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JOURNAL architecture studio air

Xi Ting Samantha Loo 347119


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CONTENTS PAGE A Case For Innovation - Architecture As A Discourse - Unique Innovations - Contemporary Scripting - Other Group Precedence - Gateway Criteria

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Matrix Cut/ Fabricate - Personal Matrixes - Rest of Group Matrix - Explaniation - Matrix conlusion - Case Study Personal - Case Study Group

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Competitive Advantage

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Learning Objectives and Outcomes

Bibliography


architecture as a discourse studley park boathouse

For Architecture studio water, we were given an assignmen analyze their architectural style and consequentially design

I ended up analyzing the work of Mario Botta. Botta was pa ment in the 1960s. Botta started developing his own person design was to design a space that connected the water to t incorporating the pier into the design.

Personally, I have been to one of Botta’s building, namely t seemed to be. The exterior of the building was made out o

For this project, I used Botta’s ideas and design ideas as a from Botta by building on his ideas and consequently deve

Similarly, I wanted the boathouse to make an impression o building to feel heavy and large. I also used a skylight and lighter. I also focused a lot on the practicality and function I found myself constantly trying to find a balance between

In fact, throughout history new forms have emerged due to project, I would attempt to overcome limitations and restri

Therefore, for the Gateway project, the rational behind my architecture generally represents the philosophy of the arc having the structure blend in and in a certain way mirror th essentially represent the ‘essence’ of Wyndham city to the 1

eoi week 1

William J. R. Curtis, Modern Architecture since 1900, 3rd edn (London: Phaidon P


Personal Project Studley Park

nt where we were each assigned a specific and revolutionary architect. We were then supposed to study their work and n a boathouse in the style of that particular architect.

art of a group of influencial Italian speaking swiss architects from Ticino who aided the Italian Neo-Rationalism movenal style where he uses bold shapes and forms, slits for circulation and symmetry.1 The idea behind the boathouse the land. I did so by ensuring that the upper floors hung over the river and by bringing the river into the boathouse by

the San Francisco Museum of Art. The first thing that I noticed about the building was its magnitude and how solid it of bricks which made the building feel large. It contrasted well with the entrance which was made out of glass.

starting point. One problem that arose was finding a balance between Botta’s style and my own. I ended up learning eloping my own philosophy for the project.

on people the same way that Botta’s building made me feel. I decided on insitu concrete for the facade as I wanted the d small circular windows to illuminate the building and also the ‘break’ the solidity of the building and make it seem nality of the design as I personally believe that the design of a building should be accessible and logical. For this project aesthetic and functionality as both are very important when trying to create a great building.

o new constrains and limitations. For instance, skyscrapers were brought about due to the lack of space in cities. For this ictions by submitting a project that is both aesthetically pleasing and functional.

structure would be to improve on existing design concepts and having the designs appear fresh and innovative. As chitect, I want mine to showcase my enthusiasm for connecting local structures to their natural environment and by he local culture and environment. I believe that that would be important for the Gateway project as the structure will e numerous vehicles that would be passing it daily.

Press Limited, 1996), p. 58.

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architecture as a discourse Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health

eoi week 1

The Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health was designed by Fran Like most of Gehry’s buildings, the centre appears almost u so it could work with the façade. The external cladding is c

Gehry usually incorporates very mundane features of the b ate the movement in his design and bring in natural sunligh incorporated into the design of the building. Also, I find the However, the building has also been deemed an eyesore by interview with the Las Vegas Sun, when asked about his des Gehry’s buildings tend to invoke strong emotions from peop

The idea behind Gehry’s buildings are generally direct and personal interest in the research of Huntington’s disease af

The building demonstrates technological advances and in it specifically designed for the Vegas landscape, the team res of the building had GPS chips embedded in it so that the bu tural engineers globally, namely from Poland, India and Ge need not be physically present to complete a project. Furth upon people that the centre was taking Alzeheimer researc

In conclusion, I learnt a lot from the Lou Ruvo center that c technological advances and that one should do what they b a strong idea and or in this case a metaphoric story is impo be used as a marketing strategy, the same way that the Gat serious about trying to improve the image of the city.

2

Chistopher Hawthorne, ‘Frank Gehry’s Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain

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Curtis, p. 663.

4

Tom Gorman, ‘Ruvo Center Architect’s Form Helps Direct Focus on a Cure’, Las Ve

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Hawthorne.

6

Hawthorne.

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Gorman.

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Joseph Giovannini, ‘Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health - Las Vegas Gehry Partners


Architect: Location:

Frank Gehry Las Vegas

nk Gehry in order to spread public awareness about Alzheimer’s. unruly, unfinished and chaotic.2 In this case, the trapezoid shaped window was encased in the steel grey framework covered with a reflective material, which gives the impression that the building is moving.

building’s landscape into the design.3 In this case, Gehry uses the sun which is almost ever present in Vegas to creht into the building. This again goes back to my personal belief that elements in the local environment should be e building aesthetically interesting because I like the fluidity of the design and the interesting cutouts for windows. y some. Therefore, how ‘artistic’ a building is very subjective as beauty lies in the eye of the beholder. During an sign, Gehry said ‘who knows what I was thinking? I just wanted it provocative.’4 He succeeded in that aspect because ple and that was what I believe made him famous.

metaphoric.5 In this case, Gehry agreed to design this building after much urging from Lou Ruvo because he had fter his good friend’s wife and sisters - in - law succumbed to it.6

ts own way the culture of today’s society. For instance, the building itself is a contradiction. Although building was sponsible for the building was not all on site for the construction. In fact, different pieces that made up the façade uilding’s surveyors could ensure the façade was pieced together accurately. Furthermore, the project involved strucermany.7 The cultural context being global where it is possible in today’s society with global teams where people hermore, Lou Ruvo was quoted saying that the architecture of the building was used as a marketing tool to impress ch seriously.8

can be applied to the Gateway project. Firstly, is that to have an effective design, one must always be open to new believe is best for the building and not what people might think the building should be like. Secondly, a design with ortant as it, in a way, gives the project a rational for its existence. Furthermore, in today’s context, architecture can teway project will be, to show that the residents there are also forward looking and open minded and that they are

n Health in Las Vegas’, Los Angeles Times, (2010).

egas Sun, (2010).

rs’, Architect, (2011) <http://mydigimag.rrd.com/publication/?i=66206> [accessed April 2012] pp. 84-94).

