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R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y | 2014–2015 T HE FU T U RE O F HE A LT H C A R E E D UC AT ION


EDUCATION

2015 BOARD OF REGENTS Thomas Drese · MA chair

Marilyn Snider · MS vice chair

Albert Peters · CPA treasurer

Sharon Diaz · PhD (hc) ( ex-officio ) David Bradley · MBA ( ex-officio)

Jonathan Brown · DPA Mary Brown David Frey · JD Owen Garrick · MD Cornelius Hopper · MD Teh-wei Hu · PhD Lloyd Leanse · BA Alvin McLean, Jr. · PhD Gary Morrison · LLB Chuck Prosper · MBA John Swartzberg · MD, FACP

president and ceo

Elaine Lemay · MHROD executive director, human resources

Scot Foster · PhD

Shirley Strong · MEd

academic vice president and provost

chief diversity officer

Gregory Gingras · MSB, CMA, CFM vice president, finance and administration, and cfo

Cynthia Ulman · MBA executive director,

Terrence Nordstrom · EdD, PT interim vice president,

Sue Valencia · BA, CFRE executive director,

enrollment and student services

DIVERSITY COMMUNITY

2015 ADMINISTRATION Sharon Diaz · PhD (hc)

RESEARCH

planning and business development

development and alumni affairs

Stephanie Bangert · MLS executive director,

TECHNOLOGY

communications and external relations

On the cover: Shanda Williams, Student Body Association’s 2015 Student of the Year and BSN graduate

GLOBALITY


MISSION

VA L U E S

Samuel Merritt University educates students to become highly skilled and compassionate healthcare professionals who positively transform the experience of care in diverse communities.

At Samuel Merritt University, we value:

VISION

»a  collegial environment where we are fair, respectful, and behave with integrity.

Samuel Merritt University will become nationally recognized as a premier, multi-specialty health sciences institution. Expert faculty and staff will shape an inclusive learning environment where all students experience best teaching practices and state-of-the-art learning approaches. The University will select and support students who will flourish in the rigorous academic programs, learn to practice expertly, and pass licensure or certifications examinations on first attempt.

»a  learning environment where we challenge ourselves and our students to think critically, seek mastery, and act compassionately.

»a  collaborative environment where we partner with one another and with others in the community. »a  n innovative environment where we take reasoned risks and move nimbly. » a results-oriented environment where we provide and expect exceptional performance and service.

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BY THE NUMBERS 3.41

CUMULATIVE GPA OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENTS ENTERING SMU

IN 2015, AN ANTICIPATED 718 STUDENTS WILL GRADUATE FROM THE FIVE DEGREE PROGRAMS AT SAMUEL MERRITT UNIVERSITY, MAKING SMU THE LARGEST SOURCE OF NEW REGISTERED NURSES IN CALIFORNIA, AS WELL AS THE LARGEST PROVIDER OF PHYSICAL AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS, PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS, AND PODIATRIC PHYSICIANS IN THE GREATER BAY AREA.

456

100%

RESIDENCY PLACEMENT RATE FOR SCHOOL OF PODIATRIC MEDICINE GRADUATES

THE AVERAGE NUMBER OF SCHOOL OF NURSING GRADUATES EACH YEAR WHO TAKE THE CALIFORNIA STATE NCLEX EXAMS

96.8% LICENSURE PASS RATE OF PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT GRADUATES IN 15-YEAR HISTORY

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R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

PERCENTAGE OF LAST YEAR’S OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY GRADUATES WHO ARE CURRENTLY EMPLOYED IN PROFESSION

96%


TABLE OF CONTENTS 04

Note to the Community

13

Virtual Cadaver Brings New Technology to Anatomy Education

24

Nursing Student Aims to Serve Hometown of Oakland

06

Dr. Cornel West Inspires Students to Enter “Sacred Profession”

14

Serving Disadvantaged Rewards SMU Nursing Educator and FNP Students

26

2014 Financial Review

08

SMU Rolls Out TeamSTEPPS, A System to Improve Teamwork and Patient Safety

16

MARC Provides New Research Opportunities for Faculty and Students

28

Honor Roll of Donors

10

SMU Leads Nation Integrating Genomics into Healthcare Education

18

Campus Notebook

12

New Team to Improve Teaching and Learning Outcomes with Innovation and Tech

22

Occupational Therapy Students Build Solutions with Assistive Devices

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NOTE TO THE COMMUNITY

In the next decade, more than five million healthcare professionals are expected to enter the workforce, making healthcare the fastest developing job sector in the US, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This rapid and well-documented growth is driven both by an aging population and the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, which rightly aims to make healthcare accessible and affordable for all. So how does Samuel Merritt University (SMU) ensure this coming tidal wave of new healthcare professionals are highly skilled and deeply compassionate? We lead the way. This 2014–2015 issue of the Report to the Community considers the national leadership role SMU has taken in healthcare education to train the future professionals who will positively impact the healthcare experience in our communities, and most particularly the underserved. To do it, we’ve installed ahead-of-the-curve curricula and ushered in modern teaching strategies.

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R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015


In March, SMU hosted the first Genomics and the Future of Healthcare Symposium, which included presentations from national experts and highlighted SMU’s pioneering effort to integrate this new field of study into undergraduate programs. We’ve also opened the Motion Analysis Research Center (MARC), which is among the few facilities of its kind on the West Coast dedicated to Interprofessional Education (IPE) that places students from our California School of Podiatric Medicine side-by-side with our occupational and physical therapy students. We’ve also unveiled the “virtual cadaver,” one of the few in the Bay Area that allows students to examine the details of the anatomy in a touch-screen 21st-century modality. We are also leading the nation in an ambitious plan to train every person on campus in TeamSTEPPS, the national communication and leadership system that will be common among future healthcare professionals. The comprehensive training would make SMU the only healthcare education institution in the US

to require all stakeholders to become fluent in the lingua franca of tomorrow’s client-based, multi-provider, healthcare delivery model. For all of our growth in research, technology, and best practices, at the heart of the SMU mission is to develop graduates who are guided by a social awareness that healthcare should be equitable, and that health disparities must be eradicated. In April, we invited the theologian and public intellectual Cornel West to speak at the pulpit of our partner Allen Temple Baptist Church in East Oakland. West reminded us that providing healthcare is fundamentally benevolent. “A sacred profession,” as West called it, rallying SMU students and faculty alike to continue with their commitment to the underserved to close the health disparity gap.

learn, embodies the mission of SMU: to place graduates back into our communities, as part of the new wave of healthcare professionals, who will deliver high quality care to our fellow citizens today, and well into the future. Sincerely,

sharon c. diaz, PhD (hc)

President and Chief Executive Officer

thomas drese, MA Chair, Board of Regents

Finally, we are privileged to introduce you to Shanda Williams, a 2015 graduate and winner of the Student Body Association’s (SBA) Student of the Year Award. Shanda’s story, as you will

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Dr. Cornel West, one of America’s most prominent and provocative intellectuals, stood at the dais inside East Oakland’s Allen Temple Baptist Church in early April and commended the students and faculty of SMU. “For you to work and provide care for those who live in neighborhoods like these and need it most is a profoundly and fundamentally human act,” West said to a filled church of nearly 400 students, faculty, and community members.” It’s a beautiful thing to empathize and comfort others. To do so in today’s America really is to be countercultural. You’re cutting against the grain. And so I’ve come to salute Samuel Merritt University, but also to learn and listen from you.” West’s inspirational words were part of an hourlong discussion titled, “Overcoming Structural

“Be culturally sensitive and humble and knowledgeable of those who you care for,” West said before his presentation. “Caring for others—at its purest and most loving form—cuts across color and class and sexual orientation and nationality. In that sense, no matter what the challenge is, serving others really is living life at its highest level; your joy and pleasure in others is passed on to them. But to do so, you have to learn and listen and understand them and their experiences.” West’s appearance was SMU’s most recent collaboration with Allen Temple, the renowned Black church located in the heart of East Oakland, where some of the city’s most striking health disparities are seen. A 2015 report from the Alameda County Public Health Department showed that a Black male who grows up in East Oakland has a life expectancy of 71 years, while a white male in the more affluent Montclair District two miles away will live to 86. The cause of that 15-year disparity is a confluence of sociological ills, the study’s authors found—poverty, violence, and lack of education to name just three.

Violence to Reduce Health Disparities: Building the Beloved Community.” The Harvard and Princeton-educated philosopher was invited by SMU’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion as part of its Social Justice Speaker Series to address how violence in underserved communities impacts public health, and how SMU graduates can best serve clients who live in those communities.

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R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

In an attempt to reduce those dramatic health disparities and fulfill SMU’s broader mission of educating students who will work in underserved communities, the University hosts free Community Learning Forums at Allen Temple, where faculty members discuss healthcare issues facing members of the community. Students and faculty also volunteer their time and services to provide free screenings at Allen Temple’s annual health fair.


Rev. Dr. J. Alfred Smith, Jr., senior pastor at Allen Temple, said the relationship between the two institutions was a rare and sacred one. “A lot of healthcare institutions will talk the talk with us,” Smith, Jr. said, “but Samuel Merritt University has walked the walk. Their faculty and students have come down from Pill Hill and joined us here in the ’hood to work with us and help care for our community. They have shown us their commitment by deeds and not just words.” West was chosen to address SMU students and faculty due to his lifelong support of social justice issues, said Shirley Strong, chief diversity officer at SMU. “Dr. West talks a lot about income disparity and social justice and we view health disparities as a clear social justice issue,” Strong said. “Our students are the caregivers who will work in the neighborhoods most impacted by structural violence, and so it is critical they are well versed in Dr. West’s ideals to make them better, more compassionate, healthcare providers.” West said the violence and poverty that afflicts lower-income neighborhoods is rooted in generations of structural failings. It would take a massive amount of resources to solve those problems, and it’s unlikely those resources will arrive anytime soon. In the meantime, West added, he was energized to see a younger generation of socially conscious activists—including the future healthcare providers at Samuel Merritt University—who he said were entering a “sacred profession.”

“There’s a beautiful awakening among our young people going on right now, given the sleepwalking that’s been going on for 35, 40 years,” West said. “That’s what I love about Samuel Merritt University; it’s not just teaching, but it’s also exemplifying. Our students learn much more by the examples that are set than they do by textbooks. Knowing how is probably more important than the knowing what. To have examples that you can emulate, imitate, and use to go on to create—that’s the beautiful thing about Samuel Merritt University, where people learn to care about others by seeing and doing.”

“Be culturally sensitive and

humble and knowledgeable of those who you care for.”

