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The 6 Asia Pacific Conference on Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights YOGYAKARTA 19 - 22 OCTOBER 2011

Black Berry Increasing Opportunities to Have Sex in Thai LGBT Communities Page 3 Julia Suryakusuma Page 7

APCRSHR See You In

Saturday, 22 October 2011

in Focus

Today is the last day of the 6th Asia Pacific Conference on Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights. At the end, it seems that there many participants who are wondering, where will the next conference be? The answer is the Philippines. Yes, we will have the 7th Asia Pacific Conference on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Manila, Philippines, and hosted by The Philippines NGO Caouncil (PNGOC) on Population, Health, and Welfare. As said by the International Steering Committee (ISC) member, Eden Divinagracia, Ph.D, Friday (21/10), the next conference tentatively will take place in SMX Convention Centre which is located next to Mall of Asia, the largest shopping center in Asia. "But the next conference will not be as usual, because we will hold it in early February 2014. This is to respect the 3rd Women Deliver Conference, which will be held in 2013," she said.

Eden also stated, the committe is optimistic to have more participants come to the next conference. It would be a "reunion and nostalgic" momment for the participants, because the first conference was held in Manila. In the closing ceremony of the 6th APCRSHR, there will be a hand-over session from Prof. Dr. Muhadjir Darwin, MPA, as the Chair of current organizing committee to Atty. Zenaida Reyes, the Chair of PNGOC. On the other hand, Prof. Terence Hull, Ph.D, said that each conference is always unique and special. This one was the only APCRSHR which provided a large space for the youth to speak up and share their minds. "It has not happened at other events, where youth were only given a small part." Terence also hopes that the next conference will adress more particular population's issues. For instance, the influence of global warming in determining the future world's population.

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Indonesia Faces Population Problems The Minister of Health of Republic of Indonesia, Dr. Endang Rahayu Sedyaningsih, MPH, Dr.PH, was giving a keynote speech on the second day of the 6th Asia Pacific Conference on Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights, Friday (21/10). She said, as the fourth most populous country in the world, Indonesia has significant part in the global reproductive health issues. But on the other hand, Indonesia has many challenges to be deal with, such as the high maternal mortality rate and HIV/AIDS.

Without extraordinary efforts, Indonesia will not be able to solve the problem and impossible to achieve the MDGs (Millennium Development Goals). To get closer to the goal, Indonesia’s government has launched several initiatives to improve maternal health, with the scheme called “Jampersal” (Jaminan Persalinan/Maternal Insurance) Program. This program provides free antenatal care, as well as delivery care in health facility, post natal care, and post delivery family planning.

According to the Endang’s speech, the maternal mortality rate is high because of the early marriage. In 2007, maternal mortality rate was estimated at 228 per 100.000 live births and keep raise until today. “Most of Indonesian women, particularly in rural area, married in the age under 20 years old,” she said. At the present, the percentage of early marriage is reaching 30 %. The average age for Indonesian women to become mother or have the first pregnancy is 21. Basically, all family planning services were fully subsidized by the government for all Indonesian women. But Indonesia’s health system faces capacity problems in reaching remote areas or isolated islands. The provision of comprehensive services is hampered by a lack of transport and communication infrastructure. In addition, the national program does not have the capacity to address the diverse family planning needs of the different ethnic and religious groups, or to do so in various languages.

l ria o t i Ed The 6th APCRSHR in Focus Editorial Team

Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Muhadjir Darwin, MPA Dr. Anna Marie Wattie Reporters: Brigitta Bestari Puspita Dina Listiorini Thalita Evani Hindarto Wenny Arifani Novi Wulandari Teguh Budi Harto Yoga Putra Erniatun Hartini Photographers: Yoga Putra Prof. Dr. Mark Woodward Erniatun Hartini Editors: Yoga Putra Prof. Dr. Mark Woodward Lay-out and Design: Sampur Ariyanto Printed by: PANIRA OFFSET

