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£4.99 ISSUE THIRTY-EIGHT

Cute crochet bunny & stylish ombré eggs! Mother´s Day felt bouquet < Floral collar & fascinator < Rainbow kids´ dungarees < Embroidered quote hoops < Little amigurumi lambs <

DEBBIE BLISS Talks to us about her new homeware collection

PLUS knit her on-trend chunky footstool ARE YOU RIDING THE THIRD WAVE OF CRAFT?

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE ¤ OMBRÉ EASTER EGGS AND CROCHET BUNNY¤ KNIT DEBBIE BLISS’ COMFY POUFFE ¤ EMBROIDER A SENTIMENT HOOPS DISPLAY ¤ TEA AND A CHAT WITH LISA COMFORT

crochet

stitch

PA TUR G N M E T TH OR O E E! SEE

embellish

26 MOLLIEMAKES 3


CONTENTS

38

issue number thirty-eight

20

ON THE COVER PHOTOGRAPHER: PHILIP SOWELS MODEL: ADELE HOUGHTON, MUSTARD MODELS

MEET M. LAPIN

Talk to us! facebook.com/MollieMakes

14 Let it rain INTRODUCING.. LIVING

The latest news from the world of handmade

Fill your life and home with crafted goodness

09 INTRODUCING…

47 LIVING

Handpicked crafty happenings

Our top picks of the most lovely buys for a hand-crafted, creative home

14 TRENDS Raindrops keep falling on our head

50 HOME TOUR

18 OUT AND ABOUT

Creative soul Marlous Snijder shows us her colourful 1980s Netherlands house

Vibrant textile art exhibition at Habitat

57 RETRO PINNY 20 CROCHET RABBIT Monsieur Lapin unveils his ombré eggs

Be a domestic goddess in the kitchen in a handmade retro-patterned apron

28 TEA AND A CHAT…

63 KNITTED POUFFE

With Sew Over It’s Lisa Comfort

Looking for a fab knitting project? Create Debbie Bliss’ foot stool for your home

34 BLOSSOM COLLAR

@MollieMakes

MollieMakes

A House of Handmade petal accessory

67 EMBROIDERED QUOTE

38 GOOD READ

Handstitch and embellish a hoop-framed motto to inspire you every morning

Ride the crest of the third crafting wave

91 TEMPLATES pinterest.com/MollieMakes

youtube.com/user/MollieMakes

41 KIDS’ DUNGAREES Rainbow brights for your little ones

4 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

Instructions for making your free zip purse and templates for our projects


83

Bookish vest top

INSPIRED BY MUM

81 Make a

statement

LOVING

Treats and treasures to fall in love with

67

Uplifting sentiments

57

Look what I made

71 LOVING

It’s Mothering Sunday on 30 March, so we’d like to dedicate this one to matriarchs. Whether it’s our mums, grannies, pals or you, dear reader! The pinny on page 57 could be straight from my mum’s kitchen drawer c.1981; Silkie Lloyd & Gemma Nemer chat about button collections they’ve inherited on pages 7 & 72; and we have gift ideas aplenty. Say thanks in style.

Lara Watson Editor

PS. Have you signed up to our FREE newsletter yet? Gathered by Mollie Makes hits your inbox every Friday with exclusive offers, tutes and competitions. Sign up here: www.molliemakes.com/mollie-makes-newsletter

Beautiful things to covet, adore and make

72 COLLECTING BUTTONS Gemma Nemer on why she can’t get enough of those pretty fasteners

73 SHEEP AMIGURUMI Get crocheting a super sweet duo

79 HANDMADE POSY Show her you care with an everlasting bouquet of felt flowers this Mother’s Day

81 FELT FASCINATOR

63

Knit a pouffe

Turn heads at weddings this spring with a beautiful statement headpiece

83 CROCHET VEST Rock the retro look with a geek chic top

98 THE BACK PAGE PROJECT Abigail Warner talks catwalks and baths Subscribe at molliemakes.com

Turn to page 7 to get the lowdown ON THIS MONTH’S zip purse kit


Contributors EDITORIAL

Editor Lara Watson Deputy Editor Charlie Moorby Art Editor Helena Tracey Production Editor Jessica Bateman Digital Production Editor Nina Camacho Picture Editor Emma Georgiou molliemakes@futurenet.com

Emma Bosanko Having been brought up in her mumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s haberdashery, Emma was bound to end up crafty. She lives in Norwich where she makes accessories for The House of Handmade, teaches in museums and eats cake. Stitch Emmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s petal-covered collar on page 34. www.thehouseofhandmade.com

Lisa Comfort Owner of London sewing cafĂŠ Sew Over It, Lisa teaches everything from how to make a Mad Men style dress to the ultimate trousers. Her expertise has also led her to appear on TV and she is writing her second sewing book. Discover Lisaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creative inspiration on page 28. www.sewoverit.com

ADVERTISING Call: 01225 442244 Senior Advertising Manager Penny Stokes US Business Development Beckie Pring Sales Executives Tiffany Jackson, Robyn McBryde Sales Director Clare Coleman-Straw MARKETING Marketing Executive Elly Ralph CIRCULATION Head of Trade Marketing James Whitaker Trade Marketing Manager Janine Smith International Account Manager Rebecca Richer PRODUCTION Production Manager Mark Constance Production Controller Stephanie Smith LICENSING Licensing and Syndication Director Regina Erak regina.erak@futurenet.com Tel +44 (0)1225 732359

Marna Lunt Marnaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ambition was to marry someone from New Kids on the Block, instead she makes detailed embroidered fabulousness on lampshades for people and can be found playing with fabric on her blog and website. Embroider Marnaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sentiment hoop on page 67. www.littleadesigns.co.uk

Kirsty Hartley Maker, author and founder of Wild Things Funky Little Dresses, Kirsty works from her studio in sunny Lancashire. When sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not sewing, she goes for walks with her three wild things and dog Mellow in the nearby woods. Sew a pair of kids rainbow dungarees on page 41. www.wildthingsdresses.com

MANAGEMENT Managing Director Jo Morrell Head of Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lifestyle Katherine Raderecht Group Senior Editor Julie Taylor Group Art Director Matthew Hunkin Editorial Director Jim Douglas SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions Manager Elizabeth Daly Call 0844 848 2852 or subscribe online at www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk Future Publishing Ltd, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath, BA1 2BW

Future produces high-quality multimedia products which reach our audiences online, on mobile and in print. Future attracts over 50 million consumers to its CSBOET FWFSZ NPOUI BDSPTT mWF DPSF TFDUPST Technology, Entertainment, Music, Women and Sports & Auto. We export and license our publications. Future plc is a public company quoted on the London Stock Exchange TZNCPM'653  www.futureplc.com

Maike van den Dries Maike has been creating things forever. Recently, plush creatures and amigurumi. Because their house was getting crowded with monsters, her boyfriend Koen suggested she sell them online. So she started MadebyMaike. Crochet a dapper Easter bunny on page 20. www.madebymaike.com

Abigail Warner Card designer Abigail likes to take pictures of her feet, food, flowers and daily antics. She tells it how it is, wears her heart on her sleeve, loves to dance and drink cocktails and believes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the simple things that make us happy. Yay! Abigail talks springtime and weddings on page 98. www.abigailwarner.com

Other contributors Katie Allen, Steph Baxter, Henry Van Belkom, Valerie Bracegirdle, Lucy Croft, Trish Flake, Sarah GrifďŹ ths, Vicky Guerrero, Kerry Moyle, Silkie Lloyd, Bonnie Mauney, Adele Houghton @ Mustard Models, Caroline Rowland, Rachael Smith, Philip Sowels, Diana Stainton, Lottie Storey, Alex Thomas

6 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

Chief executive Mark Wood Non-executive chairman Peter Allen &KLHIĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDORIĂ&#x20AC;FHUGraham Harding 5FM    -POEPO

5FM    #BUI

Print 36,962 Digital 2,793 The ABC combined print and digital publication circulation for Jan-Dec 2013 is 39,755 A member of the Audited Bureau of Circulations Š Future Publishing Limited 2013. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Future Publishing Limited (company number 2008885) is registered in England and Wales. The registered ofďŹ ce of Future Publishing Limited is at Beauford Court, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2BW. All information contained in this magazine is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Future cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/services referred to in this magazine. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Future a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Future nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage. We are committed to only using magazine paper which is derived from well managed, certiďŹ ed forestry and chlorine-free manufacture. Future Publishing and its paper suppliers have been independently certiďŹ ed in accordance with the rules of the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council).


ExcluSive Designer kit

little zip purse

Discovering the joys of vintage buttons “I think my mum’s old box of buttons with Victorian mother of pearl, wooden toggles and 1940s bird buttons had an influence on this design. Oh, and Auntie May’s muchloved tape measure! It’s funny how childhood memories pop up. I drew the sewing motifs on to paper and then scanned them into the computer to add colour, work on size and position and create the repeat. I prefer the unpredictable nature of drawing on paper rather than directly into a computer, I think imperfection adds to the character of the artwork! At the moment I design patterns for paper products but

I have had a yearning to move my original illustrations onto fabric so it’s a real thrill to see it become a reality. I’ll be using this sweet purse to keep a (little) button collection in.” Silkie Lloyd launched her stationery company, Rosehip, in 2004 when her eldest son was born so she could work from home. She lives in Bristol with her musician partner and her two boys and cycles to the studio along the harbour.When she’s not illustrating, she loves cooking with her boys, camping trips to Cornwall and playing chess (badly, she says). www.rosehipcards.co.uk For instructions on how to make your fabric zip purse, turn to page 91.

THIS GIFT COMES WITH THE PRINT COPY OF THE MAGAZINE ONLY.

Stitch our cute purse featuring a debut sewing box-inspired fabric by illustrator, Silkie Lloyd

25 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 7


INTRODUCING..

38

PHOTOGRAPH: DECORATE WITH FLOWERS: CREATIVE IDEAS FOR FLOWERS AND CONTAINERS AROUND THE HOME BY HOLLY BECKER & LESLIE SHEWRING. PUBLISHED BY JACQUI SMALL.

THE LATEST IN CREATIVE GOODNESS – HANDPICKED JUST FOR YOU

From garden to vase, bouquet to chandelier, stylists Holly Becker and Leslie Shewring are full of freshly-picked ideas for arranging petals and blooms. Decorate with Flowers, their first collaborative tome, will have you thrifting and snipping your way to shop-window-quality displays in no time. www.jacquismallpub.com

Subscribe at molliemakes.com

38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 9


TOP READ Craft Show & Sell Wanna turn your creative passion into a business? This book is packed with tips from selling online, at craft fairs and popups, to building your website and brand. www.searchpress.com

Not just a pretty face (and our DIY Fashion guest editor – see p28), Lisa Comfort is launching a new pattern range. We’re first in line for her Betty Pattern. www.sewoverit.co.uk

THIS MONTH’S WISHLIST Looking for that statement necklace? Christina Anton’s your gal. Metallics, geometrics, feathers, leather, neon (you name it) all constructed by hand into unmistakably individual must-owns. www.booandboofactory.com

What happens when a sassy stitcher crosses paths with a pile of chintzy fabrics? Lyrics and pop cult phrases get stitched into cool cribworthy hoops, that’s what. www. thimbleandbobbinuk.etsy.com 10 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

We used to change phone covers all the time (ahh, Nokia 3310), but now we’re rather pleased we’ve found this crafted-to-last pressed flower case. Immortilising our favourite petals on our favourite gadge - yes! www.leifshop.com


Speaker Joy Cho (Oh Joy) will be sharing tips for online success.

EVENT FOCUS Blogtacular From 9-10 May, we’ll be at The Royal Institution of Great Britain in London at one of the hottest creative hub events; Blogtacular. We’re joining a stellar line-up of journalists and bloggers on the Secrets of the Editors panel. Ooh-er. See you there, bloggers! www.blogtacular.com “It’s the UK blog conference we want to attend!” say Kat and Kat

WEBSITE TO WATCH Gather It wasn’t the sweet illustrations that magnetised us to this new Londonbased pattern brand (although they definitely caught our eye!), it’s its simple instructions and stylishly elegant garments. Answering prayers for newbie dressmakers, its chic designs will be making their way onto our summer sewing lists. And yours. www.gatherkits.com

Organisers and blogger hosts; Kat Molesworth and Kat Goldin.