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SMU ROLLS OUT TEAMSTEPPS, A SYSTEM TO IMPROVE TEAMWORK AND PATIENT SAFETY

Here’s a riddle: Why did students from four programs at Samuel Merritt University—nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and physician assistant—spend a Friday night playing with LEGOs?

It may sound like popsicle stick humor, but all SMU faculty, staff, and students are going to spend time together constructing LEGO towers in the coming years. The fun exercise is the introduction to a campus-wide training on TeamSTEPPS, or Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety.

Answer: To learn how to save lives.

TeamSTEPPS is a national system for healthcare professionals from different backgrounds to strengthen teamwork and communication—to learn how to speak one common language and work effectively—in an effort improve patient safety. Medical error was the third leading cause of death in the US in 2013 (440,000 deaths), according to the Journal of Patient Safety, and the majority of those errors were caused by a breakdown in leadership and miscommunication. At the same time, the future of healthcare is moving toward a patient-centered, team-based delivery model, said Michael Negrete PharmD, interim assistant vice president of academic affairs.

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R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015


“When a complex team of multiple providers come together but can’t work together it can turn into chaos quickly,” Negrete said. “To provide effective care in that scenario, you need to improve teamwork and communication.” While some current healthcare professionals may already be familiar with TeamSTEPPS, SMU stands out as a leader in healthcare education for its ambitious plan to familiarize every person on campus with the model. The goal, Negrete said, is to have all faculty and staff fully trained by the end of 2015, and to roll out a plan to ensure all students receive training prior to graduation by fall of 2016. That would make SMU one of the first—if not the only—healthcare universities in the nation to complete such a comprehensive offering of TeamSTEPPS. “Other schools may have trained people in certain areas,” Negrete said. “But we’ll be the first to ensure that it gets learned in every corner of the campus. If it’s good for patient care and healthcare teams, it’s good for all teams.”

TeamSTEPPS works hand-in-glove with another one of SMU’s academic priorities, Interprofessional Education (IPE). IPE brings different healthcare disciplines together to improve a patient’s health while TeamSTEPPS gives those professionals the skills and abilities to work effectively with each other. And so, on a Friday night this spring in the Health Sciences Simulation Center (HSSC), students from various programs moved from finding the most efficient way to build a LEGO tower as a team to deliver quality care to a standardized patient (an actress who played a patient suffering from dementia). The student roles were cast: How would a nurse, physical therapist, occupational therapist, and physician assistant collaborate to care for a difficult patient in a pressure-cooker situation? Who would take the lead, and how would they share responsibilities and divide tasks? And how would they exchange clear, effective, and timely information? And all while displaying compassion?

It took some practice. “If you had it so you could learn the other healthcare positions first,” one physician assistant student said afterward, “you could see the whole picture, not just your part in the equation. You’d be able to see what other professionals are thinking, and how they’re approaching the situation.” Negrete said the students who master TeamSTEPPS will be well suited to jump right into the healthcare workforce.“The more they know how to work and communicate with others, the more marketable their skills,” Negrete said. “ They’ll also be leaders in improving patient safety, which is the most important part of the job.”

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SMU LEADS NATION INTEGRATING GENOMICS INTO HEALTHCARE EDUCATION A few minutes before Dr. Kathleen Calzone took the stage to speak at a symposium hosted by SMU on March 18, she mentioned it was rare to find academic leaders who fully supported the integration of genetics and genomics into healthcare education. “But that hasn’t been the case here,” said Calzone of the National Cancer Institute and a nationally recognized expert in the field. “Samuel Merritt University has been paying close attention to genomics education early on. That’s ahead-of-the-curve leadership.” Calzone and fellow expert Dr. Jean Jenkins from the National Human Genome Research Institute were on campus as keynote speakers at the day-long symposium, Genomics and the Future of Healthcare: Implications for Practice and Academia. The event, which attracted a mix of more than 100 students, faculty, and healthcare providers from the Bay Area, was the first-of-its kind dedicated to the topic at SMU.

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R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

For the uninitiated, the study of genetics and genomics may sound intimidating—the stuff of science fiction and mad scientists. But as Calzone and Jenkins argued, it’s a fairly intuitive concept, and it’s critical that today’s SMU students—the future healthcare leaders—master the core principles. “We have to prepare students with this information now because the technology and the field changes so quickly,” Jenkins said. “This area wasn’t studied in med schools or nursing schools by our doctors and nurses who are practicing right now. But it will be important for the next generation of healthcare providers, and they’ll know how to integrate it into their practice and make their patients safer and healthier.” To fully understand the importance of the field, it helps to understand the definitions: The study of genetics focuses on how individual genes impact a person’s health. Health professionals have long understood the implications of single gene disorders, such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell

disease which involve mutations in the DNA sequences of single genes. As a result, the protein the gene codes for is either altered or missing. The study of genomics, on the other hand, is the study of the complete set of DNA within a single cell of an organism. More importantly, and the reason for the recent SMU symposium, is the relevance of genomic medicine. This field involves using genomic information about an individual as part of their clinical care related to diagnostic or clinical decision-making. Advances in the field of genomic medicine will provide a new way of thinking about clinical care and offers incredible opportunities for treatment and decision-making. The opportunities for targeted therapies and personalizing healthcare to the individual will most certainly revolutionize healthcare delivery. For decades, studying genes and genomics was the exclusive territory of lab-bound geneticists. But in the last 10 years, strides have been made in understanding the relevance of genetic and genomic variation that impacts health and the risk for common diseases.


The work on genomic healthcare is also poised to assist the Interprofessional Education (IPE) goals valued by the leadership and faculty at Samuel Merritt University as a premier health sciences institution. “Understanding genetics and genomics is an essential competency for all healthcare practitioners,” Brennan said. “SMU graduates will be leaders in their professions and well-positioned to both understand this field, but also meet the future challenges it presents.” The visit by Drs. Calzone and Jenkins came at a particularly relevant time for the field. In January, President Obama announced the development of the Precision Medicine Initiative—a national push to increase the study of genetics and genomics and develop medicines based on those findings. The initiative garnered bipartisan support and a related $215 million budget request was recently sent to Congress to help develop the infrastructure and research priorities necessary.

Indeed, more and more front-line healthcare providers are being asked by clients about genetic testing, what hereditary risk they have for certain diseases, and whether they should agree to particular tests. “Unfortunately,” Jenkins said, “the evidence suggests that the majority of nurses and other healthcare professionals are unprepared to deal with these questions.” However, SMU has been recognized as a leader in the effort to change this.

The effort to integrate genomics into the SMU curriculum began five years ago with the appointment of Associate Professor Patricia Brennan PhD, RN, MS, DFNAP, as an NIH Faculty Champion for Genetics and Genomics. Dr. Brennan’s appointment and subsequent collaborations with Drs. Calzone and Jenkins has led to the development of relevant coursework and resources, primarily targeted to undergraduate and graduate nursing curricula at SMU.

“That’s what makes Samuel Merritt University so innovative,” Calzone said. “Very few healthcare universities were taking note of this field early in its trajectory. To see such a small university paying attention to this emerging field early on was one thing; watching it lead the field in integrating genomics into its health education courses has been another. And watching their students connect those lessons into clinical care as professionals will be quite another.”

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NEW TEAM TO IMPROVE TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES WITH INNOVATION AND TECH

“Healthcare education is moving forward at a rapid pace,” Knoop said. “I’m happy to be collaborating with SMU’s visionaries. I look forward to helping to turn our shared vision for the future into reality.” Tanya Knoop is such a good collaborator, her past employer, Sun Microsystems, gave her an award for it. You can see the shiny trophy in her new office at SMU. “I’m all about collaboration,” said Knoop, who was named Director of Academic and Instructional Innovation last fall. “A collaborative approach yields the most productive results in all institutions, whether they are Silicon Valley start-ups or universities pushing healthcare education to new heights.” Knoop is charged with an important mission: improving teaching and learning outcomes at SMU and ensuring everyone has access to—and understands how to use—the latest educational technologies and pedagogical theories. Knoop hit the ground running and hired a new team of Instructional Designers: Christine Broz, Brian Gothberg and Elba Rios, as well as Instructional Technologist Beverly Saar to accomplish the mission.

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“Our team’s job is to work with faculty to keep SMU courses engaging and effective for today’s students,” Knoop said. Classroom dynamics are changing quickly, Knoop said, and so is the technology used to teach. A recent report showed that more universities are enhancing courses using online technologies, and that requires more video, podcast, and computer applications mastery. At SMU, professors are already experimenting with pedagogy such as “flipped classroom” and “synchronous sessions” where instructors and students are linked by video viewed off campus. Knoop’s background is well-suited to take on the new role. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering with a minor in Physics from San Francisco State University. She’s managed instructional designers in learning resource departments for Sun Microsystems and Adobe among others and consulted for several start-ups to help them build efficient systems to make their companies successful.


The California School of Podiatric Medicine (CSPM) recently acquired an Anatomage Table, also known as a “virtual cadaver” for its ability to provide a realistic 3D visualization of a human body for anatomy education. Made by a Silicon Valley company, the Anatomage Table is being used at more than 200 of the world’s leading universities and medical schools. SMU is one of only a few educational institutions in the Bay Area that have installed the advanced technology. The interactive, touch-screen technology resembles a large iPad the size of an operating table that displays a computerized version of a lifesize patient. Students can use virtual dissection tools to manipulate skeletal tissues, muscles, organs, and soft tissue. Real patient scans or cadavers provide the high-resolution images. “The Anatomage Table will be a supplement to dissection of human bodies, and will give us flexibility to view anatomical structures in virtual planar sections similar to views in CT or

MRI scans,” said Adjunct Assistant Professor Reed Rowan PhD, who began incorporating the technology into his course on the anatomy of lower extremities in late 2014. While the table is unlikely to replace the centuries-old practice of dissecting cadavers any time soon, despite the limited availability and expense of storing remains, it promises to enhance the understanding of anatomy among students who are used to relying on technology.

Venson said the virtual dissection table augments traditional teaching methods by enabling visualization of highly detailed anatomy that is tailored to specific topics and learner needs.

VIRTUAL CADAVER BRINGS NEW TECHNOLOGY TO ANATOMY EDUCATION

“At the California School of Podiatric Medicine, we are utilizing technology to enhance student learning, to respond to the ubiquitous use of technology in everyday life and to explore the unique opportunities of these tools and modalities,” said CSPM Dean and Professor John N. Venson DPM.

“Importantly, the digital table also enables us to incorporate and correlate anatomy with other disciplines including biomechanics, imaging, and surgery,” said Venson.

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It’s a Friday morning at the Native American Health Center in East Oakland and a graduate nursing student is presenting a case to his teacher of a patient complaining of severe pressure in both of her ears and muffled hearing.