Field Visit Report: LSM Kebaya LSM Kebaya is an advocacy organization for Transgender Living with HIV and AIDS. This organization located in Jalan Gowongan Lor, Yogyakarta. Some participants of the 6th Asia Pacific Conference on Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights arrived there at 14.00. Ms. Vinolia Wakidjo, Head of LSM Kebaya welcomed the participants. She introduced LSM Kebaya. The organization concerns to the activities in helping the transgendered. This organization was established on 18th December, 2011 in Yogyakarta. The founder realized that transgendered are minority in their society. Often, people treated them as stranger. There are also a stigma that transgender always identical with sexuallyactive person and always disobey the society’s rule. That is why people hate transgendered so much. Vinolia, who did not want the transgendered become minority, then established this organization. Here, Vinolia and the member of

this organization teach the transgendered members some lessons so they can get a job and make a better living. They also help the transgendered who have HIV/AIDS. They give psychosocial support to them, and assist them when they do medical check up at hospital. LSM Kebaya also helps them to buy the medicine.

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Black Berry Increasing Opportunities to Have Sex in Thai LGBT Communities The theme of satellite session 2 of the 6th Asia Pacific Conference on Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights was "The Impact of Mobile Phones on Gender and Sexuality in Changing Asia." Participants discussed the use of telecommunication devices as an element of sexual behavior. The use of communications technology for sexual purposes is common in LGBT communities in Thailand. Narupon Duangwises from Thailand explained that many transgendered Thais prefer to contact straight males by Black Berry (BB) PIN. "The transgender usually uses a fake name, pretending to be a girl, and talk mostly about beauty and celebrities," Narupon said. This caused a misunderstanding as the straight male does not know the true identity of the transgender. BB is used to make connections and also to make it easier to have sex.

Gays also often uses BB to find sexual partners, but they prefer to use social network web sites, such as Facebook. Masculinity is

On October 31, 2011the 7th billionth person will be born.

important in their interactions. Lesbians are interested in details about the lives of their BB contacts.

Let the Girls Decide

By : Frank Cimatu (The Philippine Daily Inquirer)

Have you every wondered what your number is? uzanne Ehlers, president and CEO of Population Action International, who is coordinating their booth at the conference, explained that her organization developed an "app" called "What's Your Number?" that can be downloaded from their website www.populationaction.org that tells you what "your number" is among the nearly seven billion of us now living on Planet Earth. Ehlers explained that; "We were interested not only in saying that there are too many people. We are also interested in highlighting human rights and equity." The "What's Your Number?" app also allows people to input their location on the map and also their stories. So how would you know where your number would be? At the Indonesia launch of "7 Billion Actions: A Global Movement for All Humanity" held Thursday night at Hotel Sheraton, Ms. Nobuko Horibe, UNFPA regional director for Asia and the Pacific, said counting by billions is a recent phenomenon. "The first billion was in 1804 and gradually and only recently did our population grow." She added that if you are in your 50s, you belong to the 3rd billion and if you are in your 40s or 30s, you are among the 4th billion. Horibe added that the planet will reach the 9 billion population mark in 2050, at approximately the same time that the population of the Asia Pacific stabilizes. Horibe said that the UNFPA 7 Billion campaign of the UNFPA not just about numbers but also but our stories and what we have achieved. Through their People who log on to their website 7billionactions.org, can participate in the celebration of the 7 billionth person and tell their own stories as well.

At one of the satellite sessions held on the second day of the conference Denty Piawai Nastitie explained that living in a patriarchal society can be difficult for Indonesian women. Fathers and husbands make decisions for their wives and daughters. Too often, women are treated as powerless domestic partners and are not able to make decisions for themselves. Often girls are forced into early marriage and not allowed to continue their educations if they become pregnant. The forum agreed that early marriage is not a good option. Statistically, about 44% of underage marriages result in domestic violence. There must be a better option. One concrete solution would be give girls the opportunity to speak their minds. They have rights about their lives, bodies, and fertility. Let the girls decide!

