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COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES

20162017 JULY 1,

JUNE 30,

ANNUAL REPORT


TABLE OF CONTENTS Staff Roster. .................................................................................................................................... 3 Message from the Executive Director............................................................................ 4 CAPS Mission Statement........................................................................................................ 5 CAPS Guiding Principles......................................................................................................... 5 New Staff. ......................................................................................................................................... 6 Staff Professional Contributions & Accomplishments.........................................7 Clinical Unit Highlights. ........................................................................................................... 8 Chicago CAPS.............................................................................................................................. 14 Sport Psychology Highlights............................................................................................... 16 Psychiatric Services................................................................................................................. 18 Student Satisfaction Survey. ..............................................................................................20 Group Therapy Program - Student Feedback.. ......................................................... 21 Treatment Outcomes............................................................................................................... 22 Multi-Year Clinical Trends. ..................................................................................................... 23 Outreach And Education Unit Highlights. . .................................................................. 24 Featured Outreach Highlights. . .......................................................................................... 26 Training Unit Highlights. ......................................................................................................... 27

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STAFF ROSTER LEADERSHIP TEAM John Dunkle, Ph.D., Executive Director David Shor, Ph.D., Director of Clinical Services Fabiola Montiel, Psy.D., Director of Clinical Services (Chicago Campus) Courtney Albinson, Ph.D., Associate Director for Sport Psychology Christine Cox, Financial Coordinator Elizabeth Gobbi, M.D., Associate Director for Student Psychiatric Services Monika Gutkowska, Psy.D., CGP, Assistant Director for Outreach and Education Jod Taywaditep, Ph.D., Associate Director for Training

CLINICAL STAFF Steven Andrews, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist, Coordinator of Peer Initiatives Eileen Biagi, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist, ECATT Coordinator

PROGRAM ASSISTANTS Motolani A. Alimi Candice Gant (Half-time Chicago Campus) Maria Salas Ramos

Bettina Bohle-Frankel, M.D., Staff Psychiatrist Meghan Finn, LCSW, Care and Referral Coordinator Jaclyn Fleck, Psy.D., Staff Psychologist (Chicago Campus) Mandy Freeman, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist (Chicago Campus) Lynn Gerstein, LCSW, CGP, Alcohol and Other Drug Specialist, Group Therapy Coordinator Pamela Hazard, M.D., Staff Psychiatrist Olivia D. Hoskins, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist Rosemary Magaña, M.A., LCPC, Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor Cindy McKinzie, Psy.D., Staff Psychologist Henry Perkins, Ph.D., Staff Psychologist, Coordinator of the Stress Management Clinic Qianhui Zhang, Ph.D., Post-Doctoral Fellow

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MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Greetings! I have the great honor of serving as the Executive Director of CAPS. This year, I completed my 12th year as the head of CAPS. Each year CAPS collects a great deal of data on the students who utilize our clinical services and on the individuals we reach through our outreach and programming. In addition, CAPS hosts a doctoral internship and a postdoctoral fellowship. The 2016-17 academic year was another busy one for CAPS. I am excited to share our annual report for the year. Thank you for your interest. DR. JOHN DUNKLE

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CAPS MISSION STATEMENT The mission of CAPS is to enhance the student learning experience by fostering student wellness, mental health, and personal growth within the broader Northwestern campus support network. We pursue our mission by providing clinical services, community education, consultation, advocacy, and training of future mental health professionals. CAPS Consists of five major areas that provide the services to meet our mission. CLINICAL SERVICES PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES SPORT PSYCHOLOGY OUTREACH AND EDUCATION SERVICES PROFESSIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMS

CAPS GUIDING PRINCIPLES • Professional ethics: We are dedicated to providing services informed by a commitment to principles of social justice while adhering to our professions’ ethical/legal standards. • Best practices: We utilize evidence-based practices, guided by research, clinical expertise, and individual characteristics. • Data-informed decisions: We make deliberate, strategic, data-driven decisions to maximize our ability to meet students’ needs. • Culturally informed services: We incorporate into our practices the value of cultures and identities as well as the effects of historical and current social forces in students’ lived experiences.

