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COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES

ANNUAL REPORT JULY 1, 2015 – JUNE 30, 2016

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Staff Roster. .................................................................................................................................... 3 Message from the Executive Director............................................................................ 4 CAPS Guiding Principles......................................................................................................... 4 CAPS Mission Statement........................................................................................................ 4 Staff Professional Contributions & Accomplishments........................................ 5 New Staff. ......................................................................................................................................... 5 Clinical Unit Highlights. ........................................................................................................... 6 Chicago CAPS.............................................................................................................................. 12 Psychiatric Services................................................................................................................. 14 Student Satisfaction Survey. .............................................................................................. 16 Group Therapy Program - Student Feedback.. ..........................................................17 Treatment Outcomes............................................................................................................... 18 Multi-Year Clinical Trends. ..................................................................................................... 19 Outreach And Education Unit Highlights. . ..................................................................20 Training Unit Highlights. ......................................................................................................... 23

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STAFF ROSTER LEADERSHIP TEAM

CLINICAL STAFF

CONSULTING STAFF

John Dunkle, Ph.D., Executive Director

Eileen Biagi, Ph.D.

Wei-Jen Huang, Ph.D., CGP, Group Therapy Consultant

David Shor, Ph.D., Director of Clinical Services Fabiola Montiel, Psy.D., Director of Clinical Services (Chicago Campus) Began October 1, 2015 Courtney Albinson, Ph.D., Associate Director for Outreach & Education Elizabeth Gobbi, M.D., Associate Director for Student Psychiatric Services Jod Taywaditep, Ph.D., Associate Director for Training Christine Cox, Administrative Assistant

Bettina Bohle-Frankel, M.D. Meghan Finn, LCSW Mandy Freeman, Ph.D. Lynn Gerstein, LCSW, CGP Monika Gutkowska, Psy.D., CGP Pamela Hazard, M.D. Rosemary Magaña, M.A., LCPC Cindy McKinzie, Psy.D. Henry Perkins, Ph.D. Qianhui Zhang, Ph.D., Began January 1, 2016

PROGRAM ASSISTANTS Maria Salas Ramos Candice Gant (Half-time Chicago Campus) STAFF DEPARTURES Rob Durr, Ph.D., Departed December 2015 Wei-Jen Huang, Ph.D., Departed July 2015 Lori Schwanhausser, Psy.D., Departed July 2015 Jeanie Uchiyama Retired October 2015

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MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

DR. JOHN DUNKLE

Greetings! My name is John Dunkle and I have the great honor of serving as the Executive Director of CAPS. This year, I completed my 11th year as the head of CAPS. Each year CAPS collects a great deal of data on the students who utilize our clinical services and on the individuals we reach through our outreach and programming. In addition, CAPS hosts a doctoral internship and a postdoctoral fellowship for graduate students completing their doctoral degrees in psychology and completing supervisory hours prior to licensure. The 2015-2016 academic year was another busy one for CAPS, and I am excited to share our annual report for the year. In the pages that follow, you will discover the important and great work the CAPS staff accomplished this year. Thank you for your interest.

CAPS GUIDING PRINCIPLES

CAPS MISSION STATEMENT

• COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE: Upholding excellence as the ultimate principle in our personal conduct, work, programs, policies, and services.

To provide a set of essential psychological services that addresses the psychological and developmental needs of students to help them thrive academically and interpersonally. CAPS Consists of 4 major areas (see diagram below) that provide the services to meet our mission.

• INTENTIONALITY: Making deliberate and strategic decisions that contribute to the welfare of our students, colleagues, and community. • ACCOUNTABILITY: Holding ourselves and others responsible to our values, guiding principles, and institutional resources. • AUTHENTICITY: Engaging with sincerity and honesty in our interactions and decision making. • CURIOSITY: Asking questions and seeking new approaches and strategies to find solutions and improve programs, policies, and services. • COMMUNICATION: Consistently listening intently and sharing clear information with internal and external constituents in a timely manner.