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architecture as a discourse Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower

The cocoon tower designed by Tange Architects and was th coon is the incubation period where the lava turns into a b members of society ‘butterfly’. The structure of the cocoon tower is unique where the tow and the narrow portion on the top acts provides unobstruct tallest tower in the city.9 The cocoon tower tried to bring in nature into the design. T Therefore, they had to bring ‘nature’ into the building. They with panoramic views of the city. The idea of the interactio especially with the increase in awareness about the enviro

Like most tall buildings, the building was constructed using frame. Due to constant seismic activity in Tokyo, they used are placed in the middle of the structure which is the wide ensure that the building appears elegant and also make it This building is the first circular tower in Tokyo that is eart are common. In that aspect, the building demonstrates how out with new and interesting forms.

Personally, I chose this building because it was one of the tower before and my first impression of it was that it seem reason was that it seemed the lightest around. I believe it project, as the design is meant to catch the attention and m yet still be able to seem as it were part of the environmen

In conclusion, this building is a good example on advancin not commonplace, the tower is a good example of achievin phorical story behind it that can make it relatable to the pu

9 Chistopher Hawthorne, ‘Frank Gehry’s Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain 10 Paul Noritaka Tange and Minami Masato, ‘Mode Gakeun Cocoon Tower’, Council

eoi week 1


Architect: Tange Architects Location: Shinjuku, Tokyo

he winning design for an educational building. In a way, the cocoon is a metaphor for education. For instance, the cobutterfly. Similarly, the tower serves as a location where the student ‘lava’ is being educated ‘incubated’ to be useful

wer appears to be ‘wrapped’ with a web of white ‘fabric’ like a cocoon. The white structure in a way acts as a shade ted views of Shinjuku. The building also blends nicely in the landscape and although there are 50 levels, it is not the

This is because the city did not have any space for greenery and they wanted the students to experience nature. y did so by incorporating student lounges in between classrooms. These lounges were actually three story atriums on between nature and the built environment has been increasingly common in 21st century architectural design onment and the need for green spaces.

g steel with concrete filled columns. The main structure consists of three elliptical diagrid frames and an inner core viscous oil dampers to dissipate and reduce excess seismic energy. The inner core alone has six dampers which est. Also, the frames are placed every 24m and the members intercept every 4 meters at the same angle. This is to easier to attach the external cladding. This tower was ground breaking in the aspect of reducing seismic activity. thquake resistant. This example in technological advancement is mostly applicable in countries where earthquakes w local environmental constrains does not restrict but rather forces the architect to think outside the box and come

first buildings that I thought of when I was thinking of suitable buildings for this assignment. I have been to the med to standout from the surrounding building. Although the height of the building was a huge factor, the main was because of the contrast between the ‘wrapped’ facade and the amount of glass used. Hence, for the Gateway make an impact on the people passing through it, it should have interesting textures also contrast with each other, nt.10

ng architectural discourse. Although earthquake technology is not very applicable in Melbourne as earthquakes are ng new forms despite limitations in technology. Furthermore, like the Lou Ruvo Center, the tower has a strong metaublic.

n Health in Las Vegas’, Los Angeles Times, (2010). on Tall Buildings and Habitat, (2009).

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unique innovations presented by contemporary computa Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame Museum

eoi week 2

One project that utilizes comtemporary computational desig ever, the modeling and geometry of the stadium was done b

The Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame Museum is located at Na

The geometry of the building was derived from the landscap circulation. As the design of the building was informed by h

Method Design, served as a geometry and detailing consult Hence they worked with the specialty steel consultant to de Method Design, the design was mostly created using grassh generated by algorithm alone. They also used other softwar analysis software to do detailing for the steel. This enabled structural member, support and connection of that was read

The Sports hall of Fame, according to Kolarevic’s definition example on how a system can be done and compiled wholly qualitative and quantitative information that allowed the con ing.14

In order to be able to complete an entire model for a buildi between what the designer really wants and the limitations past 50 years have generally been targeted in making the jo software available today has its limitations. Hence, one way

In conclusion, the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame is a good e to have all the necessary information on the structure to be

11 Trahan Architects, ‘Lousiana Sports Hall of Fame Museum’, (2012), p. Project Des 12 Trahan Architects, ‘Lousiana Sports Hall of Fame Museum’, (2012), p. Project Des 13 Method Design, ‘Louisana State Sports Hall of Fame + Regional History Museum’

lio for the LSH project. 14 Branko Kolarevic, Architecture in the Digital Age - Design and Manufacturing, (Ta 15 Yehuda E. Kalay, Architecture’s New Media: Principles, Theories, and Methods of C


ational design techniques

Architect: Trahan Architects Geometry and Detailing Consultant: Method Design Location: Natchitoches, Louisiana

gn techniques is the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame Museum. The Architect for the project is Trahan Architects. Howby Method Design.

atchitoches in Louisiana. Although the project was to be completed in 2011, it is still under construction.11

pe and the river in the area. This also inspired the design concept and became the organizing principle for visitor historic architecture and materials int eh region, the interior space was sculpted from panels of cast stone.12

tant for the project. As method design are the consultants to Advanced Cast Stone, a pre-cast panel fabricator. esign a suitable structural platform to service a support system for the stone panels. According to Stasiuk from hopper to extract information about the orientation and to instantiate elements of the design that cannot be fully re like Karamba and Geometry Gym and together with grasshopper, they operated it in parallel with Robot structural d them to transfer information seamlessly across the different softwares. The result is a fully detailed model of the dy for fabrication and installation of steel supports and cast stone connections.13

is the eventual target that one should strive to achieve in architecture. This is because steel structural system is an y on the computer and when completed is also ready for fabrication. This is because the 4D model contains all the nstruction of a single model that contains all the relevant and vital information that is needed to produce a build-

ing and have it ready for fabrication requires a lot of computer skills. The fact is that there is always a trade off of the software. This is because most of the computer aided design research that has been taking place over the ob easier for the human designers and not really focused on attempting to create new forms.15 All of the computer y of achieving oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design goals is to use a wide range of software, as seen by the system done by Method Design.

example a building being designed by contemporary computational techniques. For the gateway project, the aim is e collated and represented on the computer and be ready for fabrication using grasshopper.

scription on the Lousiana Sports Hall of Fame Museum. scription on the Lousiana Sports Hall of Fame Museum. â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, (2012), p. Geometry and Detailing Consultant Portfo-

aylor & Francis, 2003), p. 8. Computer-Aided Design, (MIT Press, 2004), p. 4.