Center ever since she trained there as an FNP student at SMU in the early 1990s, and when a job opened up at the center shortly after she graduated in 1996, she was hired because the medical director said she fit in so well at the clinic.

“Does she have a fever? Any allergies?” asks Rhonda Ramirez EdD, RN, director of the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) program at SMU.

“I knew that’s where I wanted to be, the kind of work I wanted to do—to work with the underserved,” she said.

No, replies the student, just congestion in her nose and ears.

Ramirez, a Filipino who grew up in Hawaii, went on to earn her doctorate in education so she could teach, and chose an emphasis on Native American youth and tribal identity.

SERVING DISADVANTAGED REWARDS SMU NURSING EDUCATOR AND FNP STUDENTS

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R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

Ramirez now shares her devotion to the Native American Health Center with her students. Each semester on Fridays, two FNP students work with Ramirez at the center in Oakland’s Fruitvale District. To prepare them for their professional careers, they treat an average of 15 scheduled patients a day—and walk-ins if there’s room.

“We need to relieve that pressure,” said Ramirez.

“They’re graduating in May so this is a great place to give them greater acuity through the experience of seeing patients and the speed with which we need to see them,” Ramirez said.

Engaging in a lengthy dialogue, the preceptor and student decide to conduct an audiometry exam and discuss which medications will best alleviate the patient’s symptoms.

The Native American Health Center opened in 1972 in San Francisco to meet the healthcare needs of one of the largest populations of American Indians in the country.

These are the kinds of real-world, hands-on, clinical experiences FNP students can expect to dive into when they enroll at SMU. Ramirez has been working at the Native American Health

As the Native American population shifted from San Francisco to Oakland in the 1980s, the center obtained federal funding to purchase a facility on International Boulevard. Since then, the center has evolved into a larger community


clinic that serves a diverse population of ethnic backgrounds, as well as low-income and homeless patients. The clinic offers medical, dental, and behavioral healthcare, as well as prevention and treatment of diabetes, obesity, HIV, Hepatitis C, and substance abuse.

“I’m not a micromanager,” Ramirez said of her teaching style. “I think the students sense that I trust them. I’m confident that the FNP program has given them good foundational knowledge and I let them apply it. Sometimes they make mistakes and then I correct them so they’ll learn.”

The center is among the most sought-after clinical rotations in the FNP program, largely due to Ramirez. And in a career field that is rapidly expanding due to the Affordable Care Act— the US Bureau of Labor Statistics expects the number of family nurse practitioners to grow 31 percent in the next decade—expert clinicians like Ramirez will play a critical role in educating the next generation of healthcare professionals.

Because the Native American Health Center prides itself on providing care with respect for cultural and linguistic differences, translators are available to make sure that patients fully understand their medical providers.

“Rhonda is amazing,” said FNP student Christopher Balkissoon. “She is in high demand because she’s a great teacher. She knows exactly what she’s doing, is very familiar with this clinic because she’s been here for so many years, and knows how to deal with this very underserved population.” “She’s very open to hearing different opinions,” adds FNP student Camelot Thompson. “She doesn’t just say ’No, you’re wrong, I’m right.’ Instead she says ’Let’s discuss it.’” Ramirez moves between two exam rooms, often stopping between patient evaluations to consult with her students. She wears a stethoscope embroidered with Native American beads—a gift from previous students that she treasures. Her students say she gives them a lot of independence, avoiding easy answers so they develop their critical thinking skills.

Ramirez is not only enthusiastic about Thompson’s idea, but immediately sees it as a clinical opportunity for future SMU students. “They could learn so much by going directly to those in need,” she said.

Among the qualities that Ramirez wants to see in future family nurse practitioners are compassion and a desire to work in underserved communities. She said the need for quality healthcare is most needed among those who are uninsured or underinsured and living in poverty because they tend to be more vulnerable to serious illness. Above all, Ramirez said, FNPs must be willing to help sick people understand the importance of wellness in their diets and lifestyle. It is a difficult but necessary challenge in disadvantaged communities where health problems like obesity and diabetes are rampant, Ramirez says, because patients often cannot afford to pay for healthy food or medicine. Ramirez’s lessons seem to be leaving a lasting impression on her students. Balkissoon plans to work with low-income patients after graduation and Thompson’s goal is to launch a mobile medical van to help those who are hardest to reach, particularly veterans and others living in homeless encampments.  15


MARC PROVIDES NEW RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES FOR FACULTY AND STUDENTS Twenty hotel housekeepers spent their hardearned time off last fall repeatedly making a bed at SMU’s Motion Analysis Research Center (MARC) to study new ways of making their jobs less painful. They are participating in a research project led by Carisa Harris-Adamson PhD, PT, an assistant professor in SMU’s Doctor of Physical Therapy program who specializes in the prevention of work-related musculoskeletal injuries. The goal of the project, which began in September 2014, is to determine whether employing a plastic wedge to lift mattresses and the use of fitted rather than flat sheets can to help reduce the risk of lower-back, arm, and shoulder injuries among hotel room cleaners. “These women are phenomenal and have been helpful in getting this research done,” said Harris-Adamson. “I don’t think people realize how physically hard their work is.” Harris-Adamson said the opening of the MARC in late 2013 enabled her to receive a $10,000

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R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

pilot grant for the project from the Southern California Education and Research Center at the University of California, Los Angeles. “The MARC has provided a lot of opportunities to do research at SMU that were not possible prior to its opening,” Harris-Adamson said. “It’s a fantastic lab. It’s got great equipment and excellent support.” The center is designed to advance the study of human movement in education, research, and patient care. Its primary mission is to serve as a teaching center on motion analysis for faculty and students from SMU’s California School of Podiatric Medicine (CSPM), Department of Occupational Therapy, and Department of Physical Therapy—an example of Interprofessional Education (IPE). “What attracted me to this job was that this was a brand new lab with all of the latest technology,” said Drew Smith PhD, director of the MARC. “But what really fascinated me was that it was

a meeting of the minds of three related disciplines. I never had the experience of working where three different disciplines merged around human movement.” The 2,000-square-foot lab is equipped with three-dimensional motion-capture cameras, in-floor force and pressure platforms, and a SMART EquiTest® to assess balance control and postural stability. In addition to providing educational opportunities for SMU students, the MARC is also hosting a number of research projects including investigating an adjustable orthotic developed by a Southern California podiatrist. Future research may include analysis by Harris-Adamson of a perching stool as an office alternative to sitting or standing, and a study of gait in autistic children by Occupational Therapy Professor Guy McCormack PhD. Smith said an additional goal is for the MARC to provide clinical services to the community and SMU alumni who have already expressed interest in sending patients over for care. “That


would also stimulate ideas for research and demonstrate to students what they’re learning in class,” he said. Smith is helping Harris-Adamson with the hotel bed research by offering his skills in laboratory data collection, analysis and technology. Long interested in occupational health, Smith once worked for the Australian government in ergonomics and how to lower back stress among manufacturing workers. Harris-Adamson’s interest in the challenges faced by hotel cleaners began while working as an ergonomic consultant in 2004. That was shortly after the start of the so-called “bed wars” among major hotel companies competing to attract guests who craved more plush accommodations and a good night’s rest. Since then, the chains have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in luxury bedding, including thick mattresses that can weigh up to 200 pounds. Housekeepers have also paid a high price for the comfort of hotel guests. In addition to other cleaning tasks, they make an average of 18 to 24 beds each day, lifting the heavy mattresses dozens of times to tuck in multiple sheets. Studies show much higher injury rates among hotel housekeepers than other service workers. For Harris-Adamson’s study, each housekeeper makes a queen-sized bed eight different ways over four hours. The researchers monitor the women’s heart rates, and use an Electromyography (EMG) to measure muscle activity as well as a lumbar motion monitor to detect lowerback strain.

Harris-Adamson will determine whether using the mattress lift tool and fitted sheets benefit the hotel cleaners by reducing their exposure to injury. Once her research results are complete, she will present the data at national and international conferences as well as to the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration. In the meantime, several high school juniors from the Envision Academy of Arts and Technology in Oakland simulated their own research at the MARC in December based on the hotel bed study. It was part of a two-week internship at

SMU that provided the students with a variety of learning experiences. The internships were arranged by HarrisAdamson, who taught Envision Academy students how to swim and sail last summer. The charter school’s mission is to ensure that its students pursue higher education. “The school really empowers students to change their lives,” she said. “It’s the perfect high school partner for SMU.

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A LOOK AT HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE PAST YEAR...


CAMPUS NOTEBOOK TERRY NORDSTROM AWARD

Terry Nordstrom EdD, PT, FNAP, assistant academic vice president and associate professor, was named a Catherine Worthingham Fellow by the American Physical Therapy Association, the highest honor bestowed in the profession. “SMU is honored to have among its ranks national leaders of Dr. Nordstrom’s scope and talent,” said Scot Foster PhD, academic vice president and provost.

SCHOOL OF NURSING AWARD

The California State Senate honored SMU’s School of Nursing students for providing free healthcare services to Oakland’s homeless and low-income residents. “Our students are transformed by their experiences of providing healthcare, listening to and building relationships with members of our society who are among the most marginalized,” said Assistant Professor Miriam Eisenhardt MPH, RN. “This integrates the practice of compassion and social justice into their identities as nurses both professionally and personally.”

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R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

monkey man visit

MONKEY MAN VISIT

A documentary film crew visited the Motion Analysis Research Center (MARC) to analyze the complex quadruped movements of Kenichi “Monkey Man” Ito, who holds the World Record for running on all fours in the 100-yard dash. “We reviewed some interesting data on a unique set of movements by a human,” said Dr. Drew Smith, director of the MARC. “It’s a fun exercise that demonstrates the adaptability of humans.”

TECH IN TEACHING SYMPOSIUM

SMU hosted the second, Improving Teaching with Technology Symposium, a nationally attended conference for innovators in healthcare education. “We’re watching what’s happening here at Samuel Merritt University very closely,” said attendee Dr. Ahmed Calvo, director, National Health Policy and Leadership Fellowship, Haas Center for Public Service at Stanford University. “You can no longer rely on a traditional curriculum or traditional teaching methods when it comes to preparing future healthcare professionals. Healthcare is changing quickly. So the best educators have to be able to adapt now, so their students learn to be adaptable later.”


school of nursing award

JAPANESE VISITORS

Nursing professors from Yamanashi Prefectural University in Kofu, Japan, visited the Oakland campus and planned to return to their country with hopes of starting what could become that nation’s first Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program. “This is fabulous,” said Assistant Professor Yuko Kamijo after her team toured Brighter Beginnings, the SMU-led free clinic in Richmond. “We’ve seen it from many angles, and have seen the great advantages to having a DNP program. It’s amazing to see how many SMU faculty continue to work as clinicians and how that keeps their students well prepared.”

