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Samuel Mason Student no: 539568

Semester 1/2012

Module 2 Group 7


C O N T O U R I N G The contours were then cut up, and I laid the contours out so that I could insert the photo into Rhino and begin my digital modelling.

O F

M O D E L

1cm contours were drawn on, then cut the model up.

When it came time to contour my model, I measured and drew nine contours at one centimetre intervals (Left). I then cut the model along the lines (above) creating contours which could then be put into Rhino and be used to create a lofted surface.


C O N T O U R I N G O F M O D E L I N R H I N O

I traced the contours with the circle tool (top left), then lofted each contour (above and left).

I began by putting the photo into Rhino using ‘PictureFrame’ then tracing circles over my cut contours. I tried to stick to a 1:5 centimetre ratio. I then lofted, and created an object which I hated and could not imagine trying to work with, without it looking like a cupcake and very far from the coiled snake it was meant to represent.


D I G I T I Z A T I O N E X P E R I M E N T A T I O N

Unhappy with the lofting effect, I decided to start playing with the ‘revolve’ function. This allowed me to create smoothed objects very quickly. In my hunt for a design which is very much is focused on layers, copying and pasting a number of revolved objects on top of each other.

Above: I decided to play around with the ‘revolve’ function, starting by tracing around the photo of my model.

Above: by copying and pasting a set of revolved objects I could create a ‘layered’ effect.

I was still not particularly satisfied with the cupcake look and so needed new ways to express the palimpsest idea of the new coming emerging from the old.


M A N I P U L A T I O N Option one: a very basic revolved curve, giving some sense of new emerging from old, but does not quite grasp the concept as much as I would like.

I N R H I N O

Above: using curves and points I was able to manipulate each curve to different shapes and then revolve them, resulting in the shapes shown in options one, two, and three.

Option two: also a very basic revolved curve, however this design has the potential to be held, when considering the final design which must function as a lantern in some way.

Option three: this curve is a bit more complex, clearly portraying a sense of something gathering and eventually coming to a sharp point and ending, as a snake does with its skin. I like the fact that the top is very large and bold – the new.

Through much pain and anguish, I manipulated many different curves to create something which portrayed the theme of layers and emphasised the fact that there is something new, bold and smooth coming from something old. The design furthest to the right I like the best, as it bulges in a number of places and gives the impression of something being shed - which closely relates to my chosen natural process. The other two designs do achieve this to an extent, but they are very basic shapes and are not quite as complex and aesthetically pleasing as I believe option 3 is. Therefore, I have chosen option three to further develop and begin to experiment with panels.


2 D

P A N N E L L I N G

I D E A S

When it came to panelling I began to struggle. I started off with some basic shapes such as triangles (below right and far left). I then started making custom panels, keeping in mind the fact that I need to represent a contrast between old and new, as shown left.


3 D

P A N N E L L I N G

I D E A S

3D panelling brought new challenges to my design process, but also proved to have high potential in terms of design possibilities and freedom. If my skills were further developed I could create some very complex patterns which closer portray the theme of old vs. New and begin experimenting with lighting and how this would have an affect on the design of the panels and where certain panels would be positioned. I particularly like the panelling to the right as it has a combination of 2d and 3d panels, clearly defining a contrast between old and new, however I’m not too sure how practical this would be to make into a physical model.


Digitization of physical models through the use of a program I am completely foreign to would have definitely been the hardest challenge that module two brought me.

R E F L E C T I O N

As challenging as it was however, I began to understand the importance of such technology in today’s design world, and how it would be a vital tool for most modern architects in producing innovative and very accurate designs. Tools such as Rhino would also be much less time consuming (once the user is competent) than it would be if I was test as many design options as I did with Rhino, by hand. Although a vital tool, I believe a lot of ideas can be lost through digitization and we must keep referring to our first idea and what we are actually trying to achieve. In my case, I needed to keep focusing on the themes of layers and old vs. new and not get lost in the diversity of the digital world. Furthermore, I believe that digitization should be used as an aid in design, not as a way of primarily design something as it cannot always be practical or relate to the design brief. Design would not be done with such accuracy and ease if it was not for these digital aids. Although Rhino did save me a lot of time, I did not use my time as wisely as I should have and so my design is paying the consequences. If I had have used my time efficiently however, I would have experimented with paper prototypes different sorts of panels and lighting options, as well as learnt how to trim cells on a panel, which would allow light to be shun where I would like it to.


module 2  

module 2 journal

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