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GRASSROOTS // MAY 2010 // ISSUE 29 CORPS RESOURCES

GRASSROOTS // JULY 2010 // ISSUE 31

GRASSROOTS

community care

What’s it all about? We are offering a no study, flexible gap year. No study requirements mean that you can start any time. (There will be some study options offered in future gap years). Who’s it for? This program is aimed at young people who have completed year 11 or 12 and are not sure about what they are going to do next in regard to ministry or employment. Perhaps they just want a year with no formal study or need to save some money to continue with their studies. It will also be suited to adults who want to re-enter the work force, change careers or test their suitability for this type of work or ministry while continuing in their current employment. What’s required? - An induction course including the Community Care membership course. - Working with Children and/or police check. (IAM ministries can assist the participant to obtain this.) - An induction at placement corps. - Each participant will be required to do eight hours of agreed ministry at a corps (possibly at your home corps). - Meet with supervisors weekly. - Meet with assigned mentor monthly. - A DVD diary will be kept at the beginning, and then term by term to graph the participant’s journey. A copy of the diary will be presented at the end of the gap year. - The mentor will discuss the participant’s discoveries in relation to ministry, personal development and their journey with God.

WHAT IS COMMUNITY CARE? CORPS PROGRAMME DEPARTMENT VISION STATEMENT The Territorial Corps Programme Department is a team committed to the growth of healthy (reproducing) corps. GRASSROOTS The Salvation Army Australia Southern Territory Corps Programme Department EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Captain Mal Davies SUPPLEMENTS COORDINATOR Captain June Knop EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Rebecca Walker DESIGNERS Simon Robertson, Chloe Neistat

I have asked many people this question since becoming the Eastern Victoria divisional community care consultant four years ago. Invariably the answer is ‘older folk’ (usually ladies) handing out Warcrys in hospitals and nursing homes. While this is true, Community Care is so much more. There has been a lot of development over the past 12 years and, as I add the territorial role to my divisional role, I am excited

by what is happening and by the possibilities. I don’t think it is groundbreaking but rather a return to where things began—East London, 1865, General William Booth and the early pioneers of the Salvation Army. So let’s start there. General William Booth’s ‘soup, soap and salvation’ mission was integral to the early Salvation Army and he encouraged ministry by all Salvationists to the hungry, sick and hurting. …continues over

ADDRESS PO Box 479, Blackburn 3130 PHONE (03) 8878 4758 EMAIL corps.programme@aus.salvationarmy.org WEB www.salvationarmy.org.au/corpsresources

grassroots31_july2010.indd 2-3

22/06/2010 4:01:52 PM


GRASSROOTS // JULY 2010 // ISSUE 31

GRASSROOTS // JULY 2010 // ISSUE 31

faith, special needs and visitation. The training, largely done by correspondence, enabled many Salvationists to be mobilised at their own pace in their own setting.

continued from cover…

Commandant Cornelie Booth (whose husband Herbert was the then territorial commander in Canada) officially inaugurated the ‘League of Mercy’ in 1892. In Australia, the League of Mercy commenced officially in 1897, although Major Alfred Barritt had begun regular hospital visitation in Melbourne in 1885. By 1897, Samaritan Brigades had formed for organised visitation to slums, prisons, widows, deserted wives, prostitutes and the lonely. By the mid 1990s, the League of Mercy ministry was largely limited to the visitation of hospitals and nursing homes, and was mainly carried out by older Salvationists.

I REMEMBER WHEN I WAS YOUNG

In 2008, the Eastern Victoria Division established a steering committee to build on the good work of the proceeding 10 years. Understanding the scriptural imperative to reach out in the name of Jesus, the division adopted the working title of IAM (pronounced ‘I am’)—In As Much—to re-cast the vision for Community Care and emphasise that it is anything a corps does in the name of Jesus for the community it serves. It is really the corpsbased social arm of The Salvation Army. It is Jesus ‘with flesh on’. In 2009, a Community Care gap year was commenced. Waverley Temple’s Cassie Magor (aged 20) served at the Noble Park Corps (Vic.) with a particular interest in ministry to Sudanese people. In 2010, Amy-Ruth Davies commenced a gap year at her home corps (Camberwell, Vic.) as a part of the corps’ Ashburton Outreach.