38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 11

PHOTOGRAPHS: TOP: BONNIE TSANG; BOTTOM: XANTHE BERKELEY

WHAT TO KNIT: THE TODDLER YEARS BY NIKKI VAN DE CAR, PUBLISHED BY KYLE BOOKS, PRICED £14.99. PHOTOGRAPHY: ALI ALLEN

Dress little ones in handmade garb (and stay confident your stitches will survive toddler playtime) thanks to Nikki Van De Car’s tried and tested designs. What to Knit: The Toddler Years caters for young ones’ growth spurts with 30 cleverly designed garments and toys. www.kylebooks.com


ADORN BY KIT LEE AND SHINI PARKS (HARDIE GRANT, £16.99) PHOTOGRAPH: KIT LEE AND SHINI PARKS

Unleash your inner fashionista with Adorn, the debut DIY book from chic fashion bloggers Kit Lee and Shini Parks. Pom pom-veil-combo cap? Absolutely. www.hardiegrant.co.uk

DIGITAL EXTRAS Come get it! We love thumbing through magazines, but have you swiped through our swish digital edition? No? Download our Mollie Makes app (via Apple Newstand), and you’ll find exactly that, plus extra content and free projects. All specially created for our fellow digital-lovers. www. molliemakes.co.uk/digital

An innovator of crochet design, Ana Gonçalves uses Zpagetti yarn (recycled elastic cottons) to make irresistibly tactile homewares. Stylish, soft and cosy. www.loopinghome.etsy.com

A new season, a new range of Lucky Boy Sunday goodies to gush over. Inspired by a ‘soft summer feeling’, we’re totally sold. Baby alpaca pastel dream blanket – added to cart. www.luckyboysunday.dk 12 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

Kirsty Hartley is a kids’ clothing genious. Her playful, yet wearable, creations are sure to expand your little ones’ imagination. Find her exclusive dungarees DIY on page 41. www.wildthingsdresses.com


PHOTOGRAPHS: 1-3: © CHARLOTTE MEDLICOTT AND TIFFANY MUMFORD; 4: BBC

02

01

SERIES FOCUS

Great British Sewing Bee Sew you own wardrobe with a second helping of patterns inspired by this popular BBC Two prime time series We’re big fans of the Great British Sewing Bee here at Mollie Makes HQ and we’re as hooked on this series as the first! If watching fabulous garments take shape before your eyes has inspired you, get started with the accompanying book. With gorgeous staples such as a pencil skirt, wrap dress, prom dress and 60s style coat, there’s something for newbies and more experienced sewists, a fur onesie for kids and the menfolk aren’t forgotten with a shirt and trousers. We were chuffed to find the pattern sheets in sizes from 8-18 too, hoorah. “It’s so rewarding making an item of clothing, for yourself or somebody else, that is all your work,” says May Martin, Subscribe at molliemakes.com

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04

a sewing teacher with 40 years’ experience and one of the two judges. “The whole creative process is a sheer joy to me. If you keep it, you give yourself a pat on the back, and if you’re making it for someone else, you’re giving them a part of yourself.” And if you don’t think you can sew? Pah, says the sewing doyenne, get thee to a sewing class. “If you want to sew, I just tell people all I need is their enthusiasm and I’ll show them how. I believe sewing is therapeutic,” she adds. We agree that a spot of stitching me-time is pure bliss. The second half of the stitchy judging duo, Patrick Grant, has been focussing on the overall finish, cut and fit, as would befit a Creative Director of Savile Row tailors. “This book explores how to handle a wide variety of fabrics, so you can be more adventurous with your sewing, while showing how to achieve an excellent fit,” he says. Sounds good to us! Sew Your Own Wardrobe and patterns is by Tessa Eveleigh and published by Quadrille for £25. www.quadrille.co.uk

01

Newbie sewists:

take a gander at this simple t-shirt: only two pattern pieces and no sleeves or openings or fastenings. Easy! 02

DIY patterns

and revamp with your own twist: this dramatic gown is one idea.

03

Make

a shirt in two prints and we’re pretty darned sure no-one else will have one quite like it. 04

Judges Patrick

Grant and May Martin alongside presenter Claudia Winkleman.

38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 13


INTRODUCING trends

PHOTOGRAPH: SEASALT CORNWALL

This month we’re obsessing about…

APRIL SHOWERS Let it rain with our wet weather-inspired top finds, no brolly needed 01

14 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38


INTRODUCING trends

03 02

Screen printed on linen, black on cream, gold raindrop… we love. www.mabelandbird.folksy.com

01

Thank you, Seasalt, for making macs fun. This lacy blossom print easily takes you from beach walk to pub lunch. www.seasaltcornwall.co.uk

02

Raining? Pah, bring it inside with cute raindrop wall stickers – just add a fluffy cloud. www.shop.finelittleday.com

03

Brighten up grey, rainy days with a playful ‘moody clouds’ bendy wire bow headband. www.splussbcn.etsy.com

04 04

Subscribe at molliemakes.com

This tumble of happy cloud pillows, from vintage-inspired French accessories brand Zü, bring guaranteed sweet dreams. www.zushop.bigcartel.com 38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 15


INTRODUCING trends

05

Forget grey weather – turn April showers into a more colourful affair with this felt mobile by Diana Stainton of Pygmy Cloud. Just the thing for brightening up a soggy weekend, don’t you think? 01

02

CLOUD MOBILE

03

04

05

06

07

08

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You will need: white, red, yellow, green, blue and red felt, black and red embroidery thread, embroidery needle, twine, white thread, pins, air erasable pen, toy stuffing and a pair of scissors. 01 Cut two raindrops using the template on page 94 and three pieces of twine each 50cm (20”) long. Sandwich a length of twine between the raindrop shapes and blanket stitch around the edge, leaving a gap for stuffing. Don’t stitch through the twine so the drops can be moved later. 02 Lightly fill with stuffing, then blanket stitch the gap closed. 03 Cut and sew three raindrops to each piece of twine. 04 Cut two pieces of white felt using the cloud template on page 94. Using an air erasable pen, draw the eyes and mouth onto one of the pieces. 05 Blanket stitch two circles of felt for cheeks using red thread. 06 Backstitch the eyes and mouth using black thread. 07 Sandwich the twine with the raindrops between the base of the two cloud shapes. Cut 20cm (8”) of twine and make a loop at the top of the cloud. Using white thread sew around the cloud, 5mm (¼”) from the edge, leaving a gap for stuffing. 08 Stuff and sew the gap closed.

Diana is a London-based crafter who loves snapping pictures, drinking tea, going on fun adventures and crafting things out of felt. www.pygmycloud.com


INTRODUCING out and about

PHOTOGRAPHS: 2, 3, 5 & 6: KATIE ALLEN; 1, 4 & 7: SUSAN BELL

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02

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05

Colour into Liquid Air exhibition preview night Prepare to be dazzled by artist Gracjana Rejmer-Canovas’ rainbow textiles. Katie Allen is inspired by the private view We love colour – the brighter the better – so when we were offered a sneak peek at Polish artist Gracjana RejmerCanovas’ new exhibition, Colour into Liquid Air, we jumped at the chance. Gracjana’s vibrant show is hosted by homewares chain Habitat’s Platform initiative, which hosts exhibitions and events with some of the most exciting new creatives, all held in the gallery at Habitat on the King’s Road, London. Stepping through the door we were immediately enveloped by an oasis of colour. Gracjana’s abstract pieces are arranged across the walls and floors like chromatic kites, with a huge piece of stitched-together 18 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

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scraps forming a giant bench for visitors. Even the specially-made Herball cocktails were bright pink and green. A video on the wall shows Gracjana, a graduate of the Slade School of Fine Art, in her studio dipping and painting linen and cottons with natural dyes. She then stitches them together, layering with acrylics and oil paints, and spraying with bleach – both “adding and taking away” colour. In the gallery, the pieces are draped over painted boards or pinned to frames: Gracjana was interested in “the contrast between the colour and fabric with the shapes of the stretchers,” and in creating a “floating, watery atmosphere” (hence the exhibition name). Her aim was a mood of “positivity” and “playfulness” with “as much colour in the space [as I could get],” influenced by the bold tones of London. The result is an exciting exhibition. Catch it at Habitat’s Platform gallery until 23 March. The next exhibition, in May, will be Space Craft, a collaboration with the Craft Council. www.habitat.co.uk/platform

01

Colours pop

from the walls and floor of the gallery. 02

Even the

cocktails came in bright shades. 03

Guests enjoying

the installation. 04

“I allowed

myself to be free,” says Gracjana of her vibrant show. 05

Scraps of

colourful and textural fabric stitched together to form a bench. 06

Softer tints

also make an appearance. 07

Gracjana busy

dyeing canvas in bright hues.


Monsieur Lapin … invites you to an exclusive private view of his latest installation, ‘Les Oeufs Ombré’


38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 21


HOW TO MAKE… A CROCHET RABBIT AND OMBRÉ EGGS RABBIT MATERIALS QStylecraft Special DK, 100% acrylic, 100g/294m, one ball in each of the following shades: Parchment 1218 (Yarn A), Walnut 1054 (Yarn B), Cream 1005 (Yarn C), Sherbert 1034 (Yarn D), Soft Peach 1240 (Yarn E) and Black 1002 (Yarn F) Q2.75mm (UK 11, US C/2) or 3mm (UK 10, US D/3) crochet hook QSafety eyes, 2 x 6mm QSoft toy stuffing QSewing needle QScissors QStitch markers (a scrap piece of contrasting colour yarn will do) TENSION Tension is not important, just ensure the stitches are dense enough for no stuffing to poke through. ABBREVIATIONS (UK) st(s) stitch(es) ch chain dc double crochet ss slip stitch htr half treble yrh yarn round hook BLO work stitch through back loop only SIZE Rabbit measures approximately 12cm (4¾”) high. 22 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

Bonjour, mes amis – the distinguished Parisian painter Monsieur Lapin is overjoyed to welcome you to the private view of his latest work. Entitled ‘Les Oeufs Ombré, it’s an intricate study of colour encapsulated in a timeless Easter-themed motif. Designer Maike van den Dries picked light and breezy spring shades for his jumper and scarf, but feel free to experiment and get as creative with colour as you like. To avoid a visible seam at the back of the striped jumper, we recommend Googling ‘crochet jogless stripes’ to find a tutorial that shows you how to stitch cleaner-looking stripes. Rabbit The rabbit is made in pieces, sewn together and stuffed. Most of the pieces are made in the round in a continuous spiral, so it helps to use a stitch marker to show where your round starts. Head Using Yarn A make a magic ring. Round 1: 7 dc into magic ring, pull ring tight. (7 sts) Round 2: 2 dc into each st around. (14 sts) Round 3: (1 dc in next st, 2 dc in next st) 7 times. (21 sts) Round 4: (1 dc in each of next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st) 7 times. (28 sts) Round 5: (1 dc in each of next 6 sts, 2 dc in next st) 4 times. (32 sts) Round 6: (1 dc in each of next 7 sts, 2 dc in next st) 4 times. (36 sts) Round 7: (1 dc in each of next 17

sts, 2 dc in next st) 2 times. (38 sts) Round 8: (1 dc in each of next 18 sts, 2 dc in next st) 2 times. (40 sts) Rounds 9-13: 1dc in each st round. (40 sts) Round 14: (1 dc in each of next 8 sts, dc2tog) 4 times. (36 sts) Round 15: (1 dc in each of next 4 sts, dc2tog) 6 times. (30 sts) Round 16: (1 dc in each of next 3 sts, dc2tog) 6 times. (24 sts) Round 17: (1 dc in each of next 2 sts, dc2tog) 6 times. (18 sts) Break your yarn, fasten off and leave a long tail for sewing. Body Ch18 using Yarn C. Round 1: 1 dc into 1st ch and each ch along. (18 sts) (pic 1) Round 2: (1 dc in each of next 8 sts, 2 dc in next st) 2 times. (20 sts) Change to Yarn D. Round 3: 1 dc in each st around. (20 sts) Round 4: 1 dc in each st around. (20 sts) Change to Yarn C. Round 5: (1 dc in each of next 4 sts, 2 dc in next st) 4 times. (24 sts) Round 6: (1 dc in each of next 11 sts, 2 dc in next st) 2 times. (26 sts) Change to Yarn D. Round 7: (1 dc in each of next 12 sts, 2 dc in next st) 2 times. (28 sts) Round 8: 1 dc in each st around. (28 sts) Change to Yarn C. Round 9: (1 dc in each of next 6 sts, 2 dc in next st) 4 times. (32 sts) Round 10: 1 dc in each st around. (32 sts) Change to Yarn D.

SPECIAL ABBREVIATIONS Dc2tog double crochet 2 together: (insert hook in next st, yrh and draw loop through) twice, yrh and draw through all 3 loops on hook. Make a magic ring hold thread in your hand and wrap working yarn around forefinger twice to create ring, slip ring off your finger and insert hook to pick up first st, ch1, then work the necessary sts for round 1 and close the ring tightly by pulling the loose end.

Round 11: 1 dc in each st around. (32 sts) Round 12: 1 dc in each st around. (32 sts) Change to Yarn A. Round 13: working in BLO, 1 dc in each st around. (32 sts) Round 14: (1 dc in each of next 6 sts, dc2tog) 4 times. (28 sts) This is the start of your first leg. If you haven’t used any stitch markers yet, we recommend doing so now. Round 15: 1 dc in each of next 14 sts Round 16: 1 dc in your marked stitch and begin your first leg, you are now working in the round on just the leg sts, 1 dc in each st around. (14 sts) (pic 2) Round 17: 1 dc in each st around. (14 sts) Round 18: 1 dc in each of next 4 sts, 2 dc in each of next 6 sts, 1 dc in each of next 4 sts. (20 sts) Rounds 19-20: 1 dc in each st around. (20 sts) Break yarn and fasten off. For the second leg, start a new round at the back, 4 sts away from the other leg (pic 3). Round 1: 1 dc in each of 1st 4 sts (bringing you up to where the first leg is), cross over to the front of the body, 1 dc in each of next 10 sts (bringing you back to the start of the second leg). (14 sts) Round 2: 1 dc in each st around. (14 sts) Round 3: 1 dc in each st around. (14 sts) Round 4: 1 dc in each of next 5 sts, 2 dc in each of next 6 sts, 1 dc in each of next 3 sts. (20 sts) Round 5: 1 dc in each st around. (20 sts) Round 6: 1 dc in each st around. (20 sts) Break yarn and fasten off. Arms (make two) Using Yarn A, make a magic ring. Round 1: 5 dc into magic ring, pull ring tight. (5 sts)


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Round 2: 2 dc in each st around. (10 sts) Round 3: (1 dc in next st, 2 dc in next st) 5 times. (15 sts) Round 4: 1 dc in each st around. (15 sts) Round 5: (1 dc in next st, dc2tog) 5 times. (10 sts) Round 6: (1 dc in each of next 3 sts, dc2tog) 2 times. (8 sts) Change to Yarn C. Rounds 7-8: 1 dc in each st around. (8 sts) Change to Yarn D.

Bring M. Lapin to life with his natty beret and debonair 'tache.

