wolf range, while a glass-fronted SubZero fridge allows him to assess ingredients at hand. Lambert wanted the backyard to be a social and culinary hub. There’s a pergola, a communal dining area, and a custom smoker by Lockhart’s Mill Scale Metalworks, which also built the pit at Lambert’s namesake restaurant. “I wanted an elevated crash pad that took advantage of the natural setting,” Lambert says. “It’s exceeded my expectations.”

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

42-55_Accents.indd 55

55 7/28/21 11:59 AM


56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 56

7/28/21 12:00 PM


History in the Making page 58

The Great Wide Open page 68

Natural Selection page 76

AIA Austin Homes Tour page 84

TOBIN DAVIES

Colorful flower beds and vinecovered arbors enrich the grounds of this country home. Page 68

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 57

57 7/28/21 12:00 PM


By

L AU R E L M I L L E R

P h o t o g ra p h y b y

TO B I N DAV I E S

WITH THE RIGHT ARCHITECT, A HISTORIC CLARKSVILLE BUNGALOW BECOMES GREATER THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS

H I S TO RY IN THE MAKING 58

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 58

7/28/21 12:00 PM


AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 59

59 7/28/21 12:00 PM


Dan and Sylvia Sharplin fell in love with Clarksville in the 1980s after relocating to Austin from their native Louisiana for grad school. “There was this funkiness about the neighborhood,” says Sylvia. “And while we moved to Westlake for more than 20 years to raise our three children, we maintained this sentimental attachment to Clarksville.” In 2015, when the Sharplins’ youngest was a senior, the couple decided that for the next chapter of their lives, they wanted to move back to Austin’s core. “In determining the neighborhood, walkability, community, and a view were our non-negotiables,” says Sylvia. Not long after, the Sharplins found a 10,000-square-foot lot on Castle Hill. The seller was an octogenarian whose family had purchased the property, along with her neighboring 1920s bungalow, in the 1940s. In 2016, the Sharplins became the owners of both properties, the latter of which was a designated Historic Landmark because it was in the Castle Hill overlay. “We’d never actually seen the interior until the day of the inspection,” says Sylvia. “It needed a lot of work, and when it’s a landmark, you don’t know what you can and can’t do until you get underway.” Restoring a historic property while maintaining its integrity is difficult, but the Sharplins also needed an architect with vision. The new addition, which would largely be situated on the neighboring lot, had to flow organically with the old. “It was a mystery as to how this would work,” says Sylvia. “We had to put our trust into the architect and builder. It was a total leap of faith.”

60

Previous page: The home’s front retains its historical essence, including a wraparound porch. This page: Clean lines formed by glass and steel create a modern back of the residence.

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 60

7/28/21 12:00 PM


AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 61

61 7/28/21 12:00 PM


62

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 62

7/28/21 12:00 PM


Opposite page: Rich blue walls and nature elements evoke the outside. This page: Classical art frames the sleek fireplace.

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 63

63 7/28/21 12:00 PM


The Sharplins turned to their former neighbor, James LaRue of LaRue Architects. “We became friends more than 32 years ago, and we followed his career because we love his work,” says Sylvia. For LaRue, it was a dream job, despite obstacles that required four years and $7 million to overcome. “The Sharplins were so open to ideas, and, as an architect, that’s an invitation to do something wonderful,” he says. The Historic Landmark Commission required the original wood-sided bungalow be replicated, which left the facade and a wraparound porch, says LaRue. “We recreated the roof and dormer, and the interior was just the foyer and primary bedroom, which became Dan’s office. When you see the front, you have no idea that there’s more new house than old just behind it. It’s unexpected and fun, with lots of light, shadow play, and extension of textures.” Because the Sharplins wanted a “clean, modern” home, LaRue had to find a way to meld two divergent styles. For the addition’s exterior, he chose soft white stucco because “It’s clean and blends into the original white wood siding,” and extensive 14-foot floor-to-ceiling windows. Taking advantage of the hillside location, LaRue and Foursquare Builders ultimately created a 4,000-square-foot, three-bedroom, four-and-ahalf-bath split-level home. “I really wanted to create a glass gallery box effect to connect the primary bedroom to the kitchen,” says LaRue. “Austin has undergone such

64

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 64

7/28/21 12:00 PM


A glass curtain wall opens to a wide patio and pool, backdropped by a panorama of downtown Austin.