In 1997, the name was changed to Community Care in an attempt to revitalise the ministry. The emphasis on caring for the community encapsulated what this ministry is really about and asserted that anyone of any age can be agents of care. ‘I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these, you did for me’ (Matthew 25:40). This is the key verse that expresses what Salvationists seek to do when they reach out with the love of God.

MAJOR JUNE PURDY

Community Care seeks to reach out in a relevant and practical

Other divisions within the territory are doing some great work, including training at corps or regional level. Major June Purdy (Northern Victoria Division) has led a significant amount of training, including writing a youth training module with Captain Nari McGifford. There has been a significant move away from the correspondence training model to using one-off seminars and ongoing ‘upskilling’ in specific areas such as grief, caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease, disability inclusion, mental health, food handling and first aid, to name a few. This shift has enabled us to individualise training for the particular setting and ministry specialties of the corps or region. Today’s young people are passionate about social justice and Community Care ministry offers them a practical way to work toward justice in their local community. 2010 will see a further re-write of the training material, making it more user friendly and culturally sensitive, with a lot more training options available. There was a threeday, territory wide conference held in March and at least two more people commence their gap year in Tasmania this year.

When I was younger I remember regularly taking a three hour journey to visit my grandfather, who was sick in hospital. One memory that is vivid for me is a delightful Salvationist that used to come and visit Pa. This woman was a beautiful lady, whose smile would light up the room when she walked in. She was actually probably the same age as my Pa or even older. My family weren’t in the Army then. But after joining the Salvos we soon found out that this lady was a part of something called ‘League of Mercy’ (now Community Care). I’m now an officer in my second appointment and I’ve been blessed with many opportunities to see the Community Care Ministry work at its best. I saw it at my home corps (Wyndham City, Vic.), at many of the corps I spent time at during various placements, during my time at the Training College and at my previous appointment. It wasn’t until I was appointed to Clarence City (Tas.) that I saw a huge variety of people coming together to work and serve in our community. Recently an opportunity arose for me to attend the Community Care and Seniors Conference—not exactly the type of conference you’d expect a 22-year-old to be attending. As I sat through the three days listening to different speakers, interacting with other delegates and trying to process all the information, my mind began to think of the possibilities of introducing Community Care ministries at Clarence City. We’re now in the process of training up our many volunteers as Community Care workers and recognising them for their service to God, the Army and the community and to also offer them ongoing support, training and development. We’ve also got two people all ready to go for the IAM Mark’d Community Care gap year program, which offers eight hours of practical ministry experience each week, mentoring and supervision. It’s an amazing opportunity for us and we are incredibly blessed to be participating. God is doing some amazing things at Clarence City and I am absolutely thrilled that Community Care Ministry is thriving here. Lieutenant Aaron Stobie Corps officer, Clarence City Corps, Tas.

Future developments include an expansion of the gap year program across the territory and online training. We are investigating the possibility of a Community Care internship, a Certificate III in Community Care and an asset based community development model of service to assist smaller and remote corps to reach out in a way that can only be imagined at the moment.

way by expressing love to the lonely and hurting in our communities.

IN AS MUCH AS YOU HAVE DONE IT TO ONE OF THESE... ...YOU HAVE DONE IT TO ME William Booth was determined that all Salvationists would continue to fight against injustice and inequity, and Community Care carries on his vision.

In 2002–2003, Community Care moved out of the Women’s Ministries Department and into the Corps Programme Department. This was an intentional outcome of the changes that had commenced in 1997, and acknowledges the wonderful work done by men and younger Salvationists as they seek to be salt and light in their communities.

The training material was updated in 2004 by Major Beth Holman, the then territorial community care secretary. This material covered Community Careoccupational health and safety, insurance, the ‘dos and don’ts’ of caring, grief, communication, self care, sharing

What is your corps doing to reach out to those in your community? What are you doing? If God is calling you to greater engagement with your community, speak to your corps officer or divisional community care secretary to learn more. Major Jennifer Cloke Territorial community care ministries consultant

IN AS MUCH AS YOU HAVE

DONE IT TO ONE OF THESE... ...YOU HAVE DONE IT TO ME. NG FOR PEOPLE // MAKING DISCIPLES // REFORMING SOCIETY // TRANSFORMING LIVES // CARING FOR PEOPLE // MAKING DISCIPLES // REFORMING SOCIETY // TRANSFORMING LIVES // CARING FOR PEOPLE // MAKING DISCIP Matthew 25:40 grassroots31_july2010.indd 4-5