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Clinical Services

Psychiatric Services

Outreach & Education Services

Professional Training Programs


CAPS STAFF PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS 2015-2016: Dr. Courtney Albinson served as Member-at-Large for the Society for Sport, Exercise & Performance Psychology (APA Division 47). Dr. John Dunkle was elected to the governing board of the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors. Lynn Gerstein and Dr. Monika Gutkowska earned Certified Group Psychotherapist status through the International Board of Group Psychotherapy.

Dr. Monika Gutkowska has been part of the AUCCCO (Association for University and College Counseling Center Outreach) Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee. Rosemary Magaña, LCPC, served as Board Member and Co-Chair for Mujeres Latinas en Accion’s Auxiliary Board: Young Professional Advisory Council. Dr. Jod Taywaditep served as Chair of the Standing Committee on Training Resources for the Association of Counseling Center Training Agencies.

NEW STAFF

DR. FABIOLA MONTIEL

DR. QIANHUI ZHANG

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CLINICAL UNIT HIGHLIGHTS Dr. David Shor, Director of Clinical Services, provides leadership for CAPS’ Clinical Unit. The next several pages will include data highlights from the Clinical Services area for the 2015-2016 academic year, including major accomplishments, utilization statistics, student demographic data, and more. Clinical Services also consists of three multi-disciplinary specialty teams, including the Eating Concerns Assessment and Treatment Team, the Alcohol and Other Drug Clinical Team, and the Student-Athlete Care Team.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS: • Ended 12 session limit policy • Dr. David Shor led a task force, consisting of the Dean of Students, and undergraduate and graduate students to review the CAPS longstanding 12 session limit. The task force did benchmarking and reviewed many models of service and forwarded the recommendation to end the session limit. DR. DAVID SHOR

• Formed a multi-disciplinary Clinical Systems Team; addressed issues such as Quality Assurance, Policy and Procedure manual update, staffing teams and other clinical system efficiency issues • Served over 2500 students – a 14% utilization rate • Provided effective treatments – student clients reported significant decrease in distress level on CCAPS pre-test and post-measures • Offered 10 interpersonal process therapy groups despite group leadership transition

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KEY CLINICAL UTILIZATION DATA 2015-2016 COMPARED TO 2014-2015 TOTAL NUMBER OF...

EATING CONCERNS ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT TEAM (ECATT) ECATT is a multi-disciplinary team run by the CAPS Eating Concerns Specialist, Dr. Elieen Biagi. Members of the team include various staff members from CAPS, Health Service, and Sports Medicine.

2015-16 2014-15

Intakes Evanston Appointments

965

905

Chicago Appointments

228

207

Evanston Daytime

788

817

Chicago Daytime

69

64

After-Hours

244

314

2233

2473

Crisis Appointments

3rd Party Consultations Students On-going Clinical Services (seen 2 or more sessions beyond initial appointment)

47 students were recommended to complete the ECATT assessment process, a decrease from last year (84 students). ECATT intake evaluations accounted for 10.9% of the total number of intake evaluations conducted and 8% of students evaluated as severe and urgent ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG (AOD) CLINICAL TEAM The AOD Clinical Team is a multi-disciplinary team directed by CAPS AOD Specialist, Lynn Gerstein, LCSW. The team consists of staff from CAPS, Health Service, and Health Promotion and Wellness. A total of 36 students were referred to AOD Clinical Team.

2013

1946

All Appointments*

19,423

19,645

Service Hours

16,060

17,624

2517

2532

Mean # Sessions = 6.45)

Students

128 students presented at CAPS with eating concerns, a slight increase from last year (121 students).

*Includes students served in direct clinical services, critical incident debriefings, and 3rd party consultations.

Fall 2015: Total students = 13; 6 Males and 7 Females (3 freshmen; 4 sophomores; 3 juniors; 2 seniors; 1 graduate) Winter 2016: Total students = 6; 3 Males and 3 Females (1 freshman; 2 sophomores; 2 juniors; 1 seniors) Spring 2016: Total Students = 17; 9 Males and 8 Females (4 freshmen; 4 sophomores; 1 junior; 5 seniors; 3 graduates) STUDENT-ATHLETE CARE TEAM The Student-Athlete Care Team is led by Dr. Courtney Albinson and consists of various staff from CAPS, and Sports Medicine. 165 student-athletes (32.8% of all student-athletes) received services this year. 34 daytime and 10 after-hours crisis appointments provided to student-athletes. 713 student-athletes (in total, non-unique) participated in QPR, healthy body image, and/or general mental health and wellness programs. 5 of 19 varsity teams received sport psychology services.