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Rounds 9-10: 1 dc in each st around. (8 sts) Change to Yarn C. Rounds 11-12: 1 dc in each st around. (8 sts) Change to Yarn D. Rounds 13-14: 1 dc in each st around. (8 sts) Break yarn, fasten off and leave a long tail for sewing. Soles (make two) Using Yarn A, make a magic ring. Round 1: 5 dc into magic ring, then

pull the ring tight. (5 sts) Round 2: 2 dc in each st around. (10 sts) Round 3: 2 dc in each st around. (20 sts) Break yarn, fasten off and leave a long tail for sewing. Ears (make two) Using Yarn A, make a magic ring. Round 1: 6 dc into magic ring, pull ring tight. (6 sts) Round 2: 2 dc in each st around. (12 sts) Round 3: (1 dc in next st, 2 dc in next st) 6 times. (18 sts) Round 4: 1 dc in each st around. (18 sts) Round 5: 1 dc in each st around. (18 sts) Round 6: (1 dc in each of next 7 sts, dc2tog) 2 times. (16 sts) Round 7: 1 dc in each st around. (16 sts) Round 8: (1 dc in each of next 6 sts, dc2tog) 2 times. (14 sts) Round 9: 1 dc in each st around. (14 sts) Round 10: (1 dc in each of next 5 sts, dc2tog) 2 times. (12 sts) Round 11: 1 dc in each st around. (12 sts) Round 12: 1 dc in each st around. (12 sts) Break yarn, fasten off and leave a long tail for sewing. Moustache (make two) Using Yarn F, make a magic ring. Round 1: 5 dc into magic ring,

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38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 23


HOW TO MAKE… A CROCHET RABBIT AND OMBRÉ EGGS then pull the ring tight. Round 2: 1 dc in each of 1st 2 sts, turn your work. Round 3: 1 dc in 1st st, ch1. Cut the yarn, leaving a long tail for sewing and pull the tail through the loop on your hook. Beret Using Yarn B, make a magic ring. Round 1: 6 dc into magic ring, pull ring tight. (6 sts) Round 2: 2 dc in each st around. (12 sts) Round 3: (1 dc in next st, 2 dc in next st) 6 times. (18 sts) Round 4: (1 dc in each of next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st) 6 times. (24 sts) Round 5: (1 dc in each of next 3 sts, 2 dc in next st) 6 times. (30 sts) Round 6: (1 dc in each of next 4 sts, 2 dc in next st) 6 times. (36 sts) Round 7: 1 dc in each st around. (36 sts) Round 8: dc2tog 18 times. (18 sts) Break yarn, fasten off and leave a long tail for sewing. Point of beret, using Yarn B: Round 1: ch3. Round 2: 1 dc in 1st st, 1 dc in 2ndst. Break yarn, fasten off and pull the tail through the top of your beret. Scarf Using Yarn E, ch 38, turn. Row 1: 1 htr in 2nd ch from hook, 1 htr in each ch along. Break yarn and fasten off. Making up Sew in all loose ends where yarn changes were made. Sew the soles to the feet, then firmly stuff the legs and body. Using the photo as a guide, sew the eyes and moustache to the head. Stuff the head, then sew to the body. Sew the arms to the body. Sew the ears and beret to the head, refer to the picture for positioning. Sew in any remaining loose ends. Monsieur Lapin is ready for Easter! 24 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

Prettify the table with a dish of rainbow wrapped eggs.

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EGG MATERIALS QPolystyrene egg. Ours are from Hobbycraft QThree different shades of embroidery thread QHot glue gun Monsieur Lapin’s glittering career has seen him exhibit his work at galleries across the world, but he’s at his happiest creating ombré eggs in his Parisian studio. Recreate his latest installation using this easy tute from Uncommon Designs. We've used 6cm (2.5") polystyrene eggs, and our favourite shades of thread for a playful Easter egg hunt.

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01 Tie the end of the embroidery thread in a knot and trim off the excess. Roll it into a flat circle roughly 1.5cm ( 5/8") in diameter. 02 Add a dot of glue to the top of the egg in the centre and gently push the circle down. Continue wrapping the embroidery thread around the egg, dabbing a little hot glue as you go. 03 Once you’re a third of the way down, flip the egg over and start wrapping the darkest colour in the same fashion. Finally, add the middle colour to the space in between. Now, sit back and admire your most egg-cellent masterpiece (sorry) before starting the next one.


Maike van den Dries Maike loves making cute â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and creepy â&#x20AC;&#x201C; creatures from her home in the Netherlands and then giving them a home through her website and Etsy shop. Maike's critters are crocheted or handmade from cuddly plush fabric. www.madebymaike.com Trish and Bonnie The crafty sisters-in-law left previous jobs (Trish in insurance and Bonnie in nursing) to become stay-athome mums and pursue their dream creating craft and DIY tutorials to share from South Carolina. www. uncommondesignsonline.com

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gEt OuR dIgItaL EdiTiOn!


sTarT YouR

frEe tRiaL tOdaY!*

aVaIlaBlE oN YouR DevIcE nOW

*Free Trial not available on Zinio.


Describe your style in a few words. Feminine and classic with a vintage twist. Which books and magazines are currently on your bedside table? I’m reading a lovely novel called When God was a Rabbit by Sarah Winman as well as a Marilyn Monroe biography – she’s a big style icon of mine.

tea and a chat with…

LISA COMFORT Sewing entrepreneur, teacher, author and editor, Lisa Comfort is a busy bee. She reveals the secrets of her career success Words: CAROLINE ROWLAND Photographs: RACHAEL SMITH

When setting up your own business there’s always one essential ingredient – passion. And dressmaking expert Lisa Comfort clearly has this in spades. The love for her craft led her to open sewing café Sew Over It in South London in 2011, driven by the compulsion to share her passion and help prevent the art of sewing becoming forever lost. Lisa’s love affair with needle and thread started way back, having spent many afternoons stitching alongside her childminder Mrs Robinson. She continued sewing throughout her 28 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

teenage years, but opted to study languages at university instead. While living in Italy she took a dressmaking course, which led her to study at the London College of Fashion on her return to the UK. Here she was offered a job with couture designer Bruce Oldfield, from which she gained invaluable industry experience before setting up on her own. We’re super excited to have this mega-talented gal also guest editing our Mollie Makes DIY Fashion special, so we sat down with her for a chat about her crafty life…

Name your top three creative blogs. I like A Pair & A Spare (www.apairand asparediy.com), Tilly and the Buttons (www. tillyandthebuttons.com) and A Beautiful Mess (www.abeautifulmess.com). Your sewing café Sew Over It is a great success. What was your inspiration for opening and how has it evolved? The seed was sewn (literally) when I was working in couture fashion in London. I started teaching private sewing lessons on the side and soon realised I enjoyed this more than my day job. I was also becoming increasingly aware that a lot of people didn’t know how to sew. My grandma’s generation all sewed but my Mum’s didn’t. So if my generation didn’t learn then it would become a lost skill. I wanted to open a shop where likeminded people could meet, sew and learn together – a space where they could work on their own projects and get help


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

‘If my generation didn’t learn sewing, it would become a lost skill.’

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if they needed it. As for classes, I wanted them to be really varied and to offer new and exciting projects. My passion is dressmaking so we offer lots in that field. Since opening, the business has grown a lot and there are new off-shoots to the original plan. We now have a range of dressmaking patterns and kits which we sell wholesale, meaning we can take Sew Over It to pastures new. We’ve also started to work with amazing brands such as Selfridges, Gap, John Lewis and Cath Kidston on in-store events.

Describe a typical working day. If I’m working at the shop then I’ll get in for 9am and have a catch-up with my manager Kate before my class starts. I then teach from 10am-1pm. I enjoy teaching the beginner classes and helping people start off on their sewing journey. Next it’s lunch or sometimes a piece of cake (we have lots of cake in the shop!) and then onto meetings with various people. I often meet up with other brands to discuss events we’re running together. I then head back home before rush hour (as I often drive)

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It signature blue

A vintage shirt

dress stands proud

painted shelf. 03

with her garment

Lisa couldn’t

friends – a 1940s

resist adding a bit

wrap dress and a lace

of Sew Over It blue

dress – in the shop.

to her home’s living

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Sewing supplies

room. The striking

are stored in jars and

mirror was bought

bowls on a Sew Over

during a trip to India.

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INTRODUCING tea & a chat

02

and continue to work from home, usually catching up on emails. Sometimes I have to work in the evenings, but that’s the sacrifice I make for running my own business. If I’m working from home all day then I’ll usually be busy with projects such as the Mollie Makes DIY Fashion special, or writing my second book – it’s all about sewing projects with a vintage twist, so keep your eyes peeled for it! How does your creative process work? Do you keep sketch books or use any online resources? A lot of it happens inside my head. I’m always absorbing inspiration – from films; people I see on the street; books and museums. I then develop these in my mind before sketching out designs. More recently I’ve been asking the rest of the team to help evolve ideas with me. It’s good to discuss things with the other dressmaking teachers, as we have to think about how they’ll work for classes.

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Colourful fabrics for

use in the shop’s Intro to Sewing class are closely guarded by an example of the Ultimate Shift Dress. 02

This beauty is

a product of the Mad Men Dress classes. 03

The Sew Over It

shop, filled with fabric and trimmings from all over the world.

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Apart from your own shop, where do you source fabrics for your projects? All over. I have someone who finds fabrics for us in Hong Kong and I recently went on a sourcing trip to Delhi, which was amazing. Closer to home, I love going to London’s Goldhawk Road – I usually go


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

‘Start simple. The hardest thing about dressmaking is the fitting, not sewing.’

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there hoping to find one specific item and come back with loads! Lots of people feel intimidated by dressmaking – what words of advice or encouragement would you give wannabe sewists? Start simple. It’s really important to start with basic shapes that require little fit. The hardest thing about dressmaking isn’t the sewing but the fitting – skirts are the best way to begin and, if you can, go to a class to help you along. Then from

there, try a few at home before going back to a more advanced class to learn how to make a dress. Choose easy fabrics to work with, such as cotton, so the challenge isn’t sewing the fabric but learning about the construction and fit. If you try something too hard, too soon, then you’ll find it stressful and off-putting.

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01

Lisa brought back

It’s heads down

at Sew Over It as

from her buying

Lisa guides three

trip in India. 03

students on their sewing journey. 02

The class listings

board – a selection of what’s on offer at

A collection of

studs and ribbons

the sewing cafe.

What’s been the highlight of your crafty career so far? It’s hard to pick just one! Writing my first book was definitely a highlight, as was 38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 31


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

02

appearing on TV’s Kirstie’s Vintage Home. But sometimes the best moments are when classes I’ve designed are successful. Afterwards, I’ll receive photos of people wearing their finished projects – that’s definitely one of the best and most rewarding feelings. What digital and social media channels are exciting you right now? Pinterest – it’s my new obsession. I was a bit slow on the uptake, but since buying my flat I’ve used it all the time for inspiration. I’m also addicted to Instagram.

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Lisa in her second

home – the Sew Over It shop and sewing cafe.

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Sewing

inspiration and new pattern ideas, pinned up in a corner of Lisa’s home.

32 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

Mollie Makes DIY Fashion Transform your closet with 132 pages of embellishing and making ideas, as well as the best in vintage, quirky, bohemian and retro looks. Find easy-to-follow instructions for crocheting, sewing and lots more. Available at newsagents and to order at www. myfavouritemagazines.co.uk

Where do you like searching for creative inspiration? I love vintage books – and Pinterest boards, of course! What projects are you currently working on? A dress and top combo – I want to take the top of our shift dress and our pencil skirt and morph them into one dress, using different fabrics for the top and bottom. Finally, what do you think is the best piece of creative advice you have ever been given? Don’t worry about fashion trends – make clothes that suit your style and figure.


cherry blossom girl We’ve made the flower crowns – time to check out the new way to wear petals with this exclusive floral collar by The House of Handmade

34 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38


ROSE ILLUSTRATION: © WWW.ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/BEASTFROMEAST


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HOW TO MAKE… A FLOWER COLLAR MATERIALS QCream cotton fabric, 45 x 50cm (17¾ x 19¾") Q50 fabric or silk flower petals QWhite medium weight iron-on interfacing, 45 x 25cm (17¾" x 97/8") QCream polyester sewing thread

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QSewing needle QSmall hook and eye fastening QIron QTwo sheets of baking paper

We’re well-accustomed to donning a Frida Kahlo-inspired flower crown during festival season. But for 2014, we’re planning to mix it up a bit with a petal-covered collar. More subtle than a bonce full of blooms, it’ll go with any type of round-necked top so get experimenting with your wardrobe. Fabric flowers can be purchased online or from florists – go for pastels for a girly effect, brights for the tropical look, or vamp it up with black flowers and beads. We’ve used hydrangea petals here, but experiment with shapes for a variety of looks.

Cut out two copies of the template on page 90 and attach them at the fold mark. Place around your neck to check the size. If you need to make the collar smaller, cut off an equal section either side of the fold mark. To lengthen, simply add to the pattern. Cut two shapes from the cotton using your final template. 02 Cut a piece of interfacing using the template. Place adhesive side down onto one of the collar pieces, then iron them between two pieces of baking paper. Place the two collar pieces right sides (RS) together. Sew around the edges 01


Vamp-up with everlasting luxury blooms. No water needed!

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using a straight stitch, leaving an 8cm (31/8") gap on the inside edge for turning. Secure the outer edge of the collar using a zigzag stitch. 03 Turn your collar RS out through the gap so the interfacing is on the inside. Iron your collar to create a neat seam and sew the gap closed using straight stitch. Attach your hook and eye – you'll find it easier to do this now than after the petals are added. 04 When buying fabric flowers you may come across some with stalks. Prepare these by cutting as short as possible so they don’t disrupt the way the flower lays against the Subscribe at molliemakes.com

fabric. Take each fabric flower head and sew the base to your collar. Start from one side and space out roughly 1.3cm (½") between petals, depending on their size, to allow

a good coverage. Larger petals will require less coverage. Continue until your collar is completely covered in a dusky layer of petals. Sew in extras if you find spaces.