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6th Asia Pacific Conference on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights YOUTH DECLARATION 19th October 2011 WHEREAS, young people (10-24) comprise a significant demographic sector of Asia and Pacific which accounts for half of the world's young population and some 850 milion in the region, making us an important asset and source of opportunity for national and regional development; WHEREAS, the young people engage in early sex of which most are unprotected and the adolescent birth rate is 53.7 for South Asia and 40.4 in South East Asia. Young girls and young women are at more at risk of experiencing pregnancy-related complications, and of engaging in unsafe abortion, thus further increasing maternal mortality; WHEREAS, young people are engaged in high risk behaviour that lead to issues on sexual and reproductive health such as early pregnancies, STIs including HVI and AIDS, unsafe abortion, gender-based violence. This high risk behaviour can be attributed to lack of comprehensive sexuality education and access to reliable and unbiased source of information and youth friendly services. WHEREAS, developing adequate accessible and quality Youth-Friendly Health Care Services is essential in lowering maternal mortality of young women especially aged 20 years and below and promoting every young persons' Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights as stated in the ICPD. WHEREAS, there is an increasing number of STI, HIV, and AIDS cases among young people and young women are infected earlier than young men. Young girls and women are put at greater risks because of the biological factors, poor information and services, women-centric gender-based violence, and lack of economic and social opportunities. The prevalence of high risk behaviours has also driven the epidemic; WHEREAS, there are no specific budget allocation for ASRH initiatives in government programs, if there is, its most often lumped with other general health projects which almost makes adolescent reproductive health invisible or insignificant; WHEREAS, the youth should actively participate in specifying budget items for Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health to ensure efficient and effective utilization of limited funds and resources to achieve progressive development of maternal, child and adolescent health; WHEREAS, there are limited venues for youth to contribute solutions and to create meaningful youth-adult partnership in all aspects of planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluating programs and policies that directly affect our lives;

collectively in addressing SRH issues of the young people. We urge the government to provide reliable data and address the gaps on young people's situation particularly on Sexual Reproductive Health leading to policy directions and budget allocation. We urge the government to provide venue for genuine participation of the young people in the policy making, program implementation, monitoring and evaluation. We strongly urge the government to implement comprehensive sexuality education in the curriculum. We urge the government to provide youth friendly services that are cost effective, gender sensitive and rights based. We urge the government to ensure that service providers are adequately trained in providing youth-friendly services.

We the delegates of Youth Day in 6th Asia Pacific Conference on Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights commit to: We commit to complement the efforts of the government, civil society and development partners in promoting comprehensive sexuality education and youth-friendly services through our peer education programs targeted to our fellow young especially the key populations. We commit to strengthen programs provided by our organizations especially in the provision of ASRH information and services through our teen centres, youth hubs, one-stop shops and other existing institutional facilities. We commit to continuously lobby and advocate for policies addressing the sexual and reproductive health needs of youth by building their capacities in policy advocacy; and respect, protect, and uphold the sexual and reproductive health rights of young people. We commit to actively engage ourselves in the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of youth programs in all levels (local, national, regional, and global); to promote the spirit of volunteerism and vigilance; and to consistently advocate for meaningful youth-adult partnership.

Signed in the 19th day of October 2011 at Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

NOW THEREFORE, We call on the government to accountability in promoting, protecting and uphold the sexual and reproductive health and rights of young people. And we call on the civil society, development partners, and our fellow young people to work The 6th Asia Pacific Conference on Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights YOGYAKARTA 19 - 22 OCTOBER 2011

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6th Asia Pacific Conference on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights YOGYAKARTA DECLARATION 22nd October 2011 Reproductive and Sexual Health is a universal concern of all people around the globe. All people-young and old, masculine and feminine, rich and poor-are at risk of problems related to reproductive and sexual health, including infectious and non-communicable diseases. Across the life span people's need for care, treatment, education and advice change, but at no time does it disappear entirely. It is because of the universality of need that the member states of the United Nations have adopted a large number of principles and declarations calling for governments to promote reproductive and sexual health. The International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in 1994 explicitly linked reproductive and sexual health to human rights, and stressed that governments should pay particular attention to girls and women since they most often suffer from the negative health consequences due to social inaction. However just six years later the meeting of world leaders to formulate the key Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) were unable to include an explicit statement on reproductive and sexual rights in their final communique due to objections raised by a small number of member states. The Cairo promises are still on the UN agenda and have been strongly promoted by the UN family of agencies, but it is cleas that international consensus remains difficult. In 2011 manu governments are falling short of the commitments they made 17 years ago. Their promises did not includ the one key element that might ensure reproductive and sexual health-that being repsect for individual reproductive and sexual rights. Without a strong sense of respect among and for individuals, social programs of intervention become hollow, guarantees of protection become empty and hopes for improvements become illusive. In November 2006 a meeting of world experts on human rights related to gender identity and sexual orientation launched a series of guidelines for governments to promote respect for individual sexual rights. In four days of meetings of the 6th Asia Pacific Conference of Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights in Yogyakarta the participants reviewed experience from across our huge region and came to the sobering conclusion that previous calls to action have fallen short of our hopes. Asian and Pacific communities are all heterogeneous in the forms of political, religious and normative beleifs they espouse, but at times they disrespect the rights and needs of individuals and minorities in their midst. While women are not a minority, they continue to suffer from the relics of patriarchy embedded in political and social institutions. Many forms of teaching about family life and interpersonal responsibilities continue to harbour discrimination against women and fail to respect the rights of young people during ages when they are reaching maturity.