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GENDER

415 (41.3%) 577 (57.4%)

8 (0.8%) 1 (0.1%) RACE/ETHNICITY

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

544 (54.1%) 192 (19.1%)

ACADEMIC STATUS

SCHOOL AFFILIATION

FIRST GENERATION COLLEGE STUDENT

HOUSING STATUS

TOP 5 RESIDENCE HALLS FOR STUDENTS REPORTING LIVING ON-CAMPUS

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Other Transgender White Asian American/Asian

82 (8.2%)

Hispanic/Latino(a)

81 (8.1%)

Multi-racial

80 (8.0%)

African American/Black

14 (1.4%) 1 (0.1%)

78 (7.8%) SEXUAL ORIENTATION

Man Woman

775 (77.1%) 70 (7.0%)

Other Native American or Pacific Islander International student Heterosexual Bisexual

44 (4.4%)

Gay

35 (3.5%)

Questioning

14 (1.4%)

Lesbian

30 (3.0%)

Other

289 (28.8%) 253 (25.2%)

Freshman/First Year Sophomore

267 (26.6%)

Junior

181 (18.0%)

Senior

472 (47.0%) 157 (15.6%)

Weinberg Communication

129 (12.8%)

McCormick

85 (8.5%)

Medill

63 (6.3%)

SESP

47 (4.7%)

Bienen

2 (0.4%)

Pritzker School of Law

2 (0.2%)

Kellogg

108 (10.7%)

Yes

852 (84.8%)

No

472 (47.0%)

Residence Hall

407 (40.5%)

Off-campus

91 (9.1%)

Greek Housing

10 (1.0%)

Other

80 (17.0%)

Foster Walker

42 (8.8%)

Willard

40 (8.5%)

Elder

38 (8.1%)

Allison

29 (6.1%)

McCulloch


UNDERGRADUATE TOP PRESENTING CONCERNS: SELF-REPORT* SUMMER 92DISTRESS 1. ACADEMIC

2. SOCIAL ANXIETY SPRING

FALL 369

229 3. GENERALIZED ANXIETY

4. DEPRESSION 5. EATING CONCERNS 6. HOSTILITY

NUMBER OF STUDENT VISTIS TO CAPS PER QUARTER SUMMER 92

7. SUBSTANCE USE SPRING 229

*WhenWINTER students come to CAPS they 315a problem checklist called the complete Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) consisting of 34 items and 7 subscales.

FALL 369

WINTER 315

45.5% 39.3%

50

OTHER DATA

40 30

45.5%

18.2%

39.3%

18.0%

20

18.2%

10 457 students reported previous counseling

394 students reported that they engaged in binge drinking* at least one time in the past two weeks. (*For men 5 or more drinks in a row and for females 4 or more drinks in a row.)

4.1%

84 students reported 180 students reported 41 students reported a that they had engaged that within the past previous suicide in self-injurious five years they had attempt. 457 students reported 394 students 84 students reported behavior (e.g., cutting) seriously considered previous counseling reported that they that they had engaged at least one time in attempting suicide atin binge engaged in self-injurious the past. least one drinking* time. at least one behavior (e.g., cutting)

18.0%

0

time in the past two weeks. (*For men 5 or more drinks in a row and for females 4 or more drinks in a row.)

at least one time in the past.

180 students repo that within the p five years they h seriously conside attempting suicid least one time

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CHICAGO (8)

SEVERE AND URGENT STUDENTS’ DATA* ACADEMIC STATUS: 31 (21.5%) Freshman/First Year | 26 (18.1%) Sophomore | 34 (23.6%) Junior | 27 (18.8%) Senior | 22 (15.3%) Graduate/Professional

RACE/ ETHNICITY

CAMPUS EVANSTON (135)

19 (13.2%) International student 72 MEN (50.0%)

9 (6.3%) Multi-Racial 12 (8.3%) Hispanic/Latino(a)

72 WOMEN (50.0%)

13 (9.0%) African American/Black 24 (16.7%) Asian/Asian American 61 (42.5%) White