Emma Bosanko A former secondary school art teacher, Emma teaches arts and crafts in museums as well as designing for her accessories label The House of Handmade. She has an obsession with faux fur and florals that is slowly taking over her house (and her life). www.thehouseofhandmade.com

38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 37


ILLUSTRATION: STEPH BAXTER


INTRODUCING good read

THE THIRD WAVE OF CRAFT Resurgences of traditional crafts have happened regularly throughout history. So what’s really behind today’s new wave of handmade? Words: LOTTIE STOREY Illustration: STEPH BAXTER

P

icture the scene: a group of women sit in a church hall. Hands clutched around mugs of tea, they discuss a campaign to address the shortage of midwives in the UK. They then pick up knitting needles, chatting loudly and inspire each other to learn new skills. This is The Women’s Institute (WI). What first began almost a century ago to encourage women to help the war-torn nation by growing and preserving food now boasts over 212,000 members – more than any political party. But this killer combo of political activism meets creativity is just as likely to happen in kitchens and classrooms, on sofas and at sewing tables all around the world. The WI may be both creative and powerful, but crafters, so are you. You’re surfing a wave that shows no signs of subsiding any time soon. This is the third wave of craft.

SUBVERSIVE STITCHING

Craft, by its very nature, is the antithesis of mass-production. In the wake of the Industrial Revolution, our crafting foremothers and forefathers in the romantic arts and crafts movement fought back against the machinery dominating the workplace. Their philosophy was that the removal of craft skills from the manufacturing process had diminished society, and felt they had a physical and spiritual need to make. This political approach to craft helped make traditional methods and the handmade fashionable once again. Later on, in the 1960s and 70s, women reached a crossroads: some turned down a road towards political awakening and the second wave of feminism, others embraced the domestic arts as sanctuary from the threat of nuclear attack, the mind-blowing progress of the day and the Cold War. And now? Similar conditions exist in the world today: technological advancement, unstable economies, environmental disasters, political unrest – all of these may give context to the current resurgence in craft. But are there other reasons why we just can’t help ourselves reaching out for the needles and yarn? Does the resurgence have its roots in a generation detached from the handmade process, who see Subscribe at molliemakes.com

the presence of man, rather than machine, as something new and exciting? Or could it be the individuality afforded to crafters in an otherwise mass-produced society? Perhaps the internet is the key factor in this recent reawakening. With the rise of online forums, social media and blogging, geographically disparate individuals are able to forge like-minded communities. Crafting online encourages participation. An incredibly positive peer pressure arises when readers see people like them exploring and creating; imagine a virtual classroom or craft group where you feel empowered to try it for yourself and share the results. Whatever the catalyst, today’s handmade movement builds on a long tradition of personal and political rebellion. Not only that, but makers are creating a shift in the world economy. Selling handmade items online offers consumers an ethical and environmentally-superior choice. No longer restricted to the mainstream high street with its watered-down catwalk fashion or diluted décor ideas, we are creating an anti-capitalist alternative. Trading direct, maker to buyer, has altered the watercourse. What could be more radical?

CRAFTING FOR A CAUSE

But while craftivism might sound like the fluffy end of personal politics, it’s really anything but. The juxtaposition of craft with a strong political message is undeniably disarming, as groups such as The Bristol Knitivists take part in yarn bombing against the English Defence League and badger culling. Plus, it’s also philanthropic. Craft drives such as sewing hats for Haitian newborns (www.soulemama. com/mama_to_mama), Dress a Girl Around the World (www.dressagirlaroundtheworld.com) and Softies for Mirabel (www.mirabelfoundation.org.au) have helped countless people across the globe. So, whatever your next craft project may be, sit up tall and be proud of your making. Know you are riding the crest of a wave, the kind of which only comes around every once in a while: a tidal wave of craft, craftivism, and political independence. Crafters, you are more powerful than you know. 38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 39


T S R U B R A T S Little rascals will love getting up to roughâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tumble in these playful unisex dungarees by Kirsty Hartley of Wild Things Funky Little Dresses


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HOW TO MAKE… STARBURST DUNGAREES MATERIALS QSoft, medium weight, woven cotton fabric (such as corduroy or cotton twill), 1 metre (1 yrd) QContrast print or plain cotton fabric, ¼ metre (9") QCotton fabric scraps in rainbow colours QIron-on bonding web or interfacing, 30 x 30cm (12")

42 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

QTaylors chalk QMatching threads QSewing machine QDressmaking scissors FINISHED SIZE Age Height (up to) 6-12m 76cm (29.9") 1-2y 90cm (35.4") 2-3y 98cm (38.6") 3-4y 104cm (40.9") 4-5y 110cm (43.3") 5-6y 116cm (45.7")

Fun, creative kidswear is where it’s at, and Kirsty Hartley’s designs are bound to spark children’s imaginations whilst still being practical enough for all the adventures playtime brings. There’s often a lack of originality in little boys’ clothing, and this eyecatching design makes a welcome change to all those sailboat and tractor motifs. Plus, little girls will have just as much fun wearing them to climb trees in the park or run around the playground. Why not experiment with creating your own appliqué designs for extra interest?

01 Using the templates on page 91, cut the pattern pieces in your required size from the main fabric, ensuring the grain line is parallel to the selvedge. Add a 1cm ( 3/8") seam allowance to the pieces (pocket piece needs 2cm) before cutting. If your fabric is lightweight, you may wish to strengthen the bib by adding a third layer of cotton or interfacing between the pieces. Use the dotted lines on the templates to cut out your turn-up and back facing pieces. 02 Cut out the starburst template on page 91 and number the


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stripes to keep them in the correct order. Iron the bondaweb to the wrong side of your chosen stripe and star fabrics, mark around the template and cut out. 03 Peel off the bondaweb backing and position on the bib. Iron into place. Using matching thread and a sewing machine, topstitch all pieces 2mm (1/8") from the edges. 04 Place the bib pieces right sides (RS) together then stitch 1cm ( 3/8") from the edge, leaving the lower edge open. Gently snip into the curved edge as shown to create a neat finish when turned. Turn Subscribe at molliemakes.com

RS out and press. 05 Zigzag stitch the pocket edges. Turn back the top edge and sew back 1.5cm ( 5/8"). Press back pocket edges by 1cm ( 3/8"). Repeat the appliquĂŠ process and apply stars or little raindrops to the pockets. Position the pockets on to the main sections of the dungarees using the pattern as a guide. Sew into place 3mm (1/8") from the edge, making sure you backstitch or create a small triangle at the pocket opening to secure in place. 06 Place dungaree panels RS together and sew the centre front

and centre back seams 1cm ( 3/8"). Stitching the back seam twice to make it extra hard-wearing. Zigzag the edges and press the seam. 07 Place the denim or contrast turn back fabric along the hem edge, RS together, and sew along the hem line. Press open. Press the hem edge back by 1cm ( 3/8") then fold into place. Sew the inside leg seam from one side to the other down to the turn back. Zigzag edges. Pin the turn back into place and sew by hand to secure. 08 Prepare the straps by placing pairs RS together and sewing 38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 43


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HOW TO MAKE… STARBURST DUNGAREES around the edges by 1cm ( 3/8"), leaving the straight narrow end open. Snip carefully around the curve, then turn through and press the strap. Sew into place. 09 Make the two front tucks at the front tummy and sew down. Take the sewn bib, and place so RS faces front section. Stitch into place. 10 Take the contrast facing. Finish the lower curved edge by zigzag stitching. Position the facing RS to the back. Sew along outer edge. Then, where the facing joins the yoke panel, twist back so RS are together and sew into place. 44 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

11 Press facing back and topstitch approximately 5mm (¼") from the edge all the way around to finish. 12 Make a buttonhole (or two if

you wish the strap to be adjustable) and sew buttons into place. Now your dungarees are ready for playtime – let's go, kids!

Kirsty Hartley Kirsty launched Wild Things Funky Little Dresses two-and-a-half years ago, aiming to create dynamic clothes for kids that instil play and a sense of fun. She now sells her handmade, UK-manufactured clothes to parents all around the world. She’s currently working on her first craft book. www.wildthingsdresses.com


       

   

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LIVING

38

INSPIRATION ALERT! SPACES, PLACES & NEW DESIGNERS TO WATCH

PHOTOGRAPH: PHILIPPA JAMES

Whether you’re tying the knot, or popping corks at a celebratory bash, the dynamic duo of party planners behind Knot and Pop are where it’s at. Neon? Pastel? Have both. As the Londonbased stylists say, this is “your day, your way.” www.knotandpop.com

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38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 47


GET THE LOOK

Timeless but recognisable, Angus and Celeste’s distinctively Aussie ceramics use the brilliance of porcelain to illustrate elegant forms of nature. www.angusandceleste.com.au 48 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

SUBTLE BLENDS

Got a flavour for midcentury design? Find made-to-order modish creations at Retro Print Revival. Bursting with retro soul, the Tipi table lamp is just a taster of what’s on offer. www. retroprintrevival.com

Laura Olivia’s Aeonium Sky combo of dreamy watercolours and handdrawing bridges the gap between digital printing and natural beauty. www.lauraolivia.com

PHOTOGRAPH: WWW.ROBSTREETER.CO.UK

Lending themselves to decorating heaven, Fine Little Day’s Pirum Parum pear and Little Green Shed’s geo thistle collage are sheer enough for any décor. www.bimbily.com www.brambleandbracken.com

Branching out from classic soft furnishings, Lindsey Lang has added a new string to her designer bow with ‘made to last a lifetime’ wall and floor surfacings. www.wallsandfloors.eu


Concealing bottles of water, these cardboard vases cleverly fold out.

PHOTOGRAPHS: © SNUG.STUDIO

For when all-over gold is too OTT, try Down That Little Lane. This ‘place to share delightful things’ stocks the prettiest polka dot wall decals – perfect for satisfying your cravings for carrots. Sorry, carats. www. downthatlittlelane.com.au

DESIGNER FOCUS Snug Studio Interior designer Kerstin Reilemann and architect Berit Lüdecke share more than their complementary careers. Their combined passion for minimalist design has empowered them to join forces to create high-quality home products and chic jewellery from their Snug Studio in Hannover, Germany. We love! www.snug-online.com

Kerstin and Berit built up their collective Snug Studio in 2010.

WEBSITE TO WATCH Bloomingville Geometric succulent planters, wall boxes ready to be filled with curios and brushed metal lamps to dress your desk with. This is the kind of place you need to visit to turn your pad from bad to rad. Impressively, the majority of its smart and chic products, designed with a nostalgic Scandinavian twist, are made in-house. www.bloomingville.com Subscribe at molliemakes.com

Magnetising: the clean design of Snug products is minimalist-chic.

38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 49


LIVING home tour

Marlous Snijder fills her Netherlands home with eye-popping colour Words: CAROLINE ROWLAND Photography: HENNY VAN BELKOM

Born and raised in Veenendaal in the Netherlands, creative soul Marlous still lives on the outskirts of the city, nestled close to beautiful forests and farmlands. She shares her home with her husband Pim and cat Molly, with their first child on the way this summer. They affectionately call their house the ‘White Lady’ (they’ve painted the entire interior white) and say that, although they can’t pinpoint why, it gives them a real feeling of being ‘home’.

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LIVING home tour

Left: The dining chairs, from the Ikea PS collection, were so rare that they had to be collected from three different locations. Marlous loves having space for a big table and eight chairs, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s become the heart of her living room. Right: Marlous spends many hours here working on sewing projects, surrounded by her favourite thrifted ďŹ nds and inspirational images.

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LIVING home tour

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When they first set foot in the 1980s property three-and-a-half years ago, the couple instantly fell in love. Their description of the existing interior makes this hard to believe – it had a swan-themed blue tiled bathroom, a brown kitchen and a lot of brown brick walls in the living room. But despite this, they knew it had been loved and that they would fit right in here. It took them three months to strip away huge amounts of wallpaper and replace the kitchen, bathroom and all the flooring, but it soon became the blank canvas they needed to start creating their colourful and intriguing home. As a blogger and publisher of online magazine Oh Marie! (www.ohmarie.nl), Marlous spends a lot of time online and says she is inspired and influenced by her super-creative blog friends. But although the online community has helped develop her style, she admits the infinite world of Pinterest, Instagram and blogs can sometimes 52 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

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be overwhelming and intimidating. To overcome this, her advice is to “always give your own twist to trends to keep things personal and original.” She describes her interior style as quirky, whimsical, playful and colourful, and her love of many different styles, eras and patterns gives the space an eclectic personality. With a preference for an uncluttered aesthetic, Marlous finds herself constantly moving and changing things around to keep it fresh. Luckily Pim is an openminded kind of guy and doesn’t bat an eyelid if she brings home a thrifted rocking zebra. Going on junk-hunting adventures inspires Marlous the most, and she says the sight of a thrift shop packed with potential treasure fills her with joy. She keeps her eyes peeled for her beloved Japanese Kokeshi dolls – although these beautifully handcrafted wooden dolls are still in production, Marlous prefers to seek out vintage examples to add to her 16-strong collection.

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Marlous’ bright,

ever-changing workroom is currently being converted into a nursery for their first baby, due later this summer. 02

This is Bruin,

a 1950s cupboard the couple bought for just 20 euros. On top sits some of Marlous’s favourite Kokeshi dolls and printer block letters she bought in New York.


This page: One of Marlousâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; favourite corners of the living room. They bought the kilim rug before moving in and she still loves its colours and ďŹ&#x201A;owers.