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 65

65 7/28/21 12:01 PM


a startling change, and we needed to respond to that by incorporating unobstructed views of downtown. We also added an infinity pool.” To extend the open plan kitchen/dining area, custom 14-foot sliding glass doors were installed. “Dining and socializing outdoors are such a part of our Central Texas lifestyle,” says LaRue. “I wanted a modern approach to capturing the quality of life here. In a nod to Texas, mesquite flooring was laid throughout the home, and the foyer walls were painted to invoke the Texas sky.” The Sharplins, who have maintained their relationship with the seller, wanted to honor her legacy in the home. The original living room chandelier, which came from The Driskill hotel, was relocated to the guest powder room. The former living room mantel, also from The Driskill, was repurposed as a vanity. The stairwell to the former basement (now parking) showcases framed vintage Time covers found in the space during restoration. The Sharplins’ leap of faith has paid off, manifesting as a home they see themselves living in for many years to come. Says Sylvia, “Jim made all the difference, because he was able to see outside the box.”

From top: Floor-to-ceiling views greet the owners each morning; the infinity pool is ideal for sunset laps.

66

Architect: LaRue Architects General Contractor: Foursquare Builders Interior Designer: Love County Design Lighting Consultant: Four Point Lighting Design Energy Consultant: Positive Energy

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 66

7/28/21 12:01 PM


Cylindrical drop lights and clerestory windows illuminate the open kitchen.

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

56-67_FEA_Clarksville.indd 67

67 7/28/21 12:01 PM


By

C H R I S WA R R E N

The Great

68

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

68-75_FEA_RiverRanch.indd 68

7/28/21 12:02 PM


P h ot og ra ph y b y

TO B I N DAV I E S

Wide Open OUTDOOR SPACES UNITE THE LIVING AREAS OF THIS CEDAR CREEK RETREAT

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

68-75_FEA_RiverRanch.indd 69

69 7/28/21 12:02 PM


The concept for Gina O’Hara’s Cedar Creek home had bubbled in her mind for decades. At a family reunion 30 years ago, O’Hara and her relatives stayed at a South Texas ranch that featured a bunkhouse whose bedrooms opened to a porch. “Everyone wanted one of those rooms,” she recalls. “It stuck with me how comfortable everyone was because they could join in and socialize when they wanted and also retreat when they wanted to take a nap or recharge.” So when O’Hara and her husband, Bill, decided to move out of their home in Zilker to a seven-acre patch of land southeast of Austin, she knew she wanted a place where the guest rooms were separate from the main living area. The result is River Ranch, a 3,600-square-foot home that has three distinct rectangular wings and a narrow pitted

70

concrete porch connecting the main living area and the two guest bedrooms. To be sure, O’Hara had more than a basic concept in mind when she set out to build her home. By the time she met with Hugh Randolph, owner of Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, O’Hara had 10 pages of notes assembled over the course of many years, including room dimensions she and her husband had measured when they were impressed with the size of a hotel lobby in Baltimore. O’Hara also knew she wanted stained, polished cement floors and all-natural interior walls rather than sheet rock. Besides these specific desires, O’Hara wanted to capture a particular feel and aesthetic. “I wanted the weight of the house in Out of Africa and a long porch with rooms off it. Hugh was quick to get that feel.”

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

68-75_FEA_RiverRanch.indd 70

7/28/21 12:02 PM


Previous spread: The long, low structure of the home integrates into the surrounding seven acres. This page: Guest rooms open to a concrete patio.

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

68-75_FEA_RiverRanch.indd 71

71 7/28/21 12:03 PM


This page: Handmade rugs from Kaskas Rug Gallery add warmth to the polished cement floors. Opposite page: Hand-pressed brick forms the main house exterior, surrounded by organic stone walls.