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NEW STAFF

Dr. Steven Andrews

Dr. Olivia D. Hoskins

Dr. Julie Sutcliffe

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Dr. Jaclyn Fleck


CAPS STAFF PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS/ ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2016-17 • Nine CAPS staff members received advanced certification in conducting tele-mental health services. • Dr. Courtney Albinson served as President-Elect for the Society for Sport, Exercise & Performance Psychology (APA, Division 47). • Dr. John Dunkle completed his first year (of three years) on the governing board of the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors. • Dr. Bettina Frankel passed her 10 year American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology Boards recertification.

• Rosemary Magaña, LCPC, served as a Board Member for Mujeres Latinas en Accion’s Auxiliary Board: Young Professional Advisory Council. • Dr. David Shor presented at the annual conference of the Association for the Coordination of Counseling Center Clinical Services on “The Counseling Center of the Future.” • Dr. Jod Taywaditep served on the Board of Directors of ACCTA (Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies).

• Dr. Monika Gutkowzka presented at the national conference of the American Group Psychotherapy Association on “Building a Successful Group Program in College Counseling Setting.”

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CLINICAL UNIT HIGHLIGHTS Dr. David Shor, Director of Clinical Services, provides leadership for CAPS Clinical Unit. The next several pages will include data highlights from the Clinical Services area for the 2016-17 academic year, including major accomplishments, utilization statistics, student demographic data, and much more. Clinical Services also consists of two multi-disciplinary specialty teams, including the Eating Concerns Assessment and Treatment Team and the Alcohol and Other Drug Clinical Team.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS: • Managed the elimination of session limits with no change in average sessions per student. • Engaged in immediate response and community care/ crisis debriefing following five student deaths. • Conducted over 1,060 crisis appointments (increase of 25% from previous year). DR. DAVID SHOR

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• Provided clinical services to over 2,800 students, the highest utilization rate in CAPS’ history.


KEY CLINICAL UTILIZATION DATA 2016-17 COMPARED TO 2015-16 TOTAL NUMBER OF...

2016-17

2015-16

1,107 (+15%)*

965

244 (+7%)

228

985 (+25%)

788

75 (+8%)

69

299 (+23%)

244

1,969 (-12%)

2,233

2,309 (+15%)

2,013

All Appointments**

21,402 (+10%)

19,423

Service Hours

17,307 (+12%)

16,423

Students

2,813 (+12%)

2,517

Intakes Evanston Appointments Chicago Appointments Crisis Appointments Evanston Daytime Chicago Daytime After-Hours Third Party Consultations Students Ongoing Clinical Services (seen two or more sessions beyond initial appointment) Mean # Sessions = 6.45)

*Percentages in parentheses indicate percent increase/decrease over last year. **Includes students served in direct clinical services, critical incident debriefings, and third party consultations.

EATING CONCERNS ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT TEAM (ECATT) ECATT is a multi-disciplinary team run by the CAPS Eating Concerns Specialist, Dr. Elieen Biagi. Members of the team include various staff members from CAPS, Health Services, and Athletics.

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG (AOD) CLINICAL TEAM The AOD Clinical Team is a multi-disciplinary team directed by CAPS AOD Specialist, Lynn Gerstein, LCSW. The team consists of staff from CAPS, Health Services, and Health Promotion and Wellness.

124 students presented at CAPS with eating concerns, a slight decrease from the prior year (N=128).

A total of 32 students was referred to the AOD clinical team this year (compared 36 referrals last year).

71 students were recommended to complete the ECATT assessment process, a sharp increase from last year (N=47).

Fall 2016: Total = 8 students; 5 female identified and 3 male identified (2 first years, 1 sophomore, 1 junior, 2 seniors, and 2 graduate students)

Students with eating concerns comprised 9.2% of the total number of students completing intake evaluations and 9.6% of students evaluated as severe and urgent.

Winter 2017: Total = 11 students; 2 female identified and 9 male identified (4 first years, 2 sophomores, 2 juniors, 2 seniors, and 1 graduate student) Spring quarter: Total = 13 students; 5 female identified and 8 male identified (3 first years, 2 sophomores, 3 juniors, 1 senior, and 4 graduate students) PAGE 9


GENDER

RACE/ETHNICITY

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT DEMOGRAPHIC DATA SEXUAL ORIENTATION

ACADEMIC STATUS

SCHOOL AFFILIATION

FIRST GENERATION COLLEGE STUDENT

HOUSING STATUS

479 (39.8%) 694 (57.6%)

23 (1.9%)

Self-Identify

3 (0.2%)

