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CRAFTS Traditional

Southwest

Issue I


CRAFTS Traditional

Southwest


CRAFTS Traditional

Southwest

“Whether

it be an ornate stained-glass window, a gorgeous tapestry, or a good piece of printing, a man’s handiwork is never better than the mind that concieves it and the hands that fashion it.” - Lewis Hine

Introduction

This magazine is a photographic exploration of traditional craft businesses in the South West of England. It aims to show people the extensive range of traditional based industries that still survive within our modern day society, the products that these crafts people produce as well as their individual stories. The crafts people that I have featured within this magazine are chosen because of the quality of the work they produce. Each of them are professional makers creating handmade and unique items. Their work can only continue to be made if it is recognised and supported by others.

Features

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Val Foss

Andrew Hall

Lace Maker

Blacksmith

wroughtirondevon.co.uk

honitonmuseum.co.uk

H.J Mears

Liz Pannell

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Leatherworker

Boat Builders

mearsboatbuilders.co.uk

devonleather.co.uk

Susan Routh

Rosamary Jacks

suzandy.co.uk

rosemaryjackspottery.co.uk

Nick Thwaites

Ann Pengelly

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Potter

Chair Caner

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Furniture Maker

Stained Glass Maker

nickthwaitesfurniture.co.uk

annpengellystainedglass.vpweb.co.uk

Malcolm Sutcliffe

Mike Rowland

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Glass Blower

Wheelwright & Coachbuilder

www.malcolm-sutcliffe.co.uk

wheelwright.org.uk

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Directory of Makers

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aNDREW hALL ASH Ironworks Before the Industrial revolution, the blacksmith was a vital part of our rural community. The art of blacksmithing is essentially to heat Iron until it is soft enough to be worked into shape using traditional hand tools. Carefully controlled heat is the most important aspect of this craft. The necessary tools of the trade are an anvil and a sledgehammer. A traditional anvil is curved and pointed at one end, and squared off at the other, allowing the maximum number of jobs to be completed using just this. In a modern blacksmiths forge they often work with a power hammer, this is especially useful when working with industrial sized iron. There is a range of various tools and techniques used within the art of blacksmithing, one of the most prominent being traditional forge welding, this is when the metal is heated and joined by hammering it together. Andrew Hall is an award winning master blacksmith working in Devon, England. Andrew founded his company ASH Ironworks in the idyllic location of a traditional thatched forge in the picturesque village of Branscombe. More recently he opened Powderham forge, situated in Exeter. Andrew started his career in blacksmithing alongside his father, fabricating gates and railings, after completing a four-year apprenticeship at A.K Wyles, in Trowbridge. Andrew also completed a course at Chippenham College. Andrew aspired to a more creative way of working with metal, and began to explore the traditional craft of blacksmithing.

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Blacksmith


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Blacksmith

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After leaving the family business Andrew started creating a range of contemporary and traditional based pieces, selling them from his working forge and showroom in Branscombe. Andrew has gained a variety of awards including ‘Champion Live Blacksmith of the Year’ for four years running, by the Worshipful Company of Blacksmiths and ‘National Blacksmith of the Year’ in 2006. In 2009 he was awarded with ‘Accredited judge’ and is now qualified to judge at county shows alone. In 2012 Andrew earned his biggest achievement yet of ‘Bronze Medal’ in recognition of his outstanding work.

In 2012 Andrew opened a second forge in Powderham of Exeter, where he works alongside his brother Gary, a trained blacksmith, his nephew, Simon, whom Andrew is training, and Eric. The newest member of the forge, Simon, hopes to have a successful career as a blacksmith. He has already won awards, during his short time with the company. In 2013 he won 3rd place in the ‘crash and dash’ competition, and took home 3rd place for his poppy candleholders, during the Devon County Show. He also won 1st place in a contest in the New Forest. Most recently Simon picked up 3rd place during a live competition at the New Forest, the task in hand to make a saleable item of his choice. Taking on new workers means that Andrew is able to dedicate more of his time to attending craft and county shows as part of the Worshipful Company of Blacksmiths. The quality of ASH Ironworks products demonstrates their skills not only as blacksmiths but artists. Andrew’s dedication to the craft has brought him a great sense of accomplishment over the years. wroughtirondevon.co.uk