It would be understandable for an architect to balk at working with a client with such a specific vision. But both Randolph and O’Hara say a give-and-take quickly emerged that improved the overall result. In fact, Randolph says his designs are ultimately influenced by collaborative processes. “We don’t have a signature style, and that’s on purpose,” Randolph says. “We want to figure out what is unique and special about a client. We want to figure out what is unique and special about the location. And we also want to bring our own filter and our own voice.” Randolph injected his voice into the design in many ways, including siting the house as a low, long structure to integrate the architecture with the landscape, incorporating large windows throughout the home, and configuring a

72

winding hallway that leads people from the entry courtyard in the main living area to the home office, the bathroom suite, and the primary bedroom. “I was worried that would feel silly,” O’Hara says. Today, though, she appreciates the circuitous hallway. She is also grateful that Randolph advocated for the materials used for the exterior: hand-pressed brick for the main house and unfinished cedar for the guest wing. Randolph believes these choices give the house a distinctive look and feel. “The cedar is a regional material, as opposed to using something like redwood, and we purposely kept it natural so that it would weather. Over time it really has developed a unique and beautiful look.” The interior design of the home is ever-evolving. Indeed, it’s taken years to assemble many of the eclectic items that

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

68-75_FEA_RiverRanch.indd 72

7/28/21 12:03 PM


“We want to figure out what is unique and special about the location.”

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

68-75_FEA_RiverRanch.indd 73

73 7/28/21 12:03 PM


Architect: Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects General Contractor: New Urban Home Builders Mechanical Engineer: Anchor Concrete

This page: In the guest wing, unfinished cedar frames garden views. Opposite page: The owners’ thoughtful interiors include a soapstone kitchen island and vintage stools.

are now in the house, including a claw-foot bathtub found at an antique store in Fort Worth and wood beams salvaged from a barn in an overgrown field in Gonzales. All the lights in the home are from the 1930s and 1940s; curtains throughout the house are made from hand-loomed French bed sheets; and the barstools around the soapstone kitchen island come from The Antique Swan in Austin. O’Hara’s appreciation for vintage items reflects her respect for the people who made the pieces. “An old or handmade object still imbues itself with the soul of the person who created it,” she says.

74

Even though River Ranch very much reflects the tastes of its owners, the collaboration between the O’Haras and Randolph is what makes it so special. In fact, Randolph remembers receiving a text from O’Hara on the first Christmas her family spent at River Ranch. “Out of the blue I got this text with a picture of their tree and the fireplace, and she says, ‘Thank you for the nicest gift that we got this year. We never would have thought of it on our own,’” he says. “My reply to her was, ‘Well, thank you, because we would never have thought of it on our own, either.’”

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

68-75_FEA_RiverRanch.indd 74

7/28/21 12:03 PM


AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

68-75_FEA_RiverRanch.indd 75

75 7/28/21 12:03 PM


76

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

76-83_FEA_Rollingwood.indd 76

7/28/21 12:04 PM


By

ANNA MAZUREK

P h o t o g rap h y b y

TO B I N DAV I E S

u r t a a l S N election

THE LANDSCAPE SETS THE STAGE FOR THIS MODERN ROLLINGWOOD TREE HOUSE AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

76-83_FEA_Rollingwood.indd 77

77 7/28/21 12:04 PM


sylvan landscape were the primary focus for Kevin and his wife, Eva, for their Rollingwood residence. “There were a number of large, mature oak trees that had grown up on the site that we literally designed around in order to make it feel even more nestled,” says Kevin about their 2,414-square-foot home, an exposed steel structure set on a sloping hill. “Most of our windows reveal nature, not other homes.” The two-bedroom and two-and-a-half-bath house serves as the main residence for the couple and their two dogs. “Connectivity with the surrounding landscape was extremely important. We value the outside space just as much as the inside, and in fact even reduced the footprint of the house from its original design,” says Kevin about the .63-acre wooded lot. When the couple started redesigning the property, the outdoor spaces were overgrown and underutilized. To maintain a natural aesthetic while creating a lawn space to accommodate both dogs and children, terraces were built from limestone boulders sourced from their Hill Country ranch. “A rock path leads to a stainless-steel hot tub, a wonderful place to relax among the woods, and a charming yellow metal swing gently sways over the embankment,” Kevin says. The couple worked with project manager and architect Brian Comeaux at Lake Flato Architects, who designed a floating offset gable roof to mirror the shape of the land and direct the eye toward the landscape at the bottom of the hill. Due to the steep grade, the compact house is stacked in sections that resemble a modern tree house with an elevated primary bedroom and screened-in porch. The biggest challenge with the residence was the large scar on the western property line left by the demolition of the previous house. “In an effort to

78

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

76-83_FEA_Rollingwood.indd 78

7/28/21 12:04 PM


The home’s floating gable roof mimics the slope of the surrounding land, which features restored rock ledges and native plantings.