ROB BONTA VISIT

California Assemblyman Rob Bonta (D-Oakland), Chair of the Assembly Health Committee, visited with students and toured the Oakland campus. “It was exciting to hear that Samuel Merritt University students are eager to work in diverse and underserved communities,” Bonta said. “It’s important that our next generation of healthcare providers reflect the communities they serve. Hearing that 90 percent of students

terry nordstrom

japanese visitors

at SMU rely on financial aid in some way shows there’s a great need to support their educations, as well as their future careers in healthcare.”

SAN YSIDRO MEDICAL MISSION

Twenty-three podiatry students, four family nurse practitioners, and an occupational therapy student from SMU traveled to San Ysidro on the US-Mexican border to provide free foot care and primary health services to a community with unmet medical needs. “The students mature right in front of your eyes,” said Dr. Timothy Dutra, assistant professor at the California School of Podiatric Medicine (CSPM). “For many, this is their first real clinical experience with an underserved population and a different culture. When they return, they are much more advanced in their clinical skills.”

FNP ONLINE PROGRAM LAUNCHES

SMU launched a new online MSN degree program for family nurse practitioners, which now ranks among the fastest-growing professions in the US healthcare system. For the first time,

rob bonta visit

students in California and six other states can earn a graduate degree through online courses developed and taught by SMU faculty. “Our program has been developed by experts in online teaching, learning, and nursing,” said Arlene Sargent EdD, RN, associate dean of nursing. “The technology and curriculum we’ve created will make the digital classroom just as invigorating as the experience inside the SMU classroom on campus.”

HENRIETTA LACKS/COMMUNITY READS

The family of Henrietta Lacks, the focus of the non-fiction bestseller, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, was on campus to discuss their grandmother’s unwitting contribution to science. The event launched SMU’s first “Community Reads” initiative, a year-long shared reading of literature and dialogue related to a critical issue in healthcare. “A lot of medical students only know my grandmother’s name from research papers and books,” Kim Lacks said. “It’s important to us that SMU students also know who she


henrietta lacks/community reads

was as a person, as a mother, and as a human being. We want students who become professionals to stop and think, ’Wait. Are we doing the right thing here?’”

ALLEN TEMPLE HEALTH FAIR

A 50-person contingent from SMU volunteered at Allen Temple Baptist’s 37th Annual Holistic Health Fair, one of East Oakland’s largest annual gatherings where children and elders can receive free treatments such as physical exams, diabetes screenings, and foot exams. “We do a lot of classroom work before we get a chance to work with people,” said Dana Loebman, a second-year physical therapy student. “It helps us when we’re able to apply those lessons in the community. It helps us build confidence, and we get a good opportunity to see where all this education is going and how it can help people.”

#blacklivesmatter

allen temple health fair

GET TO KNOW YOUR BRAIN

More than 100 residents attended the free, Get to Know Your Brain! Expo on the Oakland campus, which featured hands-on interactive exhibits for kids and parents. “Our goal is to engage and inspire people of all ages about the amazing brain and how it plays an important role in everything we do,” said Barb Puder PhD, associate professor of neuroscience. “Through fun and interactive exhibits students, teachers and community members can all learn how to make lifestyle choices that promote brain health and improve the quality of their lives.”

#BLACKLIVESMATTER

Students and staff at all three SMU campuses across Northern California participated in a die-in as part of the international #blacklivesmatter protest that aims to draw attention to racial inequality, police violence, and the trauma it inflicts in all communities. “As future healthcare professionals we’ll have an important role in educating ourselves and the public about racism and violence,” said ABSN student Sylvia La, “and bringing it to the forefront as a real issue that impacts people’s lives and well-being.”

“For many, this is their first real clinical experience with an underserved population and a different culture. When they return, they are much more advanced in their clinical skills.”

 20


OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY STUDENTS BUILD SOLUTIONS WITH ASSISTIVE DEVICES For Occupational Therapy (OT) students Megan Simmons and Christine Van Gorkum, a simple challenge came to mind when they thought about clients who’d suffered a stroke and lost motion on one side of their body. How could they continue to perform the routine things in life, like hygiene? Simmons and Van Gorkum created the “3-in-1 Styler”—a crafty invention that allows a onehanded client to use a blow dryer, manage a curling wand, and even tie a ponytail. The imaginative device was built from household appliances: the motor from an oscillating fan, some PVC piping, and a whole bunch of glue and elbow grease. “Making this helped me realize there are a lot of simple items out there that can help people live independently and live the life they want to live,” said Van Gorkum.

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The duo’s invention was just one of many on display at the annual Assistive Device Faire in March, which shows off creations from secondyear OT students who’ve taken the course, “Occupational Adaptations and Introduction to Modalities.” As a requirement of the course, students make assistive devices of potential use to people with disabilities. Some of the inventions over the years have gone to market. “I believe the projects reflect an essential function of occupational therapy—to identify ways to assist people with impairment or disability to fully participate in life,” said Assistant Professor Ginny Gibson OTD, OTR/L, CHT. Students Rebecca Brotslaw and Mark Borbe used a plastic tub, liquid nails, mesh tarp, hooks, and a chopstick to make the “Easy Wash”—a tub for one-handed dishwashing that grips plates and prevents them from slipping and possibly breaking.

Students Monica DeLeon and Rubi Reyes invented “The Post-Up,” a pulley device that allows for one-handed clients to effortlessly dump out heavy compost buckets. And for those who want to take a selfie but don’t have the strength or arm motion, students Kristina Veasley and Zoya Hadi developed the “iCute,” with a selfie stick, some electrical tape, and a wheelchair. “We wanted to make the selfie accessible to those who may not have the range of motion in their arm,” Veasley said. “It’s a fun and social phenomenon, and it brings a lot of happiness to people. And it should be available to anyone who wants to participate.”


clockwise: L  auren Clark, Trailblazer; Megan Simmons and Christine Van Gorkum, 3-in-1 Styler; Mark Borbe and Rebecca Brotslaw, Easy Wash; Kristina Veasley and Zoya Hadi, iCute;

Kamran Husain and Michael Gong, Spring Loaded Racket; Kris Meadows and Carly Sanders Golf Buddy

 23


When Shanda Williams graduates from SMU in 2015 with a bachelor’s degree in nursing, it will mark the end of an educational transformation and the beginning of her dream to change how healthcare is delivered in her hometown. “I want to take the hierarchy out of healthcare,” Williams said. “That’s why I want to become a nurse in my community with the people I grew up with, who have supported me.” Becoming a nurse was not always her goal. Williams wanted to become a lawyer since she was a young child in Oakland, but that began to change when she took her grandmother to a medical appointment. Her grandmother—with a history of diabetes, stroke, and hypertension— lied to the doctor about eating a healthy diet and taking her medication. Later, her grandmother told Williams that the doctor didn’t understand how black people eat because he was white.

NURSING STUDENT AIMS TO SERVE HOMETOWN OF OAKLAND

“That’s what sparked my interest in healthcare,” said Williams. “I realized that there needed to be more doctors and nurses who connect with patients on a cultural basis.” According to a 2013 survey conducted by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, just six percent of registered nurses in the US are African-American while 83 percent are Caucasian. Increasing the number of minority nurses will help close the health disparity gaps in underserved communities, healthcare experts say. “I think it is crucial to communities of color that students like Shanda enter the nursing profession because they have the ability to decrease

 24

R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015


anxiety during office or hospital visits, increase trust in the healthcare system, and provide equitable care specific to each patient’s lifestyle,” said Ché Abram, associate director of diversity at SMU. “I believe that Samuel Merritt University values students like Shanda because we educate students who provide quality information and care. Those SMU healthcare providers, once in the community, encourage patients to become active partners in increasing the health and wellness of their communities.” Even though Williams helped manage her grandmother’s medications and regularly checked her glucose levels, she still intended to become a lawyer so she enrolled at University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) as a political science major. Williams said she found a lack of diversity at UCSB and felt like “a fish out of water.” She developed an interest in science and began considering a career in medicine. Because her goal was to build relationships and she didn’t believe doctors could do that, she turned to nursing. Unfortunately, a nearby nursing program at Santa Barbara City College was filled and, facing pressure from her family, she signed up to take the Law School Admission Test. Knowing it would lock her into a law career, Williams didn’t show up for the test. She withdrew from UCSB and began working in hotel management, returning to the Bay Area in 2008. That year a friend suggested she check out the nursing programs at SMU, but before she could do that she discovered she was pregnant and had to put off her dream so she could provide for her daughter.

By 2010, she was still working in hotel management but her heart was no longer in it. While working full-time at a San Francisco hotel, she began taking community college courses to finish her undergraduate degree.

treated, not just racially but economically,” said Williams, adding that she gets many questions from people in the community who don’t feel comfortable asking their physicians “because they don’t want to sound stupid.”

Two years later, Williams applied for and was accepted to attend SMU’s “Nursing Success!” seminar for prospective students. She met representatives of the nursing program and learned about scholarship opportunities from the financial aid staff.

“We’re doing something wrong when our patients can’t ask questions about their own health conditions,” she said. “I want to make people comfortable so that they can tell me anything. I want it to be a partnership.”

“There was an amazing feeling on campus,” Williams recalls. “I felt like I fit in. This is where I knew I wanted to be.” She applied for the direct-entry transfer Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program, designed for underrepresented students from California community colleges. It was the only program Williams applied to because she liked that SMU offers small classes and most of its students graduate on time. Above all, she said the school’s mission of reducing health disparities in underserved communities reflects her own values. “When I walk down the streets of Oakland, I see a lot of need for education in our community about healthy choices like the need to exercise and choose water and milk over sugary beverages that I lacked when I grew up.” Williams said clinical rotations have been the most important learning experience at SMU because they enable her to put her knowledge to work. “I notice differences in how people are

Williams said having a 5-year-old makes her a more dedicated student because her time is limited and she is more motivated to spend it well. She also sees similarities in her roles as mother and nurse. “Being a nurse is like having a child; exhausting and rewarding,” she said. After graduation, Williams said she would like to work as a family nurse practitioner at Highland Hospital, a public facility in Oakland. It is “a hospital I grew up going to and where I delivered my daughter. It has the population I want to serve.” Ultimately, Williams hopes to open her own community-based health clinic where she can build long-lasting relationships with patients, helping people rather than just treating diseases. She also wants to be an inspiration to her community. “Just by being a single mother at a private school, that tells other African American men and women, ’If she can do it, I can do it.’”