Transgender

596 (49.5%) 245 (20.3%)

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White Asian American/Asian

119 (9.9%)

Hispanic/Latino(a)

96 (8.0%)

Multi-racial

93 (7.7%)

African American/Black

2 (0.2%)

Native American or Pacific Islander

33 (2.7%)

Self-Identify

105 (9.0%)

International student

891 (74.0%) 118 (9.8%)

Heterosexual Bisexual

56 (4.7%)

Gay

38 (3.2%)

Questioning

17 (1.4%)

Lesbian

39 (3.2%)

Self-Identify

327 (27.2%) 362 (30.3%)

Freshman/First Year Sophomore

297 (24.7%)

Junior

218 (18.1%)

Senior

549 (45.6%) 177 (14.7%)

Weinberg Communication

163 (13.5%)

McCormick

93 (7.7%)

Medill

82 (6.8%)

SESP

53 (4.4%)

Bienen

4 (0.3%)

Pritzker School of Law

3 (0.2%)

Feinberg

133 (11.4%)

Yes

1030 (88.6%)

No

575 (47.8%)

Residence Hall

451 (37.5%)

Off-campus

140 (11.6%)

Greek Housing

5 (0.4%) TOP 5 RESIDENCE HALLS FOR STUDENTS REPORTING LIVING ON-CAMPUS

Man Woman

93 (16.2%)

Other

Foster Walker

53 (9.2%)

Elder

47 (8.2%)

Allison

42 (7.3%)

Bobb

30 (5.2%)

Jones


UNDERGRADUATE TOP PRESENTING CONCERNS: SELF-REPORT* 1. SOCIAL ANXIETY 2. ACADEMIC DISTRESS 3. GENERALIZED ANXIETY 4. DEPRESSION

NUMBER OF STUDENT VISITS TO CAPS PER QUARTER

5. EATING CONCERNS 6. HOSTILITY 7. SUBSTANCE USE

SUMMER 104

*When students come to CAPS they complete a problem checklist called the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) consisting of 34 items and seven subscales.

SPRING 292

60

WINTER 387

50 40

50.5% 41.4%

30

OTHER DATA 27.0%

20

20.2%

10 0

FALL 421

5% 609 students reported previous counseling

499 students reported that they engaged in binge drinking* at least one time in the past two weeks. (*For men 5 or more drinks in a row and for women 4 or more drinks in a row.)

243 students reported that they had engaged in self-injurious behavior (e.g., cutting) at least one time in the past.

324 students reported that within the past five years they had seriously considered attempting suicide at least one time.

60 students reported a previous suicide attempt.

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GENDER

304 (37.5%) 497 (61.4%) 3 (0.4%) 6 (0.7%)

Man Woman Transgender Other

CAMPUS

497 (64.3%) 259 (33.5%)

Evanston Chicago

RACE/ETHNICITY

426 (52.6%) 204 (25.2%) 69 (8.5%) 44 (5.4%) 26 (3.2%) 2 (0.3%) 22 (2.7%) 215 (26.5%)

White Asian American/Asian Hispanic/Latinx African American Multi-racial American Indian or Alaskan Native Other International Student

RELATIONSHIP STATUS

349 (43.1%) 313 (38.6%) 89 (11.0%) 7 (0.9%) 6 (0.7%) 1 (0.1%)

Single Serious Dating or Committed Relationship Married Domestic partnership Separated Divorced

170 (21.0%) 121 (14.9%) 100 (12.3%) 73 (9.0%) 71 (8.8%) 55 (6.8%) 31 (3.8%) 27 (3.3%) 24 (3.0%) 21 (2.6)

Feinberg Weinberg Kellogg Pritzker School of Law McCormick Communication Medill Bienen SESP School of Professional Studies

727 (89.8%) 43 (5.3%) 12 (1.4%)

Off-campus Residence Hall Other

GRADUATE/ PROFESSIONAL STUDENT DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

SCHOOL AFFILIATION

GRADUATE/ PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS’ TOP PRESENTING CONCERNS: SELF-REPORT* 1. Social Anxiety 2. Generalized Anxiety 3. Academic Distress 4. Depression 5. Eating Concerns 6. Hostility 7. Substance Use *When students come to CAPS they complete a problem checklist called the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) consisting of 34 items and seven subscales.