enquiries@ashironworks.co.uk 01626 891163

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Blacksmith


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Blacksmith

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Blacksmith


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Blacksmith

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Boat Builders


H.J Mears Boat builders Timber was once the only reliable source from which boats could be built, before the introduction of modern materials such as fibreglass and steel. A wooden boat is carefully crafted, with most calculations being worked out by eye. The wood is precisely selected, making sure to choose a tree that is likely to have fewest knots within it, least sapwood, and a very gentle curve along its length; choosing a tree that satisfies the above allows for efficient use of the timber. Traditional wooden boats have become expensive to produce; due to their labour intensive build and cost of quality timber. So nowadays they are more of a luxury, though there are still enough buyers to provide steady business for the few traditional boat builders that remain. Mears boat builders have handcrafted wooden boats for decades. Harold Mears founded H.J Mears and son boat builders in 1945. Prior to World War II Harold worked for H.Lavis and Son in Exmouth, he then moved on to Dixon & Son at Exmouth Docs. In 1957 Harold opened his boat building business in Seaton, Devon, which is where it remains today, being run by Harold’s son Paul, and grandson Alex. Paul started working alongside his father in 1961; the job entails long hours and is physically demanding, though this has never deterred him. Paul runs the company alongside his son Alex, who started boat building after finishing his five-year degree in structural engineering. Paul and Alex work together to restore and build boats the traditional old-fashioned way, by eye. They also offer boat moorings, and GRP fibreglass roofing. Paul and Alex are currently working on a 25 foot long wooden boat named “Tarka”. The build was started in September 2013 and aims to be finished in July 2014. The boat is constructed from 7 types of wood and over 3,000 copper nails, as well as many stainless steel screws and bolts. No glue has been used at all. Many boats built by the Mears family still reside on beaches across the Southwest and further afield. mearsboatbuilders.co.uk

alexp_mears@hotmail.co.uk 01297 20964

Traditional Crafts Southwest | Boat Builders

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Boat Builders


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Boat Builders

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Boat Builders


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Boat Builders

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Chair Caner


Sue Handy Routh Chair caner The cane used for seating comes from Rattans; the most commonly used cane comes from the Far East such as; the Malay Peninsula, Indonesia and the Philippines. The plants can reach up to 500ft long and can range from a few millimetres to the thickness of a mans arm. There is a long and laborious process between the rattan plant and the cane used for seating. Once the Rattan has been harvested, the cane is cut to length, tied in lengths and is ready to be cured. After this the cane is graded, and checks are done for overall quality. A machine separates the bark, used for seating, from the inner core, used extensively for basketwork and rattan furniture. Lastly the strips are trimmed for orderly width and thickness. Caned seats come in a variety of different shapes and sizes, and there are several different patterns that can be created. Sue Handy Routh specialises in carefully reproducing the exact finishing styles of French and continental caning, she has a particular interest in Thonet and other Bentwood furniture. Sue graduated from Buckinghamshire New University, and holds a BA(hons) in furniture restoration, she started caning over 20 years ago, after inheriting a chair from her grandmother. Her knowledge of chairs as well as other furniture is fascinating. Sue works alongside her Husband Malcolm; together they restore woven seating areas of chairs, working with various materials such as; Cane, Seagrass, Riempie, Danish and other paper cords. They also undertake Lloyd loom and wicker repairs, as well as a limited amount of Rush. Susan works from her home in Buckerell, Devon. suzandy.co.uk

info@suzandy.co.uk 01404 850 116

Traditional Crafts Southwest | Chair Caner

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Chair Caner

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Chair Caner


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Chair Caner

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Nick thwaites Furniture Maker 21