overlooked in political and bureaucratic discussions of reproductive and sexual health. Youth are more often the targets of moralization rather than the partners and beneficiaries of policies and programs of information and services. We fully endorse the Youth Declaration's call for governments to implement comprehensive sexuality education and services for all youth. Looking at the persistent issues of intolerance, inequity and discrimination the Conference spent two days considering papers on contested reproductive and sexual rights, including such controversial issues as unsafe and safe abortion and the special needs of marginalized and socially excluded communities. In a final day of discussion and debate participants looked at how reproductive and sexual rights might best be claimed by all citizens, and what role civil society organizations might pursue to guarantee the health and rights of coming generations. Whenever people say that talking about different forms of sexuality to be sensitive or even taboo, they reflect a form of intolerance that constitutes disrespect for their fellow citizens' deepest emotions and commitments. Throughout the world people who have lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersexed (LGBTQI) identities struggle to be accepted for their skills and contributions to society rather than isolated or persecuted because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. Participants were concerned to learn of the physical and legal assaults made on the sexual rights of their fellow citizens. The attacks on their sexuality by religious or insecure heterosexual commentators are hurtful, but of greater hurt is the lack of protection they are offered when physically assaulted by homophobic and transphobic extremists. The theme of this conference was "Claiming Sexual and Reproductive Rights in Asian and Pacific Socities". We have conclued that the first step in citizens' claims for rights is a claim for respect. This is the claim we are making today; of our governments, and of our families, friends and fellow citizens. We, who represent people from different walks of life, different forms of sexuality, and including a wide range of religious and political beliefs, claim respect for our own situations, and promise to respect our fellow citizens' situations. We call on our societies to endorse this declaration by institutionalizing respect and tolerance in all policies and programs of reproductive and sexual health.

Signed in the 22nd day of October 2011 at Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

The first day of the conference was devoted to and led by Youth drawn from across the region. They set the pace by raising awareness of the perpectives of school and university-aged people which are too often The 6th Asia Pacific Conference on Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights YOGYAKARTA 19 - 22 OCTOBER 2011

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Religion and Reproductive and Sexual Rights Religion is often characterized as a conservative social force in tension, if not outright conflict, with efforts to promote reproductive and sexual rights. There are religious organizations and leaders who strongly, vocally and sometimes violently oppose the concepts of reproductive and sexual rights and efforts to fulfill them. Such voices can be found in all of the world's major religions. At the same time, it would be a serious mistake to say that religion, in a more general sense, stands in opposition to rights based social and political and social agendas. There are also religious leaders who advocate for these agendas. The 6th APCRSR is among the first conferences of its kind to seriously address religious issues in constructive ways. In formal presentations and informal discussions participants pointed to the potential as well as the challenges religions offers in the advancement of reproductive and sexual health and rights agendas. Discussions of the Roman Catholic Church, Protestant Churches, Hinduism and of course Islam and their roles promoting and impeding reproductive and sexual rights played a significant role in the conference. We can expec t fur ther discussions of these issues at future conferences, including the one to be held two years from now in Manila. Islamic perspectives on these issues have attracted particular attention at our meetings here in Yogya because Indonesia is a Muslim majority country and has a larger Muslim population than any other. There have been presentations concerning the challenges that fundamentalist Muslim agendas pose for advocates of reproductive and sexual rights