HOUSING

52.8%

36.7%

VISITS TO CAPS PER QUARTER 295 students 215 students 130 students 170 students

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Fall 2016 Winter 2017 Spring 2017 Summer 2016

OTHER DATA

*For men 5 or more drinks in a row and for females 4 or more drinks in a row.

428 students reported previous counseling.

297 students reported that they engaged in binge drinking* at least one time in the past two weeks.

16.8% 136 students reported that they have seriously considered suicide.

3.7% 30 students reported a previous suicide attempt.


CHICAGO (8)

SEVERE AND URGENT STUDENTS’ DATA* ACADEMIC STATUS: 27 (20.0%) Freshman/First Year | 33 (24.4%) Sophomore | 32 (23.7%) Junior | 19 (14.1%) Senior | 21 (15.6%) Graduate/Professional

RACE/ ETHNICITY

CAMPUS EVANSTON (127)

18 (13.3%) International student 64 MEN (47.4%)

12 (8.9%) African American/Black 14 (10.4%) Multi-Racial

67 WOMEN (49.6%)

15 (11.1%) Hispanic/Latinx 29 (21.5%) Asian/Asian American 45 (33.3%) White

TOP 10 PRESENTING CONCERNS

(NUMBER OF CASES)

Depression (109) Suicidal Ideation (97) Para-Suicidal Behavior (85) Anxiety (Panic, OCD, Social Phobia) (61) Academic Crisis (32) Disruptive Behavior (25) Suicide Attempt (24) Substance Abuse (23)

74 (54.8%) ER EVALUATIONS 53 (39.3%) HOSPITALIZATIONS

Relationship Crisis (22) Bipolar Disorder (20) *Severe and urgent cases include students who are currently suicidal, violent, psychotic, and/or severely compromised psychologically in some way.

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CHICAGO CAMPUS HIGHLIGHTS Dr. Fabiola Montiel serves as the Director for Clinical Services for the Chicago CAPS office. Below are important data about students utilizing the Chicago CAPS office this year as well as some trend data over the last several years.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Introduced Let’s Talk program in the Chicago campus. • Welcomed first full-time postdoctoral fellow to CAPS Chicago. • Resumed Group Therapy Program in CAPS Chicago. • Successfully on-boarded Dr. Jaclyn Fleck in her position as staff psychologist and Pritzker School of Law liaison. DR. FABIOLA MONTIEL

Number of Students Seeking Clinical Services by School: Chicago CAPS 2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

180

169

160 140 120 100

109

108

136 131

110 103 89

80 60 40

14

20 0

20 20 15 PRITZKER

FEINBERG

TGS

0 2 2 2

0 6 2 7

0 1 6 4

COMM

MEDILL

KELLOGG

SPORT PSYCHOLOGY HIGHLIGHTS

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<<Insert Current picture of Dr. Courtney Albinson, Associate Director for Sport Psychology>> Dr.


CHICAGO DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

CHICAGO CAPS STUDENTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TOP PRESENTING CONCERNS: SELF-REPORT* 1. Generalized Anxiety 2. Academic Distress 3. Social Anxiety 4. Depression 5. Eating Concerns 6. Hostility 7. Substance Use

GENDER

98 (34.4%) 185 (64.9%) 1 (0.4%) (0.4%)

Man Woman Transgender Other

RACE/ ETHNICITY

152 (53.3%) 59 (20.7%) 29 (10.2%) 17 (6.0%) 15 (5.3%) 5 (1.8%) 35 (12.5%)

White Asian American/Asian Hispanic/Latinx African American/Black Multi-Racial Self-Identify International Student

RELATIONSHIP STATUS

121 (42.5%) 118 (41.4%) 29 (10.2%) 3 (1.1%) 1 (0.4%)

Serious Dating or Committed Relationship Single Married Domestic Partnership Separated

SCHOOL AFFILIATION

159 (55.8%) 78 (27.4%) 14 (4.9%) 8 (2.8%) 7 (2.5%) 3 (1.1%) 2 (0.7%) 2 (0.7%)

Feinberg Pritzker School of Law Medill WCAS Communication Kellogg McCormick School of Professional Studies

HOUSING STATUS

258 (90.5%) 12 (4.3%)

Off-Campus On-Campus

47.5%

33.9%

*When students come to CAPS they complete a problem checklist called the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) consisting of 34 items and seven subscales.