22/06/2010 4:04:23 PM


GRASSROOTS // JULY 2010 // ISSUE 31

GRASSROOTS // JULY 2010 // ISSUE 31

faith, special needs and visitation. The training, largely done by correspondence, enabled many Salvationists to be mobilised at their own pace in their own setting.

continued from cover…

Commandant Cornelie Booth (whose husband Herbert was the then territorial commander in Canada) officially inaugurated the ‘League of Mercy’ in 1892. In Australia, the League of Mercy commenced officially in 1897, although Major Alfred Barritt had begun regular hospital visitation in Melbourne in 1885. By 1897, Samaritan Brigades had formed for organised visitation to slums, prisons, widows, deserted wives, prostitutes and the lonely. By the mid 1990s, the League of Mercy ministry was largely limited to the visitation of hospitals and nursing homes, and was mainly carried out by older Salvationists.

I REMEMBER WHEN I WAS YOUNG

In 2008, the Eastern Victoria Division established a steering committee to build on the good work of the proceeding 10 years. Understanding the scriptural imperative to reach out in the name of Jesus, the division adopted the working title of IAM (pronounced ‘I am’)—In As Much—to re-cast the vision for Community Care and emphasise that it is anything a corps does in the name of Jesus for the community it serves. It is really the corpsbased social arm of The Salvation Army. It is Jesus ‘with flesh on’. In 2009, a Community Care gap year was commenced. Waverley Temple’s Cassie Magor (aged 20) served at the Noble Park Corps (Vic.) with a particular interest in ministry to Sudanese people. In 2010, Amy-Ruth Davies commenced a gap year at her home corps (Camberwell, Vic.) as a part of the corps’ Ashburton Outreach.

In 1997, the name was changed to Community Care in an attempt to revitalise the ministry. The emphasis on caring for the community encapsulated what this ministry is really about and asserted that anyone of any age can be agents of care. ‘I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these, you did for me’ (Matthew 25:40). This is the key verse that expresses what Salvationists seek to do when they reach out with the love of God.

MAJOR JUNE PURDY

Community Care seeks to reach out in a relevant and practical

Other divisions within the territory are doing some great work, including training at corps or regional level. Major June Purdy (Northern Victoria Division) has led a significant amount of training, including writing a youth training module with Captain Nari McGifford. There has been a significant move away from the correspondence training model to using one-off seminars and ongoing ‘upskilling’ in specific areas such as grief, caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease, disability inclusion, mental health, food handling and first aid, to name a few. This shift has enabled us to individualise training for the particular setting and ministry specialties of the corps or region. Today’s young people are passionate about social justice and Community Care ministry offers them a practical way to work toward justice in their local community. 2010 will see a further re-write of the training material, making it more user friendly and culturally sensitive, with a lot more training options available. There was a threeday, territory wide conference held in March and at least two more people commence their gap year in Tasmania this year.

When I was younger I remember regularly taking a three hour journey to visit my grandfather, who was sick in hospital. One memory that is vivid for me is a delightful Salvationist that used to come and visit Pa. This woman was a beautiful lady, whose smile would light up the room when she walked in. She was actually probably the same age as my Pa or even older. My family weren’t in the Army then. But after joining the Salvos we soon found out that this lady was a part of something called ‘League of Mercy’ (now Community Care). I’m now an officer in my second appointment and I’ve been blessed with many opportunities to see the Community Care Ministry work at its best. I saw it at my home corps (Wyndham City, Vic.), at many of the corps I spent time at during various placements, during my time at the Training College and at my previous appointment. It wasn’t until I was appointed to Clarence City (Tas.) that I saw a huge variety of people coming together to work and serve in our community. Recently an opportunity arose for me to attend the Community Care and Seniors Conference—not exactly the type of conference you’d expect a 22-year-old to be attending. As I sat through the three days listening to different speakers, interacting with other delegates and trying to process all the information, my mind began to think of the possibilities of introducing Community Care ministries at Clarence City. We’re now in the process of training up our many volunteers as Community Care workers and recognising them for their service to God, the Army and the community and to also offer them ongoing support, training and development. We’ve also got two people all ready to go for the IAM Mark’d Community Care gap year program, which offers eight hours of practical ministry experience each week, mentoring and supervision. It’s an amazing opportunity for us and we are incredibly blessed to be participating. God is doing some amazing things at Clarence City and I am absolutely thrilled that Community Care Ministry is thriving here. Lieutenant Aaron Stobie Corps officer, Clarence City Corps, Tas.