and others, that define Islamic theological contexts in which advocacy can operate effectively. Valentina Sagala pointed to the example legislative programs backed by fundamentalists that stigmatize women in the name of restricting pornography and prostitution. There are also trans-national social movements including the "Polygamy Club" and the "Obedient Wives Club" both of which have branches in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore that pursue misogynist agendas in the name of Islam. Professor Siti Musdah Mulia and Kyai Marzuki Wahid presented critiques of these views from within the Islamic tradition. Both argued that concepts of human rights and respect for diversity are not only compatible with Islam, but are central Islamic values. Kyai Marzuki summarized this position as follows: "All people are equal in their human dignity and obligations without discrimation based on race, color, language, gender, religious beliefs, political ideology, social status or other considerations." He drew support from Surah al-Baqarah, al-Nisa, adz-Dzariyat and alHujurat of the Qur'an to support his views. The 6th APCRSR is among the first conferences of its kind to seriously address religious issues in constructive ways. In formal presentations and informal discussions participants pointed to the potential as well as the challenges religions offers in the advancement of reproductive and sexual health and rights agendas. Discussions of the Roman Catholic Church, Protestant Churches, Hinduism and of course Islam and their roles promoting and impeding reproductive and

sexual rights played a significant role in the conference. We can expec t fur ther discussions of these issues at future conferences, including the one to be held two years from now in Manila. Islamic perspectives on these issues have attracted particular attention at our meetings here in Yogya because Indonesia is a Muslim majority country and has a larger Muslim population than any other. There have been presentations concerning the challenges that fundamentalist Muslim agendas pose for advocates of reproductive and sexual rights and others, that define Islamic theological contexts in which advocacy can operate effectively. Valentina Sagala pointed to the example legislative programs backed by fundamentalists that stigmatize women in the name of restricting pornography and prostitution. There are also trans-national social movements including the “Polygamy Club” and the “Obedient Wives Club” both of which have branches in Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore that pursue misogynist agendas in the name of Islam. Professor Siti Musdah Mulia and Kyai Marzuki Wahid presented critiques of these views from within the Islamic tradition. Both argued that concepts of human rights and respect for diversity are not only compatible with Islam, but are central Islamic values. Kyai Marzuki summarized this position as follows: “All people are equal in their human dignity and obligations without discrimation based on race, color, language, gender, religious beliefs, political ideology, social status or other considerations.” He drew support from Surah

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Stand United for Reproductive and Sexual Rights The second day of the 6th APCRSHR, Friday (21/10), began with a Keynote address by the Health Minister of Republic of Indonesia, Dr. Endang Rahayu Sedyaningsih, MPH. In her speech, she stated that as the representative of the Indonesian government, she is commitment to advancing issues sexuality and reproductive health being discussed in the conference. Following the keynote, the conference agenda turned to a plenary session entitled "Contested Sexual Rights," in which there were presentation by GAYa Nusantara Representative Dede Oetomo, Ph.D , Youth Consortium for the RH Bill Representative Mr. Francisco M. dela Tonga, General Secretary ICRP Prof. Dr. Musdah Mulia, and Thai NGO Coalition on AIDS Representative Mr. Niwat Suwanpatthana. The speakers discussed two basic perspectives on sexuality. One views sexuality from a combination of cultural and religious perspectives. The other focuses on medical and health related issues. Religion and culture shape sexual values and influence decision making processes. Unfortunately religions can include teachings that do not promote sexual and reproductive health. Fransisco M. dela Tonga spoke about issues related to Religion and Sexual Issues that are controversial in the Philippines, These include sexuality education, access to contraceptives, forced marriage, and homosexuality. He also discussed the ways in which the Roman

Catholic Church influences government policy on sexual and reproductive health issues. He explained that the Church and the government are reluctant to endorse sexuality education because they fear that providing people, especially youth, with information will encourage sexual promiscuity. The Muslim minority in Mindano faces similar problems including forced and early marriage. Girls as young as 12 years old are sometimes forced into marriage to maintain family honor, prevent or resolve disputes, and for economic reasons. Mr. Niwat Suwanpatthana focused on health issues. He observed that instead of caring for people with HIV/AIDS the government discriminates against them. He presented data indicating that 90 percent of countries still have laws that obstruct the rights of people living with HIV/AIDS. He called for legal and policy reform, the creation of dialogue space in which issues of vulnerability can be discussed openly, increased access to services for prevention and treatment, respect for human rights and an end to inequality and injustice. The speakers agreed that none of these issues are unique to particular countries, that the nations of the Asia Pacific Region face similar challenges and that continuing struggles for sexual and reproductive rights are essential for resolving them.