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unique innovations presented by contemporary computa MSWCT Snowflake Tower

eoi week 2

The Snowflake Tower is meant to feature new thinking in arc memorable architecture. It is also the first of many towers th

The design was based on attempting to fulfill the requireme user comfort and integrating the tower with the water. The fo flake tower)

The tower also relates to nature with technology that respon that reacts to external influences like the air pressure, temp

The geometric and streamlined shaped of the tower was gen the Sports Museum, the entire structure was generated on th

This building is especially relevant to the Gateway Project. T During the night, light from the building illuminates the build different appearance during the day and night.

Another part of this building that is essential to the Gateway sports museum.

16

LAVA (Laboratory for Visionary Architecture), ‘Mswct Snowflake Tower’, (2008), p.

17

LAVA (Laboratory for Visionary Architecture), ‘Mswct Snowflake Tower’, (2008), p.


ational design techniques Architect: LAVA Location: Abu Dhabi UAE

chitecture. The building was originally developed as a prototype that was meant to translate brand values into hat would be built around the world in the new style.16

ents of the brief, which was the need for optimal lighting, air distribution, panoramic views minimal structure, good orm that resulted was one that was sleek, aerodynamic and took geometries from nature (hence the name snow

nds to the environment. There are intelligent systems and skins installed in the building perature, humidity, solar radiation and even pollution.17

nerated and formed in grasshopper and rhino especially to control the form, occupancy and building structure. Like he computer and was then broken down and exported for fabrication.

This is because the smart skin and finishing reflects light during the day making the building look fluid sharp. ding making it visible from a distance. This can be applied to the structure, making it more dynamic by giving it a

y project is the fact that the entire design was done on a computer and can be exported for fabrication like the

Project Description on MSWCT Snowflake Tower. Project Description on MSWCT Snowflake Tower.

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ve with how we use them. In the ew data mathematically first and later’.9 We can incorporate data uding aesthetics and the nd historical dimensions the new meaning. Rather than eduction of the qualitative into proach actually creates the istic potential of emergence: the mplexity and multiplicity may production of new qualities, relationships between to emerge.10

Such an approach implies that the architect’s role should be reconceptualised from that of romantic genius or technological guru to that of multidisciplinary strategist. The new architect is still ultimately responsible for design intent and needs to be able to look at the big picture to decide which factors to parameterise, to give limits to the parameters, assign a weight to each factor and determine the order and method of the information modelling process: in summary to strategise which factorsoptions, and methods will be used, howofthey will be applied consider more types information, and or generated, and to judgebe what they contribute. as inthem. the ‘new, generally more creative with But, how just we use In the softer science’, algorithms burden rigorous quantitative Petabyte Age assume we can the ‘view data of mathematically first and methodology establish and the mind is left for ‘freeit to move9 around data in thedata a context later’. We canthe incorporate 11 most creativefrom way’.many Technically this implies a broader use sources, including aesthetics and of the creative scripting in the initial stages and of design, one that is capable of sociocultural, political historical dimensions

contemporary scripting/programming cultures with criti

Reconceptualised Role Such an approach implies that the architect’s role should be reconceptualised from that of romantic genius or technological guru to that of multidisciplinary strategist. The new architect is still ultimately responsible for design intent and needs to be able to look at the big picture to decide which factors to parameterise, to give limits to the parameters, assign a weight to each factor and determine the order and because massive data is the new meaning. Rather than method of the information modelling process: in summary to strategise necessitating the mere reduction of the qualitative into OMA Research Innovation which factors and methods will be used, how they will be applied or the quantitative, this approach actuallyand creates the Parametrics Cell, Facade Study for conditions for the optimistic potential of emergence: the generated, and to judge what they contribute. But, just as in the ‘new, the Slab, 2008 softer science’, algorithms assume the burden of rigorous quantitative cumulative effects of complexity and multiplicity mayof A number of data-driven iterations the facade were generated using Role methodology and the mind is left ‘free to move around the data in the options, consider more types of information, andproduction Reconceptualised themselves result in the of new qualities, different internal and external generally be more creative withinhow use new them. In the Such an approach implies thatcreative the architect’s should be most way’.11 role which turnwe allow relationships between Technically this implies a broader use of sociocultural source material, varying 10 Petabyte Age we can ‘view data mathematically and (low reconceptualised of romantic genius technological to one that is capable of architecture and culture first to degrees emerge. creative scripting in theorinitial stages ofguru design, to high) of mutation, from that types of mutation 18 ultimately establish a context for it later’.9 We can incorporateseveral that of multidisciplinary strategist. The new architect is still datadirectional (one, two or three dimensions) and a responsible for design intent and needs to be able to look at the big from many sources, including aesthetics and the range of functional, structural and pictureThese to decide which factors to parameterise, to give limits to the sociocultural, political and historical dimensions material parameters. OMA Research and Innovation articulating the parameters, assign a weight to each factor and determine the orderParametrics and because massive data is the new meaning. Ratheriterations, than besides Cell, Facade Study for external contextual urban patterns, the Slab, 2008 method of the information modelling process: in summary to strategise necessitating the mere reduction of the qualitativealso intoindicated the two internal public A number of data-driven iterations of a different which factors and methods will be used, how they will be applied or the quantitative, this approach actually creates thefloors through the facade were generated using deformation process (a script that conditions for the optimistic potential of emergence: the generated, and to judge what they contribute. But, just as in the ‘new, different internal and external randomly ‘shook’ the grid pattern in softer science’, cumulative effects of complexity and multiplicity may sociocultural source material, varying these two horizontal zones) and algorithms assume the burden of rigorous quantitative utilised special transformationand scripts methodology the mind is left ‘free to move around the data in degrees the (low to high) of mutation, themselves result in the production of new qualities, several directional types of mutation to increase level of articulation: 11 options, consider more which types of andrelationshipsReconceptualised Role the most creative way’. in information, turn allow new between Technically this implies a broader use of (one, two or three dimensions) and a extra mutation (different thicknesses) generally be more creative with how and we use them. the 10 Such an approach implies that the architect’s roleinitial should be of design, one that is capable of architecture culture toIn emerge. scripting in the stages at sky lobbycreative zones, enlarged range of functional, structural and Petabyte Age we can ‘view data mathematically first and reconceptualised from that of romantic genius or technological guru to openings at the lobbies and radial material parameters. These 9 thickness deformation around iterations, besides articulating the establish a context for it later’. We can incorporate data that of multidisciplinary strategist. Thethe new architect is still ultimately lower sky lobby. external contextual urban patterns, responsible for design intent and needs to be able to look at the big from many sources, including aesthetics and the also indicated the two internal public picture to decide which factors to parameterise, to give limits to theOMA Research and Innovationfloors through a different sociocultural, political and historical dimensions Parametrics Cell, Facade Study for parameters, assign a weight to each factor and determine the orderthe and because massive data is the new meaning. Rather than deformation process (a script that Slab, 2008 randomly method of the information modelling process: in summary to strategise necessitating the mere reduction of the qualitative into A number of data-driven iterations of ‘shook’ the grid pattern in these two horizontal zones) and which factors and methods will be used, how they will be applied orthe facade were generated using the quantitative, this approach actually creates the different internal and external utilised special transformation scripts conditions for the optimistic potential of emergence: the generated, and to judge what they contribute. But, just as in the ‘new, to increase the level of articulation: sociocultural source material, varying softer science’, algorithms assume the burden of rigorous quantitative cumulative effects of complexity and multiplicity may extra mutation (different thicknesses) degrees (low to high) of mutation, at sky lobby zones, enlarged several directional types of mutation methodology and the mind is left ‘free to move around the data in the themselves result in the production of new qualities, (one, two or three dimensions)openings and a at the lobbies and radial most creative way’.11 Technically this implies a broader use of which in turn allow new relationships between thickness deformation around the range of functional, structural and 10 architecture and culture to emerge. creative scripting in the initial stages of design, one that is capablematerial of parameters. These lower sky lobby.