Traditional Crafts Southwest | Furniture Maker

Traditionally the woodworker was involved in every sphere of human life, with many items being produced from wood. A contemporary furniture maker lends his skills more to the design and techniques of creating a piece of furniture. The English tradition of furniture making dates back to the early middle ages, with the men who made it working with the most basic of tools. Over time the basic range of sawing and chopping implements developed into a wide range of specialist tools, such as planes, for producing flat surfaces, and then moulding planes, which produce decorative grooving and beading. The mid to late 18th Century saw the art of Veneering arrive from Holland, bringing about more decorated pieces. Timber must be properly dried before any crafting can begin. As soon as a tree is cut the water within it, which can make up more than half of the weight of the living tree, starts to evaporate. This process, which can take years in the case of thick sections of timber, causes shrinkage and leaves the wood harder and stronger. A modern day workshop would generally buy timber ready dried but may also have its own kiln to dry wood which is bought ‘green’. There is also a more extensive range of tools available, making the preparation of wood less labour-intensive. In particular with the electrification of manufacturing during the 20th Century, most furniture-making workshops were equipped with powered circular saws, bandsaws,


planing and thicknessing machines, morticers and drilling machines and, in many cases, spindle moulders, which can rapidly cut decorative profiles on lengths of timber, resulting in the obsolescence of the old moulding planes. However, for most furniture makers, hand tools are still an important part of the process, and these - planes, spoke shaves, hand saws, chisels and mallets, are in essence exactly the same as the tools used by their Georgian and Victorian predecessors. Nick Thwaites trained as a solicitor, working with a city of London law firm for 18 years. Having an enthusiasm for design and a love of furniture, in 2005 Nick decided to move to England from the firm’s Bangkok office, and start his own business, with the knowledge that if it did not work out for him he could return to law and keep making furniture as a hobby. Nick trained for a year with Chris Faulkner, near Dartington and eventually purchased a house near Honiton, Devon, which included a disused milking parlour. Nick developed this into his personal workshop, fitting it out with a workbench, tool storage and a suite of woodworking machines. Nick is now secretary of the Devon Furniture Makers Association and over the last eight years has designed and made a variety of pieces including a built in dressing room, a kitchen, tables, chairs, desks, dressing tables, and even a lectern for the head of the Hong Kong office of the law firm he used to work for.

Because Nick tends to create ‘one off’ pieces, his challenge - and his speciality - lies in designing furniture, which exactly meets the client’s requirements in terms of function and aesthetics, but also adding his own touch. For example, Nick is currently working on a collector’s cabinet for an international customer, designed to hold 50 poems, published in the 1930s in pamphlet form, that his client has collected over the years. There are 17 drawers, each divided into three sections, which have been carefully designed and made to display the poems. There is also, at the client’s request, a secret compartment. Every inch of this product has been thought about precisely, down to allowing for any movement in the wood, which may result from the difference in atmospheric humidity between England and its new home in Hong Kong. Woodworking, even in the 21st Century, comes in many forms, from large-scale timber framing for buildings, through the mechanised production of doors, windows and staircases, to the manufacture of large batches of furniture and other domestic items. Fine furniture making, with its focus on individual pieces designed, built and finished with meticulous attention to detail, represents a niche within this range, but one that clearly displays its craft heritage. nickthwaitesfurniture.co.uk

nick@nickthwaitesfurniture.co.uk 01404 548467

Traditional Crafts Southwest | Furniture Maker

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Furniture Maker


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Furniture Maker

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Furniture Maker


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Furniture Maker

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Glass Blower


Malcolm Sutcliffe glass blower The art of glass blowing survived through the industrial revolution due to the demand for high quality art glass pieces. Blowing Glass is a technique that transformed the idea of working with glass. Traditionally glass was blown into a clay mould, though free blowing soon became popular. The process of glass blowing appears easy to the untrained eye, though it requires a special technique. A ‘gather’ of glass is collected from the furnace, and is thoughtfully and carefully blown into a desired shape with a sequence of precise movements. The blowing iron is constantly rolled back and forth to prevent the glass from sagging, whilst shaping the product with a range of traditional tools. The end item is then cooled slowly in a kiln to prevent any stresses in the glass developing. Malcolm Sutcliffe studied ceramics at Birmingham Polytechnic, but was so drawn to the glass facilities that he ended up studying glass full time. After graduating Malcolm set up his first studio at Winyates Crafts Centre in Redditch. During this time he was also employed at Bristol Polytechnic and Stourbridge College of Art and Technology as a visiting lecturer. Malcolm then worked alongside two other glass blowers in a hothouse in Chesterfield, before residing to Cornwall. Malcolm now runs his business from an old bakery in Penryn, Cornwall, with his wife Jean, and Daughter Rosie. Malcolm sells his work through the family run gallery and e-commerce website. As well as having work at The Guild of Ten in Truro, he is a member of the Cornwall Crafts Association therefore always has his products available at the CCA’s two Galleries at Trelissick and Trelowarren, in Cornwall. www.malcolm-sutcliffe.co.uk info@malcolm-sutcliffe.co.uk 01326 377020