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2O14 FINANCIAL REVIEW OPERATING EXPENSES Instruction

REVENUE Total tuition

2014 $60,105,751.00

Fees

$1,091,021.00

Other revenue

$1,821,528.00

Transferred for operations Endowment income Released from restriction TOTAL OPERATING REVENUE

— $95,921.00 $1,765,723.00 $64,879,944.00

2014 $31,020,722.00

Academic support

$8,249,193.00

Student services

$4,536,322.00

Institutional support

$9,523,575.00

Auxiliary enterprises

$146,193.00

Released from restriction TOTAL EXPENSES

$1,765,723.00 $55,241,728.00

Oper Inc/(Loss) pre allocation

$7,095,437.00

Interest income/gains

$6,616,913.00

NET INCOME/(LOSS)

$13,712,350.00

INVESTMENT ACTIVIT Y IN RESTRICTED FUNDS REVENUE DEDUCTIONS  Other deductions and scholarships TOTAL REVENUE DEDUCTIONS NET OPERATING REVENUE

 26

R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

Investment income

$1,376,094.33

$2,542,779.00

Realized gains/(losses)

$3,026,265.09

$2,542,779.00

Unrealized gains/(losses)

$62,337,165.00

TOTAL INVESTMENT ACTIVIT Y IN RESTRICTED FUNDS

$(2,975,367.70) $1,426,991.72


83.8%

8.5%

5.3%

2.3%

0.1%

SPECIAL-PURPOSE SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS

PROJECTS (OTHER)

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS

MISCELLANEOUS FUNDS (INCLUDES GIFTS-IN-KIND)

ENDOWED FUNDS (OTHER)

$2,605,530

$264,694

$166,032

$69,825

$1,339

 27


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS GERALDINE “GERRI” ADAMS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Dr. Fusae Abbott Jenine Bagley-Jackson Dr. Penny Bamford Kenneth Boxton Tom and Gena Caya In memory of Geraldine “Gerri” Adams Andy Chamberlin Ronda Nash Garrett Corine Harris Elaine M. Lemay Lillian Lugo-Harvin Chris and Carla Ross In memory of Shirley Garrett Maria Pangelinan Arthur Valencia Markcus Thomas Royce and Sue Valencia

AFFORDABLE CARE ACT AND EXPANSION OF PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS TRAINING PROGRAM GRANT Department of Health and Human Services

ANNA BARNARD LGBTQIA SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Kevin Archibald

Eric Ching ’09

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Clark

Judi Baker

Dr. Marc E. Code ’02 and ’14

Dr. Penny Bamford

Jamie Conigliaro

Jim and Stephanie Bangert

Robert Czeck

Elmarie Botha Josh Campbell Lenni Chan Dr. Nicole Christensen Dr. Susan Grieve ’98 Tanya Grigg Jamie S. Hirota Yurismary Llerena Lillian Lugo-Harvin Dr. Richard MacIntyre Dr. Pamela Minarik Liza Osoteo

Debra Del Ricci Ethan Eller ’08 Deborah L. Fajans Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Fular Sheri F. Gosser Hennessey Engineers, Inc. Wei-Yuan Jar Mr. and Mrs. Mark A. Kibby Tracy Krause Weslie Modolo Kristen E. Mullarkey Michael J. Nevitt

Dr. Rhonda Ramirez ’96

Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Oehring

Chris and Carla Ross

Mr. and Mrs. Darrel Penix

Saeng Saephanh

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Reed

Anglyn S. Sasser Jennifer Scolari Hai-Thom Sota Hillary Wong

Shawn Richardson Shevlin Rush SRPR, Inc.

R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

CALIFORNIA FOUNDATION FOR EXCELLENCE IN PODIATRIC MEDICINE SCHOLARSHIPS

Scholarships given to students enrolled in the California School of Podiatric Medicine at Samuel Merritt University by the California Foundation for Excellence in 2014. Individual donor records to these scholarship funds are held at the California Foundation for Excellence. Alameda Contra Costa Podiatric Medical Society Scholarship Robert M. Barnes, DPM Memorial Scholarship Heather Barton, Esq. Memorial Scholarship Melvin Barton, DPM Scholarship Blaine Labs, Inc. Scholarship Robert L. Brennan, DPM Memorial Scholarship

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Spratt

CCPM Class of ’63

Summit Laboratory, LLC

CCPM Class of ’72

Mui Tran ’10

Theodore H. Clarke, DPM Scholarship

Kathleen Dempsey Cargo ’64 Carol Gordon Falgout ’44

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Arnold

Lisa M. Trost

Maria Ronquillo

Daryl Ann Beaton

Dominic Tu

Tuula Tunturi Sutton ’66 In memory of Betty Burdine

Sharon Bono-Beaton

Stephanie Tu

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent A. Bondy

Royce and Sue Valencia Celeste G. Villanueva Jessica T. Wieduwilt

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Gretchen Burkhart Brosius

Mr. and Mrs. James Spodeck

DAVID DANIEL BEATON ’09 ENDOWED MEMORIAL AWARD FUND

ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP FUND

BURKHART BROSIUS SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Codingline Scholarship CSPM Alumni and Associates Scholarship Sharon C. Diaz Scholarship Wes Endo, DPM Memorial Scholarship


John E. Green, DPM Memorial Scholarship Jon Hultman, DPM/Franklin Kase, DPM Scholarship Earl G. Kaplan, DPM Memorial Scholarship Burgess S. Kelly, DPM Memorial Scholarship Shirley Lanham Scholarship

Dr. John Callahan ’97

California Podiatric Medical Association

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF PODIATRIC MEDICINE ALUMNI AND ASSOCIATES OPERATING FUND (STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND SCHOLARSHIPS) Dr. Craig Aaronson ’85

Dr. Thomas Elardo ’96

Dr. Richard R. Abe ’74

Dr. Joseph E. Chambers ’78

C. Keith Greer

Dr. and Mrs. Eduardo Adamé

Dr. Carolyn McAloon ’’97

Dr. Jeffery T. Amen ’86

CALIFORNIA PODIATRIC MEDICAL ASSOCIATION ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Lawrence Family Scholarship Los Angeles County Podiatric Medical Society Benjamin Mullens, DPM Memorial Scholarship Joseph Oloff Memorial Scholarship Orange County Podiatric Medical Society/Santa Clara Valley Podiatric Medical Society Scholarship John D. Pagliano, DPM and John W. Pagliano DPM Memorial Scholarship

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF PODIATRIC MEDICINE ALUMNI AND ASSOCIATES ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dr. Patrick Briggs ’98

Amputation Prevention Center at St. Mary’s Medical Center

Dr. Natalie Chu ’97

Dr. Jeffery Angarola ’86

Dr. Amir A. Dehghan ’86

Dr. Jason Armstrong ’98

Dr. James F. Dietz ’77

Dr. Steven W. Bailey ’85

Dr. Timothy Dutra ’85

Dr. Richard Baker ’84

Dr. Anthony R. Hoffman ’95

Bako Integrated Physicians Solutions

Dr. Richard M. Jensen ’94

George Riess, DPM Memorial Scholarship

Dr. S. Patrick Lai ’77

Merton Root, DPM Memorial Scholarship

Dr. Rebecca Smiley-Leis ’88

Robert L. Rutherford, DPM Memorial Scholarship

Dr. Eddie Lo ’97

San Diego County Podiatric Medical Society Scholarship John H. Weed, DPM Memorial Scholarship Ruth Wood, DPM Memorial Scholarship Bennett Zier, MD Scholarship

American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine/Robert Barnes Memorial Fund

Dr. Frederick W. Lange ’85 Dr. Leslie G. Levy ’79 Dr. Thomas Penman ’77 Dr. Benjamin Pessah ’76 Chris and Carla Ross In memory of William Stavosky, Jr.

Dr. Thomas Carine ’76 Dr. Alan Catanzariti ’83 Dr. Hector Cervantes ’90 Dr. Rodney Chan ’76 Dr. Elizabeth Chang ’87 Dr. Deanna J. Chapman ’89 Dr. Catherine Cheung ’00 Dr. Jeffrey V. Chou ’90 Dr. Robert Choy ’83 Dr. Carl Christenson Dr. Natalie T. Chu ’88 Dr. Michael Chun ’88 Dr. Allen O. Clyde ’76 Dr. Karl R. Coulter ’74 Dr. Gary W. Count ’77 Dr. Benjamin Cullen ’10 Dr. Theodore L. Deffinger ’54

Dr. Scott Basinger ’96

Dr. Amir A. Dehgan ’86

Dr. Tracy Basso ’88

Dr. John Del Monte ’76

Bay Area Surgical Specialists, Inc.

Dr. Jane Denton ’81

Dr. Gregory Bergamo ’93

Dr. Dennis R. Dice ’72

Dr. James R. Boccio ’80 Dr. Alan Bocko ’94 Dr. Rochelle Bomar ’95 Dr. Bruce R. Booth ’88 Dr. Steven Brandwene ’83

Schwab Charitable Fund

Dr. Diane Branks ’85

Dr. E. Joseph Sekreta ’51

Dr. Michael P. Brooks ’76

Dr. Beverly A. Spurs ’85

Dr. Bruce M. Bulkin ’82

Dr. Steven Subotnick ’69

Dr. Thomas M. Burghart ’93

Irma Walker-Adamé

Dr. Gene Caicco

Dr. Kevin Wolf ’87

Dr. Robert J. Califano ’74

DG Instruments Dr. James F. Dietz ’77 Dr. Bruce M. Dobbs ’73 Dr. Mitchell F. Dorris ’89 Dr. Mark Drusin ’78 Dr. Gregory Eirich ’90 Dr. Charles Eiser ’84 Dr. Laurence S. Ellner ’89 Dr. Clifford Endo ’84 Dr. Sonia Erickson ’00 Dr. Anthony J. Errico ’71 Dr. Michael Esber ’90

Donors $25,000 Or More Appear In Bold

Members of the Universalis Centralis Circle $1,000 or More

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Dr. Richard L. Evans ’84

Dr. Jason Homan ’13

Dr. Carolyn E. McAloon ’97

Dr. Benjamin Pessah ’76

Dr. Jerry M. Fabrikant ’78

Dr. Ronald A. Hull ’86

Dr. Gary S. McCarter ’80

Pfizer, Inc.