Breast Feeding Problems for Career Woman

prefer to left their baby at home, change the breast-feeding to formulated milk, and hire a baby sitter to take care of their baby. It is really sad, because they have to give good nutrition for their baby, but they have to work for living.

One of the exhibition booths in The 6th Asia Pacific Conference on Reproductive and Sexual Health and Rights in Yogyakarta is from World Health Organization (WHO) Office in Indonesia. One of the issues they brought through the exhibition is about career woman and breastfeeding for their babies.

the WHO Office in Indonesia offers some solutions for this problems. they suggest that workplace and public space have special room for breast-feeding. for the mothers, they suggest to do breast-feeding before they go to their workplace and pump out their milk so the baby at home can drink from their mother's, not formulated milk.

Nowadays, many women choose to be career women rather than housewives. That means they have less time to take care of the member of the house, even their newborn baby. Usually, the baby just gets the breast-feeding before the mother goes to work or after come back home. Unfortunately, most mothers give breast-feeding for their baby until they reach six month old. Then, they turn to buy formulated milk. Even though many of them realize that the baby still need breast-feeding until 2 years old age. The question follows, why these women still do that? First of all, it is about their office policy. Women only can take 3 months maternal leave. Second, they are too busy at their workplace so they can not bring their baby with them. They worry if their baby will be troublesome and disturbing other people at their workplace. Eventough, they bring their baby with them; they can not give breastfeeding because there are no places for them to do so. That is why they

Julia Suryakusuma Columnist, author of :

IBUISME NEGARA : Konstruksi Sosial Keperempuanan Orde Baru

“

This conference is related to the

nations future. Commitments are not enough, because at the end only the implemmentations count.

“

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E-learning for the Sexuality Education TARSHI (Talking About Reproductive and Sexual Health Issues) is one of NGO in New Delhi, India, works towards expanding sexual and reproductive choices in people's lives in an effort to enable them to enjoy lives of dignity, freedom from fear, infection and reproductive and sexual health problems.

has developed the e-leaning through their website n the last 2 years. The launching of the website did it for the first time on October 19th, in the 6th APCRSHR conference 2011 in Yogyakarta. The modules can be downloaded after someone make register by submitting email address.

This NGO also use internet as one of the ways to provide the knowledge and information about sexuality, reproductive health and right through their website. This organization, referred to Sangita Singh from TARSHI,

These modules attempt to reach practitioners such as doctors, nurses, teachers and other people who can teach and spread information to their colleagues, families, patients, students.

From Raminten to Kraton Yogyakarta After feel the warmth of The House of Raminten, we will get more curious about Yogyakarta. The delicate food and also the unique atmosphere will guide you to explore more about this cultural city. As you read in the article before, all the staffs of the house of Raminten actually are not only boys, but also girls who wear traditional out fit, called “kemben�. They will inform you well about Yogyakarta. Leaving The House of Raminten, we can start a city sight seeing to the Tugu Golong Gilig, which is famous building as the symbol of Yogyakarta. After that, we could walk to the Malioboro Street. There are many traditional handicrafts sellers there. You might like to buy some souvenirs there. And finally, at the end of Malioboro Street we can see Kraton Yogyakarta Hadiningrat or Sultan Palace, the most famous cultural heritage in the heart of Yogyakarta. Have a nice trip!

ANNOUNCEMENT There will be a special lunch today on the 2nd floor of Grha Sabha Pramana, Gadjah Mada University, starting from 12.15 pm.

DON'T MISS IT Hosted by

Center for Population and Policy Studies Gadjah Mada University

Supported by

Badan Kependudukan dan KB Nasional

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