TOP 10 PRESENTING CONCERNS

(NUMBER OF CASES)

Depression (115) Suicidal Ideation (93) Para-Suicidal Behavior (73) Anxiety (Panic, OCD, Social Phobia) (73) Academic Crisis (44) Substance Abuse (35) Relationship Crisis (31)

68 (47.2%) ER EVALUATIONS 48 (33.3%) HOSPITALIZATIONS PAGE 10

Disruptive Behavior (28) Family Crisis (20) Bipolar Disorder (17) *Severe and urgent cases include students who are currently suicidal, violent, psychotic, and/or severely compromised psychologically in some way.


GENDER

332 (42.9%) 433 (56.0%) 1 (0.1%) 5 (0.5%)

Man Woman Transgender Other

CAMPUS

497 (64.3%) 259 (33.5%)

Evanston Chicago

RACE/ETHNICITY

394 (51.0%) 162 (21.0%) 75 (9.7%) 55 (7.1%) 44 (5.7%) 2 (0.3%) 29 (3.8%) 185 (23.9%)

White Asian American/Asian Hispanic/Latino(a) African American Multi-racial American Indian or Alaskan Native Other International Studen

RELATIONSHIP STATUS

356 (46.1%) 265 (34.3%) 94 (12.2%) 12 (1.6%) 7 (0.9%) 4 (0.5%) 1 (0.1%)

Single Committed Relationship Married Domestic partnership Separated Divorced Widowed

145 (18.8%) 132 (17.0%) 93 (12.0%) 87 (11.3%) 81 (10.5%) 68 (8.8%) 29 (3.8%) 24 (3.1%) 21 (2.7) 17 (2.2%) 1 (0.1)

Weinberg Feinberg Pritzker School of Law Kellogg McCormick Communication Medill Bienen School of Professional Studies SESP Seminary

705 (91.2%) 46 (7.4%)

Off-campus Residence Hall

GRADUATE/ PROFESSIONAL STUDENT DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

SCHOOL AFFILIATION

GRADUATE/ PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS’ TOP PRESENTING CONCERNS: SELF-REPORT* 1. Academic Distress 2. Generalized Anxiety 3. Social Anxiety 4. Depression 5. Eating Concerns 6. Hostility 7. Substance Use

HOUSING

51.3%

*When students come to CAPS they complete a problem checklist called the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) consisting of 34 items and 7 subscales.

35.9%

VISITS TO CAPS PER QUARTER 260 students 194 students 161 students 158 students

Fall 2015 Winter 2016 Spring 2016 Summer 2015

OTHER DATA

*For men 5 or more drinks in a row and for females 4 or more drinks in a row.

396 students reported previous counseling.

277 students reported that they engaged in binge drinking* at least one time in the past two weeks.

15.6% 120 students reported that they have seriously considered suicide.

4.4% 34 students reported a previous suicide attempt.

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CHICAGO CAPS Dr. Fabiola Montiel serves as the Director for Clinical Services for the Chicago CAPS office. Below are important data from students utilizing the Chicago CAPS office this year as well as some trend data over the last several years.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS • New Director for Clinical Services for Chicago CAPS on-boarded. • Completed renovation of the Chicago campus CAPS office. • Hired replacement for law school liaison. DR. FABIOLA MONTIEL

CHICAGO CAPS STUDENTS’ TOP PRESENTING CONCERNS: SELF-REPORT* 1. Academic Distress 2. Generalized Anxiety 3. Social Anxiety 4. Depression 5. Eating Concerns 6. Hostility 7. Substance Use *When students come to CAPS they complete a problem checklist called the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms (CCAPS) consisting of 34 items and 7 subscales.