Dr. Arthur Fass ’79

Dr. Jon A. Hultman ’70

Dr. Rick E. McClure ’88

Dr. Faranak Pourghasemi ’02

Dr. Eric M. Feit ’93

Dr. Dennis Hum

Dr. William D. McDonald ’83

Dr. Jay M. Purvin ’79

Dr. Christopher Fenesy ’79

Dr. William M. Jenkin ’70

Dr. Brian McDowell ’69

Elvedina Redzic

Dr. Tracy C. Ferragamo ’90

Dr. Richard M. Jensen ’94

Dr. Starlette McLean ’91

Dr. Joseph W. Reynolds ’69

Dr. Lois Fleming ’89

Dr. Stephen C. Jensen

Dr. Lawrence MacTavish ’74

Dr. Alexander Reyzelman ’95

Dr. James Fong ’82

Dr. Lynn Johnson ’70

Dr. Kenneth Mah ’80

Dr. Bobbie T. Rigby ’74

L. Bruce Ford

Dr. Roger A. Johnson ’66

Dr. Kenneth Maisak ’08

Dr. Mary Rion ’56

Dr. Brent A. Frame ’89

Dr. Anthony Kakis ’80

Dr. Kennon Martin ’75

Dr. Mario W. Rizzo ’78

Dr. Robert R. Franger ’80

Dr. Katherine L. Kalthoff ’97

Dr. Victoria Melhuish ’91

Dr. James Robison ’89

Dr. Leslie Q. Franson ’76

Dr. C. Craig Karrasch ’77

Merck & Co., Inc.

Dr. Alan Friedman ’80

Dr. Jeffrey H. Katz ’86

Dr. Bruce Meyers ’78

Root Functional Orthotic Laboratory, Inc.

Dr. Gregg Gilles ’86

Dr. Brad A. Katzman ’81

Dr. Ronald Michael ’63

Dr. Albert I. Ginsburg ’70

KCI USA, Inc.

Dr. Kevin M. Miller ’06

Dr. John S. Giurini ’83

Dr. Brian Keller ’97

Dr. Anoosh Moadab ’01

Dr. Bradford W. Glass ’73

Dr. Neil R. Kelley ’78

Dr. Robert Mohr ’76

Dr. Gail M. Grandinetti ’86

Dr. Christy King ’09

Dr. Douglas K. Monson ’84

Dr. Donald R. Green ’72

Dr. Kevin A. Kirby ’83

Dr. David W. Morse ’74

Dr. Richard A. Green ’68

Dr. Chatra Klaisri ’09

Dr. Daniel Murphy ’77

C. Keith Greer

Dr. James Knudson ’77

Dr. Robert D. Murphy ’77

Dr. Don M. Griffith ’67

Dr. Richard Koenigsberg ’73

Dr. Fred H. Nagata ’79

Dr. Holly Spohn Gross

Dr. Jonathan Kreger ’88

Dr. Lyle Nalli ’86

Dr. James M. Hagan ’72

Dr. Paul R. Kruper ’76

Dr. Samuel Nava, Jr. ’92

Dr. Gordon S. Hamblin ’76

Dr. Charles M. Kurtzer ’82

Dr. Lloyd Nesbitt ’75

Dr. Paul Young Jin Han ’83

Dr. Chun-Sun Lai ’76

Dr. Henny T. Nguyen ’96

Dr. Elliott Handwerker ’76

Dr. S. Patrick Lai ’77

Dr. James G. Nickolopoulos ’75

Dr. Steven Seibert ’87

Dr. David Hannaford ’83

Dr. Frederick W. Lange ’85

Dr. Timothy P. Shea ’73

Dr. Andrew R. Harrison ’88

Dr. Stephen E. Latter ’91

Dr. Marilyn J. Waller-Niewold ’90

Dr. Cecile Shepard ’81

Dr. Darryl M. Haycock ’95

Dr. Edward Lazo ’64

Dr. Noel S. O’Brien ’66

Dr. Alan M. Sherman ’81

Healthy Living at Home/ Kate Creedon Wound Center

Dr. Richard K. Lee ’99

Dr. Daniel O’Connell ’13

Dr. Thomas G. Shock ’83

Dr. Brian F. O’Neill ’82

Dr. Steven Shoemaker ’87

Dr. Donald E. Hershman ’80

Dr. Rebecca Smiley-Leis ’88

Dr. Christina Kwok-Olesky ’07

Dr. Timothy J. Siegfried ’92

Organogenesis, Inc.

Dr. Kash K. Siepert ’91

Osnovative Systems, Inc.

Dr. Alan M. Singer ’81

Dr. Matthew H. Paden ’91

Dr. Cynthia A. Smith ’76

Dr. Thomas Palmer ’87

Dr. Frank Smith ’83

Dr. John Panek ’93

Dr. Beverly A. Spurs ’85

Dr. Grigoriy Patish

Dr. Eric Stamps ’93

Dr. Thomas G. Penman ’77

Wade Sturgeon

Dr. Terrance Hess ’93 Dr. Weldon R. Hess ’67 Dr. Kenneth L. Hilliard ’78 Dr. John C. Hoagland ’62 Dr. Anthony R. Hoffman ’95 Dr. Arlene F. Hoffman ’76 Hollister Incorporated

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R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

Dr. Robert Lee ’74 Dr. Curtis D. Leviant ’83 Dr. Leslie G. Levy ’79 Dr. Timothy Liddy ’88 Dr. Eddie P. Lo ’97 Dr. Sandra Loving ’99 Dr. Randy E. Lowe ’92 Dr. Dennis Lyons ’78

Dr. Jordan S. Rosenthal ’86 Dr. Justin Ross ’14 Dr. Phillip B. San Fillipo Dr. Keith D. Sanneman ’76 Dr. Rodney E. Sanneman ’69 Dr. Richard J. Sarte ’84 Dr. Andrew J. Sawicki ’81 Dr. Robert J. Scardina ’75 Dr. Andrew C. Schink ’78 Dr. Beatrice Schmugler ’90 Dr. Matthew Sciaroni ’85 Dr. Richard G. Seegmiller ’95 Dr. Christopher Segler ’03


Dr. Bryan T. Sullivan ’86

CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF PODIATRIC MEDICINE STUDENT MEDICAL MISSION FUND

Dr. John Tam ’77

Johann-Christian Abordo

Dr. Ted Tanaka ’86

Jonathan J. Abraham

Dr. Nicholas J. Tanner ’82

Sarah Strong-Adams

Dr. William Tarran ’88

Joseph B. Agyen

Dr. Douglas M. Taylor

Megan E. Allen

Dr. Jan D. Tepper ’77

Amerx Health Care

The Tetra Corporation

Christopher Ayeko

CERTIFIED REGISTERED NURSE ANESTHETIST DISCRETIONARY FUND

Dr. Mose Thornton ’87

Demetrius Barnes

Rommel R. Uniza

Dr. Grace Ting ’88

Francesca M. Castellucci

Dr. Frazier Todd ’72

Samuel Cates

Dr. Paul T. Tom ’87

Eun J. Chang

Dr. Gregory A. Tovmassian ’09

Reed E. Coast

Dr. Steven I. Subotnick ’69 Dr. Victor Sucheski

Dr. Jonathan Uy Dr. Tomas C. Valdez, Jr. ’92 Dr. Ronald L. Valmassy ’74 Dr. Neil A. Van Dyck ’79 Dr. Mher Vartivarian ’09

Cinthya L. Dominguez Valerie G. Dzubur Albert A. Elhiani Lauren Eller Sarah C. Feddersen Ashley A. Haines

CAMARANO UCOP RESEARCH GRANT—PREGNANCY AND PEDIATRIC OUTCOMES FOLLOWING FERTILITY RESEARCH GRANT University of California Los Angeles— Office of the President

PRADIP AND REKHA CHOKSI ENDOWED OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SCHOLARSHIP FUND Mr. and Mrs. Pradip Choksi Chris and Carla Ross Royce and Sue Valencia

SHARON CLARK DIAZ ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND American Endowment Foundation Amy Anderson

CERTIFIED REGISTERED NURSE ANESTHETIST ANNUAL MEETING APPEAL FUND Eric D. Baumgarten ’98 Ora Bollinger ’03

Mr. and Mrs. William Bachrach In memory of David Foulkes Dr. Penny Bamford Jim and Stephanie Bangert Mary G. Brown

Alexandrina Braica ’04

Dr. Angelina Chau ’07

Emily E. Campbell ’97

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Clarke In memory of David Foulkes

Dr. Marc E. Code ’02 and ’14 Lisa Daniel Kevin Dolan ’10

Drs. Luis F. and Sharon C. Diaz

Sara Fitzpatrick

Thomas G. Drese

Dr. Scot D. Foster

Jill M. Emerson

Joseph Janakes ’06

Dr. Teh-wei Hu

Arnold Meert

Dr. Richard MacIntyre

Tricia Ouchi

Dr. Pamela Minarik

Erick M. Pierce ’10

Albert E. Peters

Lacey Beck Peck

Katherine Holland Robinson ’05

Brad Peters

Peter Duy Pham

Kenneth Rogado ’05

Mr. and Mrs. Michael B. Pilkington

Kelli Yearout ’05

Alejandro Rodriguez

Dr. Daisy Wu ’00 Dr. Bobby Yee ’89

Mr. and Mrs. Brian Potter

Dr. Kathryn E. Vaslet ’83 Dr. Thomas Vincent ’91 Dr. Paul Weiner ’92 Dr. Richard A. Weinstein ’76 Dr. Elliott Wenger ’74 Dr. Dennis L. White ’63 Dr. Stephen C. White ’51 Dr. G. Jason Wilks ’98 Dr. Joel M. Wilner ’83 Dr. Kevin Wolf ’87 Dr. Kam Y. Wong

Megan E. Hom Anna Atkins Jones Cynthia Luu Dr. Anna Maria Maglunog ’14 Stephanie Mita Francisco Moreno Olubukunola M. Oseniolalemi Jay J. Patel

Dr. Christopher Y. Yee ’83

Dr. Brittany M.C. Rice ’14

Dr. David Y. Yee ’89

Dr. Kathryn Vaslet ’83

Dr. Jenny Yu ’11

Mr. and Mrs. James T. Willmore

Dr. Michael A. Zapf ’84 Dr. Blake O. Zobell ’91 Dr. Stephen J.F. Zuber ’69

Tony Zahner

Margrette Peterson Conchita Serri Cynthia Ulman

LILLIAN B. CHAMPAGNE NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Gerald L. Thompson

Kathleen Dempsey Cargo ’64 In honor of my classmates Samuel Merritt Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1964

Irma Walker-Adamé

Royce and Sue Valencia

Donors $25,000 Or More Appear In Bold

Members of the Universalis Centralis Circle $1,000 or More

 31


THEODORE L. DEFFINGER, DPM ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND Royce and Sue Valencia

EMPLOYEE CAMPAIGN SCHOLARSHIP FUND Amy Anderson Dr. Penny Bamford Jim and Stephanie Bangert Kristine Blanco Sabine Branscum Loretta B. Camarano