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LIVING home tour

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The couple effortlessly combine new accessories into their home alongside these vintage finds, so items from Ikea and Habitat can be found alongside handmade products sourced on Etsy. The Scrapwood wallpaper by Studio Ditte in their bedroom was on the wall in their previous house, too. When they were selling the new owners really disliked it so, unable to bear the thought of it being stripped and discarded, Marlous and Pim carefully removed it and brought it with them! Marlous also recalls the story of the Moldovian carpet in their living room. They had fallen in love with this particular pattern and were heartbroken to find out someone had already reserved it. But in a twist of fate, it turned out to be too large for the other buyer’s room, so they returned it. Another favourite item is a vintage Verner Panton Panthella lamp that Marlous’ mother 54 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

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found in a thrift store. It reminds Marlous of her happy childhood, as her parents had one too. Perhaps it’s these heart-warming, quirky stories behind so many of their possessions that makes their home so special – they are surrounded by the things they love and cherish on a daily basis. As Marlous concludes: “If I could, I would hug it every single day, just because it makes us feel so at home.”

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bedroom is calm and serene. The bedspread was crocheted by Pim’s grandmother. 02

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this after the holidays when she missed the Christmas décor.

Oh Marie! Magazine Marlous is editor and publisher of her own print and online magazine Oh Marie! Published in both English and Dutch, it focuses on creativity, beautiful objects, DIYs and tips for developing your own style. It goes on sale every two months and each issue has a different theme. She also blogs at Planet Fur. www.ohmarie.nl, http://planetfur.nl


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Retro pinny

PHOTOGRAPHS: JOANNE HENDERSON AND PENNY WINCER

Cover up in the kitchen without losing your style credentials by donning this fab patterned apron


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HOW TO MAKE… A RETRO PATTERNED PINNY MATERIALS QJumbo and superjumbo ric rac, 70cm (28") each QTwo pieces of main cotton fabric, 70 x 35cm (28 x 14") and 70 x 18cm (28 x 7") QOne piece of contrasting cotton fabric, 70 x 8cm (28 x 3") QOne piece of contrast fabric for the waistband, measuring the width of the finished top of the apron (see Step 7) plus 3cm (1¼") by 15cm (6") QOne piece of fusible 58 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

interfacing measuring the same width by 7.5cm (3") deep QTwo pieces of contrast fabric for the ties measuring about 60cm (23½") or the length required, by 15cm (6") Q2.5cm (1") bias binding, the length of the finished bottom of the apron plus 2cm (¾") QMatching sewing threads QNeedle and pins QSewing machine QFabric scissors QIron and ironing board

FINISHED SIZE These instructions will give you an apron measuring approximately 70cm (28") long, and 38cm (15") across the top, with ties 60cm (23½") long. To increase the width slightly, you can either reduce the depth of the pleats (see Step 6) or cut wider main fabric panels. To increase the width by more than an inch or so, cut wider main fabric panels, but leave the contrast strip the same width. You can also cut the fabric pieces to different lengths.

If you’re as enthusiastic (not to mention messy!) when cooking as we are, then an apron is pretty much a kitchen essential. However, when attempting to be the hostess with the mostess, you’ll need something that’s suitably stylish as well as practical so you can pop in and out of the party without having to take it off. This design is quite long, but if you're short on fabric, you can adapt it to suit whatever length you like as well as your waist size – see the Finished Size notes. To really channel that domestic goddess vibe (even when you're not feeling it) we've gone for a granny-chic mix of retro patterns to help us get us in character for our chic soirée. Prawn cocktail starter, anyone?


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Turn under and stitch down a small hem at one end of each piece of ric rac. Ric rac tends to fray noticeably, so you might find some Fray Check useful here. 02 Right sides (RS) together, lay the jumbo ric rac along the right-hand long edge of the large piece of main fabric, with the turned under end 1cm ( 3/8") up from a short raw edge. Position so that when a 1.5cm ( 5/8") seam is sewn along the long edge, the seam will run along the middle of the ric rac – shown here by the dashed line. Pin the ric rac in place along the upper edge. 03 Lay the contrast strip for the skirt RS down over the ric rac, matching the raw edges. Pin the layers together, making sure you 01

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pin through the ric rac, then take out the pins inserted in Step 2. Sew the seam taking a 1.5cm ( 5/8") seam allowance. Finish the raw seam allowances by zigzag stitching them and the ric rac together. 04 Press the seam open on the RS, pressing the ric rac toward the contrast strip, and on the wrong side (WS) pressing the ric rac and both seam allowances toward the main fabric. 05 Repeat Steps 2–4 with the super-jumbo ric rac, pinning it RS together to the raw edge of the contrast strip, then pinning the smaller piece of main fabric over it. Press the ric rac and seam allowances in the same direction as the first piece. On the right side, topstitch 3mm (1/8") from the ric

rac seams to hold the layers flat. 06 Pleat the top edge of the apron. We made three pleats, each over 6cm (2") of fabric, placing one pleat 6.5cm (25/8") in from each edge and another one in the larger main fabric, 4cm (1") from the first pleat. You can change this to suit, just keep the pleats at least 3cm (1¼") from the long edges, and don’t put a pleat into the contrast strip. On the RS, topstitch the pleats to hold them in place. We topstitched about 10cm (4"), but you can stitch a shorter amount for a fuller apron. 07 Turn under and sew a double 1cm ( 3/8") hem along each of the long edges. 08 Iron the fusible interfacing onto the back of half of the waistband 38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 59


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HOW TO MAKE… A RETRO PATTERNED PINNY fabric, as shown. RS together, pin one tie piece to each end of the waistband. Taking 1.5cm ( 5/8") seam allowances, sew the two pieces together. Press the seam allowances open to finish. 09 RS together, pin the interfaced edge of the waistband to the top of the skirt, matching the side seams to the skirt edges. Sew together, taking a 1cm ( 3/8") seam allowance. 10 Open the pieces out and press the seam flat, pressing the seam allowance toward the waistband. Press under 1cm ( 3/8") hems around all the other edges of the waistband and tie piece. 11 Fold the piece in half along the interfacing, matching the edges of the ties exactly, and sew all the way around. 60 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

Open out one folded edge of the bias binding and, RS together, pin it to the bottom edge of the apron, matching the edge of the binding to the edge of the apron as shown, and so that 1cm ( 3/8") protrudes at either side. Sew along the fold in the binding. 13 Fold in the free ends of the binding and press. Then fold the 12

binding over to the WS of the apron, folding over just a little of the fabric as well, as shown. Sew along the top edge of the binding to finish the hem. We stopped and started sewing either side of the ric rac, but this isn’t strictly necessary. Now, invite a bunch of friends over for dinner and drinks so you have an excuse to wear your new apron.

Sewlicious This pretty and practical sewing project is taken from Sewlicious by Kate Haxell, published by CICO Books at £14.99 and available from all good bookshops. To purchase a copy at the special price of £10.99 plus free P&P, call 01256 302699 quoting discount code GLR 9OR. www.cicobooks.co.uk


JAM HEART BISCUITS Bake a batch of these jammy treats by La Messer to pep up tea breaks and share a little love

You will need: 500g granulated sugar, 500g frozen raspberries, 425g plain flour, 4 egg yolks, 75g caster sugar, 2 tsp vanilla extract, 2 tsp finely grated lemon zest, 325g softened butter and large scallop circle and heart cutters.

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01 Sterilise some jam jars with hot soapy water (or run through a dishwasher) and leave to dry. Then upturn the jars onto a baking tray and place in the oven for 15 minutes at 120°C. 02 Weigh the sugar into an ovenproof bowl and pop in the oven for 15 minutes at 180°C. 03 Place the raspberries in a large pan over a medium heat, bring to the boil and cook for two minutes until juicy and jammy. 04 Add the warm sugar to the raspberries on the heat. Stir until the sugar has dissolved, then boil for another six minutes. Skim off any pink froth. To test the jam, put a dollop of jam onto a chilled saucer and pop in the fridge for a few minutes. When it’s cold, push it with your finger. If it wrinkles, your jam is set. If it’s not, boil for a minute longer and test again. Transfer into your jars and chill in the fridge overnight.

05 Preheat your oven to 180°C. Sift the flour into a large bowl or electric food mixer. Add the sugar, vanilla extract, grated lemon zest, egg yolks and butter. Mix to form a dough. 06 Remove from the bowl, pat together with your hands, flatten and roll out to 2cm thick. Split in half, place in plastic bags and chill in the fridge for 30 minutes. 07 Using half of the chilled dough, roll out to 5mm. Cut out scalloped circles and circles with hearts cut out of the centres. 08 Place the biscuits on baking trays and bake for 8-10 minutes until pale golden in colour. Allow to sit in the tray for a couple of minutes, so the biscuits firm up, then transfer to a wire rack. 09 When the biscuits are cool, spread your homemade jam onto the reverse side of the whole biscuit. Place your cut-out heart circle on top to finish.

La is a designer and founder of Messyla. She loves baking, cats, coffee and working in her summerhouse. She makes fresh, beautiful cards and gifts that are a little bit vintage and a little bit country. www.messylashop.com

38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 61


PHOTOGRAPHS: PENNY WINCER

Debbie Blissâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; squidgey knitted pouffe in a tranquil suits-all-homes shade is ideal for lazy Sunday lounging

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HOW TO MAKE… A KNITTED POUFFE MATERIALS Q21 x 50g balls of Debbie Bliss cotton DK in duck egg QPair of long 9mm (US 13) knitting needles or one 9mm (US 13) circular knitting needle QYarn needle QOne kingsize machine washable polyester duvet TENSION 11 sts and 17 rows to 10cm (4") square over moss st using 9mm (US 13) needles and three strands of yarn held and used together. ABBREVIATIONS (UK) k knit p purl sl slip stitch st(s) stitch(es) FINISHED SIZE Approximately 38cm (15") tall and 173cm (68") all around.

Ahhh, this pouffe is just the place to settle down after a long, hard day. Worked in moss stitch, it’s made using three strands of cotton yarn held together to create a luxurious, oversized stitch. If you’re unfamiliar with knitting on such a large scale, make sure you practice first and don’t skip the tension swatch stage. Also, when joining in new balls of yarn, don’t add all three strands at once – try to stagger them so the joins are as unnoticeable as possible. If you don’t have a spare duvet to stuff your pouffe with, don’t worry – you could use old pillows, cushions or even old knitwear. Notes If using a circular needle, work backwards and forwards in rows; do not work in rounds. The piece is worked in turning rows throughout. Do not wrap the sts when turning, but when slipping the st after turning, pull yarn tight to avoid a hole forming. The pouffe will stretch once it’s filled, so the recommended tension does not reflect the finished size. Knitting the pouffe With 9mm (US 13) needles or circular needle and three strands of yarn used together, cast on 67 sts. Moss st row K1, [p1, k1] to end. This row forms moss st and is repeated. Moss st one more row. 1st row (right side) Moss st to last 9 sts, turn.

2nd row Sl 1 purlwise pulling yarn tight (see Notes), moss st to last 9 sts, turn. 3rd row Sl 1 purlwise, moss st last 3 sts, turn. 4th row Sl 1 purlwise, moss st to last 3 sts, turn. 5th row Sl 1 purlwise, moss st to last 9 sts, turn. 6th row Sl 1 purlwise, moss st to last 9 sts, turn. 7th row Sl 1 purlwise, moss st to last 15 sts, turn. 8th row Sl 1 purlwise, moss st to last 15 sts, turn. 9th row Sl 1 purlwise, moss st to end. 10th row Moss st across all sts. These 10 rows form the pattern and are repeated 21 times more, then work 1st to 9th rows again. Cast off all sts in moss st. Making up Close the top and bottom of the piece as follows: working with two strands of yarn and a blunt-tipped needle, insert the needle through the edge st of every 4th row-end, pulling up tightly each time to gather, until there’s only a small hole in the middle. Start to join the cast on edge to cast off edge, but only for about 5cm (2") at each end – if you join any further you won’t be able to insert the duvet. Roll the duvet into a pouffe shape and insert it into the knitted piece, trying to make as even a shape as possible. Continue to join the seam until it’s complete. Now find a cosy corner, sit back and relax.

Knits for You and Your Home This project is taken from Knits for You and Your Home by Debbie Bliss. Mollie Makes readers can buy the book for the special price of £14.99 (RRP £18.99), plus free P&P (UK only). To order, call Quadrille direct on 01256 302699, quoting reference 8KG and your credit card details. www.quadrille.co.uk

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CLOSER LOOK

knitted bliss Yarns, patterns, books, magazines... Is there anything crafty entrepreneur Debbie Bliss can’t do? Words: JESSICA BATEMAN AND CHARLIE MOORBY

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ith a huge back catalogue of patterns, her own range of yarns and even a magazine to her name, Debbie Bliss is one of the undisputed queens of knitting. But, being at the helm of such a yarn empire, does she ever get the opportunity to just sit and knit at home herself? “I find it therapeutic if it’s something really simple, like a scarf,” she tells us. “At the moment I’m knitting dog coats for an upcoming book, but I also like knitting throws, particularly in chunky yarns where the stitches are so magnified, and I love a beret or a beanie hat!” Having been taught by her mother to knit as a child – although she says she “can’t remember it happening” – Debbie kickstarted her career by pitching her patterns to various craft magazines. One editor in particular, Melody Griffiths, picked up on her work, and they went on to collaborate many times over the years. This led to an opportunity to launch her own incredibly Subscribe at molliemakes.com

popular yarns. “Twice a year I’ll go to the Pitti Filatytti trade show in Florence and look at all the new yarns from Italian manufacturers,” she explains. “Sometimes I’ll see something I like straight away, but usually I’ll collaborate with the manufacturer to develop products further.” So with her yarns being used to create items in homes all over the world, what kind of look does Debbie prefer for her own living space? “My ideal interior would contain lots of French greys, creams, and natural linen,” she reveals. “However, my husband Barry’s style is large, dark Elizabethan furniture, so our house is an unusual mix of Tudor chests and tables on grey floorboards. A pink sofa adds a pop of colour.” Debbie’s next project is an exciting new website, Debbie Bliss Online. “It’ll feature my new homeware collection, and also a section called Debbie Bliss edits, where you can buy products I love,” she says. We can’t wait! Sign up for alerts at www.debbieblissonline.com 38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 65


Handmade with love… 132 PAGES OF BEAUTIFUL WEDDING INSPIRATION, IDEAS AND CRAFTY MAKES

£7.99 from all major supermarkets and WHSmiths Or visit www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk/stitch-and-craft-bookazines Or call 0844 848 2852 (UK)+44 1604 251 045 (international)


KRAFT PAPER PHOTOGRAPH: © WWW.ISTOCKPHOTO.COM/ELECTRIC_CRAYON

o t t o A M ay aD

irational Add some insp r quotes to you embroidered t’s n ith Marna Lu w ll a w y la p dis how-to easy hoop art

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How does your garden grow? With beads and crochet f lowers, of course!

