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Sam Jak Hunter


Sam Jak Hunter


HISTORY OF Mountaineering

Often referred to as Alpinism, this activity requires experience, athletic ability and technical knowledge to maintain safety.

0121 - Roman Emperor Hadrian’s ascent of Etna (3,350m) to see the sun rise.

1775 - The first attempt to ascend Mont Blanc was made by a party of natives.

1786 - Dr Michel-Gabriel Paccard and Jacques Bal-

mat reach the summit at Mont Blanc for the first time.

1854 - Systematic mountaineering as a sport is

usually dated from Sir Alfred Wills’s ascent of the Wetterhorn.

1879 - The exploration of the highest Andes began. 1888 - Trained climbers turned their attention to the mountains of North America.

1889 - Mount Kilimanjaro was climbed by Ludwig Purtscheller and Hans Meyer.

1896 - The first mountains of the arctic region were explored in Spitsbergen by Sir W. M. Conway’s expeditions.


1921 - The British made several attempts in the 1920s to climb Mount Everest.

1924 - The Olympics included prizes for Alpinism, but these were discontinued after World War II.

1953 - After years of dreaming about it and seven

weeks of climbing, New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepalese Tenzing Norgay reached the top of Mount Everest, the highest mountain in the world, at 11:30 a.m. on May 29, 1953.

1980 - The first winter ascent of Mount Everest, by K. Wielicki and L. Cichy.

The “Base Camp� of a mountain is an area used for staging an attempt at the summit. Base camps are positioned to be safe from the harsher conditions above. There are base camps on many popular mountains, often where the summit cannot be reached in a single day. A mountain will often have additional camps above base camp. For example, the southeast ridge route on Mount Everest has a Base Camp. If the terrain becomes too steep, standard ice climbing techniques are used in which each climber is belayed, moving one step at a time.


“It’s always further than it looks. It’s always taller than it looks. And it’s always harder than it looks.”

- The 3 rules of mountaineering.


HISTORY OF Lifestyle Footwear

Lifestyle - A way of life or style of living that reflects the attitudes and values of a person or group.

Footwear - Clothing & Fashion, anything worn to cover the feet.

Lifestyle footwear is entirely dependent upon an individuals personal preferences and what they want to achieve from owning a certain shoe.

Athletic - These are designed to be worn for par-

ticipating in sports. Since friction between the foot and the ground is an important force in most sports, modern athletic shoes are designed to maximize this force.

Boot - A boot is a special type of shoe which cov-

ers the foot and the ankle and extends up the leg, sometimes as far as the knee or even the hip. Most boots have a heel that is clearly distinguishable from the rest of the sole, even if the two are made of one piece. They are typically made of leather or rubber.

Dress - These Shoes are characterized by smooth and supple leather uppers, leather soles and a narrow sleek figure

Casual - These shoes are characterized by sturdy

leather uppers, non-leather out soles and a wide profile.


1876 - The earliest rubber-soled athletic shoes date

back to 1876 in the United Kingdom, when the New Liverpool Rubber Company made plimsolls.

1880 - The concept hiking boots are first intro-

duced, they are designed to provide extra ankle and arch support, as well as extra padding for comfort during hiking. They are constructed to provide comfort for miles of walking over rough terrains, and protect the hiker’s feet against water, mud, rocks, and other wilderness obstacles. These boots support the ankle to avoid twisting but do not restrict the ankle’s movement too much.

1917 - High Top shoes were first introduced to the

market and can be described as double-layer canvas shoes with rubber soles and toe caps. Often these shoes have a higher heel and tongue for added support.

1975 - Commercial Hiking Shoes become available

in Europe; the home of trekking. An Italian shoe manufacturer made the first set fashioned exclusively for trekking Alpine trails. The shoes devised a light, relaxed trekking/running shoe out of Nylon and leather. Climbing shoes are rubber-soled, tight shoes aimed to fit in the small cracks and crevices for rock climbing.


Couloir

A narrow gully with a steep gradient in mountainous terrain.


Couloir


7

8

3

4

6

2


Couloir

1 - Aniline Leather 2 - Rosewood Veneer 3 - Larch 4 - Plaited Rope 5 - Thermoplastic Elastomer 6 - Luminous Overcast Stitch 7 - Luminous Polyester Mesh (Interior) 8 - Logo

1 5


The end of each individual strand of rope is dipped into a red wax which represents the simplicity of the brand.


The extra rope on the end of the box allows the user to carry the box as a bag. The cardboard box is held together using a friction fit and held shut using a white rope.


The Early Days of Mountaineering

Each individual shoe is encased in a separate box which is reminiscent of early Alpinists and their heavy, varied and extreme luggage loads. The use of string handles and cardboard is said to pay homage to the simplicity of early backpackers and Sylvans.


A shoe intricately engineered and developed for style and comfort.


“Style is a simple way of saying complicated things.”

- Jean Cocteau.


The bars are able to be detached from the main shoe body.


Authenticity Utilising hydrophobic spray to make the shoes waterproof. Using a variety of natural materials and man-made fibers.


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8 A

A 3

B

B

70

40

55

55

4

C

5

C

180

20

2

6

5

D

D 1 85

E

85

150 210

100

100 No.

Project

LUP Lifestyle Shoes

F

Northumbria University, CIty Campus East, School of Design Sam Jak Hunter Transport Design

1

Drawing Title

Mountaineering Shoe Status

2

Approved

3

4

5

Description

Date

By

1

TPR Sole

7th

S.J.H

2

Stitching

7th

S.J.H

3

Rope

7th

S.J.H

4

Larch Tounge

7th

S.J.H

5

Rosewood

7th

S.J.H

6

Leather

7th

S.J.H

6

E Date

Scale

NTS

Original A3 Size Drawing No.

7

Drawn

MARCH 2013 S.J.H

Prepared

S.J.H

Units

mm

LS.03-08

F

Revision

-

8


Couloir


LUP Footwear Booklet  

A full overview of the LUP footwear project

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