Parametric cell facade study for the slab

eoi week 3

There are large amounts of data available today and when used with math Traditional scientific methodology is lacking when the data gets too big or of data and with it produce very concrete results in fields such as science modern technologies into building design.

For this study done in 2008, OMA research team wanted to obtain data on zones and external urban pattern.In order to translate the data into analog

Firstly, they wanted to obtain data of the existing buildings. Hence they co This calculated the height and location of the building. The data was then building on the site.

By using this process there were able to fabricate different patterns by alt allowed for the input of cultural data of the site which helps develop the r

I really liked the potential behind this concept as it can be further expande even graphs into the project. This approach is applicable to the gateway p iterations, besides articulating the external contextual urban patterns, also indicated the two internal public OMA Research and Innovationfloors through a different Parametrics Cell, Facade Studydeformation for process (a script that the Slab, 2008 randomly ‘shook’ the grid pattern in A number of data-driven iterations of these two horizontal zones) and the facade were generated using utilised special transformation scripts different internal and external to increase the level of articulation: sociocultural source material, varying extra mutation (different thicknesses) degrees (low to high) of mutation, at sky lobby zones, enlarged several directional types of mutation openings at the lobbies and radial (one, two or three dimensions) and a thickness deformation around the range of functional, structural and lower sky lobby. material parameters. These iterations, besides articulating the external contextual urban patterns, also indicated the two internal public floors through a different deformation process (a script that randomly ‘shook’ the grid pattern in these two horizontal zones) and utilised special transformation scripts to increase the level of articulation: extra mutation (different thicknesses) at sky lobby zones, enlarged openings at the lobbies and radial thickness deformation around the lower sky lobby.

However, I found it difficult to connect the idea behind the facade to the ta behind a project simply by looking at it. For instance, when I showed by m unless the entire city is behind the project, no one but the architect will kn precedence, the biggest challenge that we would face is making the facad

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Cynthia Ottchen, ‘The Future of Information Modelling and the End of Theory Less Is Limited, More Is Dif


ique OMA Research Team Location: N/A

hematics it supersedes every other tool. r complicated to document. Therefore since the tools are already available, today, one can calculate a lot and technology. This could be the zeitgeist of this age. Therefore it is logical that one should incorporate

the social and cultural context of the site and using the data to articulate the building’s internal public g format, they ran the slab through a series of steps.

onceptually ‘flipped’ the slab on top of the buildings. recorded and put onto an excel spreadsheet where each number corresponded with a feature of the

tering and using special transformation scripts in order to increase the articulation level. This process relationship between culture and architecture.

ed where the social, cultural and historical data can also be used to incorporate voronoi patterning or project as it is an interesting method of incorporating the cultural aspect of Wyndham City into the design.

arget audiences. The idea of using computer modeling is new and it is not easy to decipher the idea mother my grasshopper matrix, she commented that it was nothing more than a bunch of dots. Therefore, now that actual meaning behind the facade. Hence, since our group will be using this project as the main de of the structure relatable and easily understood by the general public.

fferent’, Architectural Design, 79 (2009).

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about contemporary scripting/programming cultures week 3 burry reading review

eoi week 3

Scripting has been called the driving force for architecture in the 2 able.

The current model has the designer trusting software engineers to overlay, now the designer can become the new toolmaker. Hence, s norms.

However, they are still problems with scripting. Firstly, it is still in in to make scripting easier, the end result is not very original. Lastly, scripts.

According to Burry, there are three main scripting cultures, namely,

Personally, I mostly agree with the author. Scripting is interesting a tions of the software they are using. However, scripting is also diffic with it is time consuming and one would need to be very motivated script and work with it. It would then undermine the whole reason f

Scripting In Grasshopper 19

Mark Burry, Scripting Cultures: Architectural Design and Programming, (Wiley & Sons, 2011


21st century. This is because scripting allows the designer to overcome limitations with software currently avail-

produce the application needed for architectural models. However, with scripting, which is a computer program scripting allows the designer to unleash their creative potential and not be restrained and conform to current

n its experimental stages and are not in most university curriculums. Secondly, although the programs available trying to learn how to script is difficult and people just starting would have the tendency to appropriate other’s

y, productivity, experimentation by scripting a path to the ‘answer’ and scripting as a voyage of discovery.19

and revolutionary in the aspect that it allows designers to ‘own’ their work and not be constrained by the limitacult to grasp and understand. In a way, it is like learning a whole new language. Learning it and experimenting d and driven for them to see it through. Therefore, it might seem easier to simply ‘borrow’ another person’s for scripting in the first place as the designer would still find themselves constrained.