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HOW TO MAKE… EMBROIDERED HOOP ART MATERIALS QWooden embroidery hoop, 10cm (4"), 15cm (6") or 23cm (9") QPaint sample pot QPaintbrush QBackground fabric of your choice QPieces of lace, crochet, fabric scraps and paper doilies for embellishing QButtons, beads and sequins in various shapes and sizes

QEmbroidery cotton QNeedle QWater-soluble pen QFabric for backing QRibbon QFabric glue

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We’re big fans of words here at Mollie Makes HQ – whether reading them, pinning them or sticking them up on our walls for inspiration, we love discovering a phrase to lift our day. This project is a great excuse to raid your stash and put to use all those pretty scraps of fabric, buttons, doilies and so on that you’ve been hoarding. Pick something extraspecial with a stitched or printed design for the background – we used a vintage table cloth – and experiment dying crochet and fabric scraps if you want your embellishments to match. If you’re not a fan of your own handwriting, then trace some printed words onto baking paper

and pin to the fabric. Backstitch over the top, then carefully tear away the paper. If you’re stuck for ideas on what words to use, Pinterest is a great resource for finding quotes. Gather some sample paint pots and pick out one of the colours in your fabric or embellishments to paint your hoop with. Paint the hoop and leave it to fully dry. 02 Once dry, place your fabric in the hoop and arrange it so you have a pattern around the edge and sufficient space left to add your writing. Using a water-soluble pen, write a phrase or a few words onto the fabric. Don’t worry if you make a mistake – just spray 01


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it with some water and try again once it’s dry. Roughly placing your embellishments around the edge can help you find the right position. 03 Once you’re happy with your words, backstitch over them in complimentary-coloured embroidery cotton. After stitching all the words lightly spray water over the blue lines to make them vanish, then iron your fabric on the reverse. Pop it back in the hoop and stretch it tight. Pick out your lace, crochet and button embellishments. 04 Arrange your buttons and lace around the edges, then add a bit of fabric glue to hold them in place. Once the glue has dried you can add a few stitches for extra Subscribe at molliemakes.com

security if you wish, using coloured thread for added interest. We used a pale straw yellow for the buttons and added a few seed stitches in a vintage blue-green around the design for extra detail. 05 To finish, unscrew the hoop and lay a square of backing fabric on the wrong side of your work. This

will hide your working and give your hoop a neat back. Trim your fabric around the hoop – we’ve kept it showing outside the edges. 06 Finally, add a piece of ribbon in a complimentary colour to the top of the hoop. Now hang in a visible spot for morning perkme-ups and guaranteed smiles.

Marna Lunt Marna grew up amongst the heather, lapwings and peat of the North Yorkshire Moors, and its stunning seasonal colours and rich textures still inspire her artwork. Her hand-embroidered pieces are made into wall art and statement lampshades, and she creates commissions of amazing landmarks and London cityscapes. www.marnalunt.co.uk

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LOVING

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PHOTOGRAPH: CLAIRE RICHARDSON

OH, YOU PRETTY THINGS! MOODBOARDS & MUSINGS TO INSPIRE US

Hoarding a piece of floral curtain? Turn it into a lovely vintage letter. Find 35 stylish typography projects to perch on your sideboard and pep up your walls in Clare Youngsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; new top-of-thefonts Letter Art book. www.cicobooks.co.uk

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COLLECTING

PHOTOGRAPH: GEORGINA HUMPHREY

Gemma Nemer of Rotherham’s The Button Tin, on finding her most prized possessions on her doorstep I have memories of when I was a little girl, playing with my grandmother’s button tin. It was a rusty old Quality Street tin and I used to spend hours looking through the buttons, sorting them in to colours while my grandmother told me stories about where each button came from: maternity dresses, wedding dresses and night gowns. I loved how each button held a memory. I think my passion for the past and all things vintage started there too. One of my favourite aspects about collecting buttons is finding them homes in nice jars and containers. I have thousands of buttons now, too many to count in fact! I love rummaging in flea markets and antique fairs, I get so excited when I find something, I usually get butterflies in my stomach with the joy of a find! What’s even better now, is that I can take in other people’s collections at my studio. Button tins are left on my doorstep. I think it’s beautiful how people are happy to give me their collections to use 72 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

and share in my sewing projects and workshops. One of my best finds was in my friend’s cellar. We found two very old, dusty wooden crates, full to the brim with thousands of pretty and bizarrely-shaped vintage mother-of-pearl buttons, many in their original boxes. They were so old they were covered in black mould so I spent months painstakingly washing these little treasures in my bath at home. There are stunning shapes among them like triangles, squares, bows, hexagons, all sorts. I now have the enjoyable task of sorting them in to jars, another thing I love to collect! I absolutely adore 1950s pretty plastic buttons, I have a weakness for all things kitsch. I love the mouldings, they were just so ornate back then. A top collecting tip is to keep your buttons organised, show them off and enjoy them. And tell people what you collect as quite often they will find things for you. As they say, one man’s junk is another man’s treasure. www.thebuttontin.com


sPrIngTimE lAmbS

PROJECT FROM 978-4021905223 © 2012 BY E&G CREATES INC.

The weather’s finally set to warm up, and these quirky amigurumi sheep are on their way out to play

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HOW TO MAKE… CROCHET LAMBS MATERIALS Large sheep QApprox 40g/120m DK yarn in cream QApprox 5g/20m 4ply yarn in red for scarf Q4mm (UK 8, US G/6) crochet hook Q2.5mm (UK 12, US B/1 or C/2) crochet hook for scarf Q8mm safety eyes Small sheep QApprox 30g/120m 4ply yarn in cream QApprox 5g/40m 2ply/laceweight yarn in teal for bag Q3mm (UK 10, US C/2 or D/3) crochet hook Q2.25 mm (UK 13, US B/1) crochet hook for bag Q6mm safety eyes QSmall bead for bag Both sheep QOddments of pink yarn for nose markings QSewing needle QSoft toy filling QStitch markers ABBREVIATIONS (UK) st(s) stitch(es) ch chain dc double crochet ss slip stitch tr treble RS right side WS wrong side yrh yarn round hook FINISHED SIZE Large sheep measures approx 12.5cm (5"), small sheep measures approx 10.5cm (4¼") at longest point.

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Ahhh, springtime. How long you take to come around, and how good you look when you finally get here. These playful sheep can be made in any colour and size using the appropriate hook. Tension isn't important – just ensure stitches are dense enough for no stuffing to poke through. Sheep sides (make two) The large sheep is made using a 4mm crochet hook and dk yarn, the small sheep is made a 3mm crochet hook and 4 ply yarn. Start with the front leg. Foundation Ch4 Row 1 (RS) Dc into 2nd ch from hook and each of next 2 ch, turn. [3dc] Row 2 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [3dc] Rows 3-9 Repeat row 2. [3dc] Continuing to start of body Row 10 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, ch13, place stitch marker in last ch, turn. [16sts] Row 11 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [16dc] Row 12 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), 2dc into first dc, dc into each of next 14 dc, 2dc into last dc, turn. [18dc] Rows 13-15 Ch1 (does not count

SPECIAL ABBREVIATIONS Dc2tog double crochet 2 together – (insert hook in next st, yrh and draw loop through) twice, yrh and draw through all 3 loops on hook. Magic ring make a magic ring – hold thread in your hand and wrap working yarn around forefinger twice to create ring, slip ring off your finger and insert hook to pick up first st, ch1, then work the necessary sts

as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [18dc] Row 16 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog, dc into each of next 14 dc, dc2tog, turn. [16dc] Row 17 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog, place marker in st just made, dc into each of next 14 dc, ch5, turn. [20sts] Start of head. Row 18 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), place stitch marker on this ch, dc into each of first 9 sts, dc2tog leaving remaining sts unworked, turn. [10dc] Rows 19-22 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [10dc] Row 23 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each of first 8 dc, dc2tog, turn. [9dc] Row 24 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog, dc into each of next 5 dc, dc2tog, turn. [7dc] Row 25 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each of first 5 dc, dc2tog, turn. [6dc] Row 26 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog, dc into each of next 2 dc, dc2tog. Place stitch marker at the end of this row. [4dc] Fasten off. Turn work and join yarn in marked st of row 17, ch1, miss first st along edge of back, dc into each of next 4 dc, ss to next st. Fasten off.

for round 1 and close the ring tightly by pulling the loose end. NOTES The sheep are made in pieces, sewn together and stuffed. Each sheep is constructed the same way. They each have two identical sides, a gusset for the underbody and inside of legs, a gusset for the top of the head and a muzzle. Ears, tails and accessories are sewn last.

Add back leg to side of body. Turn work and rotate so you can add the back leg along the underside. Row 1 (WS) Join yarn in marked ch of row 10, ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each of first 5 dc of underside, turn. [5dc] Row 2 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [5dc] Row 3 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each of first 3 dc, dc2tog, turn. [4dc] Row 4 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog, dc into each of next 2 dc, turn. [3dc] Rows 5-10 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [3dc] Fasten off. Eyes Position the safety eye on the RS between the last 2-sts (closest to the front of the head) of row 23. Secure in place. When making the second side of the body, position the safety eye onto the WS in the same location. Underbody gusset and inside legs Foundation Ch2 Row 1 (RS) Dc into 2nd ch from hook, turn. [1dc] Row 2 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), 2dc into dc, turn. [2dc] Rows 3-6 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [2dc] Row 7 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), 2dc into first dc, dc into each of next dc, turn. [3dc] Rows 8-12 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [3dc] Row 13 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog, dc into each of next dc, turn. [2dc] Rows 14-18 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [2dc]


Row 19 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog, turn. [1dc] Row 20 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into dc. [1dc] Fasten off. Add front legs. Rotate work and join yarn in end of row 17. Row 1 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into end of row 17, dc into end of row 16, turn. [2dc] Rows 2-10 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [2dc] Fasten off. Rotate work and join yarn in other end of row 17. Repeat Rows 1-10. Fasten off. Add back legs Rotate work and join yarn in end of row 4 on other side. Row 1 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into end of row 4, 1dc into end of rows 5-7, turn. [4dc] Row 2 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog, dc into each dc across, turn. [3dc] Subscribe at molliemakes.com

Rows 3-10 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [3dc] Fasten off. Rotate work and join yarn in other end of row 4. Repeat Rows 1-10. Fasten off. Head gusset Foundation Ch2 Row 1 (RS) Dc into 2nd ch from hook, turn. [1dc] Row 2 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), 2dc into dc, turn. [2dc] Row 3 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into first dc, 2dc into each of next dc, turn. [3dc] Row 4 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into first dc, 2dc into each of next dc, dc into each of next dc, turn. [4dc] Row 5 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into first dc, 2dc into each of next dc, dc into each of next 2 dc, turn. [5dc] Rows 6-8 Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [5dc]

Row 9 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog, dc into each of next dc, dc2tog, turn. [3dc] Fasten off leaving a long tail. Muzzle This is worked in the round. Start with a magic ring. Round 1 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), 5dc into ring, ss to top of first dc to join, pull ring tight. [5dc] Round 2 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each of first 3 dc, 2dc into each of next 2 dc, ss to top of 1st dc to join. [7dc] Round 3 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each of first 3 dc, 2dc into each of next 4 dc, ss to top of 1st dc to join. [11dc] Round 4 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc around, ss to top of 1st dc to join. [11dc] Fasten off leaving a long tail. Ears (make two) Foundation Ch3 Row 1 (RS) Dc into 2nd ch from hook and next ch, turn. [2dc] Row 2 (WS) Ch1 (does not count 38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 75


HOW TO MAKE… CROCHET LAMBS as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [2dc] Row 3 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into first dc, 2dc into next dc, turn. [3dc] Row 4 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into first dc, 2dc into next dc, dc into next dc, turn. [4dc] Row 5 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into first dc, dc2tog, dc into next dc, turn. [3dc] Row 6 (WS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog, dc into next dc, turn. [2dc] Row 7 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc2tog. [1dc] Fasten off leaving a long tail.

Bored of eating grass, the pair went off to find Easter eggs.

Tail Foundation Ch8 Row 1 (RS) Dc into 2nd ch from hook and each ch across. [7dc] Fasten off leaving a long tail. Finishing Pin underside and inner leg section to the respective legs of the sides. Sew carefully around the seams of each leg from the chest to where the back meets the head. Fill the legs with toy stuffing. Sew carefully along the top of the back from where the underbody ends to the stitch marker at the end of row 26. Fill the body with toy stuffing. Sew carefully along the front from where the underbody ends to the stitch marker on row 18. Pin into place the head gusset and sew from the back of the head to the front of the gusset down both sides, leaving open a circle to fit the nose. Stuff the front of the body and the head. Pin the muzzle in place and sew around to secure to the head of the sheep, adding stuffing as you go. Weave in all ends. Pin ears into position on head using image as a guide. Sew carefully around the ears to secure to the head. Weave in ends. 76 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

Pin the tail into position on the body where the stitch marker is on row 17. Using the long tail, sew carefully around the tail to secure. Weave in ends. Using the pink yarn, embroider the mouth and nostrils onto the sheep’s face using the large main image as a guide. Accessories Scarf for large sheep Using 2.5mm crochet hook and red yarn. Foundation Ch71 Row 1 (RS) dc into 2nd ch from hook and each ch across. [70dc] Fasten off and weave in ends. Wrap scarf around neck of sheep and tie in a bow.