Traditional Crafts Southwest | Glass Blower

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Glass Blower


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Glass Blower

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Glass Blower


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Glass Blower

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Val Foss Lace maker Honiton Lace was first made in Honiton and the surrounding areas in approximately 1560. Honiton became an area popular in lace making because the tools needed to complete it were available within the local towns, such as the Flax, which was grown in the Axminster area. Many people within the town were weavers, so these skills were easily transferred to making lace. Different styles of lace are often named after the region from which they originated. Each style is made using the same traditional technique with only a pillow, pins, thread and bobbins. Honiton Lace is made in stages, with the flowers or main feature being made separately to the net backing they are applied to. The lace is made using a circular pillow, which is turned according to the area you are working on and the way in which the lace runs.

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Lace Maker


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Lace Maker

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Lace Maker


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Lace Maker

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Traditionally the net backing would have also been hand made, but are now often machine made. This bobbin lace is made with numerous bobbins, dependant on the complexity of the design. A pattern is made on stiff card and is perforated to hold pins, which holds the shape of the lace whilst working. The threads are anchored at the top, and are moved in pairs using the bobbins, twisting, plaiting and weaving the threads. Many women would work on a large piece of lace, as the delicate and intricate work takes huge amounts of long and dedicated hours. There was a greater interest in lace during the reign of Elizabeth I, whose love of lace was plain to see. In 1839 Queen Victoria ordered her wedding dress and veil to be made from Honiton lace, also fashioning the tradition of being married wearing white. Victoria made determined efforts to keep the tradition of lace making alive. Though as lace became unfashionable, and the people that were making it grew older and passed away, there was no one to replace these skilled lace makers. 1870 saw a decrease in people making lace, when laws were enforced meaning that children had to attend school, and by 1939 there was only 9 lace makers in the local area. Lace making had become a hobby rather than a way of life. Pat Perryman, of Honiton, began teaching lace making in 1972 and in 1981 made the Prince of Wales feathers in lace for Charles and Dianna’s wedding. Val Foss began lace making in 1990 but started Honiton Lace when she moved to Devon in 1997, and is now chair of Honiton Lace makers. Val also regularly gives demonstrations at Allhallows Museum in Honiton. The ladies that lace, of Honiton Museum, have each worked on the Millennium christening gown, which can be worn by grandchildren, and then their children, and so on. With the intention it will remain part of these makers family tradition. The art of making Honiton Lace continues today with both adults and children attending weekly classes, so preserving a 400 year old tradition. honitonmuseum.co.uk

info@honitonmuseum.co.uk 01404 44966

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Lace Maker


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Lace Maker

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Liz Pannell Leatherworker The craft of leatherwork to make garments dates back to before the Middle Ages. Leather working is highly associated with saddlery, but over time many other products have been created from leather. These include: shoes, luggage, fashion items and traditional pieces such as jugs and tankards. Sophisticated techniques are used today to help fabricate a range of luxury goods. A variety of traditional tools are often used help to achieve the basic tasks of cutting, punching and stitching. The leather is cut using a sharp round knife; a plough gauge can then be used to create the correct width to work with, and the edges creased and bevelled to improve their overall appearance and strength. The sewing line is often marked with a rotary pricking wheel, then the leather is stitched using a two strong needles, a stitching awl and waxed linen thread. Choosing the correct colour of thread is an important aspect of making the product, as it will add to the overall look. The edges are also dyed and burnished to seal them. The item is then waxed to finalise the process.