1).

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other cases for innovation other group precedence

Fun Cloud Pavillion

BIFID

This pavillion is a constructed entirely by a computational architectural machine. It sastifies Kolarevic’s definition of architecture which is to have a building that is completely modelled in the computer. It also has a parametric CAD system which makes the pavillion interactive. It can not only adapt the pavillion to contextual and future architectural changes but also control and dim or brighten the artificial lighting that can be controlled via a computer. For the gateway project, one should always utilize new technology as it is a means of creating interesting and innovative designs.

BIFID is an interactive ceiling proto York New Museum in 2005. The des lighting patterns” based on the sam that is applied to the geometry of t applied to the Gateway project as it number of of variation without incre through unfolding fabrication drawi

Architect: ECOLogicStudio Location: London

Architect: Alisa Andrasek (Biothing Location: New York

gateway criteria

According to the brief by Wyndham city, the installation has to be ‘exciting, eye-catching’ and would ‘inspire and e

Architecture should firstly be forward looking. This is because architecture is about creating a suitable space for achieve a new and exciting form. For instance in Tokyo, circular towers are not commonplace because of earthqua form, making it the first circular tower ever built in Tokyo. Similarly for the Gateway project, we would try to stret

For the gateway project, it is our intent to use the latest in design technology. This is because having the proficie also aid the designer in realising their design.

group eoi


g)

otype that was done for the New sign was programmed by ‘plusing me mathematics wave interference the ceiling. This approach can be t allows us to “ produce infinite easing the cost of production” ings.

ZA11 Wooden Pavillion

Architect: D Stefanescu, P, Berdarf and B. Hambasan Location: Cluj, Romania

BIFID is an interactive ceiling prototype that was done for the New York New Museum in 2005. The design was programmed by ‘plusing lighting patterns” based on the same mathematics wave interference that is applied to the geometry of the ceiling. This approach can be applied to the Gateway project as it allows us to “ produce infinite number of of variation without increasing the cost of production” through unfolding fabrication drawings.

enrich’ the municipility.

people to live, work and interact in. Architecture is a also about overcoming limitations and restrictions to akes. The Mode Gakuen Tower is a good example of a design trying to overcome obsticles, to strive for a new tch and overcome our limitations.

ency to utilize the software would not only help with experimenting and exploring suitable design options, it can

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cut definition individual matrix

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cut definition group matrix index

Definition Index

Set 1 Set 5 1) Arbitrary Points Maths Function, Component 1) Curve Intersection, Image Sampler, Rectangle 2) Arbitrary Point, Multiple Maths Function Component2) Curve Intersection, Image Sampler, Rectangle Rotation 3) Arbitrary Point, Image Sampler, Component 3) Curve Intersection, Image Sampler Rectangle (Varia4) Arbitrary Point, Attractor Point, Component tion) 5) Arbitrary Point, Curve Attractor, Component 4) Curve Intersection, Maths Function, Rectangle 5) Curve Intersection, Components Set 2 1) Arbitrary Point, Attractor Point Set 6 2) Arbitrary Point, Attractor Point Rotation 1) Arbitrary Points, Image Sampler, Extrusion 3) Arbitrary Point, Curve Attractor 2) Arbitrary Points, Maths Function, Extrusion 4) Arbitrary Point, Image Sampler, Rotation 3) Arbitrary Points, Multiple Maths Function, Extrusion 5) Arbitrary Point, Rotation 4) Arbitrary Points, Extrusion Set 3 1) Arbitrary Point, Attractor Point, Rectangle Rotation 2) Arbitrary Point, Curve Attractor, Rectangle 3) Arbitrary Points, Image Sampler, Rectangle 4) Arbitrary Points, Image Sampler, Rectangle Rotation 5) Arbitrary Points, Rectangle Rotation Set 4 1) Curve Intersection, Image Sampler 2) Curve Intersection, Attractor Points, Rotation 3) Curve Intersection, Maths Function 4) Curve Intersection, Maths Function, Rotation 5) Curve Intersection, Remapping Data 6) Curve Intersection, Rotation 7) Curve Intersection, Text Sampler 8) Curve Intersection, Attractor Points 9) Curve Intersection, Curve Attractor 10) Curve Intersection, Image Sampler, Rotation

matrix: cut

Set 7 1) Arbitrary Points, Image Sampler, Rectangle Extrusion 2) Arbitrary Points, Rectangle Extrusion 3) Arbitrary Points, Multiple Maths Function, Extrusion Set 8 1) Boolean Pattern, Maths Function, Extrusion 2) Boolean Pattern, Multiple Maths Function, Extrusion 3) Boolean Pattern, Multiple Maths Function, Rectangle Extrusion Set 9 1) Using Surface Normals, Attractor Points, Rotation 2) Using Surface Normals, Attractor Points, Extrusion 3) Using Surface Normals, Attractor Points, Rectangle Output 4) Using Surface Normals, Image Sampler


Set 10 1) Boolean Pattern, Image Sampler 2) Boolean Pattern, Image Sampler Rotation 3) Boolean Pattern, Maths Function 4) Boolean Pattern, Maths Function, Rotation 5) Boolean Pattern, Using sets 6) Boolean Pattern, Using Sets Rotation 7) Boolean Pattern, Stream Text 8) Boolean Pattern, Stream Text Rotation

Rest of Group Matrixes (jasmine) Set 13 1) Pattern Overlap, Maths Function, Extrusion 2) Pattern Overlap, Maths Function, Rotation 3) Pattern Overlap, Multiple Maths Function, Extrusion 4) Pattern Overlap, Using Sets, Rotation 5) Pattern and Overlap, using sets, extrusion 6) Pattern Overlap, Attractor Points, Shader

Set 11 1) Boolean Pattern Image Sampler, Rectangle 2) Boolean Pattern, Image Sampler, Rectangle Rotation 3) Boolean Pattern, Math Function Rectangle 4) Boolean Pattern, Maths Function, Rectangle Rotation 5) Boolean Pattern, Using Sets, Rectangle 6) Boolean Pattern, Using Sets, Rectangle Rotation 7) Boolean Pattern, Stream Text, Rectangle 8) Boolean Pattern, Stream Text, Rectangle Rotation Set 12 1) Explicit Grid (Normal Grid), Attractor Points 2) Explicit Grid (Hexagonal Grid), Attractor Points 3) Explicit Grid (Normal Grid), Image Sampler, Shader 4) Explicit Grid (Hexagonal Grid), Image Sampler, Shader 5) Explicit Grid (Normal Grid), Maths Function 6) Explicit Grid (Hexagonal Grid), Maths Function 7) Explicit Grid (Normal Grid), Rotation 8) Explicit Grid (Hexagonal Grid), Rotation

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cut definition group matrix index

Matrix

I arranged all my matrices according to the way they appear.