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

76-83_FEA_Rollingwood.indd 79

79 7/28/21 12:04 PM


80

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

76-83_FEA_Rollingwood.indd 80

7/28/21 12:04 PM


“[The home] feels grand yet cozy, modern yet warm.”

From left: More than 30 percent of the exterior walls are glass, bringing wooded views into the everyday; the owners furnished the living room with a cozy sectional sofa and leather chair.

minimize any further damage to the site, we decided to build in this scarred footprint and preserve the rest of the site and its natural features—trees, natural slope, rock bands, wooded area, lawn,” Comeaux says. This solution created privacy on both sides of the house: The building itself blocks views to the neighbor on the west; existing large trees and a lawn add privacy to the east. The house includes several outdoor spaces, such as a shaded 256-square-foot screened porch with a 63-inch gas fireplace to ensure comfort year-round. “Large sliding doors open up this space to the living room, bringing the outside in when desired,” Comeaux says. A pair of yellow Fermob rocking chairs on the open upstairs porch provide a peaceful setting to read or sip an evening cocktail under the canopy of an adjacent oak tree. “In addition to the porches, a stone-walled outdoor shower off the primary suite serves to bring nature into the daily experience of the house,” Comeaux says.

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

76-83_FEA_Rollingwood.indd 81

81 7/28/21 12:04 PM


82

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

76-83_FEA_Rollingwood.indd 82

7/28/21 12:04 PM


Architect: Lake Flato Architects General Contractor: Shoberg Homes Structural Engineer: Structural Design Consulting

“There’s not a corner of the home that we don’t use.”

Opposite page: Family members tend to gather around the soapstone kitchen island, the heart of the open floor plan. This page: Light wood and greenery set the tone in the bathroom.

Natural light was a big part of his design process to ensure a comfortable and livable space. More than 30 percent of the exterior walls are glass, including the entire north side of the house, which offers private views of the preserved wooded area by a dry creek bed. Opaque walls to the west block out the harsh afternoon sun, while east-facing glass welcomes light into the home. “Deep roof overhangs help temper direct sunlight at certain times of the day and year,” Comeaux says. The design also focused on ventilation by natural convection. Fresh air enters at the lowest level, then exits on the uppermost at the guest suite, which functions as a second primary bedroom in winter as heat rises. The interior design was handled by the owners with help from Comeaux and his wife, along with input from friends. “The soapstone kitchen island is the heart of our home and its open floor plan, and it’s where everyone always ends up,” Eva says. “Other favorites of ours include a couple of pieces of my grandmother’s furniture that we had reupholstered and Kevin’s daughter’s artwork, which looks fantastic on the walls. It’s nice to have our family around us in that way.” The entire project took three years and was completed just in time for Kevin and Eva to host Thanksgiving. “Lake Flato was able to design a home that feels grand yet cozy, modern yet warm, and big yet extremely efficient,” Kevin says. “There’s not a corner of the home that we don’t use, and we love that our peaceful respite is so close to downtown.”

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

76-83_FEA_Rollingwood.indd 83

83 7/28/21 12:04 PM


INPERSON TOUR

This fall, the AIA Austin Homes Tour is taking on the year’s biggest trend: the hybrid model. Oct. 15–18, three of these impressive abodes will open their doors for in-person visits. All nine will feature 360-degree virtual walk-throughs and live online sessions with the architects and collaborators. Compiled by Lara Hallock

84

LARUE ARCHITECTS This 3,900-square-foot house fuses two styles built nearly a century apart. The front of the home remains grounded in the context and scale of historical Clarksville, while the side and back reflect the modernization of downtown Austin. The lofty great room opens to stunning views of downtown with Austin’s first-ever floor-to-ceiling glass-pocketed curtain wall system. An outdoor entertaining space, lap pool, and sliding glass doors allow the city vibes to flow into the home. (Page 58)

W E B B E R + S T U D I O, A R C H I T E C T S Beneath the aluminum-clad exterior of this Tarrytown home lies a bright space that satisfies two competing agendas: privacy and accessibility. Inside, floor-to-ceiling glass spans the length of the back wall to allow light into the main living areas. The home has widened doorways and no thresholds to promote an open flow through the kitchen, dining room, and living room. A secret garden tucked beneath the pool deck and a bonus terrace upstairs maximize the limited square footage.