VISITS TO CHICAGO CAPS PER QUARTER

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102 students

Fall 2015

66 students

Winter 2016

49 students

Spring 2016

59 students

Summer 2015


CHICAGO DEMOGRAPHIC DATA

47.5%

GENDER

105 (38.0%) 169 (61.2%) 1 (0.4%)

Man Woman Other

RACE/ ETHNICITY

150(54.3%) 47 (17.0%) 33 (12.0%) 18 (6.5%) 17 (6.2%) 1 (0.4%) 28 (10.1%)

White Asian American/Asian Hispanic/Latino(a) Multi-racial African American American Indian or Alaskan Native International Student

RELATIONSHIP STATUS

146 (52.9%) 91 (33.0%) 24 (8.7%) 1 (0.4%) 1 (0.4%) 1 (0.4%) 1 (0.4%)

Single Serious Dating or Committed Relationship Married Domestic Partnership Separated Divorced Widowed

SCHOOL AFFILIATION

130 (47.1%) 94 (34.1%) 13 (4.7%) 8 (2.9%) 7 (2.5%) 5 (1.8%) 4 (1.4%) 2 (0.7) 1 (0.4%)

Feinberg Pritzker School of Law Weinberg Medill McCormick Kellogg Communication School of Professional Studies Bienen

HOUSING STATUS

260 (94.2%) 11 (4.0%)

Off-Campus On-Campus

OTHER DATA 33.9% *For men 5 or more drinks in a row and for females 4 or more drinks in a row.

131 students reported previous counseling.

94 students reported that they engaged in binge drinking* at least one time in the past two weeks.

13.1%

2.5%

36 students reported that they have seriously considered suicide.

7 students reported a previous suicide attempt.

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Unique Students Seeking Clinical Services by School: Chicago CAPS 2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

160 136 131

140 120

108110 103

109

100 80 60 40 14

20 0

20 20 0 2 2

Pritzker

Feinberg

TGS

Comm

0

6 2

Medill

0 1

6

Kellogg

PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES <<Insert Current picture of Dr. Elizabeth Gobbi, Associate Director for Student Psychiatric PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES Services>> Dr. Elizabeth Gobbi was appointed Associate Director for Student Psychiatric Services Dr. Elizabeth Gobbi was appointed Associate Director this academic year. In her role she oversees all aspect of psychiatric services at CAPS. Below are for Student Psychiatric Services this academic year. In some highlights of the year in this area. her role, she oversees all aspects of psychiatric services Major Accomplishments

at CAPS. Below are some highlights of the year in this area.

 CAPS recruited two psychiatry residents during winter and spring quarters. MAJOR  CAPS psychiatrists have responded to the increase in demand for services by studentACCOMPLISHMENTS athletes.  Psychiatry continues to take a leadership role• inCAPS multidisciplinary teams: Eating Concerns recruited two psychiatry residents during Assessment and Treatment, Alcohol and Other winter Drug, and Student-Athlete spring quarters.Care, and the Chicago Campus.

• CAPS psychiatrists have responded to the increase in demand for services by student-athletes.

DR. ELIZABETH GOBBI

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• Psychiatry continues to take a leadership role in multidisciplinary teams: Eating Concerns Assessment and Treatment, Alcohol and Other Drug, StudentAthlete Care, and the Chicago Campus.


Psychiatric Evaluation Appointments and # of Students X 5 Years 250 216 210

200

182

150 100

145

24

30

37

44

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

50 0

172

181

146 143 116

123121 99

# of Psychiatric Evaluations

Evanston

195 194

Chicago

161

34 2015-16 # of Students

Medication Management Appointments and # of Students X 5 Years 800

740

700 600 500 400

490 416

515

113 74

127 80

700

673

595

577

561

177 145

181 123

160 112

435

300 200 100 0

2011-12

2012-13

# Medication Manangement Appts.

2013-14

Evanston

2014-15

Chicago

2015-16

# of Students

STUDENT SATISFACTION SURVEY CAPS solicits feedback from students who utilize its services each year through a quarterly survey. This year we received feedback from 198 students and below are some highlights from the survey. PAGE 15


STUDENT SATISFACTION SURVEY CAPS’ annual satisfaction survey includes five Likert scale questions and one open-ended question that sought feedback on student learning. One-hundred and ninety nine (199) students responded (see results below).