Bag for small sheep Using 2.25mm crochet hook and teal yarn. Foundation Ch11. Row 1 (RS) Dc into 2nd ch from hook and each ch across, turn. [10dc] Rows 2-6 Ch3 (counts as tr), tr into next dc and each dc across, turn. [10tr] Row 7 (RS) Ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each tr across, ch40 for strap, ss to first st of row to join. Fasten off and weave in ends. Fold bag so that Rows 1 and 7 meet and, using the same yarn, sew up the sides of the bag. Sew small bead in position on bag and push through st to form closure. Hang round the neck of the sheep.

Girls’ Knit Accessories This project has been translated from Girls’ Knit Accessories: Hair ornament, bag charm, key chain and mobile phone strap (ISBN 978-4021905223), the Japanese publication of E&G CREATES, INC. www.eandgcreates.com/index.html


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Every week you get three new projects to try, interviews, videos, wallpapers, top vintage ďŹ nds, book reviews, our fave blogs and much more! Out every Friday on Newsstand for iPad


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The Simple Things Featuring a gorgeous blend of food, interiors, gardening, travel and wellbeing, it’s about taking time to enjoy the simple pleasures in life. Our readers say “The whole issue is a joy! I found myself fully engrossed from start to finish.” @thegreengal

NEST | HOW WE LIVE

CAKE IN THE HOUSE

COMPETITION

A BLANK CANVAS

THREE SEWING M AC H I N E S TO WIN!

THE MEDLEY OF THOUGHTFULLY CHOSEN OBJECTS IN LUCY FENTON’S HOME TELLS A VERY PERSONAL TALE

A light sponge drizzled with sweet lemon syrup. This timeless teatime loaf is just impossible to resist

PLUS TWELVE RUNNER-UP PRIZES

Words: SALLY COULTHARD Photography: FELIX FOREST / LIVING INSIDE

LEMON DRIZZLE CAKE 110g unsalted butter, softened 175g caster sugar* 175g self-raising flour, sifted 1 tsp baking powder A pinch of salt 2 large eggs 4 tbsp whole milk Finely grated zest of 2 unwaxed lemons For the topping: 100g caster sugar Juice of 2 lemons

JANOME 525S MACHINE WIN!ASEWING

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (160° fan), 350°F, gas 4. Put all the cake ingredients, except the lemon zest, into a large mixing bowl and, using an electric hand whisk, thoroughly combine until the mixture is creamy and has a dropping consistency. 2. Fold through the lemon zest and pour the cake batter out into a 1kg loaf pan that has been lined with parchment paper. Level the top with a palette knife and bake for 30–35 mins, or until an inserted skewer comes out clean. 3. In the meantime, stir the lemon juice and sugar together in a jug to make the drizzle topping. Once the cake has baked, remove it from the oven and stab it all over with a skewer to create lots of fine holes for the syrup to soak through. Pour the lemon syrup over the hot cake and leave the cake to cool completely in its pan on top of a wire rack, before turning out.

MORE MARCH WISH LIST

F R O M N OV I C E TO S E A M S T R E S S – D I S C OV E R T H E P L E A S U R E S O F S T I TC H I N G I T YO U R S E L F All you need to get started with stitching is a needle, fabric and thread, but if – like us – you dream of whipping up handmade homewares and head-turning tailoring worthy of The Great British Sewing Bee, you’ll need a little help from a sewing machine. We have three beginner-friendly machines to give away courtesy of Janome. As well as being the ideal tool for making our peg bag on page 60, the Model 525S (worth £249) is the machine of choice on the upcoming second series of Sewing Bee. It’s perfect for new stitchers and those with more experience. The Model 525S handles all types of fabric well and the jam-proof drop-in bobbin system ensures smooth, trouble-free stitching. This machine has a range of stitches and features to cope with general sewing tasks. Stitch selection is by dial – just choose the letter that matches the stitch and then start sewing. It’s that easy.

RECIPE FROM DELICIOUSLY VINTAGE by Victoria Glass (Ryland Peters & Small), photography by Isobel Wield. To buy Deliciously Vintage at the special price of £11.99 including P&P (RRP £16.99) call 01256 302699 and quote the reference GLR 9NJ. Offer ends 30th April 2014.

The automatic one-step buttonhole produces perfect buttonholes in one easy move, while the automatic needle threader takes the strain out of threading the needle. There’s plenty of accessory storage and a hard cover for protection too, making it ideal for transporting to classes and workshops. For more on the Model 525S and other sewing machines in Janome’s extensive range, visit www.janome.co.uk. How to enter Enter online at www.thesimplethings.com/ janome by 11th April 2014 for a chance to win one of three Janome Model 525S sewing machines. Each winner will also receive a copy of Beginner’s Guide to Sewing (worth £9.99), featuring 28 projects to make. Twelve runners-up will receive a copy of Beginner’s Guide to Sewing. For full competition terms and conditions, turn to page 129. 12

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* So named because the granules of this fine sugar are small enough to pass through a caster, or sugar sprinkler. Don’t have any in the cupboard? You can make your own by briefly grinding granulated sugar in a food processor.

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www.thesimplethings.com †This offer is for new print subscribers only subscribing by Direct Debit. You will receive 3 issues for £9.98 and then continue on a 6 monthly Direct Debit of £24.49 thereafter Full details of the Direct Debit guarantee are available on request. Prices correct at point of print and subject to change. For full terms and conditions please visit: www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk/terms. Offer ends 31st December 2014. Subscriptions will start on the next available issue.


y a D s ' Mum t e u q u o B Rustle up felt blooms for not one, but two ideas for Mothering Sunday gifts that will last and last


No f lower food required. Just add a pretty vase.

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HOW TO MAKE… FELT BLOOMS MATERIALS QOne strip of felt, 76 x 5cm (30 x 2"), or multiple strips cut to 5cm deep QFour pieces of green felt, 5 x 7.5cm (2 x 3") QGreen embroidery thread QCovered floral wire, 25.5cm (10") QOne button with large holes, 5cm (2") in diameter QBinder clips QPinking shears QGlue gun QCrewel needle 80 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

Treat your mum to a gorgeous gift that’ll sit pretty on her kitchen table for months to come. Make these speedy felt flowers up in contrasting bold colours for an eye-catching display and play around with varying the width and length of the strips, or the depth and breadth of your snips, to switch up the final outcome. As well as gathering them in bouquets you could try them as brooches, or use instead of bows to add a 3D touch to gift wrapping. 01 Fold the large strip of felt in half twice and secure the bottom edge with binder clips to keep the layers together. Alternatively, stack

up multiple felt strips in sets of four and clasp at the bottom. 02 Trim along one long edge of the felt strip with pinking shears. Use sharp scissors to snip between each zigzag, fringing the fabric through each layer. Snip very close to the base of the strip without cutting all the way through. 03 Unfold the fabric and, starting at one end, roll the fringed felt into a coil, gluing the base of the strip underneath the flower to secure it as it takes shape. If you're using multiple strips rather than one long one, just add them alongside, securing with a little fabric glue. Keep going until you have coiled and glued it all in place.

04 Cut two green felt leaf shapes using the template on page 91. 05 Thread your needle with approx 61cm (24") of green embroidery thread. Layer matching leaves together and backstitch around the outside edges to join them. Try different stitches, too! 06 Glue the leaves to the underside of the main flower. 07 Thread a piece of floral wire through the holes of a button, leaving a 2.5cm (1") tail. Twist the tail under the button and around the wire, securing it. Glue the button to the underside of your flower. Once you’ve made several, gather them together in a vase for the prettiest everlasting posy.


Turning Heads Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re guaranteed to make an entrance in this striking statement headpiece


Get rolling – this felty creation is easy to rustle up. 02

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HOW TO MAKE… A FELT FASCINATOR MATERIALS QOne long strip of felt, 2.7m x 2.5cm (3yrds x 1"), or multiple strips cut to 2.5cm deep that you can add in, one-by-one. Q1 felt circle, 7.5cm (3") diameter Q1 barrette clip, 5cm (2") QFabric glue QHot glue gun QScissors

We love the many weddings and outdoor bashes that the warmer months bring, but all that pressure to knock out a brand new, gorgeous outfit for each one can get a bit much, right? That’s where this high-impact (and no-sew) hair accessory comes in. Using a similar technique to the blooms on page 79, you can whip it up in less than half an hour, making it a great last-minute adornment for any party. It’s easy on your purse strings too – all you need is felt, fabric glue and a hair clip. 01 Use sharp scissors to fringe the felt strip or strips, snipping very close to the base of the strip (but

82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

not all the way through) about every 6mm (¼") along the length of the felt. You may find it quicker to fold the felt in half and do two layers at once. 02 Roll the fringed felt into a coil, securing the base of the strip underneath the flower with fabric glue as it begins to take shape. If you're using multiple strips rather

than one long one, just add them alongside the previous one, securing with a little fabric glue. 03 Make sure the felt circle is the same diameter as your flower. 04 Hot glue the felt circle to the underside of the flower and stitch or glue the barrette clip to the base. Now pop it on at the most jaunty angle you can muster.

Fabric Blooms These two projects feature in Fabric Blooms by Megan Hunt (ISBN 978-1454708018). To pre-order the book for the special price of £9.74 (RRP £10.84) plus P&P, please call 01273 488005 or visit www.thegmcgroup.com quoting code R4380 before 30 June 2014.


Geek Chic

PROJECT FROM 978-4021905254 Š 2012 BY E&G CREATES INC.

Rock the librarian look with this retro-inspired crochet cover-up

MAKE IN SIZES 6-16 ON OUR BLOG!


HOW TO MAKE… A CROCHETED VEST MATERIALS QDrop Baby Alpaca Silk (70% alpaca. 30% silk, 50g/167m) six balls in Medium Grey (8465) QOne 5cm (2") toggle Q4mm (UK 8, US G/6) crochet hook Q5mm (UK 6, US H/8) crochet hook TENSION To make size small (UK 8-10), yarn used crochets to this tension: 20tr and 9.4 rows to measure 10x10cm (4x4") over pattern using a 4mm hook. For larger sizes, see the chart on our blog www. molliemakes.com FINISHED SIZE Laid flat, this vest measures 78cm (30½") x 41cm (16in) excluding edging. Edging measures 1.5cm (½"). For larger sizes, see the chart on our blog www. molliemakes.com ABBREVIATIONS (UK) st(s) stitch(es) sp(s) space(s) ch chain ch-sp chain space dc double crochet ss slip stitch tr treble RS right side WS wrong side yrh yarn round hook tr2tog treble 2 together – (yrh, insert hook in next st, yrh and pull up loop, yrh and draw through 2 loops) twice, yrh and draw through all loops on hook

84 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

SPECIAL ABBREVIATIONS FPtr front post treble yrh, insert hook from the front of your work to the back, around the back of the indicated st and back through to the front, yrh and draw round the back of the post of the indicated st, (yrh and draw through 2 loops) twice. BPtr back post treble yrh, insert hook from the back of your work to the front, around the front of the indicated st and back through to the back, yrh and draw round the front of the post of the indicated st, (yrh and draw through 2 loops) twice. 5-tr cluster (yrh, insert hook in st indicated, yrh and pull up loop, yrh and draw through 2 loops) 5 times, inserting the hook in the same st each time, yrh and draw through all 6 loops on hook, ch1 to complete st. R-FP cluster Miss 2 sts, FPtr round each of next 2 sts, tr into each 2 sts just missed, working behind FPtrs. L-FP cluster Miss 2 sts, tr into each of next 2 sts, FPtr round each of 2 sts missed, working in front of trs. R-BP cluster Miss 2 sts, BPtr round each of next 2 sts, tr into each of 2 stsmissed, working in front of BPtrs. L-BP cluster Miss 2 sts, tr into each of next 2 sts, BPtr round each of 2 sts missed, working behind trs. Cable st Miss 3 sts, BPtr round each of next 3 sts, tr into each of 3 sts just missed, working in front of BPtrs.

We’ll never get bored of a bit of librarian chic. From flowery dresses and brogues to nerdy retro knits, our wardrobe reference points are often right out of Granny's closet. This crocheted vest can be made for UK sizes 6-16 by cleverly varying the tension to produce the required width and length. Visit our blog www. molliemakes.com for a chart and explanation on how to do this. The vest is made in one piece, working from front edge to front edge. Foundation Using a 4mm hook, ch75. Row 1 (RS) tr into 5th ch from hook, tr into next ch, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 6 ch, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 16 ch, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 6 ch, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 ch, (ch1, miss next ch, tr into next ch) 17 times, turn. [72sts] Row 2 (WS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 16 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 10 tr, R-BP cluster, tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [72sts] Row 3 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 4 tr, L-FP cluster, tr into each of next 8 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 17 times working final tr into top of beg ch3, turn. [72sts] Row 4 (WS) ch4 (counts as tr, ch1), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 16 times, tr into

each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 6 tr, R-BP cluster, tr into each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [73sts] Row 5 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 8 tr, L-FP cluster, tr into each of next 4 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 17 times, ch1, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [74sts] Row 6 (WS) ch4 (counts as tr, ch1), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 17 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, R-BP cluster, tr into each of next 10 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [75sts] Row 7 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 4 tr, 5-tr cluster into next tr, tr into each of next 7 tr, FPtr round each of next 2 tr, tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 18 times, ch1, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [76sts] Row 8 (WS) ch4 (counts as tr, ch1), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 18 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, L-BP cluster, tr into each of next 10 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [77sts]


Row 9 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 8 tr, R-FP cluster, tr into each of next 4 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 19 times, (ch1, tr into top of beg ch-3) twice, turn. [80sts] Row 10 (WS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 20 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 6 tr, L-BP cluster, tr into each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Row 11 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 4 tr, R-FP cluster, tr into each of next 8 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 21 times working last tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Row 12 (WS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 20 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 10 tr, L-BP cluster, tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Row 13 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, FPtr round each of next 2 tr, tr into each of next 7 tr, 5-tr cluster into next tr, tr into each of next 4 tr ch1, miss next ch, FPtr

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round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 21 times working last tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Row 14 (WS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 20 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 10 tr, R-BP cluster, tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Row 15 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 4 tr, L-FP cluster, tr into each of next 8 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 21 times working last tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Fasten off. (Left front completed) Row 16 (WS) Join yarn in 18th chsp, ch3, tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) twice, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 6 tr, R-BP cluster, tr into each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [44sts] Row 17 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 8 tr, L-FP cluster, tr into each of next 4 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp, ch1, tr2tog leaving beg ch-3 unworked, turn. [42sts] Row 18 (WS) ch3, tr2tog over next ch-sp and next tr, tr into each of

We'll be donning our biggest pair of specs when we debut this vest.