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Leatherworker


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Leatherworker

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Leatherworker


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Leatherworker

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Leatherworker


Liz Pannell founded Devon Leather in 2012 and works from her studio neighbouring Britain’s only remaining oak bark tannery, from which she sources her leather. Using traditional harnessmaking techniques, hand-stitching, vintage tools and the finest leather, Liz creates luxury goods made in England from start to finish, specialising in bags and belts. Liz originally studied Fine Art at University of Plymouth- Exeter School of Art and Design, but has since developed a keen eye for leatherwork, and has been trained by a retired harness-maker. Liz enjoys making beautiful functional items that can be used in everyday life, and aims to source most if not all of her materials from the local area. The leather used is often full grain, which includes all the natural marks and imperfections, meaning that every hand-crafted item is truly unique. Liz’s products are available to buy through her online shop, as well as directly from her workshop in Colyton, Devon. We have a heritage of skills and craft that cannot be matched by mass-production, and is in danger of being lost, Liz hopes that the tradition of leatherwork will continue to be practised widely. devonleather.co.uk

info@devonleather.co.uk 0117 230 8622

Traditional Crafts Southwest | Leatherworker

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Rosemary Jacks Potter 45

Traditional Crafts Southwest | Potter


Pots are amongst the earliest artefacts that have been discovered, there are numerous ways for making and decorating pots. The most common ways of shaping by hand are throwing and building, with most forms of pottery falling under one of three categories; Earthenware, Stoneware and Porcelain. Earthenware is the most ancient of the three, using traditional techniques that date back before Christ, this method also allows a greater variety of colour to be used. Rosemary Jacks creates individual hand thrown pots, incorporating a range of techniques, from her garden studio in Devon. Rosemary primarily uses earthenware, the traditional clay of Devon pottery. After the shape of the pot has been formed it is dipped into a slip of white ball clay, and can later be decorated. A method that Rosemary uses often is Sgraffitto, the technique of scratching designs and patterns into the clay. Other processes used include paper resist, slip trailing, and brush work to create designs which are animal and plant based,

including fish, chickens, birds, hares, flowers and leaves. Coloured slips and oxides with the addition of under glaze colours give the pieces and earthy quality. Rosemary completed a degree in combined science at Leicester University, after moving to Devon she started attending pottery classes in Axminster, ran by Nick Hillyard. In 1996 Rosemary bought her own wheel and continued to attend Nick’s classes alongside practicing at home. In 1997 Rosemary bought a kiln, and by 2007 she was throwing pottery on a regular basis, and now enjoys this creative art as a full time career. Rosemary regularly attends craft shows and sells her pots in shops such as Wendys Cookshop in Honiton, Otterton Mill near Budleigh Salterton and Millers Farm Shop in Kilmington, amongst many others.

rosemaryjackspottery.co.uk

info@rosemaryjackspottery.co.uk 01297 553407

Traditional Crafts Southwest | Potter

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Potter


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Potter

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Potter


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Potter

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Stained Glass Maker


Ann pengelly stained glass maker Creating stained glass is one of the oldest architectural crafts remaining, with the growth in cathedrals and churches, making stained glass became popular. There are many ways of colouring the glass, though a lot of modern makers buy the colour glass they desire. Stained glass begins with a template of the window; pieces are cut from sheets of glass to the shapes and patterns within the design. The pieces are held together by lead strips with a H shape cross section, these are then soldered together to form a stained glass window or panel, to which glazing cement is applied, filling any gaps and holding the glass securely. The technique of leading is used for exterior windows, as it is waterproof. Another technique practiced is copper foiling, which is used for interior windows. Copper foil is wrapped around the edges of each individual piece of glass; the sections are then soldered together at the joints. The production of a variety of stained glass has become popular, and these methods can be seen in the form of; lampshades, pictures, and as windows in most cathedrals and churches, as well as peoples homes, amongst a whole range of other decorative items. Ann Pengelly is a trained stained glass maker and teacher. After studying at Art College in London, she worked as an illustrator before deciding to specialise in glass. Ann moved to Devon in 1994 and started running classes from her workshop in Seaton, Devon. Her studio ‘The Good Shepherd’ resides in a converted church, which still has its original stained glass window, creating the perfect setting for her work. Ann uses traditional methods such as lead, etching and glass paints, which are fired to produce very individual work; she particularly enjoys making etched glass doors and windows. Ann also undertakes restoration work. annpengellystainedglass.vpweb.co.uk