5 4

a resultofofmy my participation participation inincounseling at CAPS ... ... AsAs a result counseling at CAPS ( Mean scores : 1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree) ( Mean scores : 1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree)

5

4.28

4.26

4.28

4

4.26

4.02

4.09

4

4.02

3.86

4.09

4

3.97

3.86

3.97

3

3 2

2 1

1

I learned I learned I learned I better I can better I developed The quality of more about coping more effective understand identify more effective my myself (e.g., Istrategies to deal ways to situations relationships I learned learned that ways I learned I better I can better problem I developed The quality of personal skills, will enable me with stress develop and which require solving with more about coping more effective understand identify more effective othersmy abilities, and to manage my maintain me to make strategies has improved myself (e.g., strategies that ways to deal ways to situations problem relationships growth areas) own mental healthy decisions that personal skills, will enable me with stress develop and which require solving with others health relationships are healthier abilities, and to manage my maintain me to make strategies has improved with others than others

growth areas) own mental health

healthy decisions that relationships are healthier with others than others

I am satisfied with the services at CAPS. 100.00%

80.00% 60.00% 100.00% 40.00%

35.34%

20.00%

34.38% 69.82%

80.00% 60.00%

0.00%

40.00%

20.00% 0.00%

87.10%

85.21%

86.41%

I am satisfied with the services at CAPS. 66.13% 69.82%

35.34% 2012-13 (116 Respondents) 34.38%

55.98%

57.40%

87.10%

85.21%

27.81%

66.13% 20.97%

57.40%

2013-14 (169 27.81% 2014-15 (186 Respondents) Respondents) Strongly Agree

2012-13 (116

2013-14 (169

86.41% 30.43%

55.98%

2015-16 (198 Respondents)

20.97% Agree Moderately

2014-15 (186

30.43%

Both

2015-16 (198

Thinking broadly, what did you learn about yourself, your relationship with others, or your Respondents) Respondents) Respondents) Respondents) community that is directly related to your participation in counseling at CAPS? (Direct quotes Strongly Agree Moderately Agree Both from students) “My counselor helped me understand helpful and harmful patterns that emerge and how to

Thinking broadly, youtolearn yourself,fulfilling your relationship with others, or your leverage them what or alterdid them live aabout more mindful, and stress free life.” community that is directly related to your participation in counseling at CAPS? (Direct quotes “Everyone is struggling with something and I'm not alone, it's just that people don't talk about fromtheir students) problems that much or show their vulnerability. It's Ok to accept that I'm not perfect.” PAGE 16

“My counselor helped me understand helpful and harmful patterns that emerge and how to


?

Thinking broadly, what did you learn about yourself, your relationship with others, or your community that is directly related to your participation in counseling at CAPS?

My counselor helped me understand helpful and harmful patterns that emerge and how to leverage them or alter them to live a more mindful, fulfilling and stress free life.”

“Everyone is struggling with something and I’m not alone, it’s just that people don’t talk about their problems that much or show their vulnerability. It’s Ok to accept that I’m not perfect.” “How sleep affects mental health and the beginning of how to direct myself away from anxious situations in a healthy way.”

“I learned that no matter what I’ve been told in the past, I am not broken, which has enabled me to move on from past experiences and improve my relationships with people on campus and back home.”

STUDENT FEEDBACK OF GROUP THERAPY PROGRAM

“I can accept that my perspective on a situation is valid, as are differing perspectives. Also, just because a person has always acted in one way in the past, it doesn’t mean that they always will in the future.”

In addition to the general satisfaction survey that CAPS sends to students, we conduct a separate survey of students participating in our group therapy program. Lynn Gerstein, LCSW, and Dr. Monika Gutkowska coordinate 9 interpersonal open-ended process groups this year. Below are some direct quotes from students who returned the survey.

“I gained insight into my responses to the losses of loved ones and the necessity of recognizing and expressing those emotions.”

“This group made me more compassionate to myself and others. This group is a major factor in my academic success and general happiness at NU.”

“I have learned an entirely different way of relating to romantic relationships.”

“One of the best experiences of my life.”

“I have learned to ask questions about myself that I had never thought to ask. I have also learned that talking to someone is not a weakness of mine but actually helps me be healthier in life.” “I learned everybody had different ways of showing and receiving affection/love and how to recognize the fact that not everyone presents the same and receives the same.” “I learned how I tend to act in response to certain situations that I encounter and healthy ways to respond.”