For the first set, I explored with using the component output and arbituary points. Irregardless of what I did, the definitions kept turning up as a mass of curves. However, when I tried to flatten it, I kept ending up with an error. Therefore, I tried it using the curve intersection input instead and I finally managed to repeat the patterns on a flat surface.

Arbitrary Points, Maths Function, Component (set 1 no.1 )

Curve Intersection, Component (set 5 no.5)

The second and third set (also applicable to sets 4-5,6-7,10-11) are ulitimately the same with the exception of their output geometries. I wanted to explore the use of different geometries on a surface. From exploring with gemetries, I discovered that the circles give the facade a more fluid feel than that of rectangles.

Arbitrary Points, Attractor Points Rotation (set 2 no.2)

However, I realised that with a limited number of Arbitrary Points as the imput, there would be lesser resulting geometries. This is evident when compared to the boolean pattern input

matrix: cut

Boolean Pattern, Maths Function (set 10 no.)

Arbitrary Points, Attractor Points Rectangle Rotation (set 3 no.1)


.

The sixth and seventh sets are different types of extrusion. As they were extruded using the arbitrary function as an input, the pattern is not as clear and distinct and that of set 8. The main difference between set six and seven is the extruding geometry output. I also realised that unless I have a lot of points when using the Arbitrary input, there is no real point in using an image sampler as the image would not be seen clearly

Arbitrary Points, Image sampler Extrusion (set 6 no.1 )

Arbitrary Points, Image sampler Rectangle Extrusion (set 7 no.1 )

Boolean Pattern, Maths Function, Rectangle Extrusion (set 8 no.3)

Set 10 and 11 were basically exploring the differences in associative techniques. The difference between the two sets are again mainly their geometry. As mentioned earlier, the circles in the Boolean Pattern input are tighter than that of the Attractor Point Set 12 is about explicit grids. Basically, although the associative techniques and ouotput are the same, differences in the grid type, be it hexagonal or a normal grid can entirely change the outcome.

Explicit Grid (Normal), Attractor Points (set 12.2)

Explicit Grid (Hexagonal), Attractor Points (set 12.2)

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cut definition group matrix index

When I was attempting the ing grasshopper and I definitely

matrixes. I did not have

was any

not confident at usinsight into the outcome.

According to Kalay, it is important that designers learn how to effectively communicate with the computers in order to achieve a good design outcome.20 It was important to do the matrixes as it not only allowed us to explore the different options that we had by trying out different permutations and combinations but also familiarize ourselves with grasshopper. Familiarizing ourselves with the software also helps us with coming out with a suitable design solution because we know the benefits and limitations of the software.21 According to Burry, our group’s scripting culture is that of a ‘voyage of discovery’.22 This is because it opens up a whole new way to explore design. While doing set 10,11 and 12, I came up with some ideas for the Wyndham city project. Basically, it was that of using lighting and layering to create the structure. Also, looking at the image of the Koala on the image sampler had me thinking about making our designs relatable. It is really important that motorist utilizing the freeway daily would understand the meaning of the structure. Hence, one idea could be to generate an image on a facade that is synonymous with Wyndham city. For instance, since Wyndham city has a famous open range zoo, placing a koala picture on the facade would enable motorist to relate it to the zoo in the area. Also, having holes cut into the facade and layering it (set 13) can allow us to create interesting shadows by day and have it lit up brightly at night.

Idea of Layering circles for lighting Pattern Overlap, Maths Function Extrude (set 10 no.1)

Koala Boolean Pattern, Image Sampler (set 10 no.1)

20

Yehuda E. Kalay, Architecture’s New Media: Principles, Theories, and Methods of Computer-Aided Design (MIT Press, 2004). 4.

21

Yehuda E. Kalay, Architecture’s New Media: Principles, Theories, and Methods of Computer-Aided Design (MIT Press, 2004). 11.

22

Mark Burry, Scripting Cultures: Architectural Design and Programming (Wiley & Sons, 2011). 32.

matrix: cut


reverse engineering facade Dior in Ginza, Tokyo

Defintions Used: perforation / image mapping / layering The Design intend behind the Dior Building in Ginza is to imprint the trademark Dior handbag skin onto the buiding. As a result, the Dior building has a double layered facade. Perforations are made onto the outer alumninum facade whilst the holes made in the inner layer are actually printed on. This method plays with perseption by making the depth between the two facades appear depper than it actually is. However, this phenomenon can only be seen if the person is standing directly infront of the building. Personally, I chose to do this building over the other alternatives because it is the only building on the list that I have actually been to. However, although I must have walked past it dozens of times, I never actually realised that there were preforations in the building, let alone the ability of the facade play with depth perception.

I believe that the function of the design is to mark its spot on the street. Ginza is one of the most conjested and upscale shopping districts in Tokyo and numerous famous fashion houses line the street. Furthermore, the Japanese in general are very particular about their image and most of them do carry very expensive designer handbags.23 Hence, I believe that they chose the facade not only based solely on the aesthetic nature but rather that the play on perception and lighting would illuminate the building from far and have it stand out from far. Furthermore, the facade looks expensive and sophisticated. This image could potientially attract customers and draw them away from other fashion houses

23

The statements on culture are not strictly factual but mostly based on my personal observations about Tokyo. I have spent the last two summers there since my family is currently based there.