Dr. Richard Rocco Maria Salas Dr. Robert K. Sandberg Dr. Arlene A. Sargent Anne C. Scher Elizabeth Sibson-Tuan Dr. Cynthia Stange Loida Stewart Michael Tam Cynthia Ulman Royce and Sue Valencia Dr. Bennett Zier

Nancy Chee Dr. Nicole Christensen Kathleen Edmunds Dr. Scot D. Foster Cecilia Garcia Gregory Gingras Dr. Sharon Gorman Mary Grefal Steve and Peggy Griffith Daniel Grobani Dr. Teresa Gwin Pam Harrison Deborah Kalish Dr. Patricia Kuster Dr. Valerie Landau Yurismary Llerena

DAVID M. AND OOLAH B. EVANS PHYSICAL THERAPY SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dr. Nicole Christensen Dr. Susan Grieve ’98 Chris and Carla Ross

EUGENE A. & VIRGINIA FALASCHI MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND Susan Penna-Falaschi In memory of Marcia Cronin Mary Nardi Margaret Perry Sandy Saxten Jolene “Sue” Swenson Denisia Trombetta

Jennifer McAdam Marie Ma Dr. Richard MacIntyre Andrea Medakovic Michael Negrete

FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER CAREER FAIR FUND California Casualty Management Company

Dr. Terrence M. Nordstrom Liza Osoteo

 32

R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

ERIN E. FRY ’07 DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE AWARD FUND Dr. Audrey Berman Mr. and Mrs. Dusty Fry Adriane Kiefling Dr. Karen Wolf

DV8 Tattoo Rachel Eakin Ann Rochell Ermitanio Flex Gym Follett Higher Education Group Freixenet USA Gundlach Bundschu Winery

GENERAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Nancy Hamler

Loretta Camarano

Melissa Husband

Adelina Gage-Kelly

Vanessa Jeong

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Cowen In memory of David Foulkes

Lafayette Park Hotel and Spa

Barbara Piepho In memory of David Foulkes

Georgia Leisure

Sue Valencia In honor of Gena Caya, Dr. Rye Huber ’81 Carla Ross

Mama’s Royal Cafe Mrs. Richard D. Mollberg Moonbeams Boutique Namaste Fit Club Napa Valley Home and Garden

GIFT-IN-KIND DONATIONS

Veronica Ortega

Alsco-Geyer Irrigation

Pep Boys

Anamaria Adam

Dan Pezel

American Giant

Priority Wine Pass

Dr. Geoffrey Bergman ’71

Renaissance Rialto, Inc.

Berkeley Repertory Theatre

Chris and Carla Ross

Dr. Audrey Berman

Molly Sanchez

Black Spring Coffee Company

James Shimoda

Brother’s Brother Foundation

Alan Sunada

Doug Bunnon Lisa Skye Carle Stacy Carter

Eliza Oun

Sobe Kick Michael Tam Maggie Tatevosyan Shannon Zurella

Sharon Chan FAMILY NURSE PRACTITIONER SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Elizabeth Ching

Lorraine Petti Dr. Cecily Reeves

Dr. Rhonda Ramirez ’96

Clif Bar

Yeojean Choo

Kevin Reilly

Corepower Yoga

Jeannene Zettler-Rhodes

Desiree’ Cruz

Dr. Bruce Richardson

Cybelle’s Pizza Restaurant

GRADUATE NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dr. Fusae Abbott Dr. Arlene A. Sargent


HEALTH SCIENCE AND SIMULATION CENTER EXPANSION PROJECT FUND Contributions in memory of Kevin Wong

Deborah L. Kelly In honor of John Garten-Shuman’s birthday Anne Seed

Dr. Fusae Abbott Dr. Penny Bamford Jim and Stephanie Bangert Dr. Cherri S. Choate ’90 and Dr. Randy Tom ’90 Drs. Luis F. and Sharon C. Diaz Education Management Solutions Dr. Scot D. Foster

DR. RYE HUBER ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND Mr. and Mrs. Gordon “Skip” Huber In memory of Paul B. Andrew Doug and Gay Lane Charitable Foundation Royce and Sue Valencia

Betty F. Grandis Lillian Lugo-Harvin Julie Ow Jan Probst Chris and Carla Ross Dr. Arlene A. Sargent Royce and Sue Valencia Venture Films of California, Inc.

HITCHCOCK HEYDMAN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND Frederick Hitchcock, Jr. In honor of Dr. Abby Heydman Roberta Richards

DRS. DANIEL C. FULMER ’76 AND GAIL R. JOHNSON ’90 PODIATRIC MEDICINE SCHOLARSHIP FUND

DR. RUSSELL O. AND ANTOINETTE M. LEWIS SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dr. Russell O. Lewis ’65

DR. WILLIAM AND PHYLLIS LOWE MEDICINE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Chris and Carla Ross

Dr. Timothy Dutra ’85

IVAN AND SARA MAY CARDIAC NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Feldman In memory of Dr. Ivan May

Dr. Audrey Berman

Chris and Carla Ross

Mark Block ’11

Diane Teilh Eichhorn ’96

Dr. Richard J. Sarte ’72 Dr. Andrew Smith

Dr. Eric W. Nelson ’79

Andrea English ’90 Virginia Jewett Enns ’57 Ted R. Jeffcoat ’06

YURI NISHIMURA ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Carol Parker Smith ’50

Kristine Blanco

Gerald L. Thompson

Kelly Nishimura

PEGGE SHUMAN HOUSER ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND

JONAS SCHOLARSHIP FUND Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare

DR. HOWARD AND PATRICIA MILLIKEN SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Royce and Sue Valencia

Dr. Brian A. Mc Dowell ’69

PIERCE D. NELSON DPM SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Dr. Marc E. Code ’02 and ’14

Chris and Carla Ross

MICHELLE LE MEMORIAL NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Lakeside Foundation

Doreen Wong

Christopher C. Weber ’90

John Garten-Shuman In honor of Anne Seed’s birthday In memory of Arthur Valencia In memory of Kevin Wong

Dr. and Mrs. Donald Elvander

Dr. Gail L. Widener

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

M. Diane Hansen

Mr. and Mrs. Pradip Choksi

Dr. James W. Stavosky ’83

Dr. Gail R. Johnson ’90

ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND

MOTION ANALYSIS LABORATORY FUND Dr. Cherri S. Choate ’90

Dr. Daniel C. Fulmer ’76

Center for Creative Leadership

Aileen Moffitt In honor of Betty and Melvin Moffitt

Dr. and Mrs. William Lowe In memory of Gloria Bluth

MEN IN NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND

ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FELLOWSHIP GRANT

MELVIN A. AND BETTY REED MOFFITT SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Westover Anesthesia, PLLC

Dr. Howard E. Milliken In memory of Patricia B. Milliken

NURSING EDUCATION ENDOWMENT FUND Llagas Foundation

NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dr. Penny Bamford Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Barker, Jr. In memory of Patricia Belford Kirkland ’55

Donors $25,000 Or More Appear In Bold

Members of the Universalis Centralis Circle $1,000 or More

 33


Dolores Beanland ’52 In memory of Elizabeth Hathaway Garibaldi ’52

Lily and Raymond Mow In memory of Tom Burt In memory of Loretta Lee

Wenonah Bakke Brichetto ’52

Catherine Kikes Phillips ’75

Class of 1972—Samuel Merritt Hospital School of Nursing Carolyn Mettler Collins ’64 Melba Koepke Cooledge ’52 Susan Cross Currie ’90 Deluxe Corporation Foundation Drs. Luis F. and Sharon C. Diaz Doreen A. Dusza In memory of Patricia Belford Kirkland ’55

Margaret Yelich-Puccinelli ’72 Mr. and Mrs. Craig Randleman In memory of Patricia Belford Kirkland ’55 Carolyn Cox Rasmussen In memory of Elisabeth Cabuzel Maxine Burr Reinschmidt ’53

June A. Estin In memory of Patricia Belford Kirkland ’55

Arlene Romonosky In memory of Patricia Belford Kirkland ’55

Pamela French ’82

Kenneth Russell ’12

Gloria Giorgi Galeotti ’49 In memory of Robert Galeotti In memory of Norma Quiriconi

Hazel Rosetto Sumpter ’58 In memory of Jody Orton Meggs

Misayo Kay Hoover ’64 Mr. and Mrs. Martin Johnson In memory of Joyce Bailey Stephen Kirkland Florence I. Kucharik In memory of Patricia Belford Kirkland ’55 Ernest Leal In memory of Mary Robinson Ryan Mell In memory of Dale Mell

R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel W. Polansky In memory of Patricia Belford Kirkland ’55

Rene Clymer-Engelhart

Carol R. Hartman ’53

 34

Jennifer Nguyen

Marjorie Snyder Way ’48 In memory of Rosalie Lapham Max Peters Marilyn Snyder Dorothy Wilkerson Bob Young Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Weidman In memory of Patricia Belford Kirkland ’55

NURSING DEAN’S DISCRETIONARY FUND American Association of Colleges of Nursing

NU XI, CHAPTER AT LARGE NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND Nu Xi, Chapter at Large

Heather Gerwin Dr. Susan Grieve ’98 Corine Hatt Margaret Hong

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SCHOLARSHIP FUND

David L. Levison

Dr. Penny Bamford

Ann D. Ramirez

Dr. Donna Breger-Stanton Elizabeth Ching Dr. Gordon M. Giles

Mr. and Mrs Joshua Mc Carley Dr. Gaye L. Raymond Giancarlo Scalise Lore C. Vanderheuvel Paula M. Whitton

CAROLE O’SHEA ENDOWED NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND The O’Shea Foundation

Dr. Gail L. Widener

PHYSICAL THERAPY SCHOLARSHIP FUND

PANAMA MEDICAL MISSION PROJECT FUND

Dr. Penny Bamford

Catherine Baird In honor of Kate Schwartz

Dr. Susan Grieve ’98

Dr. Sharon Gorman Mr. and Mrs. David Loveall and Family

PEART FUND

Diana Salter ’04

Drs. Luis F. and Sharon C. Diaz

Dr. Gail L. Widener

Schwab Charitable Fund

Ernst & Young Foundation Tidewater, Inc.