38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 85


HOW TO MAKEâ&#x20AC;Ś A CROCHETED VEST next 4 sts, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, R-BP cluster, tr into each of next 10 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [40sts] Row 19 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 4 tr, 5-tr cluster into next tr, tr into each of next 7 tr, FPtr round each of next 2 tr, tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, tr into top of tr2tog in previous row leaving beg ch-3 unworked, turn. [40sts] Row 20 (WS) ch4 (counts as tr, ch1), tr into same st, ch1, tr into next ch-sp, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, L-BP cluster, tr into each of next 10 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [43sts] Row 21 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 8 tr, R-FP cluster, tr into each of next 4 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) twice, ch1, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [44sts] Row 22 (WS) ch4 (counts as tr, ch1), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) twice, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 6 tr, L-BP cluster, tr into each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of 86 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

beg ch-3, turn. [45sts] The underarm section is complete. Before continuing with Row 23, work must be extended with a ch to shoulder height. Attach a new piece of yarn into the top of beg ch-3 of Row 22, ch35, fasten off. Row 23 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 4 tr, R-FP cluster, tr into each of next 8 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 3 times, ch1, miss beg ch-3, tr into first ch of extension ch just made, (ch1, miss next ch, tr into next ch) 17 times, turn. [80sts] Rows 24-27 Repeat Rows 12-15, do not fasten off. Row 28 (WS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 20 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 6 tr, R-BP cluster, tr into each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Row 29 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 8 tr, L-FP cluster, tr into each of next 4 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 21 times, working last tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Row 30 (WS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 20 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, R-BP cluster, tr into each of next

10 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Row 31 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 4 tr, 5-tr cluster into next tr, tr into each of next 7 tr, FPtr round each of next 2 tr, tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 21 times, working last tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Row 32 (WS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 20 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, L-BP cluster, tr into each of next 10 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Row 33 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 8 tr, R-FP cluster, tr into each of next 4 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 21 times, working last tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [80sts] Rows 34-35 Repeat Rows 10-11 Rows 36-45 Repeat Rows 24-33. Rows 46-64 Repeat Rows 10-28. Row 65 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 8 tr, L-FP cluster, tr into each of next 4 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 19 times, ch1, miss next tr, tr2tog


over next ch-sp and top of beg ch3, turn. [78sts] Row 66 (WS) ch3, (tr into next ch-sp) twice, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 18 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, R-BP cluster, tr into each of next 10 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [76sts] Row 67 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 4 tr, 5-tr cluster into next tr, tr into each of next 7 tr, FPtr round each of next 2 tr, tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 17 times, ch1, miss next tr, tr2tog over next ch-sp and last tr leaving beg ch-3 unworked, turn. [73sts] Row 68 (WS) ch3, tr into next chsp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 17 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, L-BP cluster, tr into each of next 10 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [73sts] Row 69 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 8 tr, R-FP cluster, tr into each of next 4 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 16 times, ch1, miss next tr, tr2tog over next ch-sp and last tr leaving beg ch-3 unworked, turn. [72sts] Row 70 (WS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, Subscribe at molliemakes.com

tr into next ch-sp) 16 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 6 tr, L-BP cluster, tr into each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, Cable st, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [72sts] Row 71 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 4 tr, R-FP cluster, tr into each of next 8 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 17 times, working last tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [72sts] Row 72 (WS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into next ch-sp, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 16 times, tr into each of next 3 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 10 tr, L-BP cluster, tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, BPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, tr into top

of beg ch-3, turn. [72sts] Row 73 (RS) ch3 (counts as tr), tr into each of next 2 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 2 tr, FPtr round each of next 2 tr, tr into next 12 tr, ch1, miss next ch, FPtr round each of next 6 tr, ch1, miss next ch, tr into each of next 3 tr, (ch1, miss next tr, tr into next ch-sp) 17 times, working last tr into top of beg ch-3, turn. [72sts] Front Edging Change to 5mm crochet hook Row 74 (WS), ch1 (does not count as st), dc into same st and each of next 8 sts, miss 1 st, (dc into each of next 9 sts, miss next st) 6 times, dc into each of next 2 sts, turn. [65dc] Round 75 (RS), ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across. [65dc] Fasten off. Second front edging Row 1 (WS) With WS facing, attach yarn to the bottom corner of the other front, working along the 38 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 87


HOW TO MAKEâ&#x20AC;Ś A CROCHETED VEST starting ch, using a 5mm hook, ch1 (does not count as st), dc into first ch and each of next 8 ch, miss 1 ch, (dc into each of next 9 ch, miss next ch) 6 times, dc into each of next 2 ch, turn. [65dc] Row 2 (RS), ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across. [65dc] Fasten off.

"I do like seeing my wool put to good use â&#x20AC;&#x201C; this one's a beaut!"

Bottom edging Row 1 (WS) With WS facing, attach yarn to the bottom corner of edging, working along the ends of rows, using a 5mm hook, ch1 (does not count as st), dc into end of each edging row, 2dc into end of each row across to other edging, dc into end of each edging row, turn. [150dc] Row 2 (RS), ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across. [150dc] Fasten off. Making up Before working the neckline and armhole edging the vest needs to be joined at the shoulder seams. Fold the vest along row 19 and row 55 so that the armholes line up and the front edges meet. Using a new piece of yarn, sew the shoulder seams together evenly joining the ends of rows 10-15 to the end of rows 23-28 and the ends of rows 46-51 to the end of rows 59-64. [6 rows joined each side] Neckline edging Row 1 (WS) With WS facing, attach yarn to the top corner of the edging, working along the ends of rows, using a 5mm hook,

Knit of Aran Pattern This crochet project has been excusively translated from Knit of Aran Pattern, (ISBN 978-4021905254), the Japanese publication of E&G CREATES, INC. www.eandgcreates.com/index.html

88 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

ch1 (does not count as st), dc into end of each edging row, 2dc into ends of first 9 rows to shoulder seam, dc into seam, 2dc into ends of each row across back of neck to opposite shoulder seam, dc into seam, 2dc into ends of next 9 rows, dc into end of each edging row, turn. [78dc] Row 2 (RS), ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, turn. [78dc] Row 3 (WS), ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc across, do not turn. [78dc] Rotate work to continue final round of edging round entire garment. Ch1, dc into each dc down front edge, ch1, dc into each dc across bottom edge, ch1, dc into each dc up other front edge, ss to turning ch of row 3 of neckline edging. Turn to finish. Buttonhole Ch5, ss to 4th dc down front edge. Fasten off. Armhole edging (both sides) Round 1 (WS) With WS facing, join

yarn in row 19/55, using a 5mm hook, ch1, dc into same row, 2dc into ends of next 3 rows, miss first st of next row, (dc into each of next 9 sts, miss 1 st) 3 times, dc into each of next 4 sts, working back down the other side, miss 1st st, dc into each of next 5 sts, miss 1 st (dc into each of next 9 sts, miss 1 st) twice, dc into each of next 7 sts, miss next 2 sts, 2dc into ends of next 3 rows, dc into end of next row, ss to beg ch-1 to join, turn. [75dc] Round 2 (RS), ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc around, turn. [75dc] Round 3 (WS), ch1 (does not count as st), dc into each dc around, turn. [75dc] Fasten off. Finishing Sew toggle to top corner of your front piece, making sure it's correctly positioned opposite the buttonhole. Weave in all the loose ends using a large needle and lightly block vest to size.


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MAKES

TEMPLATES All the shapes for this issue’s makes. Unless otherwise stated, templates are shown at 100%.You can find the full-size templates ready to download from www.molliemakes.com

YOUR FREE GIFT BY SILKIE LLOYD PAGE 7

01

02

Purse Cut two pieces

03

HOW TO MAKE A ZIP PURSE 01 Using the template provided, cut out two purse shapes from your fabric. Pin your zip face-down on one piece. Sew in place by hand or use a zipper foot on your machine. Open it out and press. 02 Place your second piece of fabric over your zipper, right sides together. Sew as you did in step one. Open out, press and unzip part way. 03 Hand or machine tack your trim in place along the front edge of your purse. Fold your fabric in half, matching seams. 04 Sew all the way around the outside edge. Turn your purse right sides out, pushing out the seam edges. Fill with coins!

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. The copyright for these templates belongs to the originators of the project. They work hard to create projects for you to make and love, so please don’t re-sell or distribute their work without permission from Mollie Makes. We don’t mind if you make a copy for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please pass on this information if you make a copy for a friend. Copyright law protects creative work and unauthorised copying is illegal. We appreciate your help.

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MAKES

STARBURST DUNGAREES BY KIRSTY HARTLEY PAGE 41

FIND FULL-SIZE TEMPLATES ON OUR BLOG molliemakes.com

O 6-12 months O 1-2 yrs O 2-3 yrs O 3-4 yrs O 4-5 yrs O 5-6 yrs

Tuck

Facing Centre back

Centre front

Side Strap Photocopy at 200% Cut two

Dungarees Photocopy at 400%

Turn back line

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. The copyright for these templates belongs to the originators of the project. They work hard to create projects for you to make and love, so please donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t re-sell or distribute their work without permission from Mollie Makes. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind if you make a copy for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please pass on this information if you make a copy for a friend. Copyright law protects creative work and unauthorised copying is illegal. We appreciate your help.

92 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38


MAKES

Pocket Photocopy at 200% Cut two

Bib Photocopy at 200% Cut one

FLOWER COLLAR BY EMMA BOSANKO PAGE 34 Photocopy at 200%

Collar Cut two

FELT BLOOMS BY MEGAN HUNT PAGE 79 Photocopy at 200%

Photocopy at 200%

FIND FULL-SIZE TEMPLATES ON OUR BLOG molliemakes.com

Leaf Cut two in green

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. The copyright for these templates belongs to the originators of the project. They work hard to create projects for you to make and love, so please donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t re-sell or distribute their work without permission from Mollie Makes. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind if you make a copy for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please pass on this information if you make a copy for a friend. Copyright law protects creative work and unauthorised copying is illegal. We appreciate your help.

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MAKES

CLOUD CUSHION MOBILE BY DIANA STAINTON PAGE 16 Photocopy at 200%

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Raindrop Cut two for each raindrop

Cloud Cut two in white

Cheek Cut two in red

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. The copyright for these templates belongs to the originators of the project. They work hard to create projects for you to make and love, so please donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t re-sell or distribute their work without permission from Mollie Makes. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind if you make a copy for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please pass on this information if you make a copy for a friend. Copyright law protects creative work and unauthorised copying is illegal. We appreciate your help.

94 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38


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MAKE IT Crochet flowers spring wreath <Lucky Jackson appliqué hoop <Knitted bracelets <Modflowers retro cat face cushion <Baby bear booties <

SPRING FLING BRIGHT IDEAS TO CRAFT A SEASON OF COLOUR

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Stitch our flower corsage with six ditsy fabrics and a vintage button - in full bloom!

ON SALE 11 APRIL 2014


Stationery designer Abigail Warner ponders the start of the wedding season

Name: Abigail Warner Occupation: Designer and leopard

PHOTOGRAPHS: LEFT COLUMN: TOP & CENTRE: HOLLY BOOTH; RIGHT COLUMN: TOP: EMMA CASE; CENTRE & BOTTOM: DEBS IVELJA

print enthusiast

The design world seems to come alive in spring and I find myself inspired by all things fresh and seasonal. My work is heavily influenced by my travels, interiors and fashion, so I’m excited to see the new catwalk collections and set about translating the trends into my designs. I’ve just returned from my favourite spring retail show in London. It was fabulous and exhausting – I couldn’t wait to get home and have a long soak in my bath with a glass of wine! I met new stockists and lined up some wonderful collaborations. The wedding season

i’m looking forward to hosting print design workshops at my pop-up shop has become less defined over the years and, although I’d say it now starts in November, it’s during springtime that we’re busiest with designs. Recently I’ve had commissions involving oh-so-on-trend feathers and birds, combined with whimsical typography, which the festival-going boho enthusiast in me loves. I’m also looking forward to developing my hand lettering skills this year, and hosting print design workshops at my pop-up shop in Derby.

Paris in the springtime inspires some new designs.

Currents Follow Abigail on Instagram at @amlwarner and take a look inside her pretty pastel world at www.abigailwarner.com

Next issue: So Worth Loving’s Eryn Eddy 98 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 38

A creative collaboration on the theme of a Cornish elopement…

Losing myself in Donna Tartt’s Goldfinch Listening to Death Cab for Cutie Thinking about walking barefoot and never-ending summers Eating too many Cadbury Creme Eggs (what bikini diet?)


closet tours top trends where to shop DIY projects

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