“A weekly appointment to get in touch with my emotions in a social setting.” “Open and honest environment in which to share my emotions and life experiences.” “At Northwestern, a lot of the times people seem so put together and I feel out of place. But, group gave me the opportunity to recognize and face my struggles.” “It was such an enjoyable experience.” “I enjoyed that I was forced to challenge myself and to face discomfort.”

“I learned how to be more calm in times of stress and not to let that impact my friendships at Northwestern.” “I learned how to make time for myself and truly maintain my own mental health when dealing with others.”

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“I enjoyed that I was forced to challenge myself and to face discomfort.” CAPS ASSESSES TREATMENT OUTCOME TREATMENT OUTCOMES Northwestern’s CAPS average CCAPS 34 Scores compared to normed national averages: When students Northwestern’s CAPS average CCAPS 34 Scores compared to normed national averages: When students come for come for their first appointment they complete a problem checklist called the CCAPS 34. Higher scores their firstindicate appointment they complete a problem checklist the 34. Higher scores indicate higher levels higher levels of self-reported distress. CCAPScalled stands forCCAPS the Counseling Center Assessment of of self-reported distress. CCAPS stands for the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms. Psychological Symptoms. CCAPS 34 Average Scores 2015-2016 NU CAPS Clients Compared to Normed National Average Scores Mean Scores: 0 = Not at all like me , 4 = Extremely like me

2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 CAPS Clients Average Scores

0

National Average Scores*

CCAPS 34 Subscales *National Average Scores were normed by the Center for Collegiate Mental Health at Penn State University

CCAPS 34 scores: Students who areare seen in individual therapy at CAPS CCAPS 34Subscale Subscalechange changestandardized standardized scores: Students who seen in individual therapy at complete the CCAPS 34 at their initial at one sessions. Results revealed CAPS complete the CCAPS 34 at theirsession initial and session andorattwo onefollow-up or two subsequent sessions. Results that students distress across all subscales the 2nd administration. revealed that reported studentsdecreased reported decreased distress across allatsubscales at the 2nd administration.

Standardized CCAPS Score

CCAPS 34 Subscale Change Scores 2015-2016 N = 423 Students 1.6 1.4 1.2 1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 -0.2

1st Administration

2nd Administration

CCAPS 34 Subscales

MULTI-YEAR CLINICAL TRENDS # of Unique Students Accessing CAPS Clinical Services X Academic Year PAGE 18

2015 – 2016: 2517 students


MULTI-YEAR CLINICAL TRENDS 0

005

0001

0051

0002

0052

0003

# of Unique Students Accessing CAPS Clinical Services X Academic Year

2015 – 2016: 2517 students 2014 – 2015: 2532 students 2013 – 2014: 2283 students 2012 – 2013: 2129 students 2011 – 2012: 1910 students 2010-2011: 1889 students

CAPS Student Utilization Rate vs. Rate for Comparably Sized Schools X 6 Years NU CAPS rate = Total Students Accessing CAPS/TOTAL FTE NU Students Fall 2015

16.00% 14.00% 12.00%

11.30%

10.00%

9.00%

8.00%

12.40%

11.30%

13.80%

13.40%

14.80%

9.92%

9.00%

8.19%

7.69%

6.00%

6.87%

4.00% 2.00% 0.00%

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13 NU CAPS Rate

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

National Mean Rate

# of Emergency Room Transports and Hospitalizations Compared to National Median Hospitalizations for Comparably Sized Institutions X 6 Years 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

53 43

59

39

63 45

27 14.8 2010-11

71

72

48

52 36

68

41

47

30

2012-13

OUTREACH AND EDUCATION HIGHLIGHTS

2013-14

2014-15

# Hospitalized National Median

14.8 2011-12

# ER Transports

2015-16

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OUTREACH AND EDUCATION HIGHLIGHTS Dr. Courtney Albinson serves as Associate Director for Outreach and Education at CAPS. Below are some highlights of the numbers of individuals reached and the types of programs offered through our outreach and education efforts.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS: • Held third Essential NU on Mental Health. • Reached close to 11,000 community members in Outreach and Education programming. • Trained 979 community members in the Question-Persuade-Refer (QPR) suicide prevention gatekeeper training. CAPS has trained close to 4000 NU community members in QPR since the inception of the program in March 2012. • Increased the number of sites and hours of the “Let’s Talk” Outreach Program, reaching 35 students at various campus locations DR. COURTNEY ALBINSON