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reverse engineering facade Dior in Ginza, Tokyo

matrix: cut/fabricate

Reversed Engineered Facade From Top Left: 1) Actual Ginza Dior Facade as seen from across the road 2) Grasshopper Definition (As seen from the back) 3) Grasshopper Definition (As seen from the front) 4) Grasshopper Definition (Perspective 1 Double Layered Facade) 5) Grasshopper Definition (Perspective 2 Double layered Facade)


Fabrication As a group, we decided not to fabricate the Ginza Facade. However, we were still interesting in finding out the effect of light and materials on creating shadows so I made boxes out of card, From the Top Right 1) White card box with holes in the surface - like the ginza building, it is well lighted and can be seen from far at night 2) Shadows from the white card 3) White card box wrapped in Alunimiun foil reflects rather than channels light Therefore, for the Gateway project, it is better to use dark opaque materials to cast very definite shadows

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reverse engineering facade BANQ Restaurant, Boston

In contemporary architecture, materials and their inherent properties are often fundamental points of departure for discovering and exploring new spatial possibilities and for designing different perceptions and experiences of architecture.

ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO

AIR

Material effects are not only visual effects; they are experiential effects. According to Juhani Pallasmaa, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Authentic architectural experiences derive from real or ideated bodily confrontations rather than visually observed entities

387099 Jiaying Le 377534 Melissa Tsang 374119 Samantha Loo

CASE STUDY

01   

The construction of the restaurant   

  concept     was developed by the of Wyndham city is a vibrant and growing city. In fact, it has experienced the largest growth among the areas managed by the local Victorian local govern-â&#x20AC;? theandment.fastest striated wood-slatted system. It It is predicted that an estimation of 245,000 number of people will be living there by 2021 (Wyndham website). allows the sight of the mechanical, Unlike others, Wyndham city is incredibly diverse. Besides having a strong indus-â&#x20AC;? trial and technology district, consists of many major retail precincts, veg-â&#x20AC;?to plumbing andit alsolighting systems etation growing areas and even a tourist destination -â&#x20AC;? featuring an Open Range (Wyndham website. beZooconceal from the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes. Designed similarly to the structure of

 a Thecanopy, the design approach, used goal of our Group is to design and construct a gateway that strongly repre-â&#x20AC;? and features the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strong concept of diversity and culture. As stated   

  insents project,allows onthis the brief, the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;gatewayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; would be situated on a busythe highway. facade Therefore, it is to  important that the design of the gateway is eye catching and interesting. Moreo-â&#x20AC;? ver, it needs to seamless. act as a presentation and exhibits how Wyndham city aspires conto appear This design be. FABRICATION cept - creating a seamless idea, is The concept of new technology is one of the main aspect that Wyndham city is working towards. This can be shown by the various existing centers that had explored through matrix the been built there. Thus, in relation to our ideaour of our design, our group hadand de-â&#x20AC;? cided to focus on the notion of creating an innovative parametric facade, which with the newthat design technologies approaches and ma-â&#x20AC;? theincorporates design we through arethe preparing for terials that we had reserach on. As proposed, the facade of the building is con-â&#x20AC;? structed by multi layers to signify the diversity of Wyndham city. At the same fabrication. time, this serves as an effective marketing strategy of promoting the various

                              Architect:  Office  dA,  Inc.          Location:  Boston,  USA

The construction of the restaurant was developed by the concept of the striated wood-slatted system. It allows the sight of the mechanical, plumbing and lighting systems to be conceal from the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes. Designed similarly to the structure of a canopy, the design approach, used in this project,allows the facade to appear seamless. This design concept - creating a seamless idea, is explored through our matrix and the the design that we are preparing for fabrication.

02    

                                              Architect:  Faulders  Studio        Location:  Tokyo,  Japan

Airspace Tokyo is strongly displays the design approach of mixing voronoi, layering and lighting. Built of laser-cut aluminum and plastic composite , the facade produces an unique outlook as light travels through the detailed openings , drawing attentions of the passerby as they walked by. In relation to the Gateway project, this building explores one of the design requirements of our design to be eye-catching and unique. This idea will be further looked into , in the fabrication of our current design concept.

 

              

cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s technological centers. Moreover, this approach shows how Wyndham city is forward looking and at the same time, open to new changes.

03     

done by melissa In conclusion, our proposed design would effectively serve as a visual represen-â&#x20AC;? tation of Wyndham city to the multitude of vehicles passing through daily. Moreo-â&#x20AC;? ver, it would be an innovative, interesting, diverse and fresh design that will serve as a significant landmark structure to the city.

                                              Architect  Kumiko  Inui          Location:  Tokyo,  Japan

The Dior building explores the concept of form patterning through the design of the facade and lighting. It is one of the main design approaches that we are focusing and exploring in our Gateway Project design. As shown by the Dior building, the perforated patterns achieve a subtle aesthetic appearance through the facade detailing.

banqresturant  

 

CUT - DEVELOP matrix: cut/fabricate

Argument


We decided to fabricate this because we thought it looked th emost interesting among all of the case studies. We liked how the enture building seemed to be peeling off and how fluid the restaurant looked. During fabrcation, we also designed a special holder so none of the layers are actually glued together and can be removed anytime. We thought that it was interesting concept that can be applied to the gateway project so that the structure can be easily moved if needed. It could also potientially be a possible design idea. Another concept that we came up was that the layers itself were very diverse, hence it could represent the diversity of Wyndham city. Hence, for our gateway project, we want a structure that is layered alongside the highway.

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reverse engineering facade Airspace, Tokyo

Airspace Tokyo is strongly displays the design approach of mixing voronoi, layering and lighting. Built of laser-cut aluminum and plastic composite , the facade produces an unique outlook as light travels through the detailed openings , drawing attentions of the passerby as they walked by. In relation to the Gateway project, this building explores one of the design requirements of our design - to be eye-catching and unique. Hence, as a group, we decided to fabricate it using a clear material. From the fabrication process, we realised that the voronoi patterning cut into a transparent surface can form intesting shadows. The results were a little unexpected. This is because we did not expect to see such clear shadows. However, unlike the shadows formed using wooden structure or the boxcard, it seems lighter, more fluid and less harsh. The form too is interesting. From afar, the glass appears cracked. However, upon further investigation, one would realise that it is actually a series of delicate patterns. This form can potientially be used for the gateway project as it eye catching and creates interesting patterns.