VISITS TO CAPS PER QUARTER 102 students 77 students 39 students 67 students

Fall 2016 Winter 2017 Spring 2017 Summer 2016

OTHER DATA

*For men 5 or more drinks in a row and for females 4 or more drinks in a row.

131 students reported previous counseling.

94 students reported that they engaged in binge drinking* at least one time in the past two weeks.

13.1%

2.5%

36 students reported that they have seriously considered suicide.

7 students reported a previous suicide attempt.

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SPORT PSYCHOLOGY HIGHLIGHTS Dr. Courtney Albinson is Associate Director for Sport Psychology and oversees clinical and performance psychology services provided to varsity studentathletes. Below are key highlights for the unit this year.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Developed the CAPS Sport Psychology Unit in September 2016. • Managed the continued increase in student-athletes seeking clinical services (35% of student-athletes received clinical services).

DR. COURTNEY ALBINSON

• Collaborated with Sports Medicine staff to provide comprehensive student-athlete health care. • Provided educational training programs for Department of Athletics staff in suicide prevention, responding to student-athletes in distress, and general student-athlete mental health.

Table 1: Clinical Services Provided to Student-Athletes 2016-2017 (N = 171 Students (+3.6)* Service Intake Evaluations

# of Appointments 85

Crisis Appointments Daytime

53

After-Hours

5

Individual Counseling Appointments

678

Psychiatric Evaluations

59

Medicine Management Appointments

360

Case Management Appointments

63

Performance Psychology Consultation Appointments

97

Total Appointments

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1,400

*Percent increase over 2015-16. Equivalent to a 35% utilization rate by the student-athlete population.


Table 2: Sport Psychology Team Interventions and Outreach 2016-17 Team Interventions Teams

Student-Athletes Reached

Sessions*

Service Hours

7

208

95

121.5

Student-Athletes Reached

Sessions*

Service Hours

Intro to CAPS Services

490

13

15

General Mental Health and Wellness

35

1

1

Counseling/Helping Skills

40

1

1

Suicide Prevention Training

15

1

1

Diversity and Inclusion

20

1

1

Coping with Sport Injury

35

1

1

Crisis Debriefing**

250

10

30

Total Outreach

885

28

50

Outreach Programs

*Includes group mental skills instruction, team building interventions, practice/competition observation, and coach consultation **Includes student-athletes and Department of Athletics personnel

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PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES Dr. Elizabeth Gobbi is the Associate Director for Student Psychiatric Services. In her role, she oversees all aspects of psychiatric services at CAPS. Below are some highlights of the year in this area.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Developed a comprehensive ADHD policy and shared it via CAPS’s website. • Recruited a psychiatry resident during Winter Quarter. • Responded to increased demand for services from student-athletes (up 60% in three years). Overall, psychiatrists’ appointments increased 9% in just one year. DR. ELIZABETH GOBBI

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Total # Psychiatric Appointments and # Students X Year* 1600 1400

1280 1353

1200

1240

1160

1000

1040

800 600 400

391

390

366

398 392

200 0

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

# Appointments

2015-16

2016-17

# Students

**Psychiatric appointments include psychiatric evaluations, medication management appointments, crisis appointments and all other face-to-face appointments that psychiatrists had with students.

# of Students Prescribed Medication X 5 Years 250

200

199 177

181 160

150 127 100

50

0

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

STUDENT SATISFACTION SURVEY PAGE 19


STUDENT SATISFACTION SURVEY CAPS solicits feedback from students who utilize its services each year through a quarterly survey. This year we received feedback from 285 students and below are some highlights from the survey.

Opening Paragraph: CAPS solicits feedback from students who utilize its services each year through a quarterly survey. This year we received feedback from 285 students and below are some highlights from the survey.

As a result of my participation in counseling at CAPS . . . a result of my: participation counseling5at . . . agree) ( As Mean scores 1 = stronglyindisagree, = CAPS strongly ( Mean scores : 1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree)

5

5 4

3

4.024.02

4

3.92

3.92

4.02 3.77

4

3.77

4.09

3.8

3.86

3.66

3.97

3.67

3

2 2

1

1

I learned I learned I learned I better I can better I developed The quality of more about coping more understand identify more my I learned more about I learned coping I learned more effective I better understand I can better identify I developed more The quality of my myself (e.g., strategies effective ways ways to situations effective relationships myself (e.g., personal strategies that will ways to deal with stress ways to develop and situations which effective problem relationships with skills, abilities, and enablethat me towill manage to deal with develop maintain require me to make strategies personal andhealthy which require problemsolving with othersothers has improved growth areas) my own mental health relationships with decisions that are skills, abilities, enable me to stress maintain make than others solving has improved others me tohealthier and growth manage my healthy decisions that strategies areas) own mental relationships are healthier health with others than others