TOBIN DAVIES

Grand Tour

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

84-87_AIA Homes.indd 84

7/28/21 12:13 PM


≥ HUGH JEFFERSON RANDOLPH ARCHITECTS The inspiration for the River Ranch project in Southeast Austin was Out of Africa. With that spirit in mind, the design looked to regional examples of architecture that featured simple, quiet forms, large living areas, scaled porches, and natural materials. Set on a seven-acre site, the home consists of two long, narrow, one-story buildings connected by a large L-shaped porch. Primary materials for the house are salvaged brick and locally sourced cedar. (Page 68)

BRIAN DILLARD ARCHITECTURE After undergoing multiple remodels that offered little harmony with the yard, this 1939 stone dwelling in Tarrytown was updated to highlight its original charm and scale. Renovations were made to the kitchen, dining, and living spaces to create a more open flow. A sunken living room replaced the sunroom and raised deck to better connect the house to the pool terrace and lawn below, and a new stone cabana reflects the design of the original home.

N O R T H A R R OW S T U D I O

FURMAN + KEIL ARCHITECTS

L A K E F L ATO A R C H I T E C T S

The vision of the Lean on Me House was to create a space that brings the outside in. The house works with the steep slope of the site to stay as close to the incline as possible. This results in a stacked massing home that sits atop a hill. Vertical cedar siding and a custom wood screen provide warmth and privacy, while large expanses of glass frame stunning views of the neighboring Barton Creek Habitat Preserve.

The primary design concept of the 9,546-square-foot Oak Creek Court home was to create a cozy gathering space in close proximity to the outdoors. This was best achieved in the new heart of the house: a large eat-in kitchen and sitting room with oversize windows that open to an oak-shaded yard, which spills down to the creek. The house also was updated with improved energy-performance measures to last for generations.

Located on the edge of a hill, the Rollingwood Residence was designed with a floating offset gable roof that follows the slope of the land and guides views downward, where an original path of restored rock ledges leads to a dry creek, an amphitheater, and a private gathering space. A screened porch and primary bedroom hover above grade over the sloping land like a modern tree house. (Page 76)

INPERSON TOUR

INPERSON TOUR

≥ CLARK RICHARDSON ARCHITECTS

TOBIN DAVIES

M AT T FA J K U S A R C H I T E C T U R E Inverse House is a renovation that challenges the classification of an ordinary two-story house by inverting the relationship between public and private spaces. The main driver of its design—calibrating daylight— was achieved by inverting the gable roof, allowing for the installation of clerestory windows. Interior functions of the home were pulled away from exterior walls to create light wells. Skylights also allow light to wash down the walls and into the interior of the home.

The Ramsey Residence is split into public and private areas both inside and out. Throughout the length of the house, various spaces are defined by alternating double-height clerestory-lit areas and modest traditional zones with lower ceilings. Natural daylight, material cues, and art provide a second layer to that procession. The gallery is flanked by two distinct outdoor areas: a constructed ground for cooking, herb gardening, and socializing, and a landscape with permeable surfaces and a central water feature.

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

84-87_AIA Homes.indd 85

85 7/28/21 12:13 PM


84-87_AIA Homes.indd 86

7/28/21 12:13 PM


84-87_AIA Homes.indd 87

7/28/21 12:13 PM


A u s t i n’s B e s t Architects WE POLLED HOMEOWNERS AND INDUSTRY PROS TO CREATE THIS LIST OF THE TOP ARCHITECTS

A Parallel Architecture 803 1/2 West Ave. 512-464-1199 aparallel.com info@aparallel.com Alterstudio Architecture 1801 Lavaca St., Ste. 106 512-499-8007 alterstudio.net info@alterstudio.net Barley Pfeiffer Architecture 1800 W. Sixth St. 512-476-8580 barleypfeiffer.com info@barleypfeiffer.com CG&S Design-Build 402 Corral Lane 512-444-1580 cgsdb.com db@cgsdb.com