Future developments include an expansion of the gap year program across the territory and online training. We are investigating the possibility of a Community Care internship, a Certificate III in Community Care and an asset based community development model of service to assist smaller and remote corps to reach out in a way that can only be imagined at the moment.

way by expressing love to the lonely and hurting in our communities.

IN AS MUCH AS YOU HAVE DONE IT TO ONE OF THESE... ...YOU HAVE DONE IT TO ME William Booth was determined that all Salvationists would continue to fight against injustice and inequity, and Community Care carries on his vision.

In 2002–2003, Community Care moved out of the Women’s Ministries Department and into the Corps Programme Department. This was an intentional outcome of the changes that had commenced in 1997, and acknowledges the wonderful work done by men and younger Salvationists as they seek to be salt and light in their communities.

The training material was updated in 2004 by Major Beth Holman, the then territorial community care secretary. This material covered Community Careoccupational health and safety, insurance, the ‘dos and don’ts’ of caring, grief, communication, self care, sharing

What is your corps doing to reach out to those in your community? What are you doing? If God is calling you to greater engagement with your community, speak to your corps officer or divisional community care secretary to learn more. Major Jennifer Cloke Territorial community care ministries consultant

IN AS MUCH AS YOU HAVE

DONE IT TO ONE OF THESE... ...YOU HAVE DONE IT TO ME. NG FOR PEOPLE // MAKING DISCIPLES // REFORMING SOCIETY // TRANSFORMING LIVES // CARING FOR PEOPLE // MAKING DISCIPLES // REFORMING SOCIETY // TRANSFORMING LIVES // CARING FOR PEOPLE // MAKING DISCIP Matthew 25:40 grassroots31_july2010.indd 4-5

22/06/2010 4:04:23 PM


GRASSROOTS // MAY 2010 // ISSUE 29 CORPS RESOURCES

GRASSROOTS // JULY 2010 // ISSUE 31

GRASSROOTS

community care

What’s it all about? We are offering a no study, flexible gap year. No study requirements mean that you can start any time. (There will be some study options offered in future gap years). Who’s it for? This program is aimed at young people who have completed year 11 or 12 and are not sure about what they are going to do next in regard to ministry or employment. Perhaps they just want a year with no formal study or need to save some money to continue with their studies. It will also be suited to adults who want to re-enter the work force, change careers or test their suitability for this type of work or ministry while continuing in their current employment. What’s required? - An induction course including the Community Care membership course. - Working with Children and/or police check. (IAM ministries can assist the participant to obtain this.) - An induction at placement corps. - Each participant will be required to do eight hours of agreed ministry at a corps (possibly at your home corps). - Meet with supervisors weekly. - Meet with assigned mentor monthly. - A DVD diary will be kept at the beginning, and then term by term to graph the participant’s journey. A copy of the diary will be presented at the end of the gap year. - The mentor will discuss the participant’s discoveries in relation to ministry, personal development and their journey with God.

WHAT IS COMMUNITY CARE? CORPS PROGRAMME DEPARTMENT VISION STATEMENT The Territorial Corps Programme Department is a team committed to the growth of healthy (reproducing) corps. GRASSROOTS The Salvation Army Australia Southern Territory Corps Programme Department EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Captain Mal Davies SUPPLEMENTS COORDINATOR Captain June Knop EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Rebecca Walker DESIGNERS Simon Robertson, Chloe Neistat

I have asked many people this question since becoming the Eastern Victoria divisional community care consultant four years ago. Invariably the answer is ‘older folk’ (usually ladies) handing out Warcrys in hospitals and nursing homes. While this is true, Community Care is so much more. There has been a lot of development over the past 12 years and, as I add the territorial role to my divisional role, I am excited

by what is happening and by the possibilities. I don’t think it is groundbreaking but rather a return to where things began—East London, 1865, General William Booth and the early pioneers of the Salvation Army. So let’s start there. General William Booth’s ‘soup, soap and salvation’ mission was integral to the early Salvation Army and he encouraged ministry by all Salvationists to the hungry, sick and hurting. …continues over

ADDRESS PO Box 479, Blackburn 3130 PHONE (03) 8878 4758 EMAIL corps.programme@aus.salvationarmy.org WEB www.salvationarmy.org.au/corpsresources

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22/06/2010 4:01:52 PM


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