I am satisfied with the services at CAPS. 100.00% 90.00%

70.00%

87.10%

85.21%

80.00%

60.00%

40.00% 30.00% 20.00%

55.98%

57.40%

27.81% 34.38%

27.06%

30.43% 20.97%

2012-13 (116 Respondents)

2013-14 (169 Respondents)

2014-15 (186 Respondents)

Strongly Agree

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53.73%

35.34%

10.00% 0.00%

80.79%

66.13%

69.82%

50.00%

86.41%

2015-16 (198 Respondents)

Moderately Agree

2016-17 (285 Respondents) Both


?

Thinking broadly, what did you learn about yourself, your relationship with others, or your community that is directly related to your participation in counseling at CAPS? I can trust myself, because no matter how stressed I am I continue to have progress.”

“CAPS’ appointments always made me stop and think about certain situations from an outside perspective which was always helpful. It didn’t really make me realize new qualities about myself but rather, it helped me admit to them and deal with them face to face.” “During my time using CAPS’ services I have learned to embrace myself, my thoughts, and my own opinions. I have definitely become more confident in my ability to handle perceived struggles that I am experiencing. As a result, I feel as if I have experienced a lot of self-growth and have embarked on much needed self-reflection. I am a much stronger, more resilient individual as a result of attending sessions.”

Student Feedback of Group Therapy Program

In addition to the general satisfaction survey that CAPS sends to students, we conduct a separate survey of students participating in our group therapy program. Lynn Gerstein, LCSW, coordinates nine interpersonal open-ended process groups this year. Below are some direct quotes from students who returned the survey.

“I came to CAPS feeling that I was disconnected from my friends and peers. Through counseling I realized the degree to which those fears were unfounded and also about my behaviors that were keeping me from fully connecting with other people and their causes.”

“Group has helped me grow closer to my friends, by sharing my genuine experiences with them.”

“I got better at dealing with grief/negative emotions, and how to manage that while dealing with other stress (academic, etc).”

“Through group, I learned to give more value to my opinions and emotions. I realized that it was healthy and productive to share my thoughts and feelings with others (both inside and outside of group) and that by sharing I could connect more to others.”

“I learned about self-compassion and how to set goals. Counseling also helped me understand my thoughts, where they come from and how to deal with them.” “I learned different ways people show their love. I learned to use some of my other relationships to improve on more challenging relationships.” “I learned how to more easily recognize when I was beginning to get stressed.” “I learned that many people struggle with problems like anxiety, and it is normal and acceptable to struggle while at Northwestern.”

“I learned that it’s okay to feel painful or unpleasant thoughts, rather than running from those feelings.”

“Supportive facilitation allowed for the chance to be more authentic and vulnerable with people than the grad school environment normally encourages; the chance to express negative emotions; the opportunity to learn about myself and how I am similar to and different than others.” “I learned how to recognize my emotions, which I have always struggled to legitimize.”

“I am very lucky to have had CAPS as a resource to help me deal with this anxiety.”

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others.” “I learned how to recognize my emotions, which I have always struggled to legitimize.”

CAPS ASSESSES TREATMENT OUTCOME

CAPS ASSESSES TREATMENT OUTCOME NU CAPS average CCAPS 34 Scores compared to normed national averages: When students come for

their first appointment complete a problem checklistSymptoms called the(CCAPS) CCAPS 34. Higher scores indicate CAPS averaged Counselingthey Center Assessment of Psychological 34 scores compared to normed higher of self-reported distress. stands for the Counseling Center Assessment ofcalled the nationallevels averages: When students come forCCAPS their first appointment they complete a problem checklist CCAPS 34. Higher scores indicate higher levels of self-reported distress. Psychological Symptoms. CCAPS 34 Average Scores 2016-2017 2016-17 NU CAPS Clients (N = 2025 students) Compared to Normed National Average Mean Scores: 0 = Not at all like me , 4 = Extremely like me 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 CAPS Clients Average Scores National Average Scores*

CCAPS 34 Subscales *National Average Scores were normed by the Center for Collegiate Mental Health at Penn State University (N = 183,618 students) Students are seen in individual therapy at CAPS complete CCAPS at their initial session and at or CCAPS 34who Subscale change standardized scores: Studentsthe who are 34 seen in individual therapy atone CAPS two follow-up sessions. Results revealed that students reported decreased distress across all subscales at the complete the CCAPS 34 at their initial session and at one or two follow-up sessions. Results revealed 2nd administration. that students reported decreased distress across all subscales at the 2nd administration.