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CAPS OUTREACH AND EDUCATION UNIT UTILIZATION DATA: 2015-2016 # Programs

# Persons Reached

% Persons +/2014-2015

Intro to CAPS’ Services

51

5596

+15.4

Stress Management

145

1329

-1.8

Stress Management Clinic

123

147

-50.7

Stress Management Outreach

22

1182

+12.0

44

1592

+68.6

QPR Training

39

979

+12.7

Other Outreach

5

613

+717.3

Let’s Talk

110

35

-7.9

Counseling/Helping Skills

14

452

-21.0

Peak Performance Training

7

313

+430.5

Eating Concerns

6

385

+67.4

Relationships

4

225

-72.2

Sleep Health

4

49

+58.1

Other

7

885

-46.2

TOTAL

392

10,861

+3.1

Topic Area

Suicide Prevention

PAGE 21


ESSENTIAL NU ON MENTAL HEALTH CAPS hosted the third annual ENU on Mental Health during Wildcat Welcome 2015. All incoming undergraduates, including transfer students are required to attend the ENU. For the second consecutive year, we hosted acclaimed speaker, Ross Szabo. Ross is the CEO of the Human Power Project, a company that creates cutting edge mental health curriculum. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an award winning speaker, author, and trainer.

SEND SILENCE PACKING Send Silence PackingÂŽ is an award-winning public education exhibit of 1,100 backpacks, representing the number of college students who die by suicide every year. The backpacks have been donated in memory of loved ones who have died by suicide. This impactful traveling exhibit puts a face to those lives and brings into scope the severity of suicide among college students, promoting a dialogue around suicide and mental health. Passersby walking among the backpacks see the pictures and read the personal stories of those who have died, and learn about mental health, suicide prevention, and where to seek help. This program was unveiled on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. in 2008, with a keynote speech by The Honorable Patrick Kennedy. Since then, more than 320,000 people in 98 cities throughout the country have experienced Send Silence Packing. The event took place on September 28, 2015 on the Deering Meadow.

PAGE 22


MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS • CAPS Doctoral Internship participated in a national matching process in March 2016. CAPS received 124 applications from 30 states for three intern positions and interviewed 30 candidates. We matched with three highly qualified interns from three doctoral programs in psychology from three states: ~~ Joanne Perry, M.S., from the Clinical Psychology Program at Saint Louis University ~~ Sean Serluco, M.A., from the Clinical Psychology Program at Midwestern University

DR. JOD TAYWADITEP

TRAINING UNIT Dr. Jod Taywaditep is Associate Director for Training and oversees the CAPS Doctoral Internship, which is accredited by the American Psychological Association, and the Postdoctoral Fellowship. Below are a few highlights from the training area.

~~ Shelly Sheinbein, M.S., from the Counseling Psychology Program at the University of North Texas • CAPS Postdoctoral Fellowship received 35 applications in February 2016, and the Selection Committee interviewed 10 candidates. We offered the positions to two highly qualified doctoral students in psychology: ~~ Angel Cheng from the Counseling Psychology Program at the University of Iowa ~~ Romero Huffstead, M.S., from the Counseling Psychology Program at Auburn University

DOCTORAL INTERNS IN PSYCHOLOGY AND POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS 2015-2016 (From Left to right) • • • • •

Fatma Aydin, M.A. Alex Lemiszki, M.A. Julie Sutcliffe, Psy.D. Olivia Carollo, Psy.D. Romero Huffstead, M.S.

PAGE 23


COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES

Evanston Campus CAPS Searle Hall 633 Emerson Street Evanston, IL 60208

Chicago Campus CAPS Abbott Hall 710 N. Lake Shore Drive Chicago, IL 60611-3006

Phone - 847.491.2151 Fax - 847.467.1193 After Hours Emergencies 847.491.2151

www.northwestern.edu/counseling/ Any questions about this document, please contact Dr. John Dunkle at 847.491.2151 or at j-dunkle@northwestern.edu

PAGE 24

CAPS Annual Report 2015-2016  
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