88

CG&S Design-Build / Stewart Davis, AIA 402 Corral Lane 512-444-1580 cgsdb.com db@cgsdb.com Cornerstone Architects 7000 Bee Cave Road, Ste. 200 512-329-0007 cornerstonearchitectsllp.com info@cornerstonearchitectsllp.com coXist Studio 1101 Navasota St., Ste. 3 512-992-2304 coxiststudio.com info@coxiststudio.com Cuppett Kilpatrick Architecture + Interiors 3904 Medical Pkwy., Ste. C 512-450-0820 cuppettkilpatrick.com contact@cuppettkilpatrick.com

Davey McEathron Architecture 1402 W. North Loop Blvd. 512-599-0660 daveymarchitecture.com davey@daveymarch.com

Geschke Group Architecture 11200 Ranch Road 2222 512-502-8484 geschkegroup.com hello@geschkegroup.com

Dick Clark + Associates 2120 E. Seventh St., Ste. 200 512-472-4980 dcarch.com dca@dcarch.com

hatch + ulland owen architects 1010 E. 11th St. 512-474-8548 huoarchitects.com info@huoarchitects.com

Elizabeth Baird Architecture & Design 1404 W. 45th St. 512-572-9441 elizabeth-baird.com info@elizabeth-baird.com

J Christopher Architecture 500 E. Whitestone Blvd., Ste. 2647, Cedar Park 512-256-1520 jchristopherarchitecture.com marketing@jchristopher architecture.com

Furman + Keil Architects 1211 E. 11th St., Ste. 200 512-479-4100 fkarchitects.net hello@fkarchitects.net

YURII ANDREICHYN/SHUTTERSTOCK

IN THE AUSTIN AREA

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

88-89_FEA_BestArchitects.indd 86

7/28/21 12:14 PM


A u s t i n’s B e s t A r c h i t e c t s Jauregui Architecture Interiors Construction 3660 Stoneridge Road, Bldg. A-102 512-328-7706 jaureguiarchitect.com susan@jaureguiarchitect.com Jauregui Architecture Interiors Construction / Luis Jauregui, FAIA 3660 Stoneridge Road, Bldg. A-102 512-328-7706 jaureguiarchitect.com luis@jaureguiarchitect.com Jay Corder Architect 2700 W. Anderson Lane, Ste. 309 512-243-8507 jaycorder.com jay@jaycorder.com Jen Brannon Architecture + Design 512-633-2931 jenbrannondesign.com jen@jenbrannondesign.com

McCollum Studio Architects 1300 W. Lynn St., Ste 110 512-658-6354 mccollumstudio.com kyle@mccollumstudio.com McKinney York Architects 1301 E. Seventh St. 512-476-0201 mckinneyyork.com mross@mckinneyyork.com Mell Lawrence Architects 913 W. Gibson St. 512-441-4669 melllawrencearchitects.com mell@melllawrencearchitects.com Michael Hsu Office of Architecture 4910 Burnet Road 512-706-4303 hsuoffice.com Miró Rivera Architects 505 Powell St. 512-477-7016 mirorivera.com

Jobe Corral Architects 505 W. 38th St., Ste. B 512-499-1591 jobecorral.com info@jobecorral.com

North Arrow Studio 3908 Ave. B, Ste. 307 512-956-0644 northarrowstudio.com info@northarrowstudio.com

Lake Flato Architects 1224 E. 12th St., Ste. 430 512-373-3715 lakeflato.com marketing@lakeflato.com

Pluck Architecture 1608 Treadwell St. 512-507-4096 pluckarchitecture.com hello@pluckarchitecture.com

LaRue Architects 500 N. Capital of Texas Hwy., Bldg. 8, Ste. 110 512-347-1688 larue-architects.com brookef@larue-architects.com

Restructure Studio 1706 S. Lamar Blvd., Unit B 512-645-0454 restructurestudio.com info@restructurestudio.com

Matt Fajkus Architecture, LLC 900 E. Sixth St., Ste. 100 512-432-5137 mfarchitecture.com info@mfarchitecture.com

Restructure Studio / Carina Coel 1706 S. Lamar Blvd., Unit B 512-645-0454 restructurestudio.com info@restructurestudio.com

Restructure Studio / Melissa Hargis-Villanueva 1706 S. Lamar Blvd., Unit B 512-645-0454 restructurestudio.com info@restructurestudio.com Sanders Architecture 3706 Kerbey Lane 512-482-9258 sanders-architecture.com info@sanders-architecture.com