Standardized CCAPS Score

2016-17 CCAPS 34 Subscale Change Scores 2016-2017 N = 566 Students

1.6 1.4 1.2 1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0

1st FirstAdministration Administration

18

CCAPS 34 Subscales

MULTI-YEAR CLINICAL TRENDS PAGE 22 # of Unique Students Accessing CAPS Clinical Services X Academic Year

2nd Administration Second Administration


MULTI-YEAR CLINICAL TRENDS 0

005

0001

0051

0002

0052

0003

Unique Students Accessing CAPS Clinical Services 2016 – 17: 2015 – 16: 2014 – 15: 2013 – 14: 2012 – 13: 2011 – 12:

2,813 students 2,517 students 2,532 students 2,283 students 2,129 students 1,910 students

CAPS Student Utilization Rate vs. Rate for comparably Sized CAPS STUDENT UTILIZATION RATE VS. COMPARABLY INSTITUTIONS Schools X SIZED 6 Years

NU CAPS rate = Total Students Acessing CAPS/TOTAL FTE NU Students Fall 2016 (17,491 students) 20.00% 15.00%

12.40%

11.30%

16.08%

14.80%

13.80%

13.40%

10.00% 9.00%

5.00%

0.00%

8.19%

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14 NU CAPS Rate

9.92%

6.87%

7.69% 2014-15

2015-16

9.18%

2016-17

National Mean Rate

# of Emergency Room Transports Hospitalizations to National Median EMERGENCY ROOMand TRANSPORTS ANDCompared HOSPITALIZATIONS VS. NATIONAL Hospitalizations for Comparably Sized Institutions X 6 Years MEDIAN HOSPITALIZATIONS FOR COMPARABLY SIZED INSTITUTIONS 80

74

70 60 50

40

59 39

45

71 52

72

68 48

41

53 48

47

30 27

20

36

# ER Transports # Hospitalized

30

National Median

14.8

10 0

63

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

OUTREACH AND EDUCATION HIGHLIGHTS

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

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OUTREACH AND EDUCATION HIGHLIGHTS Dr. Monika Gutkowska was appointed Assistant Director for Outreach and Education at CAPS during this academic year. Below are some highlights of the numbers of individuals reached and the types of programs offered through our outreach and education efforts.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS: • Collaborated with the International Office to launch Discovering USA, a discussion series for graduate international students to facilitate adjustment process and promote positive mental health. • Expanded Let’s Talk program to the Chicago campus. • Trained 833 Northwestern community members in suicide prevention program Question-PersuadeRefer (QPR). • Started a Graduate Student of Color Wellness and Support Group. DR. MONIKA GUTKOWSKA

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CAPS OUTREACH AND EDUCATION UNIT UTILIZATION DATA: 2016-2017 Programs

Persons Reached

% Persons +/2015-2016

Intro to CAPS’ Services

52

5,596

+15.4

Stress Management

188

1,324

+4.7

Stress Management Clinic

143

171

+14.1

Stress Management Outreach

45

1,223

+3.4

33

833

+47.7

QPR Training

27

723

+26.2

Other Outreach

5

130

+78.8

Let’s Talk

31

51

+31.4

Discovering USA*

22

438

N/A

Counseling/Helping Skills

11

665

+32.1

Sport Psychology*

97

210

N/A

Eating Concerns

6

289

-25.0

Relationships

5

76

-70.2

Sleep Health

1

4

-92

Other

18

286

-67.7

464

9,413

-13.4

Topic Area

Suicide Prevention

TOTAL

*New Program during 2016-17. PAGE 25


FEATURED OUTREACH EVENTS

DISCOVERING USA A weekly discussion for international students When: Fridays 3 - 4:30PM Where: International Office

DISCOVERING USA Discovering USA was a year-long prevention program series developed this year for international graduate students. It was a collaborative effort involving CAPS and the International Office. The goals of the series were to provide international students with a welcoming and supportive platform where they can: 1) Become familiar with campus resources; 2) Interact and develop a relationship with fellow students, staff, and faculty; 3) Learn important information and develop useful skills leading to wellness and success; and 4) Experience a sense of belonging and community.