matrix: cut/fabricate


done by jasmine

page 18 of 20


conclusion competitive advantage

Louis Sullivan once said that ‘the Roman Temple’ can no more exist in Chicago USA than the Roman Civilization can exist there. Similarly, although old techniques and methods do work, they are slowly being phased out for better and more advanced technology. This is because architecture embodies the ideologies of the age. Once a particular ideology is no longer accepted, it no longer becomes relatable. In this era, it is the advancement of technology. With the computer and the internet, we now have the ability to calculate and compute almost any type of data to its logical conclusion. Now, one now can effectively construct and fabricate a building for construction entirely on the computer. For instance, with the matrixes, I could effectively explore different ways of creating a facade, layers and even translating an image onto the facade of the building. Also if my design is complex and I wanted to see if it works, I could simply break it down on the computer and send it for fabrication. Compared to building it by hand, it both time-saving and efficient. Given that Wyndham city is a technological hub, having an innovative parametric facade that incorporates new design technologies through the approaches and materials that we had researched on would serve as an effective marketing strategy to demonstrate how strong the industry is doing. For the design proposal, we expanded on the idea used by the OMA research team in the precedence where the data of the surroundings were featured in the slab’s facade. To signify the diversity of Wyndham city, my group’s design idea is to layer the structure along the freeway, with each layer symbolizing a different aspect of Wyndham City. We would also use the population information available on the Australian Bureau of Statistics as the basis for the height of the layers, using it to show and signify the projected increase in population for the area. We would also be using Voronoi patterning for each layer and each pattern would represent the population demographic in each region of Wyndham city . In conclusion, our proposed design would effectively serve as a visual representation of Wyndham city to the multitude of vehicles passing through daily. Moreover, it would be an innovative, interesting, diverse and fresh design that will serve as a significant landmark structure to the city.

eoi conclusion/bibliography


bibliography

Andrew Rosenberg, ‘Mode Gakuen Cocoon Tower by Tange Associates’, (2011). Branko Kolarevic, Architecture in the Digital Age - Design and Manufacturing Taylor & Francis, 2003). Chistopher Hawthorne, ‘Frank Gehry’s Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas’, Los Angeles Times, 19 May 2010. Cynthia Ottchen, ‘The Future of Information Modelling and the End of Theory Less Is Limited, More I s Different’, Architectural Design, 79 (2009), 22-27. Joseph Giovannini, ‘Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health - Las Vegas Gehry Partners’, in ArchitectA merican Institute of Architects, 2011), pp. 84-94. LAVA (Laboratory for Visionary Architecture), ‘Mswct Snowflake Tower’ (2008) <http://www.l-a-v-a. net/projects/mswct-snowflake-tower-2/> [Accessed 22 April 2012]. Mark Burry, Scripting Cultures: Architectural Design and Programming Wiley & Sons, (2011). Method Design, ‘Louisana State Sports Hall of Fame + Regional History Museum’ (2012) <http:// www.methoddesign.com/lsh/> [Accessed 22 April 2012]. Paul Noritaka Tange and Minami Masato, ‘Mode Gakeun Cocoon Tower’, Council on Tall Buildings and Habitat (2009), 16-19. Tom Gorman, ‘Ruvo Center Architect’s Form Helps Direct Focus on a Cure’, Las Vegas Sun, 6 April 2010. Trahan Architects, ‘Lousiana Sports Hall of Fame Museum’ (2012) <http://www.trahanarchitects. com/#/worksinprogress/project_three_image_7> [Accessed 22 April 2012]. William J. R. Curtis, Modern Architecture since 1900. 3rd edn (London: Phaidon Press Limited, 1996), p. 736. Yehuda E. Kalay, Architecture’s New Media: Principles, Theories, and Methods of Computer-Aided DesignMIT Press, 2004), p. 536.

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conclusion learning objectives and outcome

What I have Learnt so Far

Firstly, After doing the readings in week 1, I realized that the reason why architecture design and techniques are e believed in looking toward the future and modern technology to refine heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work. Hence, he used a lot of glass, c dawn of technology and the focus on the environment, most buildings today are built using the computer and are forms and architectural designs.

Secondly, one thing I really took away from the readings is need to communicate effectively with the computer. T intent and use something else that is easier to draw on the computer. Hence it was then that I realized how impo tool for experimenting with different definitions and matrices.

Thirdly, we were exposed to parametric modeling. Parametric modeling is the process of associating and exposin the feeling of being integrated in organically into the environment rather than be forced to conform. Since archite idea of blending into the landscape. However, unlike scripting, parametric modeling would probably be a phase th

After doing reading the Wyndham city proposal, I realized that we had to design something that was memorable a drivers can see whilst driving along the highway.

The cut definitions were good starting points to generate possible design ideas. From the cut definitions, my grou important to choose the correct material for the design as different materials will age differently and the design

Also with parametric design, one can use data about the local region or vegetation in their design. They can do s ber of trees in a particular area in Wyndham city or the number of circles in the facade can represent the average the passers-by to understand.

My opinions on the course

During the first few weeks of the course, I was really disorientated. In a way, learning grasshopper and rhino was Hence, personally, the first few weeks for me were tough.

I realized though, that the more I did my readings and did my practices, the better I got at it.The hard part for me and half the time, I had no idea what I was doing. It got more difficult initially as I could not really keep up with m However, after trying (and failing) a lot of times I got better at it. Now (finally), I can roughly create basic layers starting to enjoy it a little more than I used to.

learning objectives


ever changing is because of its link to the beliefs of the era. For example, in the early 20th century Le Corbusier concrete and steel. Similarly, there is yet again a different way of perceiving things in the 21st century. With the e required by law to have a certain environmental rating for it to be built. Hence, with this constrains comes new

This is because using grasshopper is new to me and sometimes, I find that I have to compromise my original ortant it was to learn the software properly and experiment with it as the computer is a powerful and important

ng explicit parameters to computational geometry. Generally, parametric buildings have the tendency to enhance ecture is generally defined by the beliefs of their time, parametric modeling is a good way of representing the hat would probably be replaced once a better form for modeling is found.

and focus a lot on the approach as the ‘gateway’ project was located along a highway. This is to ensure that

up decided on using layering, lighting and voronoi patterning for the facade of our structure. On top of that, it is intent could be ruined if the wrong material is chosen

so in may different aspects. For instance the number of possible layers in the facade can be based on the nume number of people passing though the city. It is also important for the structure to be relatable and easy for

s like learning a new language. Also, previously, I had been procrastinating when it came to learning inDesign.

e initially was to be able to relate to my designs. When I first started doing the matrixes, everything was foreign my work and I took a lot longer than the time allocated on the ‘weekly objective’ sheet. and models on grasshopper. Although, the course is a technically difficult, now that I can keep up with it, I am

page 20 of 20

Mid Semester Journal Submission  

Assignment journal submission

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