Webber + Studio, Architects 1220 Lavaca St. 512-236-1032 webberstudio.com info@webberstudio.com Winn Wittman Architecture 1108 Lavaca St., Ste. 110-488 512-630-2724 winnwittman.com info@winnwittman.com How This List Is Made

Shiflet Richardson Architects LLC 100 Westlake Drive 512-328-2955 shifletrichardson.com info@shifletrichardson.com

Using an online survey, Austin Home solicited peer and public nominations, asking voters to nominate up to five architects they’ve worked with or know to produce outstanding work. Austin Home then tallied the results, selecting

Shiflet Richardson Architects LLC / David Shiflet 100 Westlake Drive 512-328-2955 shifletrichardson.com info@shifletrichardson.com

the top percentage of vote recipients before submitting the final list to our fact-checking process. Companies do not and cannot pay to be a part of the list. We recognize that many good architects are not included

Specht Architects 5306 Middle Fiskville Road 512-382-7938 spechtarchitects.com info@spechtarchitects.com

on the list; this is only a sampling of a huge array of talented professionals within the region. We encourage all consumers to do their own research before selecting an architect.

Stuart Sampley Architect 3534 Bee Cave Road, Ste. 114, West Lake Hills 512-771-8856 stuartsampleyarchitect.com stuartsampley@mac.com

Austin Home uses best practices and

Studio Robins Dempsey, Inc. 6820 Finklea Cove 512-589-5905 studiorobinsdempsey.com amy@studiorobinsdempsey.com

damage caused by errors or omissions

Tim Brown Architecture 300B Mercer St., Dripping Springs 512-637-0400 timbrownarch.com info@timbrownarch.com

permission from Austin Home. If you see

exercises great care in assembling content for this list. It does not warrant that the data contained within the list are complete or accurate. Austin Home does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. All rights reserved. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without written an error in the information listed, please contact editor@austinhomemag.com. Architects: Congratulations! If you’d like to display this accomplishment with

Vanguard Studio, Inc. 6601 Vaught Ranch Road, Ste. G-10 512-918-8312 vanguardstudio.com john@vanguardstudio.com

a plaque, please visit our official store at austinmonthly.com/plaques.

AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

88-89_FEA_BestArchitects.indd 87

89 7/28/21 12:14 PM


Resource Guide Elements, Page 44 August Sage, augustsage.com Four Hands Home, fourhands.com Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, hsuoffice.com Austinticity, Page 46 and 48 StoryBuilt, storybuilt.com East End Eclectic, eastendeclectic.com Indoors, Page 50 and 52 Fern Santini Collaborative, fernsantinicollaborative.com Escobedo Group, escobedogroup.com Paul Lamb Architects, paullambarchitects.com My Space, Pages 54-55 Southside Design + Build, southsidedesignbuild.com

FEATURES

History in the Making, Pages 58-67 Four Point Lighting Design, fourpointlighting.com Foursquare Builders, foursquarebuilders.com LaRue Architects, larue-architects.com Love County Design, lovecountydesign.com Positive Energy, positiveenergy.pro

90

The Great Wide Open, Pages 68-75 Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, austinarchitect.com New Urban Home Builders, newurbanhomebuilders.com Natural Selection, Pages 76-83 Lake Flato Architects, lakeflato.com Shoberg Homes, shoberghomes.com Grand Tour, Pages 84-85 Brian Dillard Architecture, briandillardarchitecture.com Clark Richardson Architects, clarkrichardson.com Furman + Keil Architects, fkarchitects.net Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, austinarchitect.com Lake Flato Architects, lakeflato.com LaRue Architects, larue-architects.com Matt Fajkus Architecture, mfarchitecture.com North Arrow Studio, northarrowstudio.com Webber + Studio, Architects, webberstudio.com Best Architects, Pages 88-89 See article for contact information of each winner Curtains, Page 96 Furman + Keil Architects, fkarchitects.net

Indoors, page 50

AD INDEX

B. Jane Gardens, Page 14 bjanegardens.com

AIA Austin, Page 53 aiaaustin.org

Barley Pfeiffer Architecture, Page 39 barleypfeiffer.com

Andersen Windows & Doors, Pages 8-9 andersenwindows.com

Cantera Doors, Page 21 canteradoors.com

Anthony’s Patio, Page 34 anthonyspatio.com Arete Kitchens, Page 31 aretekitchens.com