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dr. Penny Bamford Sarah Maxwell Dr. Lauri Paolinetti Vikas Patel Dr. Peter K. Webb

PHYSICAL THERAPY DISCRETIONARY FUND Toni L. Allendorph

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Middleton

Dr. Nicole Christensen

Ingrid Holme Miller ’50

Leah A. Flores

Renee M. Cortise

PICCHI MEMORIAL EDUCATION FUND Dr. and Mrs. Eduardo Adamé Jennifer Ault Mrs. Robert Balfour Jim and Stephanie Bangert Dr. Audrey Berman Jennifer Bollong Mrs. Bertel Borowsky Barbara Cadwalader Dr. Kenneth Caldwell Dr. and Mrs. William R. Crain Dr. James Cuthbertson Vera Dami John Donovan Dr. Larry V. Franz


Dr. Thomas Y. Fung

Martha Picchi

Galloway, Lucchese, Everson and Picchi

Joel Piser

Anita Caratti Gandolfo P’47

Cecilia Rhodes

John Garten-Shuman Dr. Neil H. Gozan Dr. L.V. Grant Dr. Teresa K. Gwin Dr. Nicola Hanchock Dr. and Mrs. Jay B. Hann, III Dr. John S. Hege Dr. Irvin Herman Dr. Joseph W. Hewitson ’89 Meryl M. Himmelman Dr. Herb Holman Mary J. Howard Mr. and Mrs. Gordon “Skip” Huber Dr. and Mrs. Sheldon Kabaker

Dr. Anthony S. Ravnik Dr. Richard M. Rocco Chris and Carla Ross Dr. Joseph Ross Dr. Delmar Sanders

Dr. Rodney J. Chan ’76 In honor of Irma Walker-Adamé College of Podiatric Surgeons British Columbia

Eugene Spector Dr and Mrs. Michael Starkweather

Drs. Luis F. and Sharon C. Diaz

Dr. William Tarran ’88

Dr. Timothy Dutra ’85

Dr. and Mrs. Wade Sherwood Melvin and Anita Siegel

Dr. Jack Fisher ’73

Andrea K. Sitchon

Dr. Oliver S. Foster

Mary Spear

Dr. Steven L. Ginex ’92

Dr. Gary W. Tamkin

Gordon Laboratories

Joanna Truman

C. Keith Greer

Royce and Sue Valencia

Dr. and Mrs. Gabriel J. Halperin

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Van Nest

Dr. Christopher Smith ’63 Dr. Eric Stamps ’93

Dr. Golta Eragi In honor of Irma Walker-Adamé

Dr. Lionel Schour

Andre Singleton

Dr. and Mrs. Ross Taubman Dr. David D.Q. Tran ’98 Dr. John N. Venson Dr. Mark Wolpa ’75 Dr. and Mrs. Michael Zapf

JAMES W. PORTER SCHOLARSHIP FUND Chris and Carla Ross

Dr. Lawrence Harkless ’75

Dr. and Mrs. Edward E. Waller, Jr.

Health Plans Organization of California, Inc.

Mary S. Kimball

Dr. and Mrs. Carl K. Watanabe

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Hughes

Lynne Kilgore Kruse ’61

Dr. Robert D. Weyand

Dr. Ronald D. Jensen ’84

Keith and Nancy Libert

Dr. Karen Ann Wolf

KLM Laboratories, Inc.

Marguerite DiMaggio Berry P’45

Dr. Susan B. Londerville

Dr. James R. La Rose ’71

Diane Blue P’62

Dr. Sandra Loving ’99

Dr. and Mrs. Bruce R. Lawrence

Sheila McNally Bolin P’59

Bill and Lorayne Keeling

Boyd Lyon Dr. Guy L. McCormack Bessanderson McNeil

AVA PISCHEL ELLIOTT ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Murray Dr. Lawrence Ng Leslie Paine Denice Paulo-Colaci Dr. Paul R. Perchonock Joanna Picchi

Barbara Hester Benson P’43

Dr. Gary M. Lepow ’74

Mary Ann Keehner Dunlap P’64

Dr. Louis Louk, Jr. ’86

Iris Tomasino French P’48

Dr. Neil Mansdorf ’97

Anita Caratti Gandolfo P’47

Dr. Clark D. Miller ’70

Anita J. Haigh P’47

Dr. Mark Miller ’84

Theresa E. Hallinan P’61

American Board of Podiatric Medicine

Dr. David Mullens ’70

Jovine Fifer Hankins P’53

Dr. Ajitha K. Nair ’10

Donna Rucker Healy P’58

Bakotic Pathology Associates, LLC

Dr. Bruce A. Olson ’65

Pamela Lampson McPherson P’70 In memory of Kathleen Royer Wesseling P’70

Elizabeth Cook

Catherine Matthews Linda Matson and Joe Mockus

PROVIDENCE COLLEGE OF NURSING ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP FUND

PODIATRIC MEDICINE SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Dr. Penny Bamford Dr. Jay Berenter ’85

Dr. Bruce Richardson Dr. Alexander Reyzelman ’95 Dr. Randall J. Sarte ’72

Joseph and Kelly Picchi

Dr. Paul Scherer ’70

Linda Picchi and

Dr. Christopher P. Segler ’03

Andrew Pojman

Dr. Timothy Shea ’73

Carol Matthews Milano P’60

Donors $25,000 Or More Appear In Bold

Members of the Universalis Centralis Circle $1,000 or More

 35


Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth G. Renz In memory of George Sharpe In honor of Providence College of Nursing Class of 1964 Mary Brusher Rion P’56 Joyce A. Taylor P’62 Katie M. Tom P’58 Trudy Canella Zellmer P’71

Corine Harris In memory of Mark K. Reynolds

SCHOLARSHIP FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS GRANT—PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT

Lillian Lugo-Harvin

Department of Health and Human Services

Nancy T. Hirota In memory of Akira Ike Hirota Chris and Carla Ross Hai-Thom Sota In memory of Mark K. Reynolds Markcus Thomas

REGENTS DIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP FUND American Endowment Foundation Jim and Stephanie Bangert Dr. Timothy Dutra ’85 Dr. and Mrs. Cornelius L. Hopper

Tarika Witherspoon

MARY E. ROBINSON ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dr. Fusae Abbott Dr. Penny Bamford

Dr. Terrence M. Nordstrom

Tom and Gena Caya In memory of Mary E. Robinson

Dr. Paul R. Perchonock

M. Diane Hansen

Albert Peters

Corine Harris

Brad Peters

Mary Hoang

Margrette Peterson

Lillian Lugo-Harvin

Alejandro Rodriguez

Kristi Kindberg

Marilyn M. Snider

Chris and Carla Ross

Hai-Thom Sota Shirley Strong

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS GRANT—PHYSICAL THERAPY Department of Health and Human Services

SCRUB CYCLE SCHOLARSHIP FUND Jennifer Salcido Carlyn B. Mills

SENIOR STUDENT TEACHING ASSISTANT PROGRAM

Dr. Fusae Abbott Dr. Penny Bamford Dr. Joan Bard Tom and Gena Caya In memory of Mark K. Reynolds Dr. Sylvia Fox Ronda Nash-Garrett

 36

R E P O R T T O T H E C O M M U N I T Y 2014–2015

Dr. Fusae Abbott Anita Korngold Baker ’81 Royce and Sue Valencia

MARK A. SWIFT, JR. MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dr. Audrey Berman In memory of Lorna DeLancey Darlene A. DeLancey In honor of Dr. Audrey Berman In memory of Joyce DeLancey Lorna DeLancey

TAVI M. VAN OGLE ’88 ENDOWED NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc.

Chris and Carla Ross

R. SHAPIRO FAMILY FOUNDATION ENDOWED PHYSICAL THERAPY SCHOLARSHIP FUND

DR. SHAHAN VARTIVARIAN ’09 MEMORIAL PODIATRIC MEDICINE SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Saeng Saephanh

The R. Shapiro Family Foundation

Dr. Jamie Anne Bakal ’09

Ronald Salazar

Royce and Sue Valencia

JERI E. RYAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND

MARILYN M. SNIDER NURSING SCHOLARSHIP FUND

Dr. John E. Swartzberg

MARK K. REYNOLDS TECHNOLOGY AND ACADEMIC INSTRUCTION FUND

STUDENT EMERGENCY LOAN FUND

Dr. Matilda Ignacio

Marilyn M. Snider

SCHOLARS IN SERVICE SCHOLARSHIP FUND

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDUCATION RESEARCH GRANT

Mark Abelson Brandy J. Beazley Corine Harris

University of California Los Angeles Public Health, Southern California

Dr. and Mrs. Karson Howard Dr. Chatra Klaisri Chris and Carla Ross In memory of Kayson Tanner Shelton Royce and Sue Valencia Dr. Bennett Zier


VIRGINIA ONETO VOLPONI ’39 NURSING ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND Annalisa Anderson Doris Chakires Barbara Farshler Stephan Neal Krug Carolyn Sneed Carolyn A. Snell Joanne Volponi In honor of Brent and Annalisa Anderson and Family Chris Chakires Sam and Doris Chakires A.J. Farshler Fred and Barbara Farshler Jeff and Lauren Farshler and Family Dina Iwai, Thomas Farshler and Enzo Tony and Julie Farshler Dustin and Shannon Lloyd and Family Stephanie Lorenz Carolyn A. Snell

Dr. Sylvia Fox Adelina Gage-Kelly Dr. Marjorie Hammer Sarah Hampson Dr. Nancy Haugen Royce and Sue Valencia In memory of “Frisky”

DR. WILLIAM AND DOREEN WONG PODIATRIC MEDICINE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND Doreen Wong

DR. PATRICIA HARVEY WEBB SCHOLARSHIP FUND Dr. Fusae Abbott Dr. Audrey Berman In memory of William Butzlaff Forrest Wayne Coffer Marguerite Knight Nasir Duane Knox Jeff Schlock Don Steinzig Daisy Catherine Thompson Arthur Valencia Roberta L. Block Drs. Luis F. and Sharon C. Diaz

Donors $25,000 Or More Appear In Bold

Members of the Universalis Centralis Circle $1,000 or More

 37


PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNITY

SAMUEL MERRITT UNIVERSITY is

committed to creating a diverse, equitable, and inclusive learning community, workplace, and campus environment. We demonstrate this commitment by ensuring that SMU is a community where:

»W  e affirm the value of human diversity, respecting our differences, while acknowledging our common humanity. » We  affirm the inherent dignity and value of every person and strive to maintain a climate based on mutual respect, fairness, and inclusion, calling for civility and decency in our personal interactions, regardless of position or status in the academy. »W  e respect the right of freedom of expression within our community and value the different perspectives of others; recognizing and appreciating these differences builds trust and contributes to the excellence of the university. »W  e challenge all forms of behavior that are prejudicial, discriminatory, and detrimental or contrary to the values expressed in this document; and we take responsibility for increasing our own understanding of these issues through education and our interactions with one another.

As a community, we are committed, individually and collectively, to embodying and safeguarding these principles.


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Samuel Merritt University 2014-2015 Report to the Community  

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