Jan. 19 New Year, New You: Fitness and Fun Learning

Jan. 26 Home Away From Home: Managing Homesickness and Building Community

Open to all international students, those who have international experiences, and those who are interested in international students' experiences

FEb. 2 Finding Your Cuddle Buddy: Dating in the USA

Registration (required) & detailed information: tinyurl.com/discoveringUSA

FEB. 9 Life Beyond the NU Bubble: Volunteering and Community Engagement Opportunities

FEB. 16

Small Steps, Big Bucks: Money Management and Budgeting Strategies

LET’S TALK EXPANSION Let’s Talk is an outreach program designed to engage students by providing informal drop-in consultations with CAPS counselors with particular emphasis on accessibility to communities who traditionally underutilize mental health services at NU. This year, Let’s Talk expanded to include the Chicago Campus in collaboration with Feinberg School of Medicine. In Evanston Let’s Talk was offered Monday through Thursday at the International Office, the Multicultural Center, the Black House, and the University Library. There were 51 students who utilized Let’s Talk services in the 2016-17 school year.

FEB. 23 Taming Your Busy Mind: Strategies for Success and Stress Resilience

What CAN I EXPECT? Meaningfully adjust to life in the USA Meet other students and make new friends Support your academic success Improve your cross-cultural skills Meet other new students Practice your English COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES

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PAGE 26

GRADUATE STUDENT OF COLOR SUPPORT AND WELLNESS GROUP This group was a new initiative this year with the goal of fostering self-care and wellness through culturally relevant discussion, practice, and support to the unique issues faced by graduate students of color.

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MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS • Received 93 applications from 29 states for three intern positions and interviewed 30 candidates for the CAPS Doctoral Internship in February, 2017. CAPS received 93 applications from 29 states for three intern positions, and interviewed 30 candidates. We matched with three highly qualified interns from three doctoral programs in psychology from three states: ~~ Keaton Muzika, M.S.W. from the Counseling Psychology program at the University of Denver ~~ Rebecca Lewis. M.S. from the Clinical Psychology program at Nova Southeastern University ~~ Meaghan Rowe-Johnson, M.S., from the Counseling Psychology program at the University of Iowa

DR. JOD TAYWADITEP

• Received 53 applications for the CAPS Postdoctoral Fellowship in January 2017, and the Selection Committee interviewed 10 candidates. We offered the positions to two highly qualified new professionals in psychology:

TRAINING UNIT Dr. Jod Taywaditep is Associate Director for Training and oversees the CAPS Doctoral Internship, which is accredited by the American Psychological Association, and Postdoctoral Fellowship. Below are a few highlights from the training area.

~~ Stephanie Carrera, Ph.D. from Iowa State University ~~ Sean Serluco, Psy.D. from Midwestern University

DOCTORAL INTERNS IN PSYCHOLOGY 2016-17 • Joanne Perry, M.S., from the Clinical Psychology Program at Saint Louis University • Sean Serluco, M.A., from the Clinical Psychology Program at Midwestern University Shelly Sheinbein

Joanne Perry

Angel Cheng

• Shelly Sheinbein, M.S., from the Counseling Psychology Program at the University of North Texas POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS 2016-17 • Angel Cheng, Ph.D., from the Counseling Psychology Program at the University of Iowa

Sean Serluco

Romero Huffstead

• Romero Huffstead, Ph.D., from the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University

PAGE 27


COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES

Evanston Campus CAPS Searle Hall 633 Emerson Street Evanston, IL 60208

Chicago Campus CAPS Abbott Hall 710 N. Lake Shore Drive Chicago, IL 60611-3006

Phone - 847.491.2151 Fax - 847.467.1193 After Hours Emergencies 847.491.2151

www.northwestern.edu/counseling/ Any questions about this document, please contact Dr. John Dunkle at 847.491.2151 or at j-dunkle@northwestern.edu

PAGE 28

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CAPS Annual Report 2016-2017  

CAPS Annual Report 2016-2017  

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