annpengellystainedglass@hotmail.co.uk 07979013641

Traditional Crafts Southwest | Stained Glass Maker

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Stained Glass Maker


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Stained Glass Maker

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Stained Glass Maker


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Stained Glass Maker

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MIke rowland and son wheelwright and coachbuilders For centuries the Wheelwright and Coachbuilder kept the pre-industrial world moving, whether it was in the form of farm carts, wagons or fine carriages. Constructing a wheel in a traditional way starts with a hub, which is turned on a lathe. The spokes are each handcrafted, and the fellies, which form the outer circle, are made using a pattern. The final part of the process is to hot bond it. The completed wheel is placed on the ground, a ring of metal, commonly known as the tyre, is heated in a fire so it expands. It is then lifted from the fire using tongs, and hammered onto the wheel swiftly, before the wood starts to burn. The metal is then cooled instantly with water, so that it shrinks, holding the precisely formed wheel together. Mike Rowland and son is one of only two Wheelwrights in Britain that hold the Royal Warrant. Mike and Greg were awarded the Royal Warrant of Appointment in 2005, this gives them the right to display the coat of arms and is accepted as a mark of excellence. From their workshop in Colyton, Devon, they have been producing handcrafted, fine quality wheels, for every purpose imaginable.

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Wheelwright & Coachbuilder

Their customers are private individuals, farmers, military and naval, museums and film companies, including the Hollywood blockbuster Gladiator, and the newly commissioned Tarzan film. In 2011 the Rowland’s were responsible for the maintenance of the wheels for the Royal and state chariot and carriages that were used for Prince Williams wedding. The Rowland’s produce an outstanding range of carefully crafted items ranging from authentic wheels for cannons, carriages built by eye to restoration projects. They’re trainee George, of only 17, stands in good stead being taught by two highly skilled professionals. George is completing his Wheelwright apprenticeship, which is the first in the country to be funded by the Livery Council Apprenticeship Scheme, and also a carpentry qualification at college. It is a joy to see such a traditional part of our heritage continuing, especially within younger generations. wheelwright.org.uk

enquiries@wheelwright.org.uk 01297 552562


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Wheelwright & Coachbuilder

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Wheelwright & Coachbuilder


Traditional Crafts Southwest | Wheelwright & Coachbuilder

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Traditional Crafts Southwest | Wheelwright & Coachbuilder


Directory of makers With many thanks to the artisans involved, with whom this project would not have been possible without.

Blacksmith Andrew Hall Powderham Park, Kenton, Exeter EX6 8JS Branscombe Forge, Branscome, Seaton, Devon EX12 3DB Boat Builders H.J Mears & Son The Harbour, Axmouth, Seaton, Devon EX12 4AA Chair Caner Susan Routh Buckerell, Honiton, Devon Furniture Maker Nick Thwaites George Park, Awliscombe, Near Hontion, Devon EX14 3PJ

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Glass Blower Malcolm Sutclitte Glass Gallery, 2 West Street, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 8EW Lace Maker Val Foss Allhallows Museum, High Street, Honiton, Devon EX14 1PG Leatherworker Liz Pannell Hamlyns, King Street, Colyton, Devon EX24 6PD Potter Rosemary Jacks Old House Bakery, The Street, Musbury, Axminster, Devon EX13 8AU

Traditional Crafts Southwest | Directory of Makers

Stained Glass Maker Ann Pengelly The Good Shepard, Stained Glass Studio, 49 Queen Street, Seaton, Devon E12 2RB Wheelwrights & Coachbuilders Mike & Alex Rowland No1 Wheelers Yard, Colyton, Devon EX24 6DT


Photographs and words by Samantha Letten Published May 2014 samanthaletten.com samanthalettenphoto.blogspot.co.uk info@samanthaletten.com


CRAFTS Traditional

Southwest


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