CG&S Design-Build, Page 23 cgsdb.com Closet Factory, Page 28 closetfactory.com

Artisan Hardwood Floors, Page 12 artisanfloors.com

Copenhagen Imports, Pages 4-5 copenhagenliving.com

Austin Auditors, Page 87 austinauditors.com

CoXist Studio, Page 11 coxiststudio.com

Austin Elite 25, Pages 6-7 elite25austin.com

Cuppett Kilpatrick Architecture + Interiors, Page 27 cuppettkilpatrick.com

Austin Granite Direct, Page 32 austingranitedirect.com

Dalgleish Construction Company, Page 35 dalgleish.net

DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN/COURTESY FERN SANTINI COLLABORATIVE

ACCENTS

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

90-95_ResourceGuide.indd 90

7/28/21 12:15 PM


AU S T I N H O M E • FA L L 2 0 2 1

90-95_ResourceGuide.indd 91

91 7/28/21 12:15 PM


Elements, page 44

Highland Homes, Page 40 highlandhomes.com

Moreland Properties, inside back cover moreland.com

Skandinavia, Page 10 skandinaviatexas.com

Homesville Realty Group, Page 91 homesville.com

North Arrow Studio, Page 86 northarrowstudio.com

Specht Architects, Page 56 spechtarchitects.com

Ed Hughey, Moreland Properties, Page 17 edhughey.com

J Christopher Architecture, Page 25 jchristopherarchitecture.com

Olson Defendorf Custom Homes, Pages 2-3 odcustomhomes.com

Texas Construction Company, Page 49 txconstruct.com

Encore Stone Studio, back cover encorestone.com

Jauregui Architect, Page 47 jaureguiarchitect.com

Pilgrim Building Company, Page 13 pilgrimbuilding.com

Four Hands Home, Page 29 fourhands.com

Jay Corder Architect, Page 42 jaycorder.com

Plush Fabric-Home Interiors, Page 41 plushhomefabric.com

Geek Window Cleaning, Page 16 geekwindowcleaning.com

Keller Williams Luxury International | Austin Portfolio Real Estate KW, inside front cover portfolioisluxury.com

Restructure Studio, Page 37 restructurestudio.com

Wally Workman Gallery, Page 45 wallyworkmangallery.com

RisherMartin Fine Homes, Page 1 rishermartin.com

Wilson & Goldrich Realtors, Page 22 wilsongoldrick.com

David Wilson Garden Design, Page 26 dwgd.com

Goosehead Insurance, Page 91 gooseheadinsurance.com

92

LaRue Architects, Page 51 larue-architects.com

Shoal Creek Nursery, Page 38 shoalcreeknursery.com

Tommy Bahama Home, Page 15 tbfurnitureaustin.com Urbanspace Interiors, Page 20 urbanspaceinteriors.com

CHASE DANIEL

Davey McEathron Architecture, Page 33 daveymarchitecture.com

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

90-95_ResourceGuide.indd 92

7/28/21 12:15 PM


90-95_ResourceGuide.indd 93

7/28/21 3:10 PM


90-95_ResourceGuide.indd 94

7/28/21 12:15 PM


90-95_ResourceGuide.indd 95

7/28/21 2:01 PM


Curtains

Daylight from new Windsor windows silhouettes the marble tub and silk Fortuny chandelier in this sophisticated bathroom, part of a 1960s home remodeled by Furman + Keil Architects and The Renner Project. To read more about this West Austin residence, which is featured on this year’s AIA Austin Homes Tour, turn to page 84. 96 96_Curtains.indd 96

TOBIN DAVIES

Soak It All In

FA L L 2 0 2 1 • AU S T I N H O M E

7/28/21 12:16 PM


AUSTIN HOME Inspiration For Your Space

TKTK

Fall 2021 / Vol. 15 / No. 1

7/28/21 11:52 AM

00_Cover.indd 6


AUSTIN HOME Inspiration For Your Space 2021 AIA AUSTIN HOMES TKTK TOUR PREVIEW

Fall Fall 2021 2021 // Vol. Vol. 16 15 // No. No. 31

7/28/21 11:52 AM

00_Cover